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Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts produces a curated list, called CWA Picks, of recommended exhibitions and events related to feminist art and scholarship in North America and around the world.

The CWA Picks for May 2013 include solo exhibitions of work by Hung Liu at the Oakland Museum of California, Kara Walker at the Art Institute of Chicago, Gillian Wearing at the Museum Brandhorst in Munich, Latoya Ruby Frazier at the Brooklyn Museum, and Wangechi Mutu at the Nasher Museum of Art in Durham, North Carolina. Of special note is a two-person show at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, called Parallel Practices, that features the first major presentation in the United States of work by the French body artist Gina Pane (1939–1990) alongside her contemporary, the American Joan Jonas.

Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

Image: Gina Pane, Azione Sentimentale, 1973, seven color photographs on wood panel, 48¼ x 40⅛ in. (artwork © Gina Pane; photograph by Francoise Masson and provided by ADAGP, Anne Marchand, and Kamel Mennour, Paris)



Filed under: Committees, Exhibitions

Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts produces a curated list, called CWA Picks, of recommended exhibitions and events related to feminist art and scholarship in North America and around the world.

The CWA Picks for April 2013 are composed of seven significant exhibitions now on view in Europe, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The Moderna Museet in Stockholm, Sweden, is hosting the traveling retrospective Hilma af Klint: A Pioneer of Abstraction, and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid is presenting a survey of work by Cristina Iglesias, who lives and works in the Spanish capital. Visitors to the British Isles can see daring painting and sculpture in Dorothy Iannone: Innocent and Aware at the Camden Arts Centre in London and extraordinary photographs by Edith Tudor-Hart at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh. Across the pond, institutions in New York are displaying hybrid drawings by the Italian Pop artist Giosetta Fiorni, video installations and photographs by the Belgian filmmaker Chantal Akerman, and strikingly innovative prints by the American Impressionist Mary Cassatt.

Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

Image: installation view of Cristina Iglesias: Metonymy at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid



Filed under: Committees, Exhibitions

Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts produces a curated list, called CWA Picks, of recommended exhibitions and events related to feminist art and scholarship in North America and around the world.

The CWA Picks for March 2013 are composed of three important exhibitions on the East Coast of the United States. Organized by Dena Muller, Jay Defeo: A Retrospective will be on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York through June 2, after its celebrated first presentation at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in California in 2012–13. Also in New York, the Bronx Museum of the Arts is presenting paintings created since 2001 by Joan Semmel. Finally, Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore and University of the Arts in Philadelphia are hosting Lenore Tawney: Wholly Unlooked For, a multivenue exhibition of work by this pioneering fiber artist.

Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

Image: Jay DeFeo working on what was then titled Deathrose, 1960 (photograph by Burt Glinn and © Burt Glinn/Magnum Photos)



Filed under: Committees, Exhibitions

2013 Regional MFA Exhibition at NYCAMS

posted by Christopher Howard


The New York Center for Art and Media Studies (NYCAMS) will host the annual CAA Regional MFA exhibition, on view February 12–27, 2013. Coinciding with the 101st Annual Conference, this exhibition, called Make It Work, will bring together a selection of artists from some of the New York area’s brightest art programs. The opening reception will take place on Friday evening, February 15, 6:00–9:00 PM.

The guest curator, Barbara Pollack, is an artist and critic whose writings have been published in Vanity Fair, the New York Times, ARTnews, and Time Out New York. Her essay for the exhibition appears below.

The artists come from seven area schools: Brooklyn College, City University of New York; New Jersey City University; the New York Academy of Art; Parsons the New School for Design; Pratt Institute; Stonybrook University, State University of New York; and the School of Art and Design at Purchase College, State University of New York.

Gallery hours are Monday–Friday, 10:00 AM–5:00 PM or by appointment. NYCAMS 
is located at 44 West 28th Street, Seventh Floor,
 New York, NY 10001. Contact the gallery at 212-213-8052.

