College Art Association

CAA News Today

New in caa.reviews

posted by March 10, 2017

Dawn Odell discusses Asia in Amsterdam: The Culture of Luxury in the Golden Age, an exhibition catalogue produced by the Peabody Essex Museum and Rijksmuseum. “The marvel of this publication is its breadth,” as it “draws together a collection of stunning objects” and focuses “on the important role the Dutch played in facilitating and celebrating the material results of cross-cultural trade.” Read the full review at caa.reviews
Karen Blough reads The Bernward Gospels: Art, Memory, and the Episcopate in Medieval Germany by Jennifer P. Kingsley. “Focusing minutely on a single patron and the visual program of one commission,” the author “brilliantly addresses a multitude of issues in Ottonian theology, history, and art” and makes “a valuable contribution to English-language scholarship on Ottonian art history.” Read the full review at caa.reviews
Emily C. Burns reviews Melissa A. Dabakis’s A Sisterhood of Sculptors: American Artists in Nineteenth-Century Rome. The author puts “sculptural production in dialogue with literature, visual culture, and the political and social histories of Rome and the United States,” tracing the city “as a welcoming site for feminine creativity” and “a complex site for gender politics and constructions of American culture.” Read the full review at caa.reviews
Filed under: caa.reviews, Uncategorized

CAA Seeks Ad Sales Rep

posted by March 08, 2017

Part-time and commission based

The College Art Association (CAA), a membership and advocacy organization for those working in the visual arts, seeks a part-time advertising sales rep with media sales experience in both print and digital platforms. The ideal candidate should have established contacts in the arts and culture publishing landscape and in the wider culture field. She/he will have the mindset to strategically target prospective clients to build relationships that support CAA’s prestigious publications and events with a strong ad sales program.

The advertising sales rep would work primarily on CAA’s two flagship print journals, The Art Bulletin and Art Journal, with some work on CAA’s digital reviews platform, caa.reviews. Additional work would include selling ads for the graduate program directories and the CAA Annual Conference. Candidates for the position should have experience in billing clients, advertising proposal creation, and proper tracking of invoices and payments.

This is a part-time, commissioned-based position. The position reports to the Director of Communications and Marketing.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Manage relationships with current advertising clients and develop strategy for new client growth
  • Work closely with staff across all departments to create client strategy aligned with journals, website content, and programs
  • Produce client contracts for ad sales
  • Oversee invoicing and record keeping for ad sales on journals and relevant websites
  • Report and present on ad sales program and results to staff members and constituents
  • Work with publications department staff and in-house graphic designer on ad placement and design as needed
  • Other duties as assigned or requested

QUALIFICATIONS

  • At least 2 years of ad sales or comparable experience
  • A warm and welcoming personality that encourages relationship building
  • Established relationships with advertisers and companies in the arts and culture field
  • Proven track record of closing new business and maintaining current business
  • Exceptional written/verbal communication skills
  • Ability to work independently, organize multiple concurrent tasks, work efficiently, and follow through on details
  • Experience with spreadsheets, systems, and database management and generally accepted programs and office equipment required
  • BS/BA degree or equivalent preferred

Send resume and cover letter to nobourn@collegeart.org with the subject line “CAA Ad Sales Rep.”

This job description is intended as a summary of the primary responsibilities of and qualifications for this position. The job description is not intended as inclusive of all duties an individual in this position might be asked to perform or of all qualifications that may be required either now or in the future.

The College Art Association is an equal opportunity employer and considers all candidates for employment regardless of race, color, sex, age, national origin, creed, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender expression, or political affiliation.

CAA Seeks Ad Sales Rep

posted by March 08, 2017

Part-time and commission based

The College Art Association (CAA), a membership and advocacy organization for those working in the visual arts, seeks a part-time advertising sales rep with media sales experience in both print and digital platforms. The ideal candidate should have established contacts in the arts and culture publishing landscape and in the wider culture field. She/he will have the mindset to strategically target prospective clients to build relationships that support CAA’s prestigious publications and events with a strong ad sales program.

The advertising sales rep would work primarily on CAA’s two flagship print journals, The Art Bulletin and Art Journal, with some work on CAA’s digital reviews platform, caa.reviews. Additional work would include selling ads for the graduate program directories and the CAA Annual Conference. Candidates for the position should have experience in billing clients, advertising proposal creation, and proper tracking of invoices and payments.

This is a part-time, commissioned-based position. The position reports to the Director of Communications and Marketing.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Manage relationships with current advertising clients and develop strategy for new client growth
  • Work closely with staff across all departments to create client strategy aligned with journals, website content, and programs
  • Produce client contracts for ad sales
  • Oversee invoicing and record keeping for ad sales on journals and relevant websites
  • Report and present on ad sales program and results to staff members and constituents
  • Work with publications department staff and in-house graphic designer on ad placement and design as needed
  • Other duties as assigned or requested

QUALIFICATIONS

  • At least 2 years of ad sales or comparable experience
  • A warm and welcoming personality that encourages relationship building
  • Established relationships with advertisers and companies in the arts and culture field
  • Proven track record of closing new business and maintaining current business
  • Exceptional written/verbal communication skills
  • Ability to work independently, organize multiple concurrent tasks, work efficiently, and follow through on details
  • Experience with spreadsheets, systems, and database management and generally accepted programs and office equipment required
  • BS/BA degree or equivalent preferred

Send resume and cover letter to nobourn@collegeart.org with the subject line “CAA Ad Sales Rep.”

