CAA News Today

CAA’s Anti-Colonialism Solidarity Statement

posted by March 02, 2022

On February 24, 2022, we witnessed the onset of military action and invasion of Ukraine. The College Art Association (CAA) strongly condemns colonialist aggression and oppression. We stand with our global colleagues, constituents, and friends who are affected by violence and threats to their safety as they struggle for peace and human rights. We recognize and hold firmly the inherent foundations for freedom, justice, and peace in the world. With peace as a central goal, we strongly condemn the deliberate destruction of heritage sites, destruction of art, and attempted hegemonic erasure of culture and history through the actions of oppressors. We encourage our international community of artists, historians, and designers to respond with care, with the aim to de-escalate the violence; and to use actions and words that will reaffirm peace, universal respect, and observance of the spirit of shared humanity. We invite members of our international community and learned societies to support colleagues, to protect scholarship and, with us, to condemn the atrocities to cultural heritage. Destruction of art and history in any one region is an action of erasure of all shared human histories.

CAA holds deep concern for the safety of working people, academic personnel, students, and the culture of the Ukraine, as well as the Global South, Middle East, and Far East and all our international constituencies affected by violence and uncertainty. We additionally support all BIPOC students and peoples and their equal treatment. CAA, its board, and its staff will continue to be in contact with affected members and offer support and advocacy. We stand in solidarity with our international arts community to create, analyze, teach, and promote art as an essential part of our institutions and our lives. We hold your safety, peace, and wellbeing at the forefront of our hearts.

CAA is a signatory of the American Historical Association’s letter condemning the Russian invasion of Ukraine. They write, “We vigorously support the Ukrainian nation and its people in their resistance to Russian military aggression and the twisted mythology that President Putin has invented to justify his violation of international norms.” To read this statement in full, please visit their website.

To read more about CAA’s advocacy, visit this page.

 


Resources for Displaced Scholars and Students

 

United States

New University in Exile Consortium 

  • The New University in Exile is an expanding group of universities and colleges publicly committed to the belief that the academic community has both the responsibility and capacity to assist persecuted and endangered scholars everywhere and to protect the intellectual capital that is jeopardized when universities and scholars are under assault.
  • The primary mission of the Consortium is to nurture academics who have been persecuted and uprooted by creating a sense of intellectual community among exiled scholars.
  • If you are affiliated with a college or university and would like your institution to take the next step toward becoming a member of the Consortium, email them at uieconsortium@newschool.edu. There are a few simple criteria for membership, primarily a commitment by your institution to host an endangered scholar. There are no membership dues.

Scholar Rescue Fund

  • The Scholar Rescue Fund launched a Ukraine-specific round of the IIE Emergency Student Fund on Monday, February 28, to provide financial support to Ukrainian students studying at US colleges and universities.

The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships

  • The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans is a scholarship program offered to immigrants and refugees in the United States. In order to qualify for the scholarship program, applicants must be planning to attend a graduate-level degree program at an accredited American university on a full-time basis. The scholarships can be awarded to US citizens whose parents were born abroad or who are not US citizens as well as to individuals who were born abroad but are naturalized citizens, adopted by US citizens, green card holders or refugee status. Those who were born abroad but graduated from an American high school may also be eligible.

The Association for Slavic, East European, & Eurasian Studies (ASEEES)

 

Global

Scholars at Risk

  • Scholars at Risk works to protect threatened scholars and promote academic freedom around the world.
  • Go to this page to identify ways to help.

The UN Refugee Agency Scholarships

  • A campaign to fund talented refugee scholars.

 

Germany

DAAD

For colleagues linked to German Universities, the website of DAAD, the German Academic Exchange Service, provides further information concerning Ukraine. The International Office at your university may be eligible for funding to support scholars from Ukraine by linking them to your university.

