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Meet the 2018 Professional Development Fellows

posted by January 28, 2019

CAA has awarded two 2018 Professional Development Fellowships—one in art history and one in visual art—to graduate students in MFA and PhD programs. In addition, CAA has named one honorable mention in art history and two in visual art. The fellows and honorable mentions both receive a complimentary one-year CAA membership and registration for the 2019 Annual Conference in New York City.

The recipient of the $10,000 fellowship in art history is C.C. McKee, a dual PhD candidate in the Department of Art History at Northwestern University and the École des hautes études en sciences sociales in Paris. Accepting the $10,000 fellowship in visual art is Camila Labarca Linaweaver, a MFA candidate in Printmaking at the University of Oklahoma.

The honorable mention for art history goes to Julia Vázquez, a PhD candidate in the Department of Art History & Archaeology at Columbia University. The honorable mentions in visual art are awarded to Kira Dominguez Hultgren, who is earning a MFA/MA in Fine Arts and Visual and Critical Studies at California College of the Arts, and Rowan Renee, who is currently pursuing their MFA at the University of Michigan.

The two fellows and three honorable mentions will be formally recognized at the 107th Annual Conference during Convocation on Wednesday, February 13, 2019.

CAA’s fellowship program supports promising artists and art historians who are enrolled in MFA and PhD programs nationwide. Awards are intended to help them with various aspects of their work, whether for job-search expenses or purchasing materials for the studio. CAA believes a grant of this kind, without contingencies, can best facilitate the transition between graduate studies and professional careers. The program is open to all eligible graduate students in the visual arts and art history. Applications for the 2019 fellowship cycle will open in the late spring.

FELLOW IN ART HISTORY

C.C. McKee

C.C. McKee is a dual doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History at Northwestern University (advised by Huey Copeland) and the École des hautes études en sciences sociales in Paris (advised by Anne Lafont). McKee received his BA from the University of California, Berkeley as a double major with honors in the history of art and highest honors in history.

McKee’s current dissertation project takes up art and visual culture from the francophone Caribbean during the long nineteenth century, arguing that, on the one hand, painting could bolster imperial authority by eliding the coeval inhumane violence and ecological brutality of colonialism. On the other, these artworks are inadvertent repositories for parallel ecologies opening onto embodied African diasporic knowledge of the Caribbean landscape.

This project represents one facet of McKee’s broader investment in the transhistorical relationship between colonialism (particularly during the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries) and its continued effects in the present. These interests include, art of the Atlantic World, contemporary African and African diasporic art, and queer aesthetic practices; all of which are indebted to black feminist, ecocritical, postcolonial, and psychoanalytic theories. McKee has developed these perspectives in various pieces of art criticism; with exhibitions at the Block Museum, Iceberg Projects (Chicago, IL), and the Ghetto Biennale (Port-au-Prince, Haiti); as well as in a forthcoming article for Art Journal. Moving forward, McKee will pursue a scholarly and curatorial practice that challenges the boundaries between the university classroom and the museum, between academic publication and exposing a broad public to the rich artistic traditions of the Caribbean.

FELLOW IN VISUAL ART

Camila Labarca Linaweaver

Camila Labarca Linaweaver was born in Santiago, Chile and immigrated to the United States at the age of 7. She lived and studied in Texas and holds a BFA from The University of Houston Clear Lake. She is a first-generation college graduate and is currently an MFA Printmaking candidate at The University of Oklahoma. While pursuing her graduate studies she has taught undergraduate courses in Printmaking and Drawing. Linaweavers focus within the printmaking medium is almost exclusively on singular and experimental prints. Using the landscape as a metaphor, she crafts narratives of immigrant displacement, loss, and alienation. Recently she has delved into time-based work, subjecting monotypes to various stop motion processes. Her unique approach to confronting her personal history as an immigrant results in highly nuanced imagery that aims to bridge opposing sides and create positive discourse within the context of global immigration issues.

As an emerging artist, Linaweaver has exhibited extensively throughout the US and has chosen to pursue a career in academia. In the future she aspires to participate in residencies and exhibitions that focus on community engagement and the intersection of landscape, identity, and culture.

HONORABLE MENTION IN ART HISTORY

Julia Vázquez

Julia Vázquez is a PhD candidate in the Department of Art History & Archaeology at Columbia University, where she is currently completing a dissertation titled “The Artist as Curator: Diego Velázquez, 1623-1660.” Her dissertation reconsiders the curatorial career of Diego Velázquez at the court of King Philip IV of Spain. It examines the major redecoration projects that Velázquez executed for galleries in the Spanish royal palace, considering the ways that his ambitions and interests as a painter found a new expression in this medium. It also analyzes significant paintings that Velázquez made in response to the royal art collection, considering the impact on his painting practice not only of its contents, but also of its display. Her research therefore proposes the career of Diego Velázquez at the Hapsburg court as a major episode in the history of the artist-curator, ultimately arguing that Velázquez’s simultaneous creative identities as painter to the king and curator of his art collection were mutually transformative.

Previously, Julia has held internships and fellowships at the Musée du Louvre, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Meadows Museum, the Museo Nacional del Prado, and the National Gallery of Art. While at the Meadows, she curated two exhibitions: “Picasso’s Dream and Lie of Franco: The Spanish Civil War in Print” (summer 2017) and “Murillo at the Meadows: A 400th-Anniversary Celebration” (2017-2018). She is currently the Hilla Rebay International Fellow at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Museo Guggenheim Bilbao, and the Collezione Peggy Guggenheim.

