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CAA on Facebook

posted by February 09, 2009

CAA has created an official group page on Facebook, the popular social-networking website, to complement CAA’s growing digital initiatives. The Facebook group joins this frequently updated CAA News page and its RSS feed, Twitter accounts for both CAA and caa.reviews, and a conference blog for the upcoming Annual Conference in Los Angeles.

We look forward to using Facebook and these other online tools to promote CAA activities and programs not only to our members, but also to a larger audience. We also encourage your feedback. This month you can look forward to postings about special conference events, tips for the job search, information about our newly published directories of graduate schools, and much more.

Filed under: CAA News — Tags:

This Week at the Rose Art Museum

posted by February 06, 2009

News about the closing of the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University and the selling of its collection slowed down this week, but not without several highlights. Brandeis President Jehuda Reinharz issued a formal apology—not for the decision to dismantle the museum’s collection but rather for his mishandling the announcement to do so. He also regretted leaving out the Brandeis community in the board of trustees’ deliberations.

Michael Rush, director of the Rose, posted his statement on the closing and sale directly to his museum’s website this week. The university’s Department of Fine Arts also joined the chorus of protest voices, issuing a statement to all university faculty, students, alumni, and friends of the department. Also, the New York Times condemned the Brandeis decision in an article by Roberta Smith and in an unsigned editorial.

Jeff Gilbride of the Daily News Tribune in Waltham, Massachusetts, was at the “funeral march” held this week by Brandeis students as an “emotional and rowdy counterpart” to last week’s sit-in at the museum. Relatedly, Jeff Weistein from Obit wonders, “Can a Museum Die?”

Greg Cook reviews the current exhibition at the Rose, Hans Hoffmann: Circa 1950, for the Boston Phoenix, and Daniel Grant considers donor responses and restrictions on gifts in his article “Is the University’s Museum Just a Rose to Be Plucked?” for the Wall Street Journal.

The Rose Art Museum website is chronicling the press on the closing and sale. Laurie Fendrich has been passionately following the story in the Chronicle Review, the blog of the Chronicle of Higher Education. And, of course, the Boston Globe has been leading the charge with daily reports.

THIS WEEK AT THE ROSE ART MUSEUM

posted by February 06, 2009

News about the closing of the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University and the selling of its collection slowed down this week, but not without several highlights. Brandeis President Jehuda Reinharz issued a formal apology—not for the decision to dismantle the museum’s collection but rather for his mishandling the announcement to do so. He also regretted leaving out the Brandeis community in the board of trustees’ deliberations.

Michael Rush, director of the Rose, posted his statement on the closing and sale directly to his museum’s website this week. The university’s Department of Fine Arts also joined the chorus of protest voices, issuing a statement to all university faculty, students, alumni, and friends of the department. Also, the New York Times condemned the Brandeis decision in an article by Roberta Smith and in an unsigned editorial.

Jeff Gilbride of the Daily News Tribune in Waltham, Massachusetts, was at the “funeral march” held this week by Brandeis students as an “emotional and rowdy counterpart” to last week’s sit-in at the museum. Relatedly, Jeff Weistein fromObit wonders, “Can a Museum Die?”

Greg Cook reviews the current exhibition at the Rose, Hans Hoffmann: Circa 1950, for the Boston Phoenix, and Daniel Grant considers donor responses and restrictions on gifts in his article “Is the University’s Museum Just a Rose to Be Plucked?” for the Wall Street Journal.

The Rose Art Museum website is chronicling the press on the closing and sale. Laurie Fendrich has been passionately following the story in the Chronicle Review, the blog of the Chronicle of Higher Education. And, of course, theBoston Globe has been leading the charge with daily reports.

Filed under: Advocacy, Museums and Galleries — Tags:

The Associated Press (AP) is claiming copyright in the image used by the street artist Shepard Fairey for his famous poster of Barack Obama. Fairey acknowledges that his image is based on a 2006 photograph taken by Manny Garcia while on an AP assignment at the National Press Club in Washington. “The AP says it owns the copyright, and wants credit and compensation,” writes Hillel Italie, a reporter for the news organization. Anthony Falzone, who is Fairey’s attorney, the executive director of the Fair Use Project at Stanford University, and a lecturer at the Stanford Law School, is arguing for fair use.