Albert Einstein German Academic Refugee Initiative (DAFI)

  • Services and opportunities
  • Scholarships
  • The UNHCR of the United Nations administers the Albert Einstein German Academic Refugee Initiative (DAFI) to help refugees afford the cost of post-secondary education. Through the program, recognized refugees can receive free tuition as well as money for books, transportation, housing, and food. The program is open to applicants who hold a secondary school diploma, have demonstrated financial need, enroll in a program where the likelihood of employment is high, and are under 28 years of age. Only one DAFI award is given out per family. Applicants must be from one of the countries specified by the UNHCR. A full list is available on their website.

 

Austria

Central European University, Vienna

  • Visit this link for ways to donate to Ukranian communities, such as housing and hardship support, as well as a new scholarship fund.

 

UK

University of Bristol Scholarship

  • A scholarship that gives refugees and asylum seekers life-changing access to university education has been expanded, the University of Bristol has announced.

Student Action for Refugees (STAR)

  • STAR campaigns for and supports the creation of scholarships to improve access to university for people who have claimed asylum in the UK. At this link, you can find a list of scholarship opportunities in the UK, together with advice for your application and information about other funding opportunities.

Council of At-Risk Academics (CARA) at Risk UK Universities Network 

  • The Network aims to facilitate cooperation and collaboration between UK higher education institutions in support of persecuted and at-risk academics, and in the defence and promotion of academic and university freedoms worldwide. 125 UK universities are currently working with us to support these aims.

 


Other Resources

CAA Committees

CAA Affiliated societies:

United Nations Security Council Resolution 2347 (2017)

UNESCO Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage

1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict  

Nazar Kozak, “Art Embedded into Protest: Staging the Ukrainian Maidan,” Art Journal 76, no.1 (Spring 2017).

 

Filed under: Advocacy

CAA has signed onto a statement condemning the many bomb threads received by at least 17 Historically Black Colleges and Universities early this year. As historically contextualized by the AHA, “These crimes are part of a long history of attacks on institutions that serve the Black community—churches, schools, and civil rights organizations—as well as on the individual men, women, and children associated with these institutions. Violent intimidation directed toward Black Americans has a long and bloody history, and recent events suggest that these acts have spawned not only a hateful legacy, but also a current, ongoing threat to the physical safety and emotional well-being of all Black Americans.” To read more visit their website.

Filed under: Advocacy

CAA has signed onto statement by the American Historical Association condemning the recent violations of the Presidential Records Act. The statement condemns “in the strongest terms former President Donald J. Trump’s reported extensive and repeated violations of the Presidential Records Act of 1978.” “Historians, journalists, and other researchers depend on these records to educate the public and inform future administrations,” the AHA wrote. “These acts of destruction and noncompliance with the Presidential Records Act demonstrate blatant contempt for both the rule of law and the principles of transparency and accountability that constitute the bedrock of our nation’s democracy.”

 

Filed under: Advocacy

Black History Month and Art Journal Open

posted by February 10, 2022

Each week this Black History Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that celebrate, recognize, and interrogate Black art, history, and experience.  This week, we are sharing a bibliography of articles from our online, open-access journal Art Journal Open that addresses these topics.

 

Aranke, Sampada. “Objects Made Black.” Art Journal Open (February 9, 2015). Crossover article from Art Journal 73, no. 3 (Fall 2014) reviewing Huey Copeland, Bound to Appear: Art, Slavery, and the Site of Blackness in Multicultural America, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013.

Baralaye, Ebitenyefa and Glenn Adamson. “The Weight of Matter: Ebitenyefa Baralaye and Glenn Adamson in Conversation.” Art Journal Open (May 20, 2021).

Ebitenyefa Baralaye, Portrait I (multiple views), 2020, salt-glazed stoneware, 25 x 12 x 10 in.
(63.5 x 30.5 x 25.4 cm) (artwork © Ebitenyefa Baralaye; photographs provided by the artist)

 

Barber, Tiffany E. “Narcissister, a Truly Kinky Artist.” Art Journal Open (March 11, 2020).

Narcissister, Red Riding Hood, 2014, mixed media (photograph provided by the artist).

 

Best, Makeda. “Interview with Texas Isaiah.” Art Journal Open (April 8, 2021). Crossover article from Art Journal 80, no. 1 (Spring 2021).

