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In the June 2016 Art Bulletin

posted by Christopher Howard — Jul 12, 2016

A grotesquely anthropomorphic hound standing on powerful back legs and blowing a stylized trumpet graces the cover of the June 2016 issue of The Art Bulletin. The etching is one of two dozen similar works by the early seventeenth-century artist Christopher Jamnitzer that Madeleine C. Viljoen explores in relation to early modern cosmography. The June issue also presents the first publication of an extraordinary eleventh-century enamel cup from a nomad’s grave in Ukraine, which Warren T. Woodfin examines in the context of other Middle Byzantine works with secular imagery. In addition, the issue features essays by David Young Kim on the multiple functions served by the carpets in Lorenzo Lotto’s paintings, and by Jean H. Duffy on issues of genre and perception in Jean Dubuffet’s mixed-genre spectacle Coucou Bazar. Shao Yiyang’s “Whither Art History?” essay reflects on the flourishing of art history in contemporary China.

The reviews section, with a theme of “Cosmopolitan Art Worlds,” includes six reviews of recent books on art in Renaissance Italy, late nineteenth-century Shanghai, turn-of-the-century Paris, modern India, contemporary Brazil and Japan, and twentieth-century Nigeria.

CAA sends print copies of The Art Bulletin to all institutional members and to those individuals who choose to receive the journal as a benefit of membership. The digital version at Taylor & Francis Online is currently available to all CAA individual members regardless of their subscription choice.

In the next issue of the quarterly journal, to be published in September, essays will consider Kongo visual and cultural practices in contemporary art, twelfth-century Chinese paintings of Buddhist rituals, the nineteenth-century perception of Watteau’s Pierrot character as forlorn, a brush-and-ink painting collectively created in the early People’s Republic of China, and intersections of global politics and imaging in the site-specific art of Walter De Maria. Four reviews will be presented under the rubric “Urban Images, Memories, and Fragments.”