CAA News Today

 

 

The CAA-GOLDEN Scholarship Program supports artists whose mission it is to give back to their communities through teaching, while nurturing and developing their own talents and capabilities as artists. Funded by Golden Artist Colors, Inc., CAA grants two unrestricted scholarships of $8,000 each on an annual basis to artists with an MFA who are pursuing a career in K-12 education. Grantees will also receive two weeks at the Sam and Adele Golden Foundation Residency Program, $1000 towards GOLDEN products, registration to the 2023 CAA Annual Conference, and one year of CAA membership.   

MEET THE GRANTEES  

Mick Bodnar  

Having grown up between two dairy farms in rural New York State, Mick Bodnar is something of an anomaly in the art world. He has over two decades of experience as a working-class graphic designer. After being displaced from that career, he embarked on a formal education. His collegiate career began at SUNY Broome Community College, where he gained an AS in Visual Communication Arts, and received the BCC Foundation Scholarship for Excellence in Liberal Arts, the Robert R. Cotten II Award in Graphic & Editorial Design, plus the SUNY Broome Second Chance Scholar Award. With those achievements, he was offered a generous scholarship to attend an elite private college. From that institution, Bard College, he earned a BA in Studio Arts, the Studio Arts Award, and the Bard Center for the Study of Hate Fellowship Award. In 2022, he gained an MFA in Painting & Drawing from SUNY New Paltz, as well as the Outstanding Graduate Award in Studio Arts and the Sojourner Truth Fellowship Award. In 2022, he plans to pursue a master’s degree in Art Education from Adelphi University. 

Mick is proud that his work to date has been well-received equally by the layman as well as by academics. He believes that art is the purest form of communication between humans, crossing the barriers of time, culture, and language — and that everyone should have access to it, regardless of background. He is committed to making art available to the general population. 

 

Beth Reitmeyer


Beth Reitmeyer. Photo by Krystal Henriquez / Assets for Artists. 

Beth Reitmeyer is a visual artist based in Nashville, TN who likes to make people happy with her colorful installations. Her work investigates landscapes and the joy of unexpected yet beautiful spaces and places that are discovered as one explores the land and structures within it: clouds, rivers, caves, geodes, stars. These environments allow viewers to explore the land and get to know one another in a more profound way, providing space for renewal and hope for persevering. 

Beth was born in Colorado Springs, CO and raised in Louisville, KY. She attended Northwestern University (MFA), The School of the Art Institute (Post Baccalaureate program), and the Pennsylvania State University (BFA). In the fall of 2022, she will be pursuing a Master’s in Education/Teaching at Western Kentucky University or Lipscomb University. 

Beth teaches with the Frist Art Museum, Western Kentucky University, Cheekwood Estates and Gardens, and Nashville School of The Arts. 

Beth’s work has been exhibited at the Frist Art Museum, Nashville; Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, New York; OZ Arts, Nashville; 1708 Gallery/Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA; FIGMENT, Chicago; The Downing Museum, Bowling Green, KY; Kindling Arts Festival, Nashville; Zg Gallery, Chicago; Ground Floor Gallery, Brooklyn, NY; Institute of Contemporary Arts, London. Beth has been an artist-in-residence at The Studios at MASS MoCA, ChaNorth/ChaShaMa Foundation, The Ragdale Foundation, CONVERGE, and Mineral House Media. Recent awards include grants from the Metro Nashville Arts Commission/National Endowment for the Arts and a finalist for a Burning Man grant. 