Texas Isaiah, don’t kill this vibe, 2018 (artwork © Texas Isaiah; photograph provided by the artist)

 

Childs, Adienne L. Riffs and Relations: African American Artists and the European Modernist Tradition. Washington, DC and New York: Phillips Collection in association with Rizzoli Electa, 2020.

Sanford Biggers, Negerplastik, 2016, repurposed antique quilt, cotton fabric fragments, tar, and glitter, 81 × 76 3/4 in. (205.7 x 195 cm) (photograph by Todd-White Art Photography, provided by Massimo De Carlo, Milan/London/Hong Kong)

 

Cunningham, Nijah. “With Each Other.” Art Journal Open (October 14, 2021). Crossover article from Art Journal 80, no. 3 (Fall 2021) reviewing Nicole R. Fleetwood. Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2020.

Dally, Jenny and Fred Eversley. “The Object and You: Fred Eversley in Conversation with Jenny Dally.” Art Journal Open (February 25, 2021).

Fred Eversley in his Venice Beach studio, 2018 (photograph by Elon Schoenholz; photograph provided by David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles)

 

 Gaines, Malik. “City after Fifty Years’ Living: LA’s Differences in Relation.” Art Journal Open (July 17, 2012).

Ice Cube Celebrates the Eames, poster, 2011 (artwork © J. Paul Getty Trust)

 

Gale, Nikita and Jesús Fuenmayor. “Barricades of Silence: Nikita Gale in Conversation with Jesús Fuenmayor.” Art Journal Open (August 20, 2020).

Nikita Gale, INTERCEPTOR, 2019, installation view, Fall Apart: Nikita Gale & Pat O’Neill, Martos Gallery, New York, January 11–February 24, 2019 (artwork © Nikita Gale; photograph by Charles Benton/Martos Gallery, provided by the artist),

 

Gbadegesin, Olubukola A. “Damon Davis’s Negrophilia: Encounters with Black Death.” Art Journal Open (August 30, 2017).

Damon Davis, Untitled (2), 2015, bookprint, ink, watercolor, adhesive, from the series Negrophilia (artwork © Damon Davis)

 

Majeed, Risham and Blake Bradford. “Just Being.” Art Journal Open (May 22, 2020).

Albrecht Dürer, Portrait of a Black Man (untitled), 1508, black chalk on paper. Original shown here; the NMAAHC has a reproduction in the Middle Passage galleries.

 

Raiford, Leigh. “Burning All Illusion: Abstraction, Black Life, and the Unmaking of White Supremacy.” Art Journal Open (January 14, 2021).

Samuel Levi Jones, Joshua, 2016, deconstructed Illinois law books on canvas, 61½ x 77 in. (156.2 x 195.6 cm) (artwork © Samuel Levi Jones; photograph provided by Galerie Lelong)

 

Sifuentes, Aram Han. “How Internalized White Supremacy Manifests for My BIPOC Students in Art School.” Art Journal Open (July 8, 2021).

Cute Rage Press (Aram Han Sifuentes and Ishita Dharap), detail of Taking Receipts:
A Log of Aggression for People of Color, 2017, color printed spiral-bound book, 8 x 5½ in.
(20.3 x 14 cm) (artwork © Aram Han Sifuentes and Ishita Dharap; photograph by Aram
Han Sifuentes)

 

Saggese, Jordana Moore, Cauleen Smith, Charles Gaines, Edgar Arceneaux, Howardena Pindell, Michael Ray Charles, and Glenn Ligon. “A Call to Artists.” Art Journal Open (October 26, 2021). Crossover article from Art Journal 80, no. 3 (Fall 2021).

 

Tani, Ellen Y. “Come Out to Show Them: Speech and Ambivalence in the Work of Steve Reich and Glenn LigonSpeech and Ambivalence in the Work of Steve Reich and Glenn Ligon.” Art Journal Open (December 23, 2019).