An exhibition of Fairey’s work opens tomorrow at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, Massachusetts, on view through August 16, 2009.

In related copyright news, a lawsuit was filed in late December against the artist Richard Prince and Gagosian Gallery by the French photographer Patrick Cariou. Prince appropriated photographs from Cariou’s book Yes Rasta from 2000 in his recent exhibition of work; the work was also reproduced in a catalogue published by the gallery. Daniel Grant has the story for the Wall Street Journal.

The Samuel H. Kress Foundation is assembling a contact database for all current and former Kress fellows in art history, art conservation, historic preservation, and related fields. The main purpose of this database is purely administrative, and the foundation’s intention is to keep all supplied contact information confidential.

Having said that, the Kress also understands that it would be helpful to the community of its fellows to communicate with each other for a variety of professional purposes, ranging from developing mentoring relationships to identifying colleagues with similar professional interests to simply comparing notes on fellowship experiences.

The foundation is therefore considering reserving a section of its new website for a password-restricted directory of current and former Kress fellows, to which only those fellows would have access.

The Kress invites all former and current fellows to complete a brief survey registering their willingness to supply contact information for a confidential directory, their interest in extending access for such a directory to other Kress fellows, and the value they would derive from having access to such a directory. The survey should take no more than five minutes to complete.

Questions? Please send an email to fellows@kressfoundation.org.

Filed under: Grants and Fellowships, Surveys — Tags:

The Department of Fine Arts at Brandeis University, chaired by Charles B. McClendon, the Sidney and Ellen Wien Professor in the History of Art, has published a statement on the closing of the Rose Art Museum. It was sent to all university faculty, students, alumni, and friends of this department. Here is the letter in full:

Late Monday afternoon (January 26) the Department of Fine Arts was notified that the University Board of Trustees resolved to disband the Rose Art Museum and sell the collection at auction to raise funds for the university. In addition to despairing at the Trustees’ action, we wish to make clear that at no point in the decision making process was the Department of Fine Arts faculty consulted. Neither was there any communication regarding the decision with the Rose Board of Overseers on which a member of the faculty sits. Nor was any reference made to the museum at the university-wide faculty meeting last Thursday (January 22) when strategies to confront the current fiscal crisis were discussed.

The department faculty wishes to express our profound sadness at the consequences of this abrupt action for the liberal arts mission, cultural life, and intellectual legacy of the university. Since its founding in 1961, the Rose Art Museum has been building a collection of post-war and contemporary art, gradually, steadily, and with the generous support of donors who believe in Brandeis. Often cited as the best in New England, the collection includes superb examples of work by nearly every major artist from the post-war decades, such as Jasper Johns and Willem de Kooning, and deep holdings of art of the present and of classic modern art from both sides of the Atlantic. No other university in the region can claim a more renowned resource for the study of modern and contemporary art. In the past year thousands of visitors came to the Rose to admire the collection.

The Rose has been a leading expression of the value Brandeis places on the arts. The museum has demonstrated the commitment of Brandeis to intellectual rigor in the humanities as well as social sciences and hard sciences. In the last few years it has served as a place where faculty and students from many disciplines come together for symposia, exhibitions, lectures, and concerts. Through the Rose, Brandeis has publicly placed a premium on creative thinking in whatever form it may take. Binding art to the mission of Jewish sponsored scholarship and education was critical to the history of post-war American art. The continued connection between art and education at Brandeis has been a defining aspect of the Brandeis contribution to American higher education. This mission and the values it has imbued in generations of students have been fundamental to the growth and successes of the educational program of the Department of Fine Arts. The Rose is essential to the character of this department as it exists today.

The collection is an intellectual history of post-war society that corresponds to the history of Brandeis itself. Curators and art historians have been drawing on our collection to tell histories of American art and culture to audiences here in Waltham and around the globe. Hundreds of students from studio art and art history classes study the collection each semester. For some, the collection has been the seedbed for important careers in the arts, Academe, and great museums.

