College Art Association

CAA News Today

Jack Hyland, CAA’s treasurer and close advisor for over 30 years, passed away suddenly on Friday, August 11, 2017. The CAA staff, board, and committees are saddened by this monumental loss. Hyland began his career in investment banking at major financial services firms, including Morgan Stanley, Warburg Paribas Becker, and PaineWebber/Young & Rubicam Ventures. In 2010, he founded Media Advisory Partners with several partners. Hyland was a strident advocate for CAA, ensuring the financial health of the organization and guiding it with sound input and wisdom through three decades.

Hyland was the author of two notable books, Evangelism’s First Modern Media Star, The Life of Reverend Bill Stidger and The Moses Virus. In the former title, Hyland examined the life of his grandfather, the famous preacher, Bill Stidger, who foresaw the possibilities of modern-day media to expand evangelical work. His second book, The Moses Virus, is a fictional thriller set in Rome.

Hyland was born in 1938 in Detroit, Michigan. He majored in Theoretical Physics at Williams College, graduating in 1959; and from Harvard Business School, graduating in 1961.

In addition to serving CAA, Hyland was Co-Chair of the Board of Trustees of Teachers College, Columbia University. He was also Chairman Emeritus of the American Academy in Rome; and Vice President and Director of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. Formerly, he was also a Trustee and Treasurer of the National Building Museum in Washington.

We offer our condolences to his partner, Larry Wente; to his former wife, Karen Conant Hyland; to his children, Liza, Jonathan and Susannah, and grandchildren.

Filed under: Board of Directors, Obituaries

Solo Exhibitions by Artist Members

posted by August 14, 2017

See when and where CAA members are exhibiting their art, and view images of their work.

Solo Exhibitions by Artist Members is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

August 2017

Abroad

Lea Kannar-Lichtenberger. Accelerator Gallery, Pyrmont, New South Wales, Australia, May 27–June 10, 2017. Deception.

Northeast

Nancy Azara. Picture Gallery at the Saint-Gaudens Memorial, Cornish, New Hampshire, July 22–September 10, 2017. Passage of the Ghost Ship: Trees and Vines. Wood sculpture and scroll/collages.

South

Diane Burko. Joy Pratt Markham Gallery, Walton Arts Center, Fayetteville, Arkansas, May 4–September 30, 2017. Glacial Shifts, Changing Perspectives: Bearing Witness to Climate Change. Painting and photography.

Tyrus Clutter. Appleton Museum of Art, Ocala, Florida, June 10–September 17, 2017. Con-Text: The Word Based Images of Tyrus Clutter. Color viscosity intaglio prints.

West

Rachel Epp Buller. Galeria Zapatista at Mission Grafica, San Francisco, California, May 12–June 16, 2017. A Hidden Garden. Monotype prints.

Ken Gonzales-Day. Luis De Jesus Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, September 9–October 28, 2017. Bone-Grass Boy: The Secret Banks of the Conejos River. Photographic project.

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , ,

CAA Receives NEA Grant for ARTspace

posted by August 11, 2017

CAA has been awarded a $25,000 Art Works grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to support the next installment of ARTspace, taking place during the 2018 Annual Conference in Los Angeles. Spearheaded by CAA’s Services to Artists Committee, ARTspace is a forum for programming designed by artists for artists that is among the most vital and exciting aspects of the conference. Held at each Annual Conference since 2001, ARTspace is intended to reflect the current state of the visual arts and arts education. The grant is the NEA’s ninth consecutive award to CAA for this event.

ARTspace offers free program sessions and includes diverse activities such as the annual Distinguished Artist Interviews—most recently with Coco Fusco and Katherine Bradford at the Annual Conference in New York last February—and screenings of film, video, and multimedia works in the Media Lounge. Also hosted in ARTspace are live performances and panel discussions that facilitate a conversational yet professional exchange of ideas and practices designed to engage CAA’s artist members as well as the general public.

ARTspace programming for 2017 included sessions on economic fairness and internet activism, artists who collaborate with their families, alternative career paths for artists outside the studio and academia, and a roundtable on artist-run institutions. CAA’s 106th Annual Conference will take place February 21–24, 2018, at the Los Angeles Convention Center and at schools, museums, and other institutions throughout Southern California.

Jane Chu, chairman of the NEA since 2014, has approved over $84 million to fund nearly 1,200 projects and partnerships in all fifty US states in the NEA’s second major funding announcement for fiscal year 2017. The Art Works category focuses on funding the creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence, public engagement with art, lifelong learning in the arts, and strengthening of communities through the arts. Through grants to thousands of nonprofits each year, the NEA promotes opportunities for people in communities across America to experience the arts and exercise their creativity.

