College Art Association

CAA News Today

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by Christopher Howard — Apr 12, 2017

Each week CAA News summarizes eight articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives. 

Artists Are Luring Their Peers and Predecessors Out of Obscurity and Back into the Spotlight

Beyond the economy of galleries, fairs, and auction rooms, there is an alternative artist-to-artist network rooted in relationships based on aesthetic influences and mutual appreciation. In recent years, artists with some degree of success and visibility have gone out of their way to bring attention to lesser-known peers and predecessors. (Read more from ARTnews.)

Eleven Female Art Professors and Teachers on Their Favorite Women Artists

Continuing the Cut’s series celebrating women in the arts and expanding on the National Museum of Women in the Arts’ social-media campaign to get their followers to name #5WomenArtists, New York has asked female art professors and teachers to name the woman artist they admire the most. (Read more from New York.)

How Art Has Depicted the Ideal Male Body throughout History

In the history of masculinity, it is money rather than muscle that tends to be articulated. Class or status has been the determining factor in the defining of male exemplars. Be it in the East or West, the epitome of a handsome man has generally been an idealized version of an upper-class individual, an archetype that has itself changed over time. (Read more from Artsy.)

Art History’s Image Problem 

“If you are going to study sixteenth-century French art, more power to you. I support the arts … but you are not going to get a job,” declared Sam Clovis, Donald Trump’s campaign cochair in an interview last May. Clovis was outlining the would-be president’s education policy, and art history served as a prime example of the kind of major that student loans, he argued, should not underwrite. (Read more from Inside Higher Ed.)

More Vibrant Tales of Obsolete Pigments

After its first installment on obsolete pigments, Hyperallergic had only hit the tip of the curious history of vanished colors. Below are a few more pigments that have mostly gone out of favor, due to them being hazardous to the health of their manufacturers or artists, having a shortage of their weird material, or advances in technology replacing them with synthetics. (Read more from Hyperallergic.)

How a Browser Extension Could Shake Up Academic Publishing

The Gates Foundation started its own open-access publishing platform, which the European Commission may replicate. The Open Access Button, a tool that helps researchers gain free access to articles, will be integrated into existing interlibrary-loan arrangements. Another initiative, called Unpaywall, is a simple browser extension that could help alter the status quo of scholarly publishing. (Read more from the Chronicle of Higher Education.)

Understanding Our Strengths and Weaknesses as Teachers

Every teacher has strengths and weaknesses. Have you ever tried to list yours? Doing so is a worthwhile activity. I’d recommend doing it in private with a favorite libation—only one, because there is a need to be thoughtful and honest. (Read more from Faculty Focus.)

Interviewing for New Hires

Because our organizations are small, vertical promotion is often difficult, if not impossible. Today, it is more common for younger people to  expect to have multiple jobs at an ever earlier stage of their careers. Finding the right people for open positions in a highly competitive job market is critical to our success as organizations. (Read more from Barry’s Blog.)

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