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The Art Bulletin

September 2012

Table of Contents

September 2012, Volume 94 Number 3

Regarding Art and Art History: Unexplained
RICHARD SHIFF
339

Notes from the Field: Contingency
LINDA CONNOR, GIOVANN ABORRADORI, MARCIA BRENNAN, MARY ANN DOANE, ANGUS FLETCHER, PETER GEIMER, GLORIA KURY, MARK LEDBURY, C. BRIAN ROSE, FRANCES SPALDING, CHRIS SPRING
344

Interview
JAMES ACKERMAN
“A Way Must Be Found to Broaden Our Perspective”: James Ackerman in Conversation with Cammy Brothers
362

Articles
JAŚ ELSNER
Iconoclasm as Discourse: From Antiquity to Byzantium
368

Iconoclasm was an attack on the real presence of the depicted prototype through assault on the image. Iconophile and iconoclast thinkers in the eighth century, for the first time, considered the image entirely as representation. A transformative moment in the discourse of images, it liberated the image from an emphasis on ontology to place it in an epistemological relation to its referent. The impulse to rethink the meanings of images emerged from debates within pre-Christian culture, between Christians and pagans, and between Christians, Jews, and Muslims, deeply influencing the understanding of images in the later Middle Ages and the Reformation.
JESSICA MAIER
Francesco Rosselli’s Lost View of Rome: An Urban Icon and Its Progeny
395

The defining image of the Eternal City for more than a century, Francesco Rosselli’s monumental engraving of Rome (ca. 1485/87–90), now lost, was a milestone in urban representation. Rosselli’s view embodied a new approach to depicting the city that emphasized physical resemblance while conveying a strong sense of urban identity. The success of Rosselli’s paradigm, appropriated by generations of later artists, demonstrates the breadth and strength of the print market. The print’s history provides a revealing case study of the establishment, transmission, and transformation of a paradigm, and it raises important questions of authorship and innovation in Renaissance print culture.
ELIZABETH KINDALL
Experiential Readings and the Grand View: Mount Jizu by Huang Xiangjian (1609–1673)
412

Some Chinese artists exploited the spatial and temporal potential of the handscroll format by moving beyond traditional linear readings to experiential readings. Huang Xiangjian, for example, in 1656 composed a pictorial ascent of Mount Jizu in Yunnan Province that lent itself to such a constructed experience. Its reception combined a knowledgeable reading of the artist’s picture and inscription with viewers’ ability to visualize the mountain’s polyvalent topography in full from the summit. This transformative experience culminates in a daguan, or “grand view”: an elevated, panoramic prospect metaphorically implying the comprehensive understanding of certain enlightened individuals.
FREDERIC J. SCHWARTZ
Architecture and Crime: Adolf Loos and the Culture of the “Case”
437

Adolf Loos, author of the modernist polemic “Ornament and Crime,” was involved in two widely publicized criminal trials during his career. An investigation of his encounters with criminality suggests that his experiences with the press and the courts had implications for both his architectural practice and theory. The publicity surrounding scandals and criminal cases in early twentieth-century Vienna provided opportunities for the debate of matters of general importance at a time when few others existed. It is illuminating to view Loos’s architecture, scandals, and controversies in light of the changing nature of public discourse.
Reviews
PHILIPPE MOREL
Alessandro Nova, The Book of the Wind: The Representation of the Invisible
458

CARL BRANDON STREHLKE
Michael Viktor Schwarz and Pia Theis, Giottus Pictor, vol. 1, Giottos Leben, mit einer Sammlung der Urkunden und Texte bis Vasari; Michael Viktor Schwarz with Michaela Zöschg, Giottus Pictor, vol. 2, Giottos Werke; Anne Derbes and Mark Sandona, The Usurer’s Heart: Giotto, Enrico Scrovegni, and the Arena Chapel in Padua; Laura Jacobus, Giotto and the Arena Chapel: Art, Architecture & Experience; Serena Romano, La O di Giotto; Chiara Frugoni, L’affare migliore di Enrico: Giotto e la cappella Scrovegni; Julian Gardner, Giotto and His Publics: Three Paradigms of Patronage; Francesco Benelli, The Architecture in Giotto’s Paintings
460

ARIELLA AZOULAY
Martin A. Berger, Seeing through Race: A Reinterpretation of Civil Rights Photography
465

MATTHEW SIMMS
John Elderfield, De Kooning: A Retrospective; Richard Shiff, Between Sense and de Kooning
468

Reviews Online
January–March 2012
472

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