College Art Association

CAA News Today

The College Art Association (CAA) seeks nominations and self-nominations for one US scholar and two scholars based outside the United States to serve on the jury of CAA’s Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grant through June 30, 2017. Candidates must be actively publishing scholars with expertise in any branch of American art history, visual studies, or a related field with demonstrated seniority and achievement; institutional affiliation is not required.

The Terra Foundation for American Art awarded CAA a major, three-year grant to administer an annual program to support book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of American art. The Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grant will award funds of up to $15,000 to US and non-US publishers for books that examine American art in an international context, increase awareness of American art internationally through publication outside the United States, allow wider audiences to access important texts through translation, and/or result from international collaboration. For grant guidelines, detailed eligibility requirements and application instructions, please visit www.collegeart.org/terrafoundation.

Members of the Terra Foundation International Publication Jury meet once each year to select awardees. The first meeting of the jury will take place at CAA’s Annual Conference in New York on February 11, 2014. Subsequent meetings will take place via teleconference each February. Two months prior to the meeting, CAA staff will provide all application materials and reader’s reports to jurors for review prior to the jury meeting. Jurors for this grant would serve as volunteers and would not be entitled to receive compensation for service, however, travel and hotel expenses for the 2014 jury meeting will be paid by the College Art Association.

US candidates must be CAA members in good standing and should not currently serve on another CAA editorial board or committee. Jury members may not themselves apply for a grant in this program during their three-year term of service. Nominators should ascertain their nominee’s willingness to serve before submitting a name; self-nominations are also welcome. Please send a letter describing your interest in and qualifications for appointment, a curriculum vitae, and contact information to: Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grant, College Art Association, 50 Broadway, 21st Floor, New York, NY 10004; or send all materials as email attachments to Betty Leigh Hutcheson, bhutcheson@collegeart.org. Deadline: December 1, 2014.

About CAA

The College Art Association is dedicated to providing professional services and resources for artists, art historians, and students in the visual arts. CAA serves as an advocate and a resource for individuals and institutions nationally and internationally by offering forums to discuss the latest developments in the visual arts and art history through its Annual Conference, publications, exhibitions, website, and other programs, services, and events. CAA focuses on a wide range of advocacy issues, including education in the arts, freedom of expression, intellectual-property rights, cultural heritage and preservation, workforce topics in universities and museums, and access to networked information technologies. Representing its members’ professional needs since 1911, CAA is committed to the highest professional and ethical standards of scholarship, creativity, criticism, and teaching. Learn more about CAA at www.collegeart.org.

About the Terra Foundation

The Terra Foundation for American Art is dedicated to fostering exploration, understanding, and enjoyment of the visual arts of the United States for national and international audiences. Recognizing the importance of experiencing original works of art, the foundation provides opportunities for interaction and study, beginning with the presentation and growth of its own art collection in Chicago. To further cross-cultural dialogue on American art, the foundation supports and collaborates on innovative exhibitions, research, and educational programs. Implicit in such activities is the belief that art has the potential both to distinguish cultures and to unite them.

People in the News

posted by October 17, 2014

People in the News lists new hires, positions, and promotions in three sections: Academe, Museums and Galleries, and Organizations and Publications.

The section is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2014

Academe

Amy Freund, previously an assistant professor at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, has become assistant professor and Kleinheinz Family Endowed Chair in Art History in the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University in Dallas.

Adriene Jenik, director of the Herberger Institute School for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University in Tempe, has taken a year’s leave, which began on August 1, 2014.

Stephanie Langin-Hooper has left Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio, to begin a new position as assistant professor and Karl Kilinski II Endowed Chair of Hellenic Visual Culture in the Department of Art History at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas.

Aleca Le Blanc has left her position as managing editor of the Getty Research Journal at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California, to become assistant professor of Latin American art in the Department of the History of Art at the University of California, Riverside.

Kathryn Maxwell has been appointed acting director of the Herberger Institute School for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University in Tempe.

Judith Rodenbeck, professor of modern and contemporary art at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York, has accepted a position on the faculty of the Department of Media and Cultural Studies at the University of California, Riverside, for the 2014–15 academic year.

Ashley Thompson, formerly senior lecturer in the School of Fine Art at Leeds University in England, has become professor and Hiram W. Woodward Chair in Southeast Asian Art in the University of London’s School of Oriental and African Studies.

Museums and Galleries

Esther Bell, formerly curator of European paintings, drawings, and sculpture at the Cincinnati Art Museum in Ohio, has become the new curator in charge of European paintings at the Fine Arts Museum in San Francisco, California.

