Join Now      Log In

CAA News Today

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by CAA — Dec 15, 2016

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

December 2016

Devon Baker, a PhD student in art history at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, has been awarded a 2016–17 Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellowship by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. She will conduct research for her dissertation, which explores print culture in Renaissance Lombardy, using printmaking to examine larger themes of mobility, north-south exchange, and transmateriality.

Amy Beecher, an artist based in New York and Providence, Rhode Island, has received a fall 2016 fellowship from the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire, in the interdisciplinary artist category.

Daniella Berman, a doctoral candidate at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts, has been awarded a 2016–17 Theodore Rousseau Fellowship by the Metropolitan Museum of Art to work on her dissertation, which considers the unfinished history paintings of the French Revolution and identifies an emergent aesthetic of “unfinishedness” developed by artists in response to the shifting sociopolitical landscape.

Douglas Brine, associate professor of art history at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas, has accepted a 2016–17 J. Clawson Mills Scholarship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to undertake research and writing for his book project, “The Art of Brass in the Burgundian Netherlands: Makers, Markets, Patrons, Products.”

Emily Casey, a PhD candidate in art history at the University of Delaware in Newark, has been given a Sylvan C. Coleman and Pam Coleman Memorial Fund Fellowship for 2016–17 by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. She will examine representations of oceanic space in American art and material culture to show how colonial and early national identities were constructed in relation to these.

Joshua Cohen, assistant professor at City College, City University of New York, has received a 2016–17 Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellowship from the Metropolitan Museum of Art to complete a book that tracks modernist appropriations of African sculpture by European and African artists between 1905 and 1980.

Joelle Dietrick, assistant professor of art and digital studies at Davidson College in Davidson, North Carolina, has accepted a Pollock-Krasner Foundation award to support her studio production during the 2016–17 academic year before she goes to Hamburg, Germany, for her Fulbright Global Award (April–July 2017). As part of the Fulbright, Dietrick will travel to Santiago, Chile, and Hong Kong, China, during the next two winter breaks.

Brad Hostetler, who earned a PhD in art history last year at Florida State University in Tallahassee, has been awarded a 2016–17 Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellowship from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to complete revisions for a book project, “Enshrining Sacred Matter: The Form, Function, and Meaning of Reliquaries in Byzantium, 843–1204.”

Amy Huang, a doctoral candidate in the history of art and architecture at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, and an adjunct lecturer for Boston University in Massachusetts, has received a 2016–17 Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellowship from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. She will research visual modes of remembrance in Chinese paintings through seventeenth-century Nanjing and investigate how memory operated through texts, images, and historic sites.

Frances Jacobus-Parker, a PhD student in art and archaeology at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, has been given a Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellowship for 2016–17 by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, where he will work on the first comprehensive study of the oeuvre of the pivotal American artist Vija Celmins.

Samuel Johnson, who earned his PhD in the history of art and architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 2015, has been awarded a Leonard A. Lauder Fellowship by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. In 2016–17 Johnson will study the effects of the papiers collés of Georges Braques and Pablo Picasso on the photographs of El Lissitzky, László Moholy-Nagy, and Man Ray.

Anna Jozefacka, an adjunct professor at Hunter College, City University of New York, has been awarded a 2016–17 Leonard A. Lauder Fellowship by the Metropolitan Museum of Art to conduct research on Cubism’s relationship to the evolution of modern architectural and interior design in the first three decades of the twentieth century.

Julia McHugh, a doctoral student in art history at the University of California, Los Angeles, has accepted a Douglass Foundation Fellowship in American Art for 2016–17 from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to work on her dissertation, which examines the ways in which patrons used tapestries and other textiles to adorn interiors, both domestic and sacred, in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Peru.

Patricia Miranda, an artist, curator, educator, and founder of MAPSpace, a gallery in Port Chester, New York, has completed an October 2016 residency at I-Park Residency in East Haddam, Connecticut.

Jiha Moon, an artist who lives and works in Atlanta, Georgia, has received a 2016 Artadia Award.

Elyse Nelson, a PhD candidate in the history of art at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts, has been given a Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellowship by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. During 2016–17 she will work on a dissertation that explores the Italian neoclassical sculptor Antonio Canova’s renewed relationship with his British patrons after Napoleon’s defeat in 1814.

Giulia Paoletti, a core lecturer at Columbia University in New York, has been awarded a 2016–17 Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellowship by the Metropolitan Museum of Art to research and assist with the development and preparation for a planned reinstallation and renovation of the African art galleries.

John Richardson, professor of art and chair of the James Pearson Duffy Department of Art and Art History at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan, has received the 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Mid America College Art Association.

Miriam Said, a doctoral student in the history of art at the University of California, Berkeley, has accepted a 2016–17 Frances Markoe Fellowship by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to explore material-based mechanisms of ritual affect as it was manifested in and between the Near East and Greece in the first millennium BC.

John A. Tyson, a recent recipient of a PhD in art history from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, has joined the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, as a 2016–17 participant in the fellowship and internships program. He will assist the Department of Modern Art with research for the upcoming Rachel Whiteread retrospective and lead tours in the newly reinstalled East Building permanent and special exhibition galleries.

Aaron Wile, a PhD candidate in the history of art and architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has accepted a Chester Dale Fellowship from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. During 2016–17 he will complete his dissertation, “Painting, Authority, and Experience at the Twighlight of the Grand Siècle, 1690–1721,” and begin transforming it into a book manuscript, consulting materials at the museum.

Katharine Wright, who earned her PhD in art history at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, in 2015, has been awarded an Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Research/Collections Specialist Fellowship for 2016–17 by the Metropolitan Museum of Art to catalogue the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art’s collection of American modernism.

Tara Zanardi, an associate professor at Hunter College, City University of New York, has accepted a 2016–17 Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellowship from the Metropolitan Museum of Art to research the Porcelain Room at the Royal Palace in Aranjuez, a tour-de-force in its implementation and display of porcelain, the interior exemplifies Charles III’s innovative artistic and political strategies at court.