HONORABLE MENTIONS IN VISUAL ART

Kira Dominguez Hultgren

Kira Dominguez Hultgren (b. 1980) is a California-, Utah-, and Minnesota-based textile artist. She studied French postcolonial theory and literature at Princeton University (BA Comparative Literature, 2003), and performance and fine arts in Río Negro, Argentina from 2010-2012. While in Patagonia, she apprenticed with master weaver Mary Coronado, where Dominguez Hultgren studied the process and history of indigenous warp-faced weaving of Mallín Ahogado on a Mapuche vertical post loom.

Today, Dominguez Hultgren combines her interests in postcolonial theory and weaving in both her art and writing-research practice. In her third year at California College of the Arts, Dominguez Hultgren is earning a dual-degree MFA/MA in Fine Arts and Visual and Critical Studies. Her research interests include material and embodied rhetorics, loom technologies, decolonizing material culture, and analyzing textiles as a performative critique against the visual. She has won numerous awards including California College of the Art’s All College Honors Graduate Fine Art Award, the Edwin Anthony and Adalaine Boudreaux Cadogan Scholarship, and the Lenore Tawney Fiber and Material Studies Scholarship. Dominguez Hultgren is represented by Eleanor Harwood Gallery in San Francisco, where she had her first solo show, Wingspan, in 2018.

Rowan Renee

Rowan Renee is a genderqueer artist who uses photography to interrogate how sexual bodies are gendered, victimized, policed and punished. Through photographic, printmaking and sculptural techniques, they produce and appropriate images that intervene on issues of authorship, the representation of queer and feminine bodies within the art-historical canon, and the intersection of homophobia and misogyny in sex law and copyright law. The disjunctures of pleasure and abjection, felt through jouissance, informs their manipulation of images. Through artistic labor, they see a means to construct transformative meaning from experiences of violence, persecution and erasure that threaten queer and feminine subjects.

Currently pursuing their MFA at the University of Michigan, Renee works between Ann Arbor, Michigan and  Brooklyn, NY. Their career began in 2006, when they joined The Miss Rockaway Armada, a collaborative flotilla of thirty people who floated down the Mississippi river on junk rafts built from NYC construction waste. Recently, they have received awards from the Aaron Siskind Foundation, the Rema Hort Mann Foundation and the Anchorage Museum of Art, as well as fellowships from the Jerome Foundation and the McColl Center for Visual Art. In 2018 they were named an Elsie Choy Lee Scholar by the University of Michigan. Their solo exhibitions include Z at Pioneer Works (2015), Bodies of Wood at The Aperture Foundation (2017), and No Honor No Heart at the Center for Visual Arts Toledo (2019). Their work has been profiled on NPR, in The New York Times, VICE, Hyperallergic, Huffington Post, American Photo Magazine and Guernica, among many other publications.

Honorees this year include Howardena Pindell, Ursula von Rydingsvard, Anna C. Chave, Senga Nengudi, Nancy S. Steinhardt, Edward Sullivan, Molly Nesbit, and many other scholars, artists, authors, and teachers

CAA Annual Conference, New York City, February 13-16, 2019

CAA is pleased to announce the recipients and finalists of the 2019 Awards for Distinction. Awardees this year were chosen from a pool of scholars, artists, teachers, and authors who are constantly pushing our understanding of the visual arts. The CAA Awards for Distinction are presented during Convocation at the CAA Annual Conference on Wednesday, February 13 at 6:00 PM at the New York Hilton Midtown. The CAA Annual Conference runs from February 13-16, 2019.

Howardena Pindell. Courtesy the artist and Garth Greenan Gallery.

Among the winners this year is Howardena Pindell, recipient of the 2019 Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement. Pindell studied painting at Boston University and received her MFA from Yale University. Since 1979, she has been a professor of painting and conceptual drawing at SUNY Stony Brook University. Pindell is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, two National Endowment for the Arts grants, a Joan Mitchell Foundation grant, and a Studio Museum in Harlem Artist Award. In 1990, CAA awarded her the Most Distinguished Body of Work or Performance Award. Pindell’s work is in the permanent collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Yale University Art Gallery, the Fogg Museum at Harvard University, and the Rhode Island School of Design Museum, among many others.

Ursula von Rydingsvard. Photo: Zack Garlitos

Ursula von Rydingsvard is the winner of the 2019 Artist Award for Distinguished Body of Work. Von Rydingsvard is best known for her unmistakable towering sculptures with mountainous topographic surfaces created from carved cedar wood. She has also explored other mediums in her work, such as bronze, paper, and resin. Over an artistic career spanning more than forty years, Von Rydingsvard’s work has been in solo exhibitions at Galerie Lelong, SCAD Museum of Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and Dieu Donné. Her work has been included in numerous group exhibitions and is in the permanent collections of more than thirty museums. She is the recipient of a Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Sculpture Center, the Skowhegan Medal for Sculpture, a Joan Mitchell Foundation grant, and an Academy Award in Art from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, among other awards and recognitions. A major exhibition of her work, Ursula von Rydingsvard: The Contour of Feeling, was presented at the Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia (April 27 – August 26, 2018) and will travel to the National Museum of Women in the Arts in March 2019.

