College Art Association

CAA News Today

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by CAA — Oct 15, 2012

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2012

Fred C. Albertson, associate professor in the Department of Art at the University of Memphis in Tennessee, has been named a 2012–13 Getty Scholar at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Albertson will be in residence at the Getty Villa in Malibu, working on a project titled “Palmyrene Sculpture in North American Museums.”

Ronni Baer, the William and Ann Elfers Senior Curator of Paintings at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, has been named a Museum Guest Scholar at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Baer will be in residence from January to March 2013.

Martina Bagnoli, curator of medieval art at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, will be a scholar in residence at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Bagnoli will use her residency to research “The Five Senses and Medieval Art.”

Susanna Berger, a graduate student at the University of Cambridge in England, has been awarded a 2011–13 Samuel H. Kress Fellowship via the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. The title of Berger’s research project is “The Art of Philosophy: Early Modern Illustrated Thesis Prints, Broadsides, and Student Notebooks.”

Kathryn Brown, assistant professor of art history at Tilburg University in the Netherlands, has been awarded a funded visiting fellowship at the Humanities Centre of the Australian National University in Canberra for July and August 2013. Her project is titled “Global Art and the Networked City.”

Kaira Marie Cabañas, a lecturer and director of the MA Program in Modern Art: Critical and Curatorial Studies in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University in New York, has been named a 2012–13 Getty Scholar at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. She will spend her residency on “Expressive Restraint: Geometric Abstraction and the History of Madness in Brazil.”

Matthew P. Canepa, assistant professor of art history at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, will be a Getty Scholar in residence at the Getty Villa in Malibu, California. Canepa, a specialist in the art and archeology of ancient Iran and the Mediterranean, will be working on a project, “Royal Glory, Divine Fortune: Contesting the Global Idea of Iranian Kingship in the Hellenized and Iranian Near East, Central and South Asia (330 BCE–642 CE).”

Tiziana D’Angelo, a doctoral candidate in the Department of the Classics at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been awarded a predoctoral fellowship from the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. D’Angelo’s residency will be devoted to a research project, titled “Travelling Colors: Artistic Models and Cultural Transfers in South Italian Funerary Wall Painting (IV–II BCE).”

Thierry de Duve, emeritus professor at the Charles de Gaulle Université Lille 3 in Villaneuve, France, has been awarded a William C. Seitz Senior Fellowship at the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. His research project is called “Manet’s Testament, Duchamp’s Message, Broodthaers’ Lesson.”

Jessica Feldman, an intermedia artist based in New York, has earned an emerging artist fellowship from Socrates Sculpture Park in Long Island City, New York. An exhibition of outdoor work by the fifteen fellowship recipients will be on view from September 9, 2012, to March 31, 2013.

Ksenya Gurshtein, a recent PhD graduate of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, has been named a 201113 Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.

Cynthia Hahn, professor of art history at Hunter College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, has been named an Ailsa Mellon Bruce Senior Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Hahn will use the fellowship to work on her project, “Reliquaries: Objects, Action, Response.”

Marius Bratsberg Hauknes, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, has been awarded a twenty-four-month Chester Dale Fellowship. The 2011–13 fellowship is administered by the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Hauknes’s dissertation is titled “Imago, Figura, Scientia: The Image of the World in Thirteenth-Century Rome.”

Jessica L. Horton, a PhD candidate in the Graduate Program in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester in Rochester, New York, has been named a 2011–13 Wyeth Fellow through the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. She will use her fellowship, from the International Dissertation Research Fellowship Program, to conduct research on “Places to Stand: Native Art beyond the Nation.”

Mark Jamra, a typographic designer and associate professor at the Maine College of Art in Portland, has won a Stonington Residency at the Stephen Pace House in Stonington, Maine. The residency provides studio space and living accommodations and is open only to college alumni, faculty, and staff members.

Paul B. Jaskot, professor of the history of art and architecture at DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois, has been named Ailsa Mellon Bruce Visiting Senior Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Jaskot will use his fellowship to work on a project, titled “Cultural Fantasies, Ideological Goals, and Political Economic Realities: The Built Environment at Auschwitz.”

Nathaniel B. Jones, a doctoral student in art history at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, has received the David E. Finley Fellowship via the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. He intends to conduct research on his dissertation, “Nobilibus pinacothecae sunt faciundae: The Inception of the Roman Fictive Picture Gallery,” in Europe for two years, spending the third year of the fellowship in residence at CASVA.

Jennifer Josten, assistant professor in the Department of History of Art and Architecture at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, has been named a Getty Postdoctoral Fellow at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Josten’s project is titled “Mathias Goeritz’s Arquitectura Emocional: Shades of the New Monumentality in Midcentury Mexico.”

Subhashini Kaligotla, a poet and a doctoral student in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University in New York, has been named an Ittleson Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Her fellowship, which spans from 2012 to 2014, will be devoted to her dissertation, “Shiva’s Waterfront Temples: Reimagining the Sacred Architecture of India’s Deccan Region.”

Cindy Kang, a PhD candidate in the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, has been named a Getty predoctoral fellow for 2012–13. Kang will be in residence at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California, working on her dissertation, “Wallflowers: Tapestry and the Nabis in the Fin-de-siècle France.”

Jinah Kim has been named a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Kim, a recent PhD graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, will devote her fellowship to “Visions and the Visual: Color in Esoteric Buddhist Visual Practices in Medieval South Asia.”