Make It Work

Art making is a long and difficult journey, with practitioners balancing the need for mastering a range of techniques against the desire to achieve unique expression. Nowhere is this tension felt more acutely than in art school, where the individual is often pitted against the group and, indeed, against authorities figures, on their way to making work that truly is self-expressive. I watch my own students struggle between the need for approval—am I doing this right?—and the courage to embark on their own path, between perfecting skill and defying convention.

The artists in this exhibition are still enrolled in graduate school—Brooklyn College, New Jersey City University, the New York Academy of Art, Parsons, Pratt, Stony Brook, and Purchase—all esteemed programs that have produced many of New York’s leading artists. But even though they are students, these individuals have already become full-fledged artists, experimenting and creating as all artists do on their way to realizing fully formed concepts and productions. Using a variety of media—sculpture, painting, photography, video, and digital printmaking—they manage not only to “make work,” but also to make work that challenges ideas about what work is.

In this exhibition you find diverse practices even within a single academic program. John Ros from Brooklyn College creates a landscape of drywall and fluorescent lights, laid out on the floor, while his classmate Kate McGraw combines abstraction and folk art in her brightly patterned drawings. Sergio Villamizar from New Jersey City University takes inspiration from comic-book depictions of superheroes as his colleague Darren Fisher constructs a hostile, aggressive contraption in a work called Surface Tension. The contributions of two students from the New York Academy of Art, Elizabeth Glaessner and Robert Fundis, make a strong case for the vitality of realist painting. But check out Spidey by Ezra Thompson from Stony Brook, a hauntingly suggestive canvas of a boy trick-or-treating.

There are captivating videos on view: Christine Howard Sandoval (Parsons) films a walk along the city’s waterfront, and Judith Shimer (Pratt) is hysterically funny in her Ugly Video. In One Act Video in Several Scenes, Samantha Harmon (Purchase) dissects the moving-images aspect of video by depicting a sequence of still photographs of tiny maquettes of buildings. Sculpture also is particularly strong: Jonathan Stanish (Pratt) displays an assemblage, titled Leisure, comprising a mannequin and silkscreen print; Elianna Mesaikos (Purchase) presents Filthy Gorgeous, made on the spot in the gallery with melted sugar; and Ryann Slauson (Purchase) offers Portrait, a witty replica of a construction site, made from cardboard, plastic, wood, and clay. Slauson is one artist who directly examines the meaning of “work,” but you can discern a similar inquiry in the jagged line of photographs, unframed and tacked to the wall, in Artifacts, an installation by Nicholas Warndorf (Stony Brook), and in the way traditional sculpture is challenged through photographs by the duo Kaitlynn Redell and Sara Jimenez (Parsons).

Make It Work is, of course, the encouraging admonition of Tim Gunn on the television series Project Runway. And I share with him the sense of wanting everyone to do well, everyone to do his or her best. But this exhibition is not a competition, not a Work of Art, the name of another television show that turns contemporary art into a contest. The sixteen participants here are not contestants who approach art making as a competition. In fact, by bringing the artists together in one exhibition, I find an interesting dialogue among them, a shared inquiry into the necessary tools, processes, and attitudes that go into making an artwork—especially one that challenges traditional notions of what an artwork should be. That takes real work, and for that, each participant in this show should be congratulated.




Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts produces a curated list, called CWA Picks, of recommended exhibitions and events related to feminist art and scholarship in North America and around the world.

The CWA Picks for December 2012–January 2013 include several important exhibitions in the United States, England, and Sweden. In New York, Lehman Maupin Gallery is hosting a two-part presentation of new work by Mickalene Thomas, whose traveling survey at the Brooklyn Museum was a November pick. Other events in the city include a temporary performance and installation work by Ann Hamilton at the Park Avenue Armory and sculpture, painting, and drawing by Caroline Burton at Accola Griefen Gallery.