This job description is intended as a summary of the primary responsibilities of and qualifications for this position. The job description is not intended as inclusive of all duties an individual in this position might be asked to perform or of all qualifications that may be required either now or in the future.

The College Art Association is an equal opportunity employer and considers all candidates for employment regardless of race, color, sex, age, national origin, creed, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender expression, or political affiliation.

New in caa.reviews

posted by March 03, 2017

Michele Prettyman Beverly reads Queering Post-Black Art: Artists Transforming African-American Identity after Civil Rights by Derek Conrad Murray. The volume “amounts to the most comprehensive (and engaging) post-black theoretical methodology to date,” offering a new level of “critical rigor and innovative thinking” and “highlighting the intersection of black queer and sexual identities.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.
Charles Palermo reviews Philippe Geinoz’s Relations au travail: Dialogue entre poésie et peinture à l’époque du cubism: Apollinaire-Picasso-Braque-Gris-Reverdy. Among the literary genre of these– or habilitation-turned books, it “is among the very best,” “filled with close readings, wide-ranging and thoughtful use of existing literature, and a framework of pertinent intellectual-historical context.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.
John Clark reviews Radicalism in the Wilderness: International Contemporaneity and 1960s Art in Japan by Reiko Tomii. This “impeccably researched and well-written contribution” offers a “challenge to art history” by “understanding the way in which modernisms from the periphery within a cultural continuum coordinate with international and transnational tendencies to constitute contemporaneity.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.
Stephanie S. Dickey discusses Laurinda S. Dixon’s The Dark Side of Genius: The Melancholic Persona in Art, ca. 1500–1700. “Much more than an iconographic or visual survey,” the book “presents a solidly researched, interdisciplinary synthesis of early modern thinking about melancholia as a medical and cultural condition,” blending “medical, literary, and art-historical learning and lore.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.
Filed under: caa.reviews

caa.reviews Editorial Board Seeks Candidates

posted by February 28, 2017

CAA invites nominations and self-nominations for three individuals to serve on the caa.reviews Editorial Board for four-year terms, July 1, 2017–June 30, 2021. Candidates may be artists, art historians, art critics, art educators, curators, or other art professionals with stature in the field and experience writing or editing books and/or exhibition reviews; institutional affiliation is not required. The journal also seeks a librarian to serve in an ex officio capacity to advise the editorial board on technical and distribution issues.

CAA encourages applications from candidates with a strong record of scholarship who are committed to the imaginative development of caa.reviews. An online journal, caa.reviews is devoted to the peer review of recent books, museum exhibitions, and projects relevant to the fields of art history, visual studies, and the arts.

The editorial board advises the editor-in-chief and field editors for the journal, and helps them to identify books and exhibitions for review and to solicit reviewers, articles, and other content for the journal. The editorial board guides the journal’s editorial program and may propose new initiatives for it. Members stay abreast of trends and issues in the field by attending and reporting on sessions at the CAA Annual Conference and academic conferences, symposia, and other events in their fields.

The caa.reviews Editorial Board meets three times a year, twice in the spring and fall and once at the CAA Annual Conference in February. Members also attend the annual meeting of the caa.reviews Council of Field Editors at the Annual Conference. Members pay their travel and lodging expenses to attend the meeting at the conference. Meetings in the spring and fall are currently held by teleconference. Members of all editorial boards volunteer their services to CAA without compensation.

Candidates must be current CAA members and should not currently serve on the editorial board of a competitive journal or another CAA editorial board or committee. Nominators should ascertain their nominee’s willingness to serve before submitting a name; self-nominations are also welcome. Please send a statement describing your interest in and qualifications for appointment, a CV, and your contact information to: caa.reviews Editorial Board, College Art Association, 50 Broadway, 21st Floor, New York, NY 10004; or email the documents to Deidre Thompson, CAA publications assistant. Deadline: April 21, 2017.

Filed under: caa.reviews, Publications, Service

New in caa.reviews

posted by February 24, 2017

Danny Smith visits Architecture of Life, the inaugural exhibition in the new building of the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive. Presenting a “sweeping, cacophonous vision,” the show conceives “of architecture as the organizing principle of everything from reality to society and human relationships,” making it “a compelling examination in homemaking.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.
Kimberly L. Dennis reads Old Women and Art in the Early Modern Italian Domestic Interior by Erin J. Campbell. The author “describes a proliferation of portraits of old women in the second half of the sixteenth century in northern Italy,” arguing “that these portraits served to remind viewers of the duty of old women to model familial and civic virtue.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.
Dustin London reviews Suzanne P. Hudson’s Robert Ryman: Used Paint. The volume “documents the development of Ryman’s art from the early 1950s to the turn of the century” and “provides a thorough description and analysis of the variety of his approaches to painting.” Hudson “writes with eloquence and perspicuity to bring Ryman’s work to a wider audience on its own terms.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.
Filed under: caa.reviews