 

 

Filed under: Artists, Artists’ Materials, Awards

Jonathan Fineberg and Art Since 1940

posted by June 22, 2022

A prolific art historian and critic in the fields of 20th and 21st century art and the psychology of art, Jonathan Fineberg has shaped generations of students with his many publications and textbooks. As a long-time member of CAA, Fineberg describes his experience with the organization: 

 “Seymour Slive, one of my favorite art history professors in college told me I should join the College Art Association if I wanted to be an art historian. CAA was (is), he pointed out, my professional association!  I signed up right away (in 1966) and have remained an active member ever since.  I’ve served on the board, I started the “artist interviews” many years ago, I’ve chaired and participated in many sessions and committees over more than fifty years, and until COVID hit I think I only missed one annual conference – my personal protest against the racism and anti LGBTQ+ stance of the state of Louisiana (that was the year we went to New Orleans). I love CAA for the many things it does for artists and art historians.  

 In order to give back this year I decided that I have made my fair share of royalties on my survey book Art Since 1940: Strategies of Being, so I took back the rights from the publisher and have given a high-resolution copy of the last edition to CAA for free download by any students and teachers who want it. You will find it here. I hope it inspires students to love contemporary art as I do and to bring them to join their fellow travelers in the CAA.” 

 CAA is immensely grateful for Fineberg’s generous donation to CAA, a digital version of his seminal work, Art Since 1940: Strategies of Being, 3rd Edition. Fineberg is offering this publication at no-cost access to both members and non-members for three years. A valuable pedagogical resource at many universities, this text is out of print, which presents a problem for many art history professors and students who cannot obtain copies. We are grateful for Fineberg’s donation, and for his fifty-plus-year membership in CAA. 

Last month, The College Art Association signed onto a letter from the American Society for Environmental History (ASEH) directed to the EPA in protest of the agency’s decision to retire its online archive. The letter was sent on Monday, June 13, 2022, in coordination with the delivery of a letter from Environmental Data & Governance Initiative (EDGI) with co-signers, including the Sierra Club several libraries, and other organizations.

The announcement is available on ASEH’s website.

EDGI’s letter can be found here, and their press release can be found here.

Filed under: Advocacy

Join our Board of Directors

posted by June 09, 2022

CAA seeks nominations for individuals passionate about shaping the future of the organization by serving on the Board of Directors for the 2023-2027 term. The board is responsible for all financial and policy matters related to CAA, promoting excellence in scholarship, and encouraging creativity and technical skills in design and art practice. CAA’s board is also charged with representing the membership regarding current issues affecting the visual arts and the humanities.

Candidates must be current CAA members. Nominations and self-nominations should include a short statement of interest, a résumé, and the following information: the nominee’s name, affiliation, email address, and telephone number, as well as the name, affiliation, and email address of the nominator if different from the nominee. Please send all information and/or any questions via e-mail to Maeghan Donohue, Manager, Strategic Planning, Diversity, and Governance. Deadline: July 8, 2022.

Filed under: Board of Directors, Governance

Pride Month and Art Journal Open

posted by June 08, 2022

 

This Pride Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that center LGBTQ+ topics, as well as gender and sexual identity, in the fields of visual arts and the humanities. This week, we are sharing a bibliography of articles on these topics from our open-access journal Art Journal Open.

 

 

Downey, Kerry. “Creating Good-Enough Containers: Reflections on Queerness in Community-Based Museum Education.” Art Journal Open (January 9, 2019). 

 

Kerry Downey, They said to the ocean, 2016, monotype with chine-collé, 19 x 13.5 in. Printed with Marina Ancona / 10 Grand Press. 

Doyle, Jennifer and David Getsy. “Queer Formalisms: Jennifer Doyle and David Getsy in Conversation.” Art Journal Open (March 31, 2014). 

Math Bass, Body No Body Body, 2012, latex paint on canvas and wood, installation view, Overduin and Kite, Los Angeles, 2012 (artwork © Math Bass; photograph provided by Overduin and Kite) 

Getsy, David J. and Che Gossett, “A Syllabus on Transgender and Nonbinary Methods for Art and Art History.” Art Journal Open (February 4, 2022). Crossover article from Art Journal, 80, no. 4 (Winter 2021). 