Midcareer retrospectives are trending: the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh is offering a look at painting by Deborah Kass in relation to the Pope of Pop, and the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York is showcasing Rosemarie Trockel’s mixed-media work. Across the Atlantic, Kate Davis has produced work in dialogue with Jo Spence at Drawing Room in London, and Tensta Konsthall in Stockholm is highlighting the full painting and film career of Marie-Louise Ekman.

Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

Image: Deborah Kass, Before and Happily Ever After, 1991, oil and acrylic on canvas, 72 x 60 in. (artwork © Deborah Kass)



Filed under: Committees, Exhibitions

Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts produces a curated list, called CWA Picks, of recommended exhibitions and events related to feminist art and scholarship in North America and around the world.

The CWA Picks for November 2012 include several important exhibitions in New York, New Jersey, and Nebraska, and in Germany. The first is Creeping Ornamentalism, a prescient, timely installation by Susan Hamburger that focuses on the destruction caused by Hurricane Irene in 2011 in New Jersey, Vermont, and Massachusetts.

In New York, the Brooklyn Museum boasts two stellar shows, Materializing “Six Years”: Lucy R. Lippard and the Emergence of Conceptual Art and Mickalene Thomas: Origin of the Universe, and two commercial galleries are showing the work of Sandra Ramos and Penny Slinger. Out west, the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha is showing prints by numerous women artists in Under Pressure. Across the Atlantic, Kunstverein Hamburg presents Kiki Kogelnik: I Have Seen the Future.

Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

Image: Susan Hamburger, detail of a cartouche in the installation of Creeping Ornamentalism, 2012, acrylic-painted collage on paper with foam-board molding, dimensions variable (artwork © Susan Hamburger; photograph provided by the Visual Art Center of New Jersey)



Filed under: Committees, Exhibitions

The Samuel H. Kress Foundation has awarded CAA a start-up grant to support the development of a Code of Best Practices for Fair Use of Copyrighted Images in the Creation and Curation of Artworks and Scholarly Publishing in the Visual Arts. The project will address all areas of the visual arts and involve participants from the fields of art history, studio art, print and online publishing, art museums and related areas.

CAA’s Board of Directors recognized the need for the development of a Code of Best Practices by establishing a Task Force on Fair Use at the May 7, 2012 meeting. The rationale for this undertaking is to address what amounts to a crisis in the visual arts field. At this time, there is significant evidence that concerns around the implications of copyright—and especially uncertainty surrounding the fair use doctrine (currently codified under section 107 of the Copyright Act)—is substantially inhibiting the ability of scholars and artists to develop new work requiring the use of images and other third-party copyrighted works. The visual arts field needs the opportunity to explore and better understand copyright and fair use law, come to a consensus on best practices in the use of third-party images, and adhere to a code that is within the law and practicable for visual arts scholarly publications and creative work.

This fall, with the support of the Kress Foundation, CAA will establish a research plan and administrative framework for developing a comprehensive Code of Best Practices for Fair Use. CAA’s newly-created Task Force on Fair Use will begin work with two recognized authorities on the subject: Peter Jaszi, Professor of Law, Washington School of Law, American University and Pat Aufderheide, Director, Center for Media Studies, American University. Jaszi and Aufderheide, the authors of Reclaiming Fair Use: How to Put Balance Back into Copyright (Chicago University Press, 2011) have worked with numerous disciplines—including documentary film makers, dance archivists, research librarians, and journalists—to develop best practices in fair use. CAA’s Task Force will be co-chaired by Jeffrey P. Cunard (CAA Counsel and Partner, Debevoise & Plimpton) and Gretchen Wagner (CAA Committee on Intellectual Property and ARTstor General Counsel); its other members include Anne Collins Goodyear (CAA President and Associate Curator, Prints and Drawings, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institute); Linda Downs (CAA Executive Director and CEO); Suzanne Blier (CAA Board Member and Allen Whitehill Clowes Professor of Fine Arts and of African and African American Studies, Harvard University); DeWitt Godfrey (CAA Vice President for Committees and Director, Institute for Creative and Performing Arts, Colgate University); Randall C. Griffin (ex-officio as CAA Vice President for Publications, Professor, Division of Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, Southern Methodist University); Paul Jaskot (CAA Past President and Professor of History of Art and Architecture, DePaul University); Patricia McDonnell (CAA Vice President for External Affairs and Director, Wichita Art Museum); Charles Wright (CAA Board Member and Chair, Department of Art, Western Illinois University). Throughout the project, CAA will involve its members and the larger visual arts community in building a comprehensive Code designed to serve all members of its constituency. CAA’s Committee on Intellectual Property will address CAA’s work on Fair Use at its upcoming public session at the Annual Meeting in February 2013 (Saturday, February 16, at 12:30 pm).

