College Art Association

CAA News Today

Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts produces a curated list, called CWA Picks, of recommended exhibitions and events related to feminist art and scholarship in North America and around the world.

Leading off the CWA Picks for December 2011 is an exhibition at the Gibbes Museum of Art in South Carolina covering three hundred years of work by women artists such as Henrietta de Beaulieu Dering Johnston, who is considered the first female professional artist in America. Three solo shows in New York are also worth checking out: new photographs by Nan Goldin, sculptural installations from Sarah Sze, and a Sanja Iverković survey.

Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

Image: Henrietta de Beaulieu Dering Johnston, Henriette Charlotte Chastaigner (Mrs. Nathaniel Broughton), 1711, pastel on paper, 14 2/5 x 11 3/5 in. Gibbes Museum of Art, Gift of Victor A. Morawetz (artwork in the public domain)

Filed under: Committees, Exhibitions

Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts produces a curated list, called CWA Picks, of recommended exhibitions and events related to feminist art and scholarship in North America and around the world.

Leading off the CWA Picks for November 2011 are two concurrent but unique exhibitions—at the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art in Connecticut and the Leubsdorf Gallery at Hunter College in New York—by the artist, poet, and performer Patti Smith, known for her 1975 album Horses and her collaborations and friendship with the late Robert Mapplethorpe. Next, the committee highlights the second annual Feminist Art History Conference, taking place November 4–6 at American University in Washington, DC. Papers will cover a wide range of topics in art history, from medieval times to the present. Surveys of work by Francesca Woodman and Sherri Levine round out the November selections.

Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

Image: Patti Smith, Arthur Rimbaud’s Utensils, Musée Rimbaud, Charleville, 2005, unique Polaroid, 4¼ x 3¼ in. (artwork © Patti Smith; photograph provided by the artist, Robert Miller Gallery, and the Wadsworth Atheneum)

Filed under: Committees, Exhibitions

Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts produces a curated list, called CWA Picks, of recommended exhibitions and events related to feminist art and scholarship in North America and around the world.

The CWA Picks for October 2011 comprise nine exhibitions on view in the United States and Australia. Of special note are solo museum shows by the celebrated painters Charline von Heyl in Philadelphia and Dana Schutz in Purchase, New York, and a gallery exhibition of work by the sculptor Harmony Hammond. This month the Fuller Craft Museum in Brockton, Massachusetts, wraps up an exhibition, Furniture Divas, of recent functional creations by women artists and designers; and A Different Temporality examines feminism and art in Australia from 1975 to 1985.

Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

Image: Vivian Beer, Anchored Candy No. 1, 2008, steel, automotive finish, and patina (photograph by Allison Swiatosha and provided by the artist and the Fuller Craft Museum)

Filed under: Committees, Exhibitions

Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts produces a curated list, called CWA Picks, of recommended exhibitions and events related to feminist art and scholarship in North America and around the world.

The CWA Picks for September 2011 include an academic conference hosted by Purdue University in Indiana that addresses tenure issues for women professors. The picks also highlight several exhibitions of historical and contemporary art on view in the United States and abroad. In Nashville, the Frist Center for the Visual Arts presents Travey Snelling’s “Woman on the Run,” and the Philadelphia Museum of Art will soon open the much-anticipated Zaha Hadid: Form in Motion, which looks at the architect’s furniture, objects, and footwear.

In Europe, the Palazzo Reale in Milan is staging Artemisia Gentileschi: Story of a Passion, the Baroque painter’s first-ever survey in Italy. Up north in Brussels, a contemporary art center is showing work by the twentieth-century Polish sculptor Alina Szapocznikow, and Tate Britain in London is presenting a unique group exhibition called Thin Black Line(s).

Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

Image: Zaha Hadid, WMF Flatware, 2007, stainless steel, dinner fork, 8¾ in.; salad fork, 6⅝ in.; dinner knife, 9⅛ in.; teaspoon, 5⅞ in.; soup spoon, 8⅞ in. Made by Württembergische Metallwarenfabrik AG, Geislingen, Germany (photograph provided by the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Zaha Hadid Architects)

Filed under: Committees, Exhibitions

Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts produces a curated list, called CWA Picks, of recommended exhibitions and events related to feminist art and scholarship in North America and around the world.

The CWA Picks for July–August 2011 shine invigorating spotlights on two momentous forces that supported and inspired international artistic developments in the twentieth century: the Baltimore sisters Claribel and Etta Cone, and the writer and impresario Gertrude Stein. The Jewish Museum in New York hosts an exhibition dedicated to the Cones’ stunning collection of modern art, and the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco focuses on the Stein’s life and legacy.

If in New York, CWA also suggests viewing a new multichannel video work by Dara Birnbaum at Marian Goodman Gallery and taking a journey around the world via Ruth Gruber’s photographs at the International Center of Photography. Elsewhere, The Guerrilla Girls Talk Back is a recommended exhibition of newly acquired prints, multiples, and ephemera at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, DC, and Claude Cahun’s comprehensive retrospective at Jeu de Paume in Paris, France, addresses issues in feminist scholarship and turning points in the understanding of the female artist.

Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

Image: Claribel Cone, Gertrude Stein, and Etta Cone sitting a table in Settignano, Italy, June 26, 1903. Baltimore Museum of Art. Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone Papers, Archives and Manuscripts Collection, CG.12 (photograph provided by the Baltimore Museum of Art)

Filed under: Committees, Exhibitions

Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts produces a curated list, called CWA Picks, of recommended exhibitions and events related to feminist art and scholarship in North America and around the world.

The CWA Picks for June 2011 include a nationwide list of screenings for !Women Art Revolution, Lynn Hershman Leeson’s documentary film on the feminist art movement, and a retrospective of the work of the mask-clad Guerrilla Girls, opening at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, DC. In addition, two events—a three-day conference in Lisbon and a survey of the infamous Young British Artist, Tracey Emin, in London—give an international flavor to the picks.

Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

Filed under: Committees, Exhibitions

Audio of the 2011 CAA Centennial Session on “Feminism,” chaired by Norma Broude of American University and Griselda Pollock of the University of Leeds, has been uploaded to the website of Documenta, the major international art exhibition that takes place every five years in Kassel, Germany. The next one, Documenta 13, is scheduled for June 9–September 16, 2012, and its website has become a repository for news on preliminary events and happenings as well as a forum for discussing timely issues in the art world. Its artistic director, Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, a panelist in the “Feminism” session, arranged to have the 2½-hour audio recording posted to the Documenta website, where it will be permanently archived and available to promote discussion among a worldwide array of visitors to that site.

The CAA session was organized as two panels: the first on “Attaining Full Equality: Women, Artists, Museums, and Markets,” moderated by Broude, and the second on “New Directions and International Perspectives in Feminist Art History,” led by Pollock. After four decades of feminist scholarship and political activism in the art world, and on the occasion of CAA’s centenary, the session brought together a cross-generational and international group of museum-affiliated curators, international art-fair and exhibition organizers, art-market experts, and art historians to share their perspectives on present accomplishments, institutional impediments, productive strategies, and future frontiers for feminism’s creative enterprise.

Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts produces a curated list, called CWA Picks, of recommended exhibitions and events related to feminist art and scholarship in North America and around the world.

The CWA Picks for May 2011 include an exhibition of new work by Uta Barth at the Art Institute of Chicago, a career-spanning survey for Loïs Mailou Jones at the Women’s Museum in Dallas, and a show at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, called Women Who Rock: Vision, Passion, Power.

In addition, two events—a graduate-student symposium and a lecture by Gail Levin—will take place next weekend (May 14–15) at the Brooklyn Museum in New York.

Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

Image: Chrissie Hynde’s jacket for the cover of the Pretenders’ self-titled debut album from 1980 (photograph provided by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum)

Filed under: Committees, Exhibitions

Svetlana Mintcheva, director of programs at the National Coalition Against Censorship, reports on a recent meeting about the Hide/Seek controversy that was held at Rutgers University earlier this month. The first two paragraphs are below; you may also read the full article.

Hide/Seek: Museums, Ethics, and the Press

Hide/Seek may be remembered as the censorship controversy that launched a hundred discussion panels. There were public statements and street protests, of course, letters to the Smithsonian Board of Regents and articles in the press, but most of all, there were the conferences. Starting with a gathering at the Jewish Community Center in Washington, DC, spreading to the West Coast, and featuring major public events at the Corcoran and the New Museum, these discussions responded to an apparently endless desire to analyze and assign blame, to blow off steam and extract lessons, and to place what happened within the history of Culture Wars in America.

An April 9 symposium, “Hide/Seek: Museum, Ethics, and the Press,” organized by the Institute of Museum Ethics at Seton Hall University and the Institute for Ethical Leadership at Rutgers Business School, had the goal of framing the issues surrounding the Hide/Seek controversy as ethical ones. Daniel Okrent, former chairman of the National Portrait Gallery, opened the event by posing several key questions: Is choosing to do a controversial show an ethical decision? Should a show ever be changed after opening? What happens after a controversy in terms of institutional definition and future planning? A diverse group of participants from such disciplines as art history, law, political science, and philosophy, as well as Smithsonian representatives and one journalist, attempted to grapple with these issues and more.

Read the full article in the Features section.

Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts produces a curated list, called CWA Picks, of recommended exhibitions and events related to feminist art and scholarship in North America and around the world.

The CWA Picks for April 2011 include three exhibitions: Sheila Hicks: 50 Years in Philadelphia, Lynda Benglis in New York, and Vija Celmins: Television and Disaster 1964–1966 in Los Angeles. The committee also selected a conversation between the artist Diane Burko and the geographer Åsa Rennermalm, who will discuss climate issues and activism.

Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

Filed under: Committees, Exhibitions