Del LaGrace Volcano, Moj of the Antarctic: On the Mountain, Antarctica, 2005, giclée print, 30 x 36 in. (76.2 x 91.4 cm) (artwork © Del LaGrace Volcano)

Latimer, Tirza True. “Introduction: Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives.” Art Journal Open (October 24th, 2013). Crossover article from Art Journal 72, no. 2 (Summer 2013). 

Veronica Friedman, Pages from monthly planners, 1980 and 1981. Veronica Friedman Papers, Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Historical Society, San Francisco (photograph © Barbara McBane)

Queer Caucus for Art.Update from the Queer Caucus for Art.” Art Journal Open (January 26, 2016). 
Rosa, Maria Laura. “Questions of Identity: Photographic Series by Alicia D’Amico, 1983–86.” Art Journal Open (July 2, 2019).Crossover article from Art Journal 78, no. 1 (Spring 2019). 

Alicia D’Amico photograph of Liliana, a performance by Liliana Mizrahi, 1983, scanned copy of original negative, reproduction from original 35mm negative contact (photograph © Archivo Alicia D’Amico, Buenos Aires)

Shvarts, Aliza. “Toward a Reparative Pedagogy: Art as Trigger, Art as Repair.” Art Journal Open (April 7, 2022). 

 

 

Whitener, Brian. “Transiting in Anti-Patriarchal Worlds: The Queer Photography of Fernando Fuentes.” Art Journal Open (November 18, 2021).   

Fernando Fuentes, “Emma” (with Homero Emma Jimenez), 2020 (photograph by Constanza Moctezuma) 

 

Filed under: Advocacy, AJO, Publications

Pride Month and caa.reviews

posted by June 02, 2022

This Pride Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that center LGBTQ+ topics, as well as gender and sexual identity, in the fields of visual arts and the humanities. This week, we are sharing a bibliography of publications and exhibitions on these topics reviewed this past year on our open-access journal caa.reviews.

 

Arscott, Caroline and Katie Scott, editors. Manifestations of Venus: Art and Sexuality. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2001.
Battcock, Gregory. Oceans of Love: The Uncontainable Gregory Battcock. Ed Joseph Grigely, Cologne, Germany: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther Konig, 2016.
Betancourt, Roland. Byzantine Intersectionality: Sexuality, Gender, and Race in the Middle Ages. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2020.
Black Sheep Feminism: The Art of Sexual Politics. Dallas: Dallas Contemporary, 2016.
Brandt, Amy ed. Tseng Kwong Chi: Performing for the Camera. Norfolk, VA and New York: Chrysler Museum of Art, Grey Art Gallery, New York University, and Lyon Artbooks, 2015.
Butler, Connie. Mark Bradford: Scorched Earth. Exh. cat. Los Angeles: Hammer Museum in association with Prestel, 2015.

Mark Bradford. Lights and Tunnels, 2015 (photograph © 2015 Joshua White; provided by Hauser & Wirth)

Butt, Gavin. Between You and Me: Queer Disclosures in the New York Art World, 1948–1963. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2005.

 

 

De Salvo, Donna. Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again. Exh. cat. New Haven and New York: Yale University Press in association with The Whitney Museum of American Art, 2018.  

Installation view, Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, November 12, 2018–March 31, 2019 (photograph © 2018 by Ron Amstutz, provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Licensed by Artists Rights Society [ARS], New York) 

Corn, Wanda M. and Tirza True Latimer. Seeing Gertrude Stein: Five Stories. Exh. cat. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011.