For the full list of 2017 Art Works grants visit the NEA website.

New in caa.reviews

posted by August 11, 2017

Deanna Pytlinski visits Women of Abstract Expressionism at the Denver Art Museum. “There is much to celebrate about the exhibition,” and “the mood of the show was decidedly exuberant in its design and content.” “Paying overdue attention to the presence of women in a movement long understood to be inherently masculinist,” it makes “the reasons for Abstract Expressionism’s success come alive once again.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Ugochukwu-Smooth C. Nzewi reviews Twins in African and Diaspora Cultures: Double Trouble, Twice Blessed, edited by Philip M. Peek. The book challenges “existing African arts and culture scholarship’s disproportionate attention on how twin births constitute a problem to parents and communities,” instead taking “a dialectic approach to show how twins embody ambiguity” and “complementary duality.”  Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Eric M. Frank discusses the Museo dell’Opera del Duomo in Florence, Italy, which opened in 2015. The “spectacular new” institution is “a modern manifestation” of the “same Enlightenment principles that inspired the creation of the public museum,” as well as “an extensive pedagogical installation focused on historical context and religious belief that intentionally aspires to educate and spiritually transform each visitor.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Filed under: caa.reviews

Books Published by CAA Members

posted by August 09, 2017

Publishing a book is a major milestone for artists and scholars—browse a list of recent titles below.

Books Published by CAA Members appears every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

August 2017

David S. Areford. La nave e lo scheletro: Le stampe di Jacopo Rubieri alla Biblioteca Classense di Ravenna (Bologna: Bononia University Press, 2017).

Alexis L. BoylanAshcan Art, Whiteness, and the Unspectacular Man (New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2017).

Marilyn R. Brown. The “Gamin de Paris” in Nineteenth-Century Visual Culture: Delacroix, Hugo, and the French Social Imaginary (New York: Routledge, 2017).

Clarence C. Cook. A Description of the New York Central Park, intro. Maureen Meister (New York: New York University Press, 2017).

Diana GisolfiPaolo Veronese and the Practice of Painting in Late Renaissance Venice (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017).

D. Gustafson and A. M. Zervigón. Subjective Objective: A Century of Social Photography (Munich: Hirmer Verlag, 2017).

Rebecca Peabody. Consuming Stories: Kara Walker and the Imagining of American Race (Oakland: University of California Press, 2016).

Corine Schleif and Volker Schier, eds. Manuscripts Changing Hands (Wiesbaden, Germany: Harrassowitz, 2016).

Rachel Stern. The Expressionist Fritz Ascher: To Live Is to Blaze with Passion / Der Expressionist Fritz Ascher: Leben ist Glühn, ed. Ori Z. Soltes (Cologne: Wienand, 2016).

Athena TachaVisualizing the Universe: Athena Tacha’s Proposals for Public Art Commissions 1972–2012, ed. Richard E. Spear (Washington, DC: Grayson, 2017).

Nancy Um. Shipped but Not Sold: Material Culture and the Social Protocols of Trade during Yemen’s Age of Coffee (Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 2017).

Phoebe WolfskillArchibald Motley Jr. and Racial Reinvention: The Old Negro in New Negro Art (Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2017).

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: ,

Each week CAA News summarizes eight articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Professors as Targets of Internet Outrage

Many professors who have expressed their views about race and politics this year have found themselves targets of both the left and right. Nothing is too abstrusely academic, it seems, to seed an attack campaign fueled by websites that surveil social media to find gotcha-worthy gems. (Read more from the New York Times.)

Demands to Cancel Dana Schutz’s ICA Exhibit Don’t Help the Cause for Social Justice

A small group of Boston activists demand as much in their passionate opposition to the current Dana Schutz exhibition at ICA Boston. Should an artist be blacklisted and blocked from showing their work at museums around the nation because one of their recent paintings tackled the painful topic of the history of racial violence? (Read more from the National Coalition against Censorship.)

Upstart Co-Lab Wants Businesses to Hire More Artists

We’re used to the common narrative of the artist as someone so inspired that they simply can’t stomach a drab office job, preferring to ditch the cubicle for the white cube. And yet research has found that employers almost universally report creativity is of increasing importance in the “traditional” workplace. (Read more from Artsy.)

