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The Art Bulletin

March 2012

Table of Contents

March 2012, Volume 94 Number 1

Editor’s Note
Karen Lang
7

Regarding Art and Art History
ANNE M. WAGNER
8

Notes from the Field: Anthropomorphism
ELIZABETH KING, J. M. BERNSTEIN, CAROLYN DEAN, CAROLINE VAN ECK, FINBARR BARRY FLOOD, DARIO GAMBONI, JANE GARNETT AND GERVASE ROSSER, JAMES MEYER, MIYA ELISE MIZUTA, ALINA PAYNE
10

Interview
JULIA GELSHORN
Two Are Better than One: Notes on the Interview and Techniques of Multiplication
32

PHILIP URSPRUNG
“Curiosity Is the Motor of the Entire Interview Project”: Hans Ulrich Obrist in Conversation with Philip Ursprung
42

Articles
YUKIO LIPPIT
Of Modes and Manners in Japanese Ink Painting: Sesshū’s Splashed Ink Landscape of 1495
50

Splashed Ink Landscape by the Zen monk-painter Sesshū Tōyō (1420–1506?) embodies a complex relation between medieval Japanese ink painting and artistic subjectivity. A careful study of the history and semantics of splashed ink and the painting’s inscriptions reveals Sesshū’s work to be a multifaceted pictorial artifact that reflects how monk-painters during Japan’s medieval period imagined artistic transmission in terms of a spiritual bloodline. It also demonstrates how using the splashed ink mode to formalize such transmission allowed the monk-painter to be cast as a cultivated gentleman according to classical literati aesthetic discourse.
ANDREI POP
Henry Fuseli: Greek Tragedy and Cultural Pluralism
78

The wash drawings and oil paintings of subjects from Greek tragedy by Anglo-Swiss painter Henry Fuseli (1741–1825), routinely categorized as romantic classicism, might be better explained in terms of the contemporary revival of Greek tragedy, made possible by the philosophical anthropology of Johann Gottfried von Herder and David Garrick’s theater of character. From this climate of experimentation with foreign cultures arose a morally detached spectator and a critique of Eurocentrism in the era of Captain Cook and the American Revolution. Fuseli’s classicism thus played its part in the formation of the modern liberal version of cultural pluralism.
MONICA BLACKMUN VISONÀ
Agent Provocateur? The African Origin and American Life of a Statue from Côte d’Ivoire
99

A biography of a statue sculpted in or near the Lagoon region of Côte d’Ivoire reveals how her “social life” has become entangled with American art history. Created to address spiritual beings in her homeland, she was purchased by Paul Guillaume in France and was exhibited by Alfred Stieglitz and Marius de Zayas in New York in 1914. Donated to Fisk University by Georgia O’Keeffe in 1949, she has engaged in a dialogue with African American artists. In all of these interactions, the figure has been not a passive object but an active agent of cultural change.
Reviews
SHEILA DILLON
Richard Neer, The Emergence of the Classical Style in Greek Sculpture
130

JULIAN GARDNER
Stephen Perkinson, The Likeness of the King: A Prehistory of Portraiture in Late Medieval France
132

GERHARD WOLF
Alexander Nagel and Christopher S. Wood, Anachronic Renaissance
135

MARC FUMAROLI
Walter S. Melion, The Meditative Art: Studies in the Northern Devotional Print (1550–1625)
141

Reviews Online
July–September 2011
144

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