Henri Matisse. Woman with a Hat (1905). Oil on canvas. 31 3/4 x 23 1/2 in. (80.7 x 59.7 cm). SFMOMA, Bequest of Elise S. Haas. © Succession H. Matisse, Paris / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Ben Blackwell

Doyle, Jennifer. Hold It Against Me: Difficulty and Emotion in Contemporary Art. Durham: Duke University Press, 2013.
Findlen, Paula, Wendy Wassyng Roworth, and Catherine M. Sama, editors. Italy’s Eighteenth Century: Gender and Culture in the Age of the Grand Tour. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2009.
Gallucci, Margaret A. Benvenuto Cellini: Sexuality, Masculinity, and Artistic Identity in Renaissance Italy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.
Gill, Lyndon K. Erotic Islands: Art and Activism in the Queer Caribbean. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2018.
Gómez-Barris, Macarena. Beyond the Pink Tide: Art and Political Undercurrents in the Americas. American Studies Now: Critical Histories of the Present. Oakland: University of California Press, 2018.
Guyton, Wade. One Month Ago. Edition of 500. New York: Karma, 2014.  
Johnson, E. Patrick and Ramón H. Rivera-Servera, editors. Blacktino Queer Performance. Durham: Duke University Press, 2016.
Jones, Amelia. Seeing Differently: A History and Theory of Identification and the Visual Arts. New York: Routledge, 2012.
Jones, Amelia and Erin Silver. Otherwise: Imagining Queer Feminist Art Histories. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016.

With follow-up interview between Amelia Jones and David J. Getsy, Abstract Bodies and Otherwise: A Conversation with Amelia Jones and David Getsy on Gender and Sexuality in the Writing of Art History. February 16, 2018

Junge, Sophie. Art about AIDS: Nan Goldin’s Exhibition Witnesses: Against Our Vanishing  Berlin: De Gruyter, 2017.
Katz, Jonathan David and Rock Hushka, editors. Art AIDS America. Exh. cat. Seattle: Tacoma Art Museum in association with University of Washington Press, 2015.

Courtesy of the Zuckerman Museum of Art. Photos by Mike Jensen

Latimer, Tirza True. Eccentric Modernisms: Making Differences in the History of American Art. Oakland: University of California Press, 2016.
Murray, Derek Conrad. Queering Post-Black Art: Artists Transforming African-American Identity after Civil Rights. London: I.B. Taurus, 2016.
No Wrong Holes: Thirty Years of Nayland Blake. Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, September 29, 2019–January 26, 2020; MIT List Visual Arts Center (online), Cambridge, MA, October 16, 2020–February 14, 2021.

No Wrong Holes: Thirty Years of Nayland Blake, installation view, MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, MA, 2020–21 (photograph © Charles Mayer, provided by MIT List Visual Arts Center)

 Patel, Alpesh Kantilal. Productive Failure: Writing Queer Transnational South Asian Art Histories. Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 2017.
Rice, Shelley. Inverted Odysseys: Claude Cahun, Maya Deren, Cindy Sherman.  Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1999.
Salter, Gregory. Art and Masculinity in Post-War Britain: Reconstructing Home. London: Routledge, 2019.
Transamerica/n: Gender, Identity, Appearance Today. McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, June 20–September 15, 2019.

Jacolby Satterwhite, How lovly is me being as I am, 2014, neon, installation view from Transamerica/n: Gender, Identity, Appearance Today, McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, 2019 (artwork © Jacolby Satterwhite; photograph provided by the artist and Morán Morán, Los Angeles)

Tony Greene: Room of Advances. MAK Center for Art and Architecture, Schindler House, Los Angeles, June 18–September 7, 2014.

Tony Greene. His Puerile Gestures (1989). Mixed Media. 25 1/2 x 29 3/4 in. Collection of Ray Morales, from the estate of Norm MacNeil

Turner, James Grantham. Eros Visible: Art, Sexuality and Antiquity in Renaissance Italy.  New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017.
Tyburczy, Jennifer. Sex Museums: The Politics and Performance of Display. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016.
Zanele Muholi: Isibonelo/Evidence. Brooklyn Museum, New York, May 1–November 8, 2015.

Zanele Muholi: Isibonelo/Evidence. Installation view. Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum.

 

Filed under: Advocacy, caa.reviews, Publications