Kate Ezra has left her position as Nolen Curator of Education and Academic Affairs at the Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut.

Erika Holmquist-Wall, formerly assistant curator of paintings at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts in Minnestoa, has been named Mary and Barry Bingham Sr. Curator of European and American Painting and Sculpture at the Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky.

Ted Mann, formerly assistant curator at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, has become a San Francisco–based consulting curator for the museum’s Panza Collection.

Virginia Reynolds, curatorial assistant for the Detroit Institute of Arts in Michigan, has left her position at the museum.

Kailin Weng has left her position at Chinese art project manager at the Smithsonian Institution’s Freer and Sackler Galleries in Washington, DC. She is now a graduate student at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Organizations and Publications

Roger Thorp, formerly publishing director for Tate Publishing in London, England, has been appointed editorial director for art and children’s books at Thames and Hudson, also in London.

Institutional News

posted by October 17, 2014

Read about the latest news from institutional members.

Institutional News is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2014

The Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts, has been awarded a grant of $118,737 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, a federal agency, in the Museums in America program. The Clark will use the funds to digitize significant volumes from the Julius S. Held Collection of Rare Books.

The North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh has accepted a $1.9 million grant from the State Employees’ Credit Union Foundation to help fund research in art education.

The University of Texas at Dallas has received a $17 million contribution from the arts patron Edith O’Donnell to create the school’s new Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History, which opened this fall.

As a CAA member, you have access to a diverse range of mentors at Career Services during the 103rd Annual Conference, taking place February 11–14, 2015, in New York. All emerging, midcareer, and even advanced art professionals can benefit from one-on-one discussions with dedicated mentors about artists’ portfolios, career-management skills, and professional strategies.

You may enroll in either the Artists’ Portfolio Review or Career Development Mentoring—please choose one. Participants are chosen by a lottery of applications received by the deadline; all applicants are notified of their scheduled date and time slot by email in early 2015. Both sessions are offered free of charge. Conference registration, while encouraged, is not necessary to participate. All applicants must be current CAA members.

Artists’ Portfolio Review

The Artists’ Portfolio Review offers CAA members the opportunity to have digital images or DVDs of their work reviewed by artists, critics, curators, and educators in personal twenty-minute consultations. Whenever possible, CAA matches artists and mentors based on medium or discipline. You may bring battery-powered laptops; wireless internet, however, is not available in the room. Sessions are filled by appointment only and are scheduled for Thursday, February 12, and Friday, February 13, 2015, 8:00 AM–NOON and 1:00–5:00 PM each day.

To apply, download and complete the Career Development Enrollment Form. Send the completed form by email to Lauren Stark, CAA manager of programs; by fax to 212-627-2381; or by mail to: Artists’ Portfolio Review, College Art Association, 50 Broadway, 21st Floor, New York, NY 10004. Deadline extended: January 9, 2015.

Career Development Mentoring

Artists, art historians, art educators, and museum professionals at all stages of their careers may apply for one-on-one consultations with veterans in their fields. Through personal twenty-minute consultations, Career Development Mentoring offers a unique opportunity for participants to receive candid advice on how to conduct a thorough job search; present cover letters, CVs, and digital images; and prepare for interviews. Whenever possible, CAA matches participants and mentors based on medium or discipline. Sessions are filled by appointment only and are scheduled for Thursday, February 12, and Friday, February 13, 2015, 8:00 AM–NOON and 1:00–5:00 PM each day.

To apply, download and complete the Career Development Enrollment Form. Send the completed form by email to Lauren Stark, CAA manager of programs; by fax to 212-627-2381; or by mail to: Career Development Mentoring, College Art Association, 50 Broadway, 21st Floor, New York, NY 10004. Deadline extended: January 9, 2015.

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by October 15, 2014

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2014

Grimanesa Amorós, an artist based in New York, has been named the 2014 Lebowitz Visiting Artist in Residence for the Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series at the Institute for Women and Art at Rutgers University in Piscataway, New Jersey.

Paul Catanese, associate professor at Columbia College Chicago in Illinois and director of his school’s MFA program for interdisciplinary arts and media, has received a 2014 Efroymson Contemporary Arts Fellowship. The award will support his studio practice and help to expand work on his project visible from space. Catanese will also develop visible from space in early October during a Playa Artists’ Residency in eastern Oregon.

Blane De St. Croix has received a 2014–15 residency in Brooklyn, New York, from the Sharpe-Walentas Studio Award Space Program (formerly known as the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation).

