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The Art Bulletin

March 2014

Table of Contents

June 2014, Volume 96 Number 2

Whither Art History?
PARUL DAVE MUKHERJI
Whither Art History in a Globalizing World
151

Articles
HALLIE FRANKS
Traveling, in Theory: Movement as Metaphor in the Ancient Greek Andron
156

Scholars have long acknowledged the capacity of imagery on Greek sympotic vases to participate in their context, treating symposiasts to tricks of the eye, puns, and metaphoric allusions. The potential of mosaic decoration in the Classical andron (the location of the private symposium) to participate in the symposium in a similarly active way has received less attention. A study of examples of mosaic iconography in combination with prescribed movements that took place during the symposium leads to the proposal that some andrones encouraged the experience of the space through the metaphoric theme of the symposium as a journey at sea.
MARCIA POINTON
Casts, Imprints, and the Deathliness of Things: Artifacts at the Edge
170

The practice of making death masks was extensive throughout Europe in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, yet their interest to scholars has been confined to their preparatory role in the production of portrait sculpture, the dissemination of phrenology, and as a figure for the indexicality of photographic images. The meanings generated, past and present, by casts of faces and other body parts can be investigated by addressing their materiality. As three-dimensional artifacts, positives deriving from negatives, casts have been understood as deathly in that they present an absence. In what does this deathliness consist, and how is it communicated?
SUGATA RAY
Colonial Frames, “Native” Claims: The Jaipur Economic and Industrial Museum
196

From its establishment in 1887, the Jaipur Museum was a locus of contestation between its principal patron, the Indian state of Jaipur, and the British government. The examination of narratives of contestation alongside the museum’s architecture and display reveals a localized nineteenth-century museological practice that strategically operated from within the bureaucracies of colonial governance, yet destabilized the imperial aspirations of colonial museology. While museums as instruments of modern knowledge making have been seen by scholars as a failure, “native” participation in the nineteenth-century exhibitionary order can also be read as an indigenous reframing of modern museology in the colony.

JOSEPH M. SIRY
Modern Architecture for Dramatic Art: Frank Lloyd Wright’s “New Theatre,” 1931–2009
213

From 1931 Frank Lloyd Wright developed what he termed the “New Theatre” as the rethinking of an ideal building for drama. Wright saw the theater as a culturally essential medium whose survival had been threatened by film. Like other modernist architects, Wright imagined removing the proscenium stage and shaping an amphitheater of seating around a projecting stage to convey the unity of performance and audience. While self-consciously modern in its form, his solution for an ideal theater, realized in Dallas as the Kalita Humphreys Theater in 1959, drew on cultural memories of historic theater architecture, including Greek and Elizabethan models.

Reviews
WEI-CHENG LIN
Megan E. O’Neil, Engaging Ancient Maya Sculpture at Piedras Negras, Guatemala
238

PAUL BAROLSKY
Michael W. Cole, Ambitious Forms: Giambologna, Ammanati, and Danti in Florence
240

JOANNE RAPPAPORT
Daniela Bleichmar, Visible Empire: Botanical Expeditions and Visual Culture in the Hispanic Enlightenment
241

Reviews Online
October–December 2013
244

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