The Award for Excellence in Diversity recognizes the work of an individual or organization in the visual arts whose commitment to inclusion in scholarship or practice stands out as groundbreaking and unifying. The winner of the Award for Excellence in Diversity for 2019 is the Chicano Studies Research Center at UCLA. The work of the center entails five distinct areas: a library, an academic press, collaborative research projects, public programs and community partnerships, and a grant and fellowship program.

Each year, CAA awards two Distinguished Feminist Awards, one to a visual artist and one to a scholar. The two winners for 2019 are Senga Nengudi for visual artist, and Anna C. Chave for scholar.

The full list of 2019 CAA Awards for Distinction Recipients

Artist Award for Distinguished Body of Work

Ursula von Rydingsvard

Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement

Howardena Pindell

Distinguished Teaching of Art Award

Susanne Slavick

Distinguished Feminist Award—Visual Artist

Senga Nengudi

Distinguished Feminist Award—Scholar

Anna C. Chave

Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award

Nancy S. Steinhardt

Edward Sullivan

Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award for Writing on Art

Molly Nesbit

Award for Excellence in Diversity

Chicano Studies Research Center (CSRC)

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award

Zeynep Çelik Alexander
Kinaesthetic Knowing: Aesthetics, Epistemology, Modern Design
University of Chicago Press, 2017

Finalists

Olga Bush
Reframing the Alhambra: Architecture, Poetry, Textiles and Court Ceremonial 
Edinburgh University Press, 2018

Linda Kim
Race Experts: Sculpture, Anthropology, and the American Public in Malvina Hoffman’s Races of Mankind
University of Nebraska Press, 2018

Carolyn Yerkes
Drawing after Architecture
Princeton University Press, 2017

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award

Wendy Kaplan
Design in California and Mexico 1915–1985: Found in Translation
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 2017

Finalists

Jeffrey Spier and Timothy Potts
Beyond the Nile: Egypt and the Classical World
J. Paul Getty Trust, 2018

Christophe Cherix
Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions 1965–2016
Museum of Modern Art, 2018

Naoko Takahatake and Jonathan Bober
The Chiaroscuro Woodcut in Renaissance Italy
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 2018

Cecilia Fajardo-Hill, Andrea Giunta, and Rodrigo Alonso
Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985
Hammer Museum, University of California, 2017

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums, Libraries, Collections, and Exhibitions

Andrew C. Weislogel and Andaleeb Badiee Banta
Lines of Inquiry: Learning from Rembrandt’s Etchings
Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, 2017

Finalists

Patrick A. Polk, Roberto Conduru, Sabrina Gledhill, and Randal Johnson
Axé Bahia: The Power of Art in an Afro-Brazilian Metropolis
Fowler Museum at UCLA, 2018

Antonio Sergio Bessa and Jessamyn Fiore
Gordon Matta-Clark: Anarchitect
Bronx Museum of Art, 2017

Mark Sloan
Fahamu Pecou: Visible Man
Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, 2016

Frank Jewett Mather Award for Art Criticism

Julia Bryan-Wilson
Fray: Art + Textile Politics
University of Chicago Press, 2017

Rebecca M. Schreiber
The Undocumented Everyday: Migrant Lives and the Politics of Visibility
University of Minnesota Press, 2018

Art Journal Award

Mara Polgovsky Ezcurra
“Beyond Evil: Politics, Ethics, and Religion in Léon Ferrari’s Illustrated Nunca más
Art Journal, Fall 2018

Arthur Kingsley Porter Prize

Nathan T. Arrington
“Touch and Remembrance in Greek Funerary Art”
The Art Bulletin, September 2018

CAA/AIC Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation

Karl D. Buchberg

Jodi Hauptman

Learn about the juries that select the recipients of the CAA Awards for Distinction.

Contacts

Nick Obourn, Director of Communications, Marketing, and Membership
nobourn@collegeart.org, 212-392-4401

Joelle Te Paske, Media and Content Manager
jtepaske@collegeart.org, 212-392-4426

IMAGES AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

Hashtags: #CAA2019 #CAANYC

Finalists for the 2019 Morey and Barr Awards

posted by November 29, 2018

CAA is pleased to announce the 2019 finalists for the Charles Rufus Morey Book Award and two Alfred H. Barr Jr. Awards. The winners of the three prizes, along with the recipients of other Awards for Distinction, will be announced in January 2019 and presented during Convocation in conjunction with CAA’s 107th Annual Conference, taking place in New York, February 13-16, 2019.

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award

Zeynep Çelik Alexander, Kinaesthetic Knowing: Aesthetics, Epistemology, Modern Design (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2017)

Olga Bush, Reframing the Alhambra: Architecture, Poetry, Textiles and Court Ceremonial (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2018)

Linda Kim, Race ExpertsSculptureAnthropology, and the American Public in Malvina Hoffman’s Races of Mankind (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2018)

Carolyn Yerkes, Drawing after Architecture (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017)

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award

Christophe Cherix, Cornelia Butler, and David Platzker, Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions 1965-2016 (New York: Museum of Modern Art, 2018)

Jeffrey Spier and Timothy Potts, Beyond the Nile: Egypt and the Classical World (Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Trust, 2018)

Naoko Takahatake and Jonathan Bober, The Chiaroscuro Woodcut in Renaissance Italy (Los Angeles: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 2018)