Glenn Ligon, Come Out Study #13, 2014, silkscreen on canvas on panel, 36 x 47 7/8 in. (91.4 x 121.6 cm) (artwork © Glenn Ligon; photograph by Ronald Amstutz, provided by the artist, Hauser & Wirth, New York, Regen Projects, Los Angeles, Thomas Dane Gallery, London, and Chantal Crousel, Paris)

 

Thompson, Krista. ““I WAS HERE BUT I DISAPEAR”: Ivanhoe “Rhygin” Martin and Photographic Disappearance in Jamaica.” Art Journal Open (August 14, 2018).

Production still from The Harder They Come, 1972, 16mm color film, dir. Perry Henzell, cinematography by Frank St. Juste, David McDonald, and Peter Jessop, produced by International Films / Xenon Pictures (photograph published under fair use)

 

Williams, Stephanie Sparling. “Artful Embodiment: Genealogies of the Impossible.” Art Journal Open (November 27, 2018). Crossover article from Art Journal 77, no. 3 (Fall 2018) reviewing Uri McMillan, Embodied Avatars: Genealogies of Black Feminist Art and Performance, New York: New York University Press, 2015.
Winslow, Margaret. “Pope.L: The Body and Its Void.” Art Journal Open (January 14, 2021). Crossover article from Art Journal 79, no. 4 (Winter 2020) reviewing member: Pope.L, 1978–2001., exhibition organized by Stuart Comer with Danielle A. Jackson. Museum of Modern Art, New York, October 21, 2019–February 1, 2020.

Zorach, Rebecca. “Art and Soul: An Experimental Friendship between Street and Museum .” Art Journal Open (September 4, 2011).

Art & Soul exterior with Rainbow mural by Sachio Yamashita, 1969 (mural now destroyed) (mural artwork © Eileen Petersen Yamashita, all rights reserved, used with permission; photograph © Ann Zelle)

 

 

Filed under: Advocacy, Publications

CAA has signed onto the statement released by the Middle East Studies Association on February 3, 2022. Addressed to President Biden, Secretary of State Blinken, and Secretary of Homeland Security Mayorkas, it seeks immediate action in enabling the safe and speedy relocation of Afghanistan’s students and scholars to the United States. Due to shortcomings in existing visa requirements, it calls on the government to create a dedicated visa category for Afghan scholars and students to allow for travel. To read the statement in full, visit the Middle East Studies Associations website.

Filed under: Advocacy

Black History Month and caa.reviews

posted by February 03, 2022

Each week this Black History Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that celebrate, recognize, and interrogate Black art, history, and experience.  This week, we are sharing a bibliography of publications and exhibitions reviewed on our online, open-access journal caa.reviews from this past year that addresses these topics.

caa.reviews also houses rosters of dissertation titles in progress and completed since 2002 and many long-form essays that intersect with these themes as well, such as current Editor-in-Chief of Art Journal, Eddie Chambers, essay Reflections on African and African Diaspora Art from 2016.

 

Childs, Adienne L. Riffs and Relations: African American Artists and the European Modernist Tradition. Washington, DC and New York: Phillips Collection in association with Rizzoli Electa, 2020.

Sanford Biggers, Negerplastik, 2016, repurposed antique quilt, cotton fabric fragments, tar, and glitter, 81 × 76 3/4 in. (205.7 x 195 cm) (photograph by Todd-White Art Photography, provided by Massimo De Carlo, Milan/London/Hong Kong)

 

 

 

 

Choi, Connie H., Thelma Golden, and Kellie Jones. Black Refractions: Highlights from the Studio Museum in Harlem. New York: Rizzoli Electa, 2019.

Jordan Casteel, Kevin the Kiteman, 2016, oil on canvas, 78 x 78 in. (198.1 x 198.1 cm). The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, Museum purchase with funds provided by the Acquisition Committee 2016.37 (artwork © Jordan Casteel; photograph by Adam Reich, provided by American Federation of Arts)

 

 

 

 

Cohen, Joshua I. The “Black Art” Renaissance: African Sculpture and Modernism across Continents. Oakland: University of California Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Driskell: Icons of Nature and History. Atlanta and New York: High Museum of Art and Rizzoli Electa, 2021.