Caitlin Earley, a graduate student in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Texas at Austin, has received a 2014–15 junior fellowship in Precolumbian studies from Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection in Washington, DC. The award will support her project, titled “At the Edge of the Maya World: Power, Politics, and Identity in Monuments of the Comitán Valley.”

Danielle Joyner, assistant professor of medieval art history at the University of Notre Dame in Notre Dame, Indiana, has received a 2014–15 fellowship in garden and landscape studies from Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection in Washington, DC. She will work on a project called “Landscapes and Medieval Arts.”

Micheline Nilsen, a faculty member in art history at Indiana University South Bend, has accepted a 2014–15 fellowship in garden and landscape studies from Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection in Washington, DC. Her project is titled “From Turnips to Lawn Chairs: Allotment Gardens in Europe, 1920 to 1975.”

Camille Serchuk, professor of art at Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, has been awarded a 2014–15 fellowship from the National Humanities Center, based in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. She will work on her project, “Realm and Representation: Art, Cartography and Visual Culture in France, 1450–1610.”

Exhibitions Curated by CAA Members

posted by October 15, 2014

Check out details on recent shows organized by CAA members who are also curators.

Exhibitions Curated by CAA Members is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2014

Charlotte Ickes and Iggy Cortez. Itinerant Belongings. Slought Foundation and Charles Addams Fine Arts Hall, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 1–December 20, 2014 (Slought Foundation); November 1–22, 2014 (Charles Addams Fine Arts Hall).

Katerina Lanfranco. All Worked Up. Rhombus Space, Brooklyn, New York, September 12–October 5, 2014.

Tirza True Latimer. Harmony Hammond: Becoming/UnBecoming Monochrome. RedLine, Denver, Colorado, August 2–September 28, 2014.

Ellen K. Levy. Sleuthing the Mind. Pratt Manhattan Gallery, New York, September 17–November 5, 2014.

María Margarita Malagón-Kurka. Roda, su poesía visual. Museo Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá, Columbia, April 11–August 3, 2014.

Theresa Papanikolas. Art Deco Hawaii. Honolulu Museum of Art, Honolulu, Hawai‘i, July 3, 2014–January 11, 2015.

Catherine Tedford. Paper Bullets: 100 Years of Political Stickers from around the World. Hatch Kingdom Sticker Museum, Berlin, Germany, September 13–October 24, 2014.

Books Published by CAA Members

posted by October 15, 2014

Publishing a book is a major milestone for artists and scholars—browse a list of recent titles below.

Books Published by CAA Members appears every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2014

Laura Auricchio. The Marquis: Lafayette Reconsidered (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2014).

Liana De Girolami Cheney, ed. Agnolo Bronzino: The Muse of Florence (Washington, DC: New Academia Publishing, 2014).

James Elkins, ed. Artists with PhDs: On the New Doctoral Degree in Studio Art, 2nd ed. (Washington, DC: New Academia Publishing, 2014).

Philip Goldswain, Nicole Sully, and William M. Taylor, eds. Out of Place (Gwalia): Occasional Essays on Australian Regional Communities and Built Environments in Transition (Crawley: University of Western Australia Press, 2014).

Andrew D. Hottle. The Art of the Sister Chapel: Exemplary Women, Visionary Creators, and Feminist Collaboration (Burlington VT: Ashgate, 2014).

Karen Kurczynski. The Art and Politics of Asger Jorn: The Avant-Garde Won’t Give Up (Burlington VT: Ashgate, 2014).

Margaret McCann, ed. The Figure: Painting, Drawing, and Sculpture (New York: Skira Rizzoli, 2014).

Each week CAA News publishes summaries of eight articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Tax Court Ruling Is Seen as a Victory for Artists

If you say you are an artist, but you make little money from selling your art, can your work be considered a profession in the eyes of the Internal Revenue Service? In a ruling handed down in early October by the United States Tax Court and seen by many as an important victory for artists, the answer is yes. (Read more from the New York Times.)

Can the Monograph Survive?

The first four chapters prove the scholar’s done the work, and the next two chapters—the ones “people might actually read”—present the argument. Elsewhere and in between are the reworking of the author’s dissertation and implicit tenure pitch. That’s how Timothy Burke, professor and chair of history at Swarthmore College, described the scholarly monograph during a recent forum on its future sponsored by the Association of Research Libraries. (Read more from Inside Higher Ed.)

An Expert Cites Dozens of Paintings as Rembrandt’s

Are there suddenly dozens more genuine Rembrandts in the world? There are if art authorities accept the findings of Ernst van de Wetering, the Dutch art historian and longtime head of the Netherlands-based Rembrandt Research Project. In its sixth and final volume, published last week, van de Wetering reattributes seventy paintings—often discounted by previous scholars as well as the institutions that own them—to the Dutch master. (Read more from the Wall Street Journal.)