Cecilia Fajardo-Hill and Andrea Giunta, Radical Women:  Latin American Art, 1960-1985 (Los Angeles : Hammer Museum, University of California, 2017)

Wendy Kaplan, Design in California and Mexico 1915-1985: Found in Translation (Los Angeles: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 2017)

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums, Libraries, Collections, and Exhibitions

Antonio Sergio Bessa and Jessamyn Fiore, Gordon Matta-Clark: Anarchitect (New York: The Bronx Museum of Art, 2017)

Andrew C. Weislogel and Andaleeb Badiee Banta, Lines of Inquiry: Learning from Rembrandt’s Etchings (Ithaca: Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, 2017)

Mark Sloan, Fahamu Pecou: Visible Man (Charleston, SC: Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, 2016)

Patrick Arthur Polk, Axe Bahia: The Power of Art in an Afro-Brazilian Metropolis (Los Angeles: Fowler Museum at UCLA, 2018)

The presentation of the 2019 Awards for Distinction will take place on Wednesday evening, February 13, 2019 from 6-7:30pm in the Grand Ballroom East at the New York Hilton Midtown. The event is free and open to the public. For more information about CAA’s Awards for Distinction, please contact nyoffice@collegeart.org

Filed under: Awards, Books

Attendee at 2018 CAA Annual Conference in Los Angeles. Photo: Rafael Cardenas

In August, we announced that CAA received a major anonymous gift of $1 million to fund travel for art history faculty and their students to special exhibitions related to their classwork. We’re pleased to now be accepting applications for the newly created Art History Special Exhibition Travel Fund. 

The fund is designed to award up to $10,000 to qualifying undergraduate and graduate art history classes to cover students’ and instructors’ costs (travel, accommodations, and admissions fees) associated with attending museum special exhibitions throughout the United States and worldwide.  The purpose of the grants is to enhance students’ first-hand knowledge of original works of art.

Applications are due by January 15, 2019.

APPLY NOW

Related: Someone Just Gave Budding Art Historians $1 Million So They Can Afford to Actually Go See the Art They’re Studying

GUIDELINES

  • These awards support student and instructor travel costs incurred while visiting museum special exhibitions in the United States and worldwide.
  • Graduate and undergraduate art history classes are eligible to apply for funds to attend temporary museum exhibitions (not exhibitions on permanent display) in the United States and other countries. Exhibitions on any artist, period, or area of art history are eligible for funding.
  • Awards are made directly to institutions whose membership in CAA is in good standing. Applicant instructors must be individual members of CAA in good standing. Funds may only be used to travel to exhibitions that correspond directly to the content of the class.  Ideally, classes will be no larger than fifteen students and planned to benefit from the special exhibition (for instance, a seminar on the subject of the exhibition).
  • Awards may only be used for admission fees, travel and lodging expenses for the instructor and class members. Every attempt to attain group rates must be made.

Completed applications must include the following:

  • An application form
  • Instructor’s curriculum vitae
  • A course description and syllabus that identifies and explains the exhibition as part of the pedagogical aim of the course
  • An explanation of the instructor’s expertise in the subject matter of the exhibition
  • A tentative itinerary of travel and lodging
  • A budget detailing transportation and lodging expenses associated with traveling to and from the exhibition and lodging and admission costs, including an explanation of how any travel and accommodation funds in excess of the award will be raised
  • A letter of support from the instructor’s department chair or dean

 AWARDS

Awards will not exceed $10,000 per class, per exhibition.

ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Recipients of the award will be guaranteed a session at the subsequent CAA Annual Conference after their travel has ended. CAA will make the session available, but costs associated with attending the conference, including registration, membership, travel, and accommodation, will be the participants’ responsibility.

TIMELINE

The deadline for application materials is January 15, 2019.

APPLY NOW

2018 CAA Annual Conference. Image: Rafael Cardenas

We are pleased to announce CAA has received a major anonymous gift of $1 million to fund travel for art history faculty and their students to special exhibitions related to their classwork. The gift will establish the Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions, a new program to be administered and juried by CAA.

“This incredibly generous gift will not only support art history scholars and students for years to come, it is a powerful message to the visual arts field that their work is as important as ever,” said Hunter O’Hanian, CAA’s executive director. “The new Fund also reinforces CAA as the preeminent organization supporting and advancing professionals in the visual arts and design.”

Groundbreaking in its scope, the Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions is intended exclusively to enhance the first-hand knowledge of original works of art. The Fund will support travel, lodging, and admission for art history students and faculty in conjunction with special museum exhibitions in the United States and throughout the world. Awards will be made exclusively to support travel to exhibitions that directly correspond to the class content. However, exhibitions on all artists, periods, and areas of art history are eligible.

Awards of up to $10,000 will be granted on a per project basis by a jury formed by CAA to oversee the Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions.

Applications will be accepted by CAA beginning in fall 2018. All application criteria and information will be listed on the CAA website.

CAA is pleased to announce the 2018 recipients of the Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grant. This program, which provides financial support for the publication of book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of American art, is made possible by a generous grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art. For this grant, “American art” is defined as art (circa 1500–1980) of what is now the geographic United States.

The seven Terra Foundation grantees for 2018 are:

Buquet, Benoît, Graphics: Art and design graphique aux États-Unis dans les anées 1960 et 1970, Les Presses Universitaires François-Rabelais.
Winner of the International Author Conference Subvention.