David Driskell, Young Pines Growing, 1959, oil on canvas. Clark Atlanta University Art Museum, John Hope Franklin Purchase Award (artwork © Estate of David C. Driskell; photograph provided by High Museum of Art)

 

 

 

 

Diouf, Mamadou and Maureen Murphy, editors. Déborder la négritude: Arts, politique et société à Dakar. Dijon. France: Les presses du réel, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

Fleetwood, Nicole R. Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gonzalez, Aston. Visualizing Equality: African American Rights and Visual Culture in the Nineteenth Century. John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hank Willis Thomas: All Things Being Equal . . . New York and Portland, OR: Aperture Foundation in association with Portland Art Museum, 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harris, Shawnya L.,editor. Emma Amos: Color Odyssey. Athens: Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, 2021.

Emma Amos, All I Know of Wonder, 2008, oil on linen, African fabric, 70 1/2 x 55 1/2 in. (179.1 x 141 cm), installation view, Emma Amos: Color Odyssey, Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, Athens, 2021 (photograph by the author)

 

 

 

Jarrell, Wadsworth A. AFRICOBRA: Experimental Art toward a School of Thought. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monahan, Anne. Horace Pippin, American Modern. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mühling, Matthias and Stephanie Weber, editors. Senga Nengudi: Topologies. Munich: Hirmer, 2021.

Senga Nengudi, Warp Trance, 2007, multi-channel audio/video installation in collaboration with the Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, with a sound composition by Butch Morris, installation view, Senga Nengudi: Topologies, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2021 (photograph © Aaron Igler, provided by the artist and The Fabric Workshop and Museum)

 

 

 

No Wrong Holes: Thirty Years of Nayland Blake. Los Angeles and Cambridge, MA: Institute of Contemporary Art and MIT List Visual Arts Center (online), 2020.

No Wrong Holes: Thirty Years of Nayland Blake, installation view, MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, MA, 2020–21 (photograph © Charles Mayer, provided by MIT List Visual Arts Center)

 

 

 

Oliver, Valerie Cassel. The Dirty South: Contemporary Art, Material Culture, and the Sonic Impulse. Richmond, VA and Durham, NC: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in association with Duke University Press, 2021.

Rodney McMillian, Asterisks in Dockery (Blues for Smoke), 2021, vinyl, thread, wood, paint, lightbulb, installation view, The Dirty South: Contemporary Art, Material Culture, and the Sonic Impulse, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 2021 (photograph © Sandra Sellars, provided by Virginia Museum of Fine Arts)

 

 

Powell, Richard J. Going There: Black Visual Satire. Cambridge, MA and New Haven, CT: Hutchins Center for African & African American Research in association with Yale University Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas, Sarah. Witnessing Slavery: Art and Travel in the Age of Abolition. London and New Haven: Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art in association with Yale University Press, 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuite, Diana, editor. Bob Thompson: This House Is Mine. Waterville, ME and New Haven, CT: Colby College Museum of Art in association with Yale University Press, 2021.

Bob Thompson, The Snook (The Sack), 1961, oil on canvas, 23 1/2 x 36 in. (59.7 x 91.4 cm). Collection of Andrew Nelson (© Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York)

 

 

 

VanDiver, Rebecca. Designing a New Tradition: Loïs Mailou Jones and the Aesthetics of Blackness. University Park, PA: Penn State University Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Each week this Black History Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that celebrate, recognize, and interrogate Black art, history, and experience. This week, we look forward to the research and scholarship that will be presented virtually at the upcoming Annual Conference. Many sessions feature talks that look at or investigate Blackness, racism, colonialism, neo-colonialism, and slavery, Black identity, theory of race, Afrofuturism, queerness, the African diaspora, and  intersections between these topics.