 




Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts produces a curated list, called CWA Picks, of recommended exhibitions and events related to feminist art and scholarship in North Americn and around the world.

The CWA Picks for August 2012 include several important exhibitions in New York and a handful on view this month in Europe. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is hosting a survey of work by the Dutch photographer and video artist Rineke Dijkstra; the Whitney Museum of American Art has given over its third floor to Sharon Hayes, who is incorporating performance into her exhibition of photography and video; and the Brooklyn Museum is presenting a collaborative project led by Ulrike Müller in its Raw/Cooked series, which features artists who live and work in the borough.

Across the Atlantic, MUSAC in León, Spain, has staged Feminist Genealogies in Spanish Art: 1960–2010, organized by Juan Vicente Aliaga and Patricia Mayayo, which investigates the underrecognized role that feminist activism and theory has played in Spanish art since the 1960s. Elsewhere, the Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos has created an installation of large-scale sculptures in the Palace of Versailles, and Goldsmiths in London has spread work by Su Richardson across two venues in London.

Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

Image: Rineke Dijkstra, The Krazyhouse (Megan, Simon, Nicky, Philip, Dee), Liverpool, UK, 2009, four-channel HD video projection with sound, 32 min., looped (artwork © Rineke Dijkstra; photograph provided by the artist, Marian Goodman Gallery, New York and Paris, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum)



Filed under: Committees, Exhibitions

Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts produces a curated list, called CWA Picks, of recommended exhibitions and events related to feminist art and scholarship in North Americn and around the world.

The CWA Picks for April 2012 include exhibitions from all over the United States and Europe. Kate Gilmore shows new videos at David Castillo Gallery in Miami, the city in which the German-born artist Dara Friedman filmed her most recent work, Dancer, which makes its debut at CAM Raleigh in North Carolina. Other April picks include exhibitions of new work by Sturtevant in Stockholm, Sarah Braman in Los Angeles, and Jacqueline Humphries in New York, as well as a retrospective of paintings and works on paper by Jaune Quick-to-See Smith at the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

Image: Kate Gilmore, Rock, Hard, Place, 2012, high-definition color video with sound, 11:15 min. (artwork © Kate Gilmore; photograph provided by David Castillo Gallery)



Filed under: Committees, Exhibitions

Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts produces a curated list, called CWA Picks, of recommended exhibitions and events related to feminist art and scholarship in North Americn and around the world.

The CWA Picks for March 2012 go international with solo exhibitions of work by Rosemarie Trockel in Belgium, Eija-Liisa Ahtila in Sweden, and Kimsooja in France. In the United States, the Museum of Modern Art in New York is hosting a career survey of photographs by Cindy Sherman, arguably one of the most influential artists of the past fifty years. Close at her heels are the Guerrilla Girls, who have taken over two galleries at Columbia College Chicago for their own retrospective, which comprises their important works of art and activism since the 1980s. Rounding out the March picks are a special collaboration between the British artist Rachel Kneebone and the French sculptor Auguste Rodin at the Brooklyn Museum and the graphic production of Sister Mary Corita at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, DC.

Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

Image: Cindy Sherman, Untitled #463, 2007–8, chromogenic color print, 68⅝ x 72 in. (artwork © Cindy Sherman; photograph provided by the artist, Metro Pictures, and the Museum of Modern Art)



Filed under: Committees, Exhibitions

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