College Art Association

CAA News Today

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by CAA — Dec 15, 2012

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

December 2012

Anna Sigrídur Arnar of Minnesota State University, Moorhead, has received the Robert Motherwell Book Award for the best publication in the history and criticism of modernism in the arts—including the visual arts, literature, music, and the performing arts. The $20,000 prize, administered by the Dedalus Foundation, based in New York, recognizes The Book as Instrument: Stéphane Mallarmé, the Artist’s Book, and the Transformation of Print Culture (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011). Nominations are made by publishers, and the winner is chosen by a panel of distinguished scholars and writers.

Oskar Bätschmann of the Schweizerisches Institut für Kunstwissenschaft in Zürich, Switzerland, has been named Samuel H. Kress Professor at the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC.

Nina Berson has used a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant to produce a summer institute, “Mesoamerica and the Southwest: A New History for an Ancient Land,” which took place June 17–July 23, 2012. This NEH institute, sponsored by the Community College Humanities Association and held in Mexico, Arizona, and New Mexico, examined the interconnections among Mesoamerican and ancient Southwestern archaeological, anthropological, and art-historical studies.

S. Hollis Clayson, Bergen Evans Professor in the Humanities and Professor of Art History at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, has been named the 2013–14 Samuel H. Kress Professor at the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. Clayson will be the senior member of the center and counsel postdoctoral fellows. She will also complete her book, Electric Paris: The Visual Cultures of the City of Light in the Era of Thomas Edison (to be published by the University of Chicago Press).

Jonathan Fineberg, professor of art history emeritus at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, has received a 2012 Craft Research Fund Project Research Grant, administered by the University of North Carolina’s Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design in Hendersonville. He will use the $5,000 award to conduct research for the first scholarly monograph on the work of Robert Arneson.

Julia P. Herzberg has received a 2012–13 Fulbright Scholar grant. From March to May 2013, she will teach a graduate course, “Latin American Artists in the US from 1995: Globalism and Localism,” at the Universidad Diego Portales in Santiago, Chile, and work on a curatorial project at el Museo de la Memoria y los Derechos Humanos, also in Santiago.

Alexander Brier Marr of the University of Rochester in Rochester, New York, has earned an Ailsa Mellon Bruce Predoctoral Fellowship for Historians of American Art to Travel Abroad. The fellowship is administered by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC.

Constance Moffett has used a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant to produce a summer institute, “Leonardo da Vinci: Between Art and Science” which took place June 25–July 13, 2012. This NEH institute, sponsored by the University of Virginia and Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz, explored how Leonardo melded art and science by using geography and cartography to begin his study of military engineering, canalization, and architecture.

Rachel Silberstein, a doctoral student in oriental studies at the University of Oxford in England, has earned a student and new professionals scholarship from the Textile Society of America. The award provided free registration for the society’s symposium, which was held September 19–23, 2012, in Washington, DC.

Carol Solomon, visiting associate professor of art history at Haverford College in Haverford, Pennsylvania, has received a 2012–13 Fulbright Award in the Middle East and North Africa Regional Reserach Program. She will undertake research in Tunisia and Morocco on contemporary art of the Maghreb, focusing on issues of national memory, culture, and identity.

Jenni Sorkin, assistant professor of contemporary art history at the University of Houston in Texas, has received a 2012 Craft Research Fund Project Research Grant from the University of North Carolina’s Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design in Hendersonville. Her $12,500 award will go toward research on a book-length study that recovers the gendered history of weaving and its uncertain disciplinary status within the mid-twentieth-century university.

Catherine Whalen, assistant professor at the Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design, and Culture in New York, has accepted a 2012 Craft Research Fund Project Research Grant, administered by the University of North Carolina’s Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design in Hendersonville. She will share the $8,000 award with a colleague, working toward a book on Paul Hollister, a critic and historian of the studio glass movement.

Teresa Wilkins, a doctoral student at Indiana University in Bloomington, has earned a 2012 Craft Research Fund Graduate Research Grant for $8,285 from the University of North Carolina’s Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design in Hendersonville. She will conduct dissertation research investigating the construction, use, and sociopolitical meaning of the modern feather arts of Hawai‘i.

Yanfei Zhu, a doctoral student in the Department of History of Art at Ohio State University in Columbus, has been named an Ittleson Fellow for 2011–13 by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. His project is titled “Transtemporal and Cross-Border Alignment: The Rediscovery of Yimin Ink Painting in Modern China, 1900–1949.”