As to the proposed future of the museum building, at no time before or after notification of the decision, have members of the Fine Arts Department expressed a desire to change the function of the Rose or reuse the building. There is no academic advantage to be salvaged from closing the museum and selling our art. It is a sad response to the current fiscal crisis that treasures left in trust for current and future students are now being sacrificed. The department remains committed to continuing the legacy of the intellectual and artistic practice here. We are losing an irreplaceable tool to fulfill that goal.

The Department of Fine Arts offers undergraduate degrees in studio art and art history and hosts a postbaccalaureate program in studio art. Both the department and the Rose Art Museum are CAA institutional members.

NEA Names New Acting Chairman

posted by February 03, 2009

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) announced yesterday the appointment of Patrice Walker Powell as acting chairman. In this position, she will provide oversight for agency grantmaking and day-to-day agency operations and supervise administrative activities. She assumed the role on January 29.

In 2008, Powell was appointed deputy chairman for states, regions, and local arts agencies. In that role, she was responsible for managing the agency’s grants and special projects involving a national network of governmental and nonprofit partners; small grant programs such as Challenge America Fast-Track; and the NEA’s AccessAbility activities that are also carried out in conjunction with state and regional organizations. Powell has been a staff member at the NEA since 1991.

In addition, Anita Decker was appointed by the White House as NEA director of government affairs effective February 4. In this role she manages the endowment’ relations with Congress and the White House, international and federal partnership programs, and the operations of the National Council on the Arts. Previously, Decker was on the staff of President Barack Obama’s election campaign.

NEA NAMES NEW ACTING CHAIRMAN

posted by February 03, 2009

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) announced yesterday the appointment of Patrice Walker Powell as acting chairman. In this position, she will provide oversight for agency grantmaking and day-to-day agency operations and supervise administrative activities. She assumed the role on January 29.

In 2008, Powell was appointed deputy chairman for states, regions, and local arts agencies. In that role, she was responsible for managing the agency’s grants and special projects involving a national network of governmental and nonprofit partners; small grant programs such as Challenge America Fast-Track; and the NEA’s AccessAbility activities that are also carried out in conjunction with state and regional organizations. Powell has been a staff member at the NEA since 1991.

In addition, Anita Decker was appointed by the White House as NEA director of government affairs effective February 4. In this role she manages the endowment’ relations with Congress and the White House, international and federal partnership programs, and the operations of the National Council on the Arts. Previously, Decker was on the staff of President Barack Obama’s election campaign.

Filed under: Advocacy — Tags:

Winter 2008 Art Journal Published

posted by February 02, 2009

The Winter 2008 issue of Art Journal has just been published. The table of contents is posted on the CAA website, and your printed copy will arrive in the mail this month.

In the Forum, Suzanne Hudson and Anne Byrd collected papers first presented at their cochaired CAA session from the 2008 Annual Conference in Dallas–Fort Worth. Entitled “I’ll Be Your Mirror, or Why and How Do We Work on Living Artists,” the section presents essays and responses from Hudson, Byrd, Ágnes Berecz, Huey Copeland, Phyllis Tuchman, and Johanna Burton. Richard Meyer’s essay here “ ‘Artists sometimes have feelings,’ ” won CAA’s 2009 Art Journal Award, to be awarded at the upcoming conference in Los Angeles.

Features include “Toward an Aesthetic Marine Biology,” a deep-sea investigation by J. Malcolm Shick, a professor of zoology and oceanography, of underwater imagery in historical and contemporary art and its use in his classroom. Two other texts on pedagogy round out the section: Julia Morrisroe and Craig Roland consider “A Collaborative Approach to Preparing MFA Art Students to Teach at the University Level,” and Harrell Fletcher leads a conversation with his students on the MFA in social practice that he developed at Portland State University.

In Reviews, Lisa Frye Ashe examines the exhibition Morris Louis Now: An American Master and its catalogue, published to accompany a show that originated at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia, in 2006 and traveled to San Diego and Washington, DC. In related art-historical areas, Harry Cooper reviews Mark Godfrey’s book Abstraction and the Holocaust, and Gail Levin looks at the exhibitions Action Painting (on view in Basel, Switzerland in 2008) and Action/Abstraction: Pollock, de Kooning, and American Art, 1940–1976 (opening on February 13 at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York, after stops in New York and St. Louis), while also reviewing their catalogues.

Filed under: Art Journal, Publications