Stuart Lingo, associate professor of art at the University of Washington’s School of Art in Seattle, has been named a Samuel H. Kress Senior Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Lingo will use his fellowship to work on a project titled “Bronzino’s Bodies: Fortunes of the Ideal Nude in an Age of Reform.”

Beili Liu, a multidisciplinary artist and associate professor of art at the University of Texas at Austin, received the Distinction Award at the 2011 Kaunas Biennial in Lithuania. Liu’s art uses elemental materials, such as wood, paper, salt, metal, and incense, to transform gallery spaces into meditative installations.

David S. Mather, who recently earned his PhD in the Visual Arts Department at the University of California, San Diego, has received a postdoctoral fellowship from the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles. Mather will use his residency at the Getty Center to further develop “‘The Wild Joy of Color’: Boccioni and the European Avant-Garde,” a chapter from his dissertation.

Jennifer Nelson, a graduate student in the Department of the History of Art at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, has been awarded a Robert H. and Clarice Smith Fellowship for 2012–13 from the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Nelson will use the award to work on “Image beyond Likeness: The Chimerism of Early Protestant Visuality, 1517–1565.”

Joshua O’Driscoll, a doctoral candidate in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been named a 2011–14 Paul Mellon Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. O’Driscoll will spend time on “Picti Imaginativo: Image and Inscription in Ottonian Manuscripts from Cologne.”

Ann E. Patnaude, a PhD student in the Department of Art History at the University of Chicago in Illinois, has received a twelve-month Chester Dale Fellowship for 2012–13, administered by the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Her dissertation is called “Locating Identity: Mixed Inscriptions in Archaic and Classical Greek Pottery and Stone, ca. 675–336 BCE.”

David Pullins, a doctoral candidate the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been named a David E. Finley Fellow for 2012–15. The fellowship, which comes from the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, will allow him to work on his dissertation, “Cut and Paste: The Mobile Image from Watteau to Pillement.”

William W. Robinson, the Maida and George Abrams Curator of Drawings in the Fogg Museum’s Division of European and American Art at Harvard Art Museums in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been named a Museum Guest Scholar at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Robinson will be in residence at the Getty from July to September 2013.

Sophia Ronan Rochmes, a PhD candidate in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at the University of California, Santa Barbara, has received a predoctoral fellowship from the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Rochmes will work on “Shades of Gray: Functions of Color and Colorlessness in Grisaille Manuscripts.”

Jennifer Margaret Simmons Stager, who earned her PhD from the History of Art Department at the University of California, Berkeley, has received a fellowship to study at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California, supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities. She will be in residence at the Getty Villa in Malibu, researching “The Embodiment of Color in Ancient Mediterranean Art.”

Roberto Tejada, the Distinguished Endowed Chair in Art History in the Meadows School of Art at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, has been named the 2012–13 recipient of the Fulbright-FAAP Distinguished Chair in the Visual Arts. The award from the Fulbright US Scholar Program will enable Tejada to engage in scholarship with faculty and students at the Fundação Armando Alvares Penteado (FAAP) in São Paulo, Brazil.

Krista Thompson, associate professor of art history at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, has received an American Council of Learned Societies fellowship for her project, “Photography, Screen, and Spectacle in Contemporary African Diasporic Cultures.”

Ming Tiampo, associate professor of art history at Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario, has received an honorable mention from the Dedalus Foundation’s Robert Motherwell Book Award for Gutai: Decentering Modernism (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011).

Noa Turel has been awarded a postdoctoral fellowship from the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Turel, who recently received her PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara, will be in residence from September 2012 to June 2013, working on “Living Color: The Animation Paradigm of Pictorial Realism 1350–1550.”

Susan M. Wager, a PhD student in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University in New York, has been named a Samuel H. Kress Fellow for 2012–14 from the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Wager, whose specialty is eighteenth- and nineteenth-century French visual culture, will research her dissertation, titled “Boucher’s Bijoux: Luxury Reproductions in the Age of Enlightenment.”

Gennifer Weisenfeld, associate professor in the Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, has been awarded a grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts for her book, Imaging Disaster: Tokyo and the Visual Culture of Japan’s Great Earthquake of 1923 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2012).

Stephen Hart Whiteman has been awarded a 2012–14 A. W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. His project is titled “Vocabularies of Culture: The Landscape of Multiethnic Emperorship in the Early Qing Dynasty (1661–1722).”

Jeff Williams, an artist and assistant professor in studio art at the University of Texas at Austin, has won the 2012 Texas Prize, a $30,000 triennial award sponsored by the Austin Museum of Art/Arthouse. The prize, given to an emerging artist based in Texas, is juried by an international group of artists, scholars, and curators.

Marie Yasunaga, a PhD candidate in the Department of Comparative Literature and Culture at the University of Tokyo in Japan, has received a predoctoral fellowship from the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Yasunaga will be a resident from September 2012 to June 2013; her project is titled “Color Theories in Museum Spaces: Installation Experiments by Karl Ernst Osthaus and Karl With. From German Kunstgewerbe-Reformbewegung through Symbolism and Expressionism to the Era of the White Cube.”

Mantha Zarmakoupi, a Humboldt Postdoctoral Fellow in the Archäologisches Institut at the Universität zu Köln in Germany, has been named a 2012–13 Getty Scholar at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Zarmakoupi specializes in classical art and archeology, which she will explore during her residency in a project titled “The Idea of Landscape in Roman Luxury Villas.”