New in caa.reviews

posted by February 10, 2017

Vivien Green Fryd reviews Georgia O’Keeffe by Nancy J. Scott, a biography that, unlike its predecessors, draws on “the extensive correspondence, which only became available in 2006, between O’Keeffe and her husband,” Alfred Stieglitz. Although the author “does provide new information based on” the letters, “she fails to engage critically with the materials at her disposal.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Erica Levin reads Kaira M. Cabañas’s Off-Screen Cinema: Isidore Isou and the Lettrist Avant-Garde. In this “concise, thought-provoking study,” the author “sheds light on the brief but often overlooked period of radical filmmaking,” showing “how Lettrist cinema disrupted the signifying conventions of the film medium” and “reconceptualized the specific discursive practices embedding cinema” in postwar France. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Rebecca Bedell discusses the exhibition catalogue Picturing the Americans: Landscape Painting from Tierra del Fuego to the Arctic. “No previous publication has offered such an expansive and inclusive survey of the hemisphere’s landscape art,” and “its collectivity of voices … substantially enriches the still-opening conversation about pan-American art.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Filed under: caa.reviews

New in caa.reviews

posted by February 03, 2017

Laura Anne Kalba visits Sonia Delaunay at Tate Modern. The exhibition marked “the first-ever in-depth analysis of the artist’s work in the United Kingdom” and featured “a provocative succession of works of high art, crafts, and industrially produced goods,” which “produced a heightened awareness of the tension between reverence for the unique art object and the allure of the copy.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Catherine E. Burdick reads The Spectacle of the Late Maya Court: Reflections on the Murals of Bonampak by Mary Ellen Miller and Claudia Brittenham. In this “thorough text,” the authors “draw from decades of study to advance fresh perspectives regarding the facture, narrative, and reception of these exquisite paintings,” “enriching our knowledge of one of the most complete artworks produced in the pre-Columbian Americas.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Modupe G. Labode discusses Dell Upton’s What Can and Can’t Be Said: Race, Uplift, and Monument Building in the Contemporary South. A “challenging, carefully argued book,” the volume “explores the meaning of the evolving commemorative landscape” of Confederate and civil rights monuments. Creating a “layered description” of the subject, Upton “reaches unsettling conclusions about race and public life.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Robert Bezucha reviews The Museum of French Monuments 1795–1816: ‘Killing art to make history’ by Alexandra Stara. The book traces the history of the “Museum of Monuments,” a “short-lived,” “revolutionary,” and “controversial” institution that, in the words of the author, “heralded the modern understanding of artifact-based history.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Filed under: caa.reviews

New in caa.reviews

posted by January 27, 2017

Wayne Franits reviews Genre Imagery in Early Modern Northern Europe: New Perspectives, edited by Arthur J. DiFuria. The eight essays “challenge” and “transcend” traditional studies on this topic “by exploring the complex, heterogeneous reception of such imagery among early modern viewers,” and they achieve this “noteworthy goal” with “varying degrees of success.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.
Deborah Lewittes discusses the exhibition catalogue for Designing Home: Jews and Midcentury Modernism, produced by the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco. Offering “a fresh take on the popular topic of twentieth-century domestic design,” the “elegant” and “graphically stunning” book is “a work of scholarly importance” and “provides interesting cultural tidbits.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.
Astrid Köhler examines Daguerreotypes: Fugitive Subjects, Contemporary Objects by Lisa Saltzman. The volume “distinguishes itself from most other theories of photography, both in content and approach, via a lucid analysis” that “brings together heterogeneous objects that share a distinctive relation to time, identity, and memory.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.
Filed under: caa.reviews, Uncategorized

New in caa.reviews

posted by January 20, 2017

Amanda Cachia visits Electronic Superhighway (2016–1966) at Whitechapel Gallery in London. The “ambitious exhibition” covers “fifty years of digital culture” and considers “how the world’s ceaseless flow of electronic information and unrelenting proliferation of images have come to impact contemporary art.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Lauran Whitworth reviews Art AIDS America, organized by the Tacoma Museum of Art and the Bronx Museum of the Arts. Aiming “to be the most comprehensive exploration of the impact of AIDS on the course of American art,” the “powerful” show is “haunted by loss and erasure but simultaneously teeming with verve and resistance.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Elizabeth M. Molacek discusses the Power and Pathos: Bronze Sculpture of the Hellenistic World exhibition, curated by Jens Daehner and Kenneth Lapatin of the Getty Villa. “A feast for the eyes,” the exhibition provided “an unprecedented opportunity” to see nearly fifty objects and “succeeded in demonstrating the significance of bronze and defining the trajectory of monumental sculpture in the Hellenistic period.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Anna Blume reads Images Take Flight: Feather Art in Mexico and Europe, 1400–1700, edited by Alessandra Russo, Gerhard Wolf, and Diana Fane. The “scholarly and magnificent book” features thirty-three essays “that reveal how feathers, birds, and images of flight became defining signifiers within art, thinking, and history during the geographical expansion of Europe into the Americas.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Filed under: caa.reviews, Uncategorized