 

In chronological order:

 

February 17-19:

Reimagining the Past alongside Black Women Artists, Thursday, February 17, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Latinx Bodies: Presence/absence and representation (Part 1) , Thursday, February 17, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

To See, to Keep, to Know: Photography and Intergenerational Knowledge Production, Thursday, February 17, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 – 1:30 p.m. EST)

Archive, Object, Image: Reading Against the Grain in the Dutch and Spanish “Golden Ages,” , Thursday, February 17, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 – 1:30 p.m. EST)

U.S. Latinx Art, Pre-1950 ,Thursday, February 17, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 – 1:30 p.m. EST)

Latinx Bodies: Presence/Absence and Representation (Part 2) , Thursday, February 17, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Haunting and Memory in Arts of Africa and the African Diaspora , Friday, February 18, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

The air we breathe: aesthetics and politics of the breath in transpacific and transatlantic visual cultures ,Friday, February 18, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Flipping the Script , Friday, February 18, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

(re)activation of Exhibitions as sites of contestation, Friday, February 18, 2022, 4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

Decolonial Teaching Methodologies in Digital Arts & Design, Saturday, February 19, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

What’s the “matter” with American Sculpture?, Saturday, February 19, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Signs o’ the Times: Music and Politics in Contemporary Art ,Saturday, February 19, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

The Price of Blackness: African American art and visual culture in the first two decades of the Twenty-First Century, Saturday, February 19, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (11:00 – 12:30 p.m. EST)

Knowing People: Black Practices in Queer Collaborations, Saturday, February 19, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

‘Heresies’ and Other Mythologies, Saturday, February 19, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Signs o’ the Times: Music and Politics in Contemporary Art, Part II ,Saturday, February 19, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Toward an Inclusive Methodology: Experiments in Art Writing,Saturday, February 19, 2022, 4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

 

March 3-5

Women in Architecture: The African Exchange,Thursday, March 3, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

The Promise of Modern Art and Design: Cold War-Era Art and Diplomacy,Thursday, March 3, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

DESIGN INCUBATION COLLOQUIUM 8.2: RECENT RESEARCH IN COMMUNICATION DESIGN , Thursday, March 3, 2022,9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Blackness and the Ashcan School, Thursday, March 3, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Carnival in Africa, Friday, March 4, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Curatorial Care: Feminist and Queer Practices ,Friday, March 4, 2022,9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST

Reading Kerry James Marshall’s ‘Rythm Mastr’, Friday, March 4, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 – 1:30 p.m. EST)

Transnational, Transcultural, Transversal: On the Decolonial Discourse of Art,Friday, March 4, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 – 1:30 p.m. EST)

Black Collage, Friday, March 4, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Abolitionist Aesthetics, Friday, March 4, 2022, 4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

Art History and Social Justice in Practice ,Friday, March 4, 2022,4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

Activist Exhibitions, Friday, March 4, 2022, 4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

On Afro-pessimism and Its Alternatives ,Saturday, March 5, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Reconsidering Art History Through Access ,Saturday, March 5, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)
New Perspectives in Art, Design, and Art History: Supporting and Showcasing Emerging Voices from Marginalized Communities ,Saturday, March 5, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

New Ways of Seeing ,Saturday, March 5, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Botanical Intimacies: Colonialism, Decolonial Practice, and Queered Ecologies , Saturday, March 5, 2022,4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

 

 

Filed under: Advocacy, Annual Conference — Tags:

Button design celebrating 50% representation of women at the 2020 Conference, designed by the Committee on Women in the Arts (CWA).


Help CAA celebrate its 50th anniversary of feminism at the organization! CAA wants to better understand and document the history of its Committee of Women in the Arts, including the committee’s many collaborations with other affiliate committees and groups, such as the Women’s Caucus for Art, The Feminist Art Project, the Queer Caucus, and many more. To this end, CAA is issuing a call to expand its CWA archives through a crowd sourcing campaign.