Chicago, Judy, Through the Flower—My Struggle as a Woman Artist, translated into French by Sophie Taam, Les Presses du Réel.

Hills, Patricia, Modern Art in the USA: Issues and Controversies of the 20th Century, translated into Chinese by Qiao Hu, Jiangsu Phoenix Fine Arts Publishing.

Mehring, Frank, Riding the Tidal Wave of Modernism: (Trans)National Approaches to the Artwork of Winold Reiss, Deutscher Kunstverlag.
Winner of the International Author Conference Subvention.

Sheehan, Tanya, Study in Black and White: Race, Photography, Humor, Pennsylvania State University Press.

Sutton, Gloria, Stan VanDerBeek’s Movie-Drome: An Experience Machine, translated into French. Preface by Philippe-Alain Michaud. Éditions B2.

Wells, K. L. H., Weaving Modernism: Postwar Tapestry Between Paris and New York, Yale University Press.

The International Author Conference Subventions confer two non-US authors of top-ranked books travel funds and complimentary registration to attend CAA’s 2019 Annual Conference in New York, February 13-16; they also received one-year CAA memberships.

The two author awardees for 2018 are:

  • Benoît Buquet
  • Frank Mehring
Filed under: Awards

CAA invites nominations and self-nominations for individuals to serve on eight of the thirteen juries for the annual Awards for Distinction for three years (2018–21). Terms begin in May 2018; award years are 2019–21. CAA’s fifteen awards honor artists, art historians, authors, curators, critics, and teachers whose accomplishments transcend their individual disciplines and contribute to the profession as a whole and to the world at large.

Candidates must possess expertise appropriate to the jury’s work and be current CAA members. They should not hold a position on a CAA committee or editorial board beyond May 31, 2018. CAA’s president and vice president for committees appoint jury members for service.

Jury vacancies for spring 2018:

Nominations and self-nominations should include a brief statement (no more than 150 words) outlining the individual’s qualifications and experience and a CV (an abbreviated CV no more than two pages, may be submitted). Please send all materials by email to Aakash Suchak, CAA grants and special programs manager; submissions must be sent as Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF attachments. For questions about jury service and responsibilities, contact Tiffany Dugan, CAA director of programs and publications.

Deadline extended! New deadline is: Thursday, May 31, 2018.

Pepón Osorio, Badge of Honor, 1995. Photo: Sarah Welles

Drawing on his childhood in Puerto Rico and his adult life as a social worker in the Bronx, artist Pepón Osorio creates meticulous installations incorporating the memories, experiences, and cultural and religious iconography of Latino communities and family dynamics. The 2018 CAA Distinguished Artist Awardee for Lifetime Achievement, Osorio is a professor in the Community Arts Practices Program at the Tyler School of Art at Temple University. He is also the recipient of a 2018 United States Artists Fellowship, among many other awards and fellowships.

CAA media and content manager Joelle Te Paske worked with Pepón in 2016 on reForm, a project responding to school closures in Philadelphia in collaboration with students, teachers, and Temple University. In the project high schoolers, affectionately nicknamed “Bobcats” after their former school mascot, were invited to contribute to an art installation at Tyler School of Art, where they also met with local politicians to advocate for community-based school reform.

Joelle caught up with Pepón in January 2018 to hear his thoughts on being an artist and professor, and to learn about his hopes for the year ahead.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Pepón Osorio, To my darling daughters, 1990. Photo: Carlos Avedaños

JTP: I’m happy to be speaking with you. When I heard that you were getting the award, it was great news!

So, we find ourselves in 2018—how are you doing? What’s on your mind?

PO: I think that I am still processing the fact that we are in 2018 and 2017 didn’t look very good for us. Both as an artist and a citizen. I’m hoping that we begin to tell the truth in a country of lies. I hope that is what 2018 is like. This is a very interesting moment with the CAA lifetime achievement award, because I’ve been mostly thinking in retrospect. How in the world did we get here? How did we get here and how did this happen?

I’m looking in retrospect and trying to see where energy is stored and how to rejuvenate so I can move forward with a new perspective. That’s where I’m at.

JTP: I love that—looking for pockets of energy that are there, but haven’t quite been found.

PO: That in addition to how do we tell the truth in a country of lies? What does that mean? Everything’s been blurry to the point that you begin to doubt. That’s where we are.

JTP: Definitely. And what does your work look like right now? 

PO: I am working on a couple of ideas. My production is very, very, very small. I don’t produce tons of work. I only produce work that I feel is urgent and is important. So I’m working on a whole bunch of ideas for possible pieces. Of all those ideas, one will emerge and come out. I’m working with that and also teaching. I’m trying to perfect the transformation of my methodology into a philosophical pedagogy. I’m trying to figure that out without losing touch with my creative self and my sense of curiosity.

JTP: When you say philosophical, do you mean putting together a formal pedagogy? Or more in a spiritual way?

PO: Well, both. I have been teaching at Tyler over the years and I feel that I always want to be able to center myself in my pedagogy in the way that I center myself in my artistic practice.

Pepón Osorio, Scene of the Crime… (whose crime?), 1993. Photo: Frank Gimpaya

I’m looking at what I’m really good at and that which I know most, which is my methodology of getting my work done, my practice. How do I transform that into a pedagogy of philosophy? That I can go around and teach something that I feel has this philosophy at the center of the work, similar to my artistic practice. Those are the things that I’ve been doing. A lot of looking in retrospect. Really looking in retrospect at the system.