Bonfire of the Humanities

It has long been fashionable to say that the globe is shrinking. In the wake of the telegraph, the steamship, and the railway, thinkers from the late-nineteenth century onward often wrote of space and time being annihilated by new technologies. In our current age of jet travel and the internet, we often hear that the world is flat, and that we live in a global village. Time has also been compressed. In the 1980s, this myopic vision found a name: short-termism. (Read more from Aeon.)

Will My Nonacademic Writing Come Back to Haunt Me?

As a graduate student, I have published in nonacademic venues on the topic of parenting a special-needs child. Now I am concerned that this is going to come back to haunt me on the faculty job market. Some of my professors have pressured me to quit the graduate program, assuming I couldn’t manage academia and motherhood. I kept at it, and finished my degree, but will search committees secretly think the same thing as those professors? (Read more from Vitae.)

Warburg Institute Threatened by Funding Woes

The Warburg Institute here has trained generations of scholars, who liken its world-renowned library of Renaissance and post-Classical material to an intellectual paradise. Now many scholars fear for the Warburg’s future over a funding dispute with the University of London, which has housed the collection since 1944, after it was moved from Nazi Germany. (Read more from the New York Times.)

Tate and Oil: Does the Art World Need to Come Clean about Sponsorship?

In a cramped second-floor room in an office block mostly used for immigration hearings, one of the most famous museums in the world is fighting to keep a secret. In March, the Information Commissioner ruled that Tate must, against its wishes, reveal some of what was said in meetings where the latest of several sponsorship deals with oil giant BP was discussed. (Read more from the Guardian.)

Preventing a “Digital Landfill”

University libraries need to advocate for government openness and electronic record keeping, speakers during the Association of Research Libraries fall membership conference implored, or risk the digital landscape’s becoming a “digital landfill.” The call to action emerged from a day during which members of the association debated how libraries should involve themselves in producing accessible digital resources, managing institutional data, and supporting campus innovation. (Read more from Inside Higher Ed.)

Filed under: CAA News

The Art Journal website is pleased to announce the publication of The New Geography: Earth Music and Land Art, Version 2.0 by Mike Maizels. This is the first installment of a three-part essay in which Maizels, the Mellon New Media Curator/Lecturer at the Davis Museum at Wellesley College, pairs a contemporary work of new media with an earlier work of media art. In this piece, Maziels examines two installations in which the weather plays a direct role: John Luther Adams’s The Place Where You Go to Listen (2008) and Robert Watts’s Cloud Music (1974).

The Art Journal website welcomes submissions and project proposals from artists, scholars, critics, curators, and other prospective contributors who share an interest in modern and contemporary art, design, pedagogy, and visual culture. Submission guidelines are available on the website and queries can be sent to art.journal.website@gmail.com.

Filed under: Art Journal, Publications

The American Council of Learned Societies Humanities E-Book (HEB) released Round 11 of their online collection this August. These 353 titles bring the total of the volumes in the collection to 4,315. The new round includes additional titles from two of HEB’s original publishing partners, Oxford University Press and Harvard University Press, as well as books from new partners such as University of Toronto Press and Michigan State University Press.

All the titles in Humanities E-Book are available to College Art Association members. The American Council of Learned Societies Humanities E-Book (HEB) makes individual subscriptions available through standing membership in any of the 72 ACLS constituent societies.

The subscription offers unlimited access to 4,315 cross-searchable, full-text titles across the humanities and related social sciences. The titles in HEB have been selected and peer reviewed by ACLS constituent learned societies for their continued value in teaching and researching. The collection comprises both in- and out-of-print titles ranging from the 1880s through the present, and includes many prize-winning works. It also includes special series such as the Records of Civilization: http://www.humanitiesebook.org/the-collection/series_ROC.html and the College Art Association Monographs: http://www.humanitiesebook.org/the-collection/series_CAA.html.

Individual subscriptions are ideal for those whose school might not yet have an institutional subscription to HEB or for individual members of a learned society who might not be affiliated with a subscribing institution. (A full list of subscribing institutions can be found on the HEB website, at http://www.humanitiesebook.org/subscriptions-pricing/subscribing-institutions.html.) Individual subscriptions are USD $40.00 for a twelve-month subscription, and College Art Association members can sign up via the HEB website: http://www.humanitiesebook.org/subscriptions-pricing/individuals.html.

For more information about individual subscriptions, contact subscriptions@hebook.org.

Filed under: Online Resources, Publications