If you ever served on the CWA or collaborated with its members, please consider contributing images of photographs or ephemera, memories that are pertinent to its history, or any digital files or recordings. Any contributions will become eligible to become part of CAA institutional archive and will be featured in a series of CAA social media posts reflecting on our history and shared throughout 2022. It is imperative that CAA digitizes these important resources to ensure that the history of women’s contributions to the arts and arts education are not forgotten

To submit:

  • Send materials and questions to info@collegeart.org, with “CAA Feminism” in the subject line
  • Provide:
    • Name and email
    • Social media handles or accounts (if you would like us to tag you in the post)
    • Date of material / date of acquisition
    • Description of material/ contents
    • Preferred credit line (I.e.: image/material provided to CAA courtesy of XXX / anonymous)
    • Permissions: Copy and paste this sentence into your email if you would allow us to feature the image on social media: “I give permission to share this material on social media.”
    • Donations: If you would like to donate the original materials to CAA, please copy and paste this sentence into your email: “I would like to donate these materials to CAA.”
    • Attachment of the material, following these specs:
      • Image/document:  please send jpegs that are at least 1200 px on the longest side, 72 ppi
      • Audio: MP3 format
      • Video: MP4 or mov

 

Filed under: Advocacy, Committees — Tags:

Fifty Years of Feminism at CAA

posted by January 14, 2022

Recipients of the Committee on Women Awards, 2000 (left to right: Joanna Frueh, Flavia Rando, Mary D. Garrard, Norma Broude, Linda Nochlin, Carolee Schneemann, Samella Lewis, Ferris Olin). Photograph by Maria Politarhos.


 

Please join us in celebrating fifty years of feminism at CAA. We will share resources and perspectives on these histories throughout the year.

Fifty years ago in 1972, CAA founded its first committees devoted to women in the arts. A meeting of more than 250 women at the 60th Annual Conference titled “Meeting for Women Members of the College Art Association,” marked the starting point for the association’s focus on supporting and promoting the advancement of feminism in art. CAA’s board formalized its advocacy for women the same month by establishing the Committee on the Status of Women (COSW), the first committee to focus on women in CAA’s history.  Linda Nochlin, who was on the CAA Board at the time, became its first chair followed by Ann Sutherland Harris in 1973.

The Women’s Caucus for Art (WCA) was also formed at CAA in 1972 in response to the Annual Conference, but in 1974, the WCA broke off from CAA to become its own independent nonprofit organization and rapidly increased its membership. Today, the WCA is a close affiliate of CAA, whose history is often intertwined with our own. The COSW was renamed the Committee on Women in the Arts (CWA) in 1996, and it continues to promote the recognition of women’s valuable contribution to the visual arts and to critical art-historical study; advocate for feminist scholarship and activism in art; develop partnerships with organizations with compatible missions; monitor the status of women in the visual-arts professions; provide historical and current resources on feminist issues; and support emerging artists and scholars in their careers. Notable individuals involved with this effort over the years have included award recipients, such as art historians Linda Nochlin, Norma Broude, and Mary Garrard, as well as artists Carolee Schneemann, Faith Ringgold, and Carrie Mae Weems.

The CWA’s session, “50th Anniversary of Committee on Women in the Arts: Looking Back, Moving Forward,” at CAA’s upcoming virtual Annual Conference will dive into this history. Taking place on February 18, 2022 from 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. CST, is chaired by Joanna P. Gardner-Huggett and includes a panel discussion with Judith K. Brodsky, Ferris Olin, Midori Yoshimoto, Carron P. Little, Kalliopi Minioudaki, and Zoë Charlton.

Women-centered content is also one of the main three content threads at the 110th Annual Conference. Check out these sessions here and register today to attend!

Filed under: Advocacy, Committees — Tags: ,

As part of CAA’s 10-year anniversary celebration of its publication, The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association, chapter authors reflect on their contributions and how their impressions of the field have changed. Our final video in the series features Judith Brodsky, Mary Garrard, and Ferris Olin, who co-authored chapter 11, “Governance and Diversity.”

Involved not just in CAA, its Annual Conference, and its Committee on Women in the Arts (CWA), but also with CAA’s affiliate society the Women’s Caucus for Art, these three women represent pillars in the field of feminist art history.

In this video, they discuss the first 100 years of CAA’s history representing women and underrepresented groups, and point to the future: 2022 marks fifty years of the first committee to represent women at CAA. CAA is excited to honor this milestone at the 2022 Annual Conference and beyond.