JTP: That’s great. I’ve enjoyed being at CAA because I’ve been thinking more about history. It’s always there for you to learn from. The more you dig into it, the more you learn about the moment you’re in.

PO: Exactly.

JTP: What are the biggest changes you’ve seen in your time at Tyler as part of the faculty?

PO: The changes that I’m seeing at Tyler are new faculty members are coming in with a preoccupation that seems to be different from the history Tyler was built on. I’m looking at faculty members who are much more interested and preoccupied with things other than the object; where new faculty members are coming in with a clear understanding of what the true intention of becoming an artist is.

So I’m seeing that. I’m seeing transformations. We obviously have a new dean who is also looking at ways of transforming the past into a bright and hopeful future. Which is basically what I think this whole nation should be looking at.

JTP: I’m with you. Feels a little blurry, as you said, right now.

PO: Exactly. I think that the new blood and new faculty members that are coming to Tyler are interested in redefining a lot of concepts. I see that a lot in the world. I see that a lot with new generations of people coming up who are very interested in: “Let’s redefine this thing, because the system as it is simply doesn’t work.”

JTP: Would you say that’s your favorite part of being on the faculty at the moment?

Pepón Osorio

PO: Yes. Also because I always feel that I found a niche in this. As an artist, dealing with the social, the political, the truth, and interdisciplinary work that creates very complex, chaotic environments—all that stuff seems to be so unacademic. I came in and I just felt like, “What in the world? What is my place in all this?” Little by little, by joining a new faculty and redefining, it’s making perfect sense. I’m finding myself more and more comfortable. That there are people around me that are supportive, that understand my trajectory and understand how I got to where I am now, whatever that place is.

It’s wonderful and I think to me that is a highlight. It’s finding a space in academia that feels comfortable and that I can bring the complexity of who I am into it, without necessarily having to be only one person.

JTP: I think that’s beautifully put. Everyone brings their own experiences. No one wants to be part of a monolithic institution that doesn’t let people be themselves …well, ok, some people do. But it’s interesting to me there’s so much more openness for that than I thought there might be, coming to a traditional academic membership organization like CAA, for instance.

PO: Basically, for me, it feels that this is not in demand. I am not filling up a demand of what all the people want to see. This is who I am. In relationship to the earlier question, I just feel like I was able to figure out a way to become myself in a world where people have demands of, “Oh you should be a professor.” Everybody thinks that you should be a [certain type of] professor. No. You just can’t be anybody else but who you are. It just so happened that being a professor is part of that.

We are looking at being an artist from a three-dimensional reality and in a more inter-dimensional way—that being an artist and professor is a very complex human being. I love that. I’d love to embrace that and not hide it from anyone. As a professor, I come in with all my imperfections as well. It’s not like I’m trying to correct them, I’m just going to do a balancing act with all this. That’s me, anyway.

JTP: If there was one thing that you would recommend to students or artists that they should be reading that they aren’t, what would you recommend?

PO: I’m not sure, but a student did ask me the other day if I have a recommendation of what he should be reading and what came out, which is really interesting, was feminist literature.  Just listen to that stuff, read it, and understand what it means so then you can place yourself, as a male, in a place of understanding. That’s all.

JTP: I love it—you say, “Yes, I have an answer. Feminist literature.” Done. 

Detail, En la barbería no se llora (No crying allowed in the barbershop),
1994. Photo: Frank Gimpaya

PO: I think that women should be reading it, but I think that men should be getting into it and reading and understanding where it comes from. I think that people, mostly men, will probably begin to empathize with the reality and the system, the fact that it’s not supportive of women.

JTP: I’m curious if you’ve attended CAA conferences in the past? What did you think?

PO: I have participated in the past. I have been in a couple of them.

JTP: It’s my first experience with the conference. It’s enormous.

PO: Yes, it always surprises me how the college system is much bigger than what I always think of it. I just wish that there were much younger people coming in to turn this thing upside down.

JTP: I agree. We’re trying to think of different ways to get closer to that. This year I know that we’re doing outreach to high schools in LA for all the free events. How amazing would it be to have a whole bunch of juniors and seniors in high school from a local public LA high school show up at the LA convention center alongside established, older academics? Just everybody.

PO: So both of them can see each other. Both of them can see each other and it’s like, “Okay, this is what’s coming up,” and the younger will say, “Oh, this is what it’s been.”

Find a happy medium somewhere in there. It’s just too much of the extremes. That’s my reaction. Too much of the extremes.

JTP: I agree. It reminds me of reForm, even just in terms of space—basically allowing people to feel comfortable. I just loved that the Bobcats (high school students who collaborated on the project with Osorio) walked through the main space of Tyler to get down to their classroom. It made Tyler theirs, in a way.

PO: A lot of people asked me, “Why aren’t you doing this piece in their neighborhood?” It was because the chances for the students to come into a college and to occupy space in a college environment were one in a million. I just thought if we can open up a space for them to occupy a classroom, open up a space for them to understand and to begin to look at the social architecture of a university, that’s more than enough for me.

