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The Art Bulletin

June 2013

Table of Contents

June 2013, Volume 95 Number 2

Regarding Art and Art History
CECELIA F. KLEIN
187

Notes from the Field: Mimesis
DEXTER DALWOOD, SUZANNE PRESTON BLIER, DANIELA BOHDE, HELEN C. EVANS, SARAH E. FRASER, THOMAS HABINEK, TOM HUHN, JEANETTE KOHL, NIKLAUS LARGIER, PETER MACK, ALEX POTTS
190

Interview
YUKIO LIPPIT
Fantasies and Foreign Contact in the Art History of Japan: Timon Screech in Conversation with Yukio Lippit
212

Articles
ELIZABETH SEARS AND CHARLOTTE SCHOELL-GLASS
An Émigré Art Historian and America: H. W. Janson
219

Horst Woldemar Janson, among the most influential of the German art historians who immigrated to the United States in the Nazi era, left Germany in 1935 at age twenty-one. He thus completed his doctorate not at Hamburg, where he had been Erwin Panofsky’s student, but at Harvard. Fascinated by American culture, as attested by an unpublished essay of 1935—here translated—comparing America and Europe, Janson adapted quickly to his new academic environment. As scholar, critic, and editor, he applied his formidable energy and organizational skills to initiatives extending well beyond writing the classic survey History of Art.
EMINE FETVACI
From Print to Trace: An Ottoman Imperial Portrait Book and Its Western European Models
243

Although they worked within the emergent Ottoman visual idiom, the court historian Seyyid Lokman (in office 1569–97) and the artist Osman (act. ca. 1565–85) appear to have used Western European models, specifically, Paolo Giovio’s Elogia, when they created the 1579 book of imperial portraits, the Şemā‘ilnāme (Book of Dispositions). Despite the stark visual differences between the two books, they share several key points: an understanding of the portrait as a visual document; Neoplatonic and physiognomic concepts activating the link between visual and verbal portraiture; and a metaphoric understanding of the relation between an original and its impression.
SUSANNA BERGER
Martin Meurisse’s Theater of Natural Philosophy
269

In the early seventeenth-century, the Franciscan professor of philosophy Martin Meurisse developed an international reputation for his use of art in the organization and transmission of knowledge. One of his most innovative creations was an illustrated thesis print engraved in 1615 by Léonard Gaultier that interprets Aristotle’s system of natural philosophy. The broadside juxtaposes image and text to produce a theater of nature, in which characters appear to act out Aristotle’s philosophical concepts. Meurisse’s pedagogical broadside, with its intricate, theatrical iconography, provides evidence of the complex uses of imagery in philosophy education in early modern France.
VICCY COLTMAN
Henry Raeburn’s Portraits of Distant Sons in the Global British Empire
294

Henry Raeburn, a major late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century British artist, has received insufficient critical scrutiny. His little-known group of portraits of the Fraser family of Reelig is dominated by representations of the adolescent male sons. In the context of this Scottish Highland family’s temporal and geographic dislocation around the British Empire, these portraits were both present and prescient. As a fundamental expectation of portraiture, likeness was the dominant affective category in the lived reality of the British Empire.
MARTIN J. POWERS
The Cultural Politics of the Brushstroke
312

In both modern and premodern critical writing, both “East and West,” the brushstroke eventually came to be characterized as a vehicle of personal expression in defiance of the stifling rules of naturalistic representation. By the mid-twentieth century, the image of the bohemian master flinging paint would have been familiar to both Chinese and European art lovers. It does not follow, however, that the seductive rhetoric of the brushstroke has been deconstructed or even understood, as demonstrated by the cultural politics of the brushstroke in debates between and among European, American, and Chinese intellectuals over a period of four centuries.
Reviews
CHARLES PALERMO
Dario Gamboni, The Brush and the Pen: Odilon Redon and Literature; Linda Goddard, Aesthetic Rivalries: Word and Image in France, 1880–1926; Anna Sigrídur Arnar, The Book as Instrument: Stéphane Mallarmé, the Artist’s Book, and the Transformation of Print Culture
328

BRIDGET ALSDORF
Mary Jane Jacob and Michelle Grabner, eds., The Studio Reader: On the Space of Artists
333

BOLAJI CAMPBELL
David T. Doris, Vigilant Things: On Thieves, Yoruba Anti-Aesthetics, and the Fates of Ordinary Objects in Nigeria
336

Reviews Online
October–December 2012
339

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