Brodsky and Olin are each presenting at the upcoming 110th Annual Conference. See links underneath their bios below for more information on their sessions, panels, and talks.

 

SPEAKERS BIOGRAPHIES

Judith K. Brodsky is currently distinguished professor emerita at Rutgers University. She founded the Rutgers Center for Innovative Print and Paper, now renamed the Brodsky Center in her honor and located at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. The Center has been instrumental in promoting the recognition of women artists and artists of color. She is also co-founder of the Rutgers Center for Women in the Arts and Humanities and The Feminist Art Project, a national and international program to promote women artists in the cultural milieu. With her colleague, Dr. Ferris Olin, she established the Miriam Schapiro Archives on Women Artists at Rutgers and was curator of the Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series at Rutgers from 2006-2013. Brodsky was the co-founder of the Women Artists Archive National Directory (WAAND), funded initially by the Getty Foundation, a digital directory of archives where the papers of women artists active in the US since 1945 are located. A printmaker and book artist, Judith’s work is in over 100 permanent collections. She has also organized and curated many exhibitions and has published extensively, including contributions to The Power of Feminist Art and SIGNS, A Journal of Women in Culture and Society; Junctures in Women’s Leadership: The Arts. Most recently she published the first book on the impact of feminist theory on digital technology in the arts titled Dismantling the Patriarchy, Bit by Bit: Feminism, Art, and Technology, Bloomsbury, 2021. She served as CAA’s President and received the Annual Recognition Award from CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts, as well as past national president for ArtTable and Women’s Caucus for Art.

Details for Judith Brodsky’s participation in the 2022 Annual Conference: link.

Mary D. Garrard, professor emerita of art history at American University, Washington, D. C., is a scholar whose work has combined Italian Renaissance art with feminist studies. Her book, Artemisia Gentileschi: The Image of the Female Hero in Italian Baroque Art (Princeton, 1989), was a groundbreaking contribution to the field, that launched modern studies of the now-famous artist. In Artemisia Gentileschi Circa 1622: The Shaping and Reshaping of an Artistic Identity (University of California, 2001), Garrard addressed new critical issues in Gentileschi studies. Her third book, Artemisia Gentileschi and Early Modern Feminism, positions the artist among the feminist treatises and debates of her time (Reaktion Books, London, 2020). Beyond Artemisia, Garrard has written and spoken extensively on Italian Renaissance, Early Modern art, and feminist art history. With her colleague Norma Broude, Garrard created and edited three books that have become basic texts in art history and women’s studies courses, including Feminism and Art History: Questioning the Litany (1982); The Expanding Discourse: Feminism and Art History (1992); and Reclaiming Female Agency: Feminist Art History After Postmodernism (2005).  Broude and Garrard also created and contributed to The Power of Feminist Art: The American Movement of the 1970s (1994).

Ferris Olin is distinguished professor emerita at Rutgers University, where she was the co-founder and co-director (with Judith K. Brodsky) of Rutgers Center for Women in the Arts and Humanities, and The Feminist Art Project, an international collaboration to make visible the impact of women on the cultural landscape. She also established the Miriam Schapiro Archives on Women Artists at Rutgers as well as the Margery Somers Foster Center, a research center focused on documenting women’s leadership in the public arena, and served as Associate Director of the Institute for Research on Women and earlier, Director of the Art Library. She was curator of the Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series at Rutgers from 1995-2006 and later (with Judith K. Brodsky) from 2006-2013. With Brodsky, Olin also created the Women Artists Archive National Directory (WAAND). Olin has also published broadly. Her most recent book, co-authored with Judith K. Brodsky, is called Junctures in Women’s Leadership: The Arts (Rutgers University Press, fall 2018). Olin has served on the boards of numerous non-profit organizations and was Vice-President of the College Art Association. She is the recipient of numerous awards, among them the Women’s Caucus for Art Lifetime Achievement Award and the College Art Association Committee on Women’s Annual Recognition Award (now known as Distinguished Feminist Award).

Details for Ferris Olin’s participation in the 2022 Annual Conference: link.

Filed under: Advocacy, Event, Publications