I think that’s basically what I’m referring to when I’m talking about the CAA conference. If we can only suggest and show up a little bit more, that it’s much bigger than that, and that there’s a world out there both ways, that’s it. That’s what needs to happen. So people can come and begin to think differently. That was exactly what happened with the Bobcats. I said, “I’m just doing this at the institution because there are multiple functions in which the institution can work. This is one of them.” We think about institutions as the only place for education. Education is much bigger than that.

JTP: I agree, and I think that gets us closer to the truth you were talking about earlier. It opens up many more opportunities. 

PO: Yes. It unties that sense of curiosity in all the kids’ minds.

reForm, 2014-2016, installation at Tyler School of Art classroom. Photo: Constance Mensh

JTP: Do you think artists can change the world?

PO: I think artists have changed the world. I think that the changes that I have seen in this country are not by artists alone, but I think that they have. When you’re talking about artists, I think you’re mentioning just these single artists changing the world, and I don’t think that that has happened. But I don’t think that that cannot happen.

I’m saying yes, because in the changes that I’ve seen in the world, there has always been an artist behind that. I do agree, but I don’t think that an artist alone can do it.

To break it down, I think that creativity has always been at the center of world’s change. Artists have always been on the periphery of it. Sometimes at the center of those changes.

JTP: Great, thank you. Lastly, you touched on this a bit, but what gives you hope for the future?

PO: Change.

JTP: Pepón, I’m right there with you. The possibility that it won’t be how it is right now.

PO: Exactly. That’s all. I just hope for change.

CAA’s Annual Conference Convocation, including the presentation of the Awards for Distinction, will occur February 21, 6:00-7:30 PM and will be livestreamed.

See the full list of 2018 CAA Awards for Distinction.

Honorees this year include Pepón Osorio, Firelei Báez, Kellie Jones, Joseph Masheck, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Lowery Stokes Sims, and many other scholars, artists, authors, and teachers

CAA Annual Conference, Los Angeles, CA, February 21-24, 2018

Pepón Osorio. Courtesy the artist.

CAA is pleased to announce the recipients and finalists of the 2018 Awards for Distinction and the creation of a new Award for Excellence in Diversity. Honorees this year are among the leading scholars, artists, teachers, and authors in the field of visual arts. The CAA Awards for Distinction are presented during Convocation at the CAA Annual Conference on Wednesday, February 21 at 6:00PM at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The CAA Annual Conference runs from February 21-24, 2018.

Among the winners this year is Pepón Osorio, recipient of the 2018 Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement. Osorio is the first artist of Puerto Rican descent to receive the award from CAA. Drawing on his childhood in Puerto Rico and his adult life as a social worker in the Bronx, Osorio creates meticulous installations incorporating the memories, experiences, and cultural and religious iconography of Latino communities and family dynamics. “The work is created when I bring together where I am and where the rest of society is,” said Osorio in an Art21 documentary about his work. Osorio is a professor in the Community Arts Practices Program at the Tyler School of Art at Temple University. He is also the recipient of a 2018 United States Artists Fellowship, among many other awards and fellowships.

Firelei Báez. Courtesy of the artist and Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco.

Firelei Báez is the winner of the 2018 Artist Award for Distinguished Body of Work. Báez was born in the Dominican Republic and works in New York City. Her work on paper, canvas, and in sculpture explores black female subjectivity, myth, and science fiction. Baez is a creator of fantastical figures that transmute through ornate pattern and vivid color. She has held residencies at Headlands Center for the Arts, Joan Mitchell Center, Fine Arts Work Center, Lower East Side Print Shop, and Lower Manhattan Cultural Council Workspace, and is the recipient of the Joan Mitchell Painters and Sculptors Award, the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Award in Painting, the Catherine Doctorow Prize for Contemporary Painting, and the Chiaro Award from Headlands Center for the Arts.

The newly created Award for Excellence in Diversity recognizes the work of an individual in the visual arts whose commitment to inclusion in scholarship or in practice stands out as groundbreaking and unifying.

The inaugural winner of the Award for Excellence in Diversity is Kellie Jones, Associate Professor in Art History and Archeology and the Institute for Research in African American Studies at Columbia University. Jones’s research and teaching concerns African American and African Diaspora artists, Latinx and Latin American artists, and issues in contemporary art and museum theory. Her most recent book, South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s, was published by Duke University Press in 2017.

CAA will also award for the first time two Distinguished Feminist Awards, one to a visual artist and one to a scholar. The winners of the 2018 Distinguished Feminist Awards are Lynn Hershman Leeson (visual artist) and Lowery Stokes Sims (scholar).

In publishing, CAA recognizes the achievements of several authors and editors.