The Letters of Picasso’s Dealer and a Century’s Worth of Impressionist Archives Are Going Online

Art historians and dealers researching works of art will soon have a new trove of materials to work with, courtesy of the Wildenstein Plattner Institute. A century’s worth of documentation—stock books from galleries, artists’ correspondence, annotated sale catalogues—will be digitized to develop online catalogues raisonnés for Manet, Morisot, Monet, and more. (Read more from Artnet News.)

The Multifarious Book

A few years ago the director of a university press told me that her goal was “to save the monograph.” “Which one?” I responded. It was an impolitic remark, but it helped to make the point that books perform all kinds of tasks, and when we say we want to “save” the book, it is reasonable to ask if some of those tasks could usefully be performed in better, faster, and cheaper ways. (Read more from the Scholarly Kitchen.)

Cindy Sherman Takes Selfies (as Only She Could) on Instagram

For the most part artists use Instagram like the rest of us: as a document of everyday fascinations, a bit scrubbed up for public consumption. But Cindy Sherman—who knows more than most about the deceptions of selfies—has quietly been exploring Instagram’s potential for something more than self-promotion. (Read more from the New York Times.)

Performance Piece Featuring Witches Raises Questions at Seattle Art Fair

On Thursday evening, at the end of the first day of the Seattle Art Fair, I went on a witch hunt. Ten women wearing black hooded cloaks were wandering the aisles. Amid booths housing galleries from around the world, the dark figures walked, carrying battle axes, reading poetry, playing music, and taking pictures on their phones. (Read more from the Observer.)

Philippe de Montebello on How the Metropolitan Museum Can Reclaim Its Glory

Philippe de Montebello is an institution in his own right—as venerable and encyclopedic as would befit the Metropolitan Museum of Art, which he led for three decades. Recently, Artnet News’s editor-in-chief sat down with de Montebello to discuss the changes and opportunities at the Met, and his new role in the gallery world. (Read more from Artnet News.)

Filed under: CAA News

Work with us at CAA

posted by August 04, 2017

In July CAA announced a restructuring of the organization and the departure of several staff members who took advantage of a buyout program. As part of the restructure we find ourselves with the opportunity to hire new staff at CAA. Below are six positions we are hiring for immediately. Please feel free to share these postings with colleagues and friends who might be a good fit. Click on the linked title of the position to learn more about the role and for application submission details.

Institutional and Individual Giving Manager

Publications and Programs Administrator

Sponsorship and Partnership Manager

Publications and Programs Editor

Grants and Special Programs Manager

Staff Accountant

Filed under: Jobs — Tags:

New in caa.reviews

posted by August 04, 2017

Amy Buono reads Peruvian Featherworks: Art of the Precolumbian Era, edited by Heidi King. The volume is “an important contribution to a profoundly complex yet largely overlooked artistic genre: Andean featherwork.” It “highlights both the difficulties of interpreting ancient Andean featherworking and its rich scholarly potential” and “is a superb resource for understanding how featherwork fits into the larger arena of Andean artistic practices.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

 

 

 

 

Rhonda L. Reymond reviews Civil Rights and the Promise of Equality and African American Women, both edited by Laura Coyle and Michèle Gates Moresi, which are part of a series published by the National Museum of African American History and Culture. “These volumes deserve a place on library bookshelves enriching the photographic section in general and adding to the significant number of books examining or reproducing images of African Americans.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

 

 

 

 

Anne Leonard discusses Interiors and Interiority, edited by Ewa Lajer-Burcharth and Beate Söntgen. Featuring “twenty-two essays, mostly by German and U.S. scholars,” the book argues that “the relationship between interiors and interiority is not limited to private spaces and individual psychology but engages just as ineluctably with complex dynamics of performativity, cultural mobility, technology, and material agency.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jenny Lin examines Van Gogh on Demand: China and the Readymade by Winnie Won Yin Wong. The author “not only overturns accounts of Dafen as a factory full of exploited assembly-line painters, which she successfully reveals as strategically crafted fictions, but also unsettles contemporary art’s unspoken hierarchies and topples modernist and postmodernist assumptions about originality, authenticity, and authorship.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Filed under: caa.reviews

Dear CAA members,

For the past year we have watched conversations grow in discussion groups on CAA Connect, our online social community for members. We see how our members want to stay in touch and develop ideas around the visual arts and their work outside of our Annual Conference. Our CAA-Getty International Program Scholars, for example, have a discussion group with 280 posts and twenty library items. Our Resources for Academic Art Museum Professionals (RAAMP) group has over 100 resources posted.

