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The Art Bulletin

June 2015

Table of Contents

June 2015, Volume 97 Number 2

Whither Art History?
MOYO OKEDIJI
African Art and Language as Semioptic Text
123

Articles
MARVIN TRACHTENBERG
Building and Writing S. Lorenzo in Florence: Architect, Biographer, Patron, and Prior
140

Who built S. Lorenzo in Florence? Was it the first Renaissance church, or merely a classical veneer on a medieval brick structure? Was Filippo Brunelleschi its founding architect, or did he share the credit with Matteo Dolfini, the church prior? Were the founding patrons the Medici, or rather the prior and the church community? Is the chapter on S. Lorenzo in the vita of Brunelleschi by Antonio Manetti by and large an accurate historical source, or is it politically motivated narrative that has befuddled art historians from Vasari to the present? Read on.
ADAM EAKER
Van Dyck between Master and Model
173

Anthony van Dyck’s early paintings of Saint Sebastian allowed the painter to propose an analogy between the martyrdom of the saint and the practice of posing models in the studio. He used disguised self-portraiture to identify not with the artist but, rather, with the model. On the one hand, Van Dyck’s Sebastian paintings declare the young painter’s commitment to life study. On the other, his self-depiction as both martyr and model allowed him to allegorize his specific position within the studio of Peter Paul Rubens.
JENNIFER MILAM
Rococo Representations of Interspecies Sensuality and the Pursuit of Volupté
192

Enlightenment writers proposed the existence of an animal soul, refuting the Cartesian beast-machine. Arguments credit the caresses of a dog to its master as direct visual evidence of the capacity of an animal to feel and show emotion. A focus on paintings by Jean-Honoré Fragonard sets the Rococo representation of lapdogs within the context of changing ideas about the relationship between animal and human. Eroticized images of lapdogs are related to radical materialist theories that assert the role of physical pleasure in human motivation.

BRIDGET ALSDORF
Félix Vallotton’s Murderous Life
210

In 1907 the Franco-Swiss artist Félix Vallotton wrote La vie meurtrière (The Murderous Life), a mock-autobiographical novel with striking tropological connections to his fin-de-siècle prints. An examination of those connections reveals that Vallotton developed a unique visual language in both image and text for the relation between sight and social responsibility. The Paris crowd scenes that first established his artistic reputation attest to the largely unrecognized significance of the gawker (le badaud) as a modern type, a figure for the attractions and fraught ethics of urban spectatorship that is distinct from the far more studied flâneur.
Reviews
VITTORIA DI PALMA
Hanneke Grootenboer, Treasuring the Gaze: Intimate Vision in Late Eighteenth-Century Eye Miniatures
229

MEGAN R. LUKE
Paul B. Jaskot, The Nazi Perpetrator: Postwar German Art and the Politics of the Right; Alex Potts, Experiments in Modern Realism: World Making, Politics and the Everyday in Postwar European and American Art; Hannah Feldman, From a Nation Torn: Decolonizing Art and Representation in France, 1945–1962
231

Reviews Online
October–December 2014
235

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