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award

Benjamin Anderson

Cosmos and Community in Early Medieval Art, Yale University Press, 2017

Laura Anne Kalba

Color in the Age of Impressionism: Commerce, Technology, and Art, Penn State University Press, 2017

Finalists:

Susanna Berger

The Art of Philosophy: Visual Thinking in Europe from the Late Renaissance to the Early Enlightenment, Princeton University Press, 2017

Dorothy Ko

The Social Life of Inkstones: Artisans and Scholars in Early Qing China University of Washington Press, 2017

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award

Barbara Drake Boehm and Melanie Holcomb, editors

Jerusalem, 1000–1400: Every People Under Heaven, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2016

Finalists:

Wanda M. Corn

Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern, Brooklyn Museum, DelMonico Books, Prestel, 2017

Matthew Affron

Paint the Revolution: Mexican Modernism, 1910–1950, Yale University Press, 2016

Robert Cozzolino, Anne Classen Knutson, and David M. Lubin, editors

World War I and American Art, Princeton University Press, 2016

Pilar Silva Maroto

Bosch: The 5th Centenary Exhibition, Thames & Hudson, 2016

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums, Libraries, Collections, and Exhibitions

Melissa Rachleff

Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952–1965, Grey Art Gallery, New York University and DelMonico Books, Prestel, 2017

Finalists:

Jane A. Sharp, editor

Thinking Pictures: The Visual Field of Moscow Conceptualism, Zimmerli Art Museum, Rutgers University, 2016

Kevin Sharp, editor

Wild Spaces, Open Seasons: Hunting and Fishing in American Art, University of Oklahoma Press, 2016

Frank Jewett Mather Award for Art Criticism

Elise Archias

The Concrete Body: Yvonne Rainer, Carolee Schneemann, Vito Acconci, Yale University Press, 2016

Art Journal Award

Heather Igloliorte

“Curating Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit: Inuit Knowledge in the Qallunaat Art Museum,” Art Journal, Summer 2017

Finalists:

Nazar Kozak, “Art Embedded into Protest: Staging the Ukrainian Maidan,” Art Journal, Spring 2017

Allison Young, “Visualizing Apartheid Abroad: Gavin Jantje’s Screenprints of the 1970s,” Art Journal, Fall/Winter 2017

Arthur Kingsley Porter Prize

Aaron M. Hyman

“Inventing Painting: Cristóbal de Villalpando, Juan Correa, and New Spain’s Transatlantic Canon,” The Art Bulletin, June 2017

AWARDS FOR DISTINCTION IN TEACHING, WRITING ON ART, AND CONSERVATION

Helen Frederick is the winner of the 2018 Distinguished Teaching of Art Award.

Edward S. Cooke, Jr., and Alex Potts are the winners of the 2018 Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award.

Joseph Masheck is the winner of the 2018 Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award for Writing on Art.

The CAA/American Institute for Conservation Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation award for 2018 will be given to Paul Messier.

Learn about the juries that select the recipients of the CAA Awards for Distinction.

Contacts

Nick Obourn, Director of Communications, Marketing, and Membership
nobourn@collegeart.org, 212-392-4401

Joelle Te Paske, Media and Content Manager
jtepaske@collegeart.org, 212-392-4426

IMAGES AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

Hashtags: #CAA2018 #CAALA #CAAworks #CAAadvocacy #CAAfairuse

Finalists for the 2018 Morey and Barr Awards

posted by November 14, 2017

CAA is pleased to announce the 2018 finalists for the Charles Rufus Morey Book Award and two Alfred H. Barr Jr. Awards. The winners of the three prizes, along with the recipients of other Awards for Distinction, will be announced in January 2018 and presented during Convocation in conjunction with CAA’s 106th Annual Conference, taking place in Los Angeles, February 21-24, 2018.

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award

The Charles Rufus Morey Book Award honors an especially distinguished book in the history of art, published in any language between September 1, 2016, and August 31, 2017. The four finalists for 2018 are:

Benjamin Anderson, Cosmos and Community in Early Medieval Art (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017)

Susanna Berger, The Art of Philosophy: Visual Thinking in Europe from the Late Renaissance to the Early Enlightenment (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017)

Laura Anne Kalba, Color in the Age of Impressionism: Commerce, Technology, and Art (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2017)

Dorothy Ko, The Social Life of Inkstones: Artisans and Scholars in Early Qing China (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2017)

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award

The Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for museum scholarship is presented to the author(s) of an especially distinguished catalogue in the history of art, published between September 1, 2016, and August 31, 2017, under the auspices of a museum, library, or collection. The five finalists for 2018 are:

Matthew Affron, Paint the Revolution: Mexican Modernism, 1910-1950 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2016)

Wanda M. Corn, Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern (Brooklyn: Brooklyn Museum, 2017)

Robert Cozzolino, Anne Classen Knutson, and David M. Lubin, eds., World War I and American Art (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2016)

Barbara Drake Boehm and Melanie Holcomb, eds., Jerusalem, 1000-1400: Every People Under Heaven (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2016)

Pilar Silva Maroto, Bosch: The Fifth Centenary Exhibition (New York: Thames & Hudson, 2016)

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums, Libraries, Collections, and Exhibitions

In 2009, CAA established a second Barr award for the author(s) of catalogues produced by smaller museums, libraries, and collections with an annual operating budget of less than $10 million. The finalists for the second Barr award for 2018 are:

Melissa Rachleff, Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952-1965 (New York: Grey Art Gallery, New York University, 2017)

Jane Ashton Sharp, Thinking Pictures: The Visual Field of Moscow Conceptualism (New Brunswick, NJ: Zimmerli Art Museum, Rutgers, 2016)

Kevin Sharp, ed., Wild Spaces, Open Seasons: Hunting and Fishing in American Art (Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 2016)

The presentation of the 2018 Awards for Distinction will take place on Wednesday evening, February 21, 6:00–7:30 PM, at the LA Convention Center in Los Angeles. The event is free and open to the public. For more information about CAA’s Awards for Distinction, please contact Aakash Suchak, CAA grants and special programs manager at 212-392-4435.

Filed under: Awards, Books