Now it’s time to expand the network. CAA is joining forces with the Modern Language Association (MLA) to become part of their Humanities Commons platform, and CAA will also have its own CAA Commons network as part of the partnership. The two networks (Humanities Commons and CAA Commons) will serve different purposes for our members, but we believe each will be of value. Humanities Commons is an open-access network where one can create a professional profile, discuss common interests in groups, develop new publications, and share work. The Humanities Commons network is open to anyone. CAA Commons will be the CAA member portal on the same network, where CAA members only can start discussion groups, contribute to discussion groups, and post resources for professionals in the visual arts.

CAA is not alone in joining Humanities Commons. Other members include The Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES), Association for Jewish Studies (AJS), and the Modern Language Association (MLA), of course. Going forward we expect many more associations and organizations to join the network, creating a dynamic, interdisciplinary forum that CAA members can explore and use to expand the reach of their professional work.

Features of CAA Commons and Humanities Commons

Logging in to CAA Commons and Humanities Commons

Which email should I use to create an account?

 If you do not have a Humanities Commons or CAA Commons account, you must create one. The CAA Support page can guide you through creating an account. Please note when creating an account, you must use your primary CAA member email address. If you do not remember this email address please log in to your CAA account to check.

I already have a Humanities Commons account

If you already have a Humanities Commons account, then you will automatically be added to the CAA Commons platform and have full access.

Please note that you DO NOT use your CAA Member ID to log into Humanities Commons or CAA Commons.

Join CAA Commons

For more information about creating an account and extensive FAQs about CAA Commons and Humanities Commons, please visit the CAA Support page.

By joining CAA Commons, you are accepting the Terms & Conditions of the platform.

If you have any questions, please contact us at caa@hcommons.org.

Sincerely,


Hunter O’Hanian
Executive Director
Chief Executive Officer

Hunter O'Hanian
Kathleen FitzpatricK
Project Director,
Humanities Commons, Modern Language Association

Each week CAA News summarizes eight articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

How Do Artists Get Gallery Representation?

While it’s possible to go it alone, it’s hard to understate the importance of a supportive, dedicated gallery to your career. The right gallerist doubles as a sounding board while you develop your work, a public platform for your practice, and a source of income. (Read more from Artsy.) 

Seven Residencies That Can Help Emerging Artists

For young artists fresh from art school or an MFA program, studio space may be prohibitively expensive, and leaving the nurturing bubble of school is daunting. Residencies can fill that gap—if these up-and-coming artists know which ones to apply for. (Read more from Artnet News.)

The Distracted Classroom: Transparency, Autonomy, and Pedagogy 

If we want to make a dent in the problem of digital distractions in class, we must begin by clarifying the policies we have created and the reasons behind them. Those reasons might look different from teacher to teacher. (Read more from the Chronicle of Higher Education.)

Another Year on the Academic Job Market

Perhaps the summer months can provide you some time for concentrated focus on your next—and hopefully last—round on the market. Here is one person’s perspective on what you might do between now and the next academic hiring season. (Read more from Inside Higher Ed.)

Your Syllabus Doesn’t Have to Look Like a Contract

Zac Wendler was tired of the same routine at the beginning of every semester. He would hand out his syllabus—five or so pages of text—and students would glance at it and wait for him to walk them through it. Then for the rest of the semester, they would ask him questions that could be easily answered if they had read the syllabus. (Read more from Vitae.)

Protesters Call on ICA Boston to Cancel Dana Schutz Show

An exhibition of Dana Schutz’s recent work opened at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, and it won’t be without controversy. Protestors released an open letter expressing their disappointment that the museum is honoring an artist they believe should instead be held accountable for her portrait of Emmett Till, Open Casket. (Read more from Hyperallergic.)

Why We Shouldn’t Punish Small Museums for Deaccessioning

AAM and AAMD contend that their member institutions should only deaccession artworks in their holdings for the express purpose of either acquiring new works or, in the AAM’s case, caring for existing works. It’s an ideologically pure, dependably crowd-pleasing position to take. (Read more from Artnet News.)

Look Up, See a Masterpiece

You’re strolling around an art museum, and one painting catches your eye. Intrigued and mesmerized, you think to yourself, “Now that’s a masterpiece!” Many intangibles go into that judgment, but new research suggests it is partially inspired by one easily measured variable: the painting’s placement on the wall. (Read more from Pacific Standard.)

Filed under: CAA News