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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by February 14, 2018

Former President Barack Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama stand next to their newly unveiled portraits during a ceremony Monday at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Trump’s Budget Plan Again Calls for Slashing Arts, Public Media Funding

For a second year, President Trump has proposed the elimination of federal funding for public media and the arts. (Billboard)

Paintings of Barack and Michelle Obama Unveiled at Portrait Gallery

The paintings, by Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald respectively, are a historic first. (NPR)

Werner’s Nomenclature of Colours: a Pre-Photographic Guide for Artists and Naturalists

A look at the preeminent guide to color for artists, scientists, naturalists, and anthropologists in the 19th-century. (Colossal)

The Greatest Lovers in Art History, from Frida Kahlo and Auguste Rodin to Nan Goldin

Love it or hate it, get in the Valentine’s Day spirit with these artworks. (Artsy)

One of the Earliest Illustrated Medical Books Offers a Lens Into Medieval Health

Originally published in 1491, Fasciculus medicinae quickly proved popular, and dozens of editions followed until 1522. (Hyperallergic)

Meet the Brooklyn Puppet Designer Behind the Fantastical Olympics Opening Ceremony

A five-minute performance represented a year of hard work for artist Nicholas Mahon. (artnet News)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by February 07, 2018

John Singleton Copley, Mrs. James Warren (Mercy Otis), ca 1763, oil on canvas (© Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Bequest of Winslow Warren)

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Boston and Philadelphia’s Art Museums Gamble Loaning a Painting on the Super Bowl

It looks like the MFA will be sending John Singleton Copley’s Mrs. James Warren (Mercy Otis) to the City of Brotherly Love. (Hyperallergic)

A Peek at Famous Readers’ Borrowing Records from a Private New York Library

Thanks to carefully maintained circulation info, we know when Alexander Hamilton checked out Goethe. (Atlas Obscura)

Sprawling Maya Network Discovered Under Guatemala Jungle

Laser technology was used to survey digitally beneath the forest canopy, revealing houses, palaces, elevated highways, and defensive fortifications. (BBC)

Liberal Indoctrination? Not So Much

New research suggests that college is a time when students gain appreciation of multiple perspectives. (Inside Higher Ed)

7 Artists Reinventing the Ancient Art of Mosaics

From the floors of ancient Pompeii to the walls of the New York subway, mosaics have been a feature of urban life for thousands of years. (Artsy)

AI May Have Just Decoded a Mystical 600-Year-Old Manuscript That Baffled Humans for Decades

The 240-page Voynich manuscript is written in an unknown script and an unknown language that no one has been able to interpret—until now. (artnet News)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 31, 2018

Athi-Patra Ruga, Miss Azania — Exile is waiting, 2015, South Africa, 11th African Biennale of Photography

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Paris on Alert as River Seine Continues to Rise and Louvre Shuts Basements

The iconic museum had to close its basement amid the flooding, in a bid to protect the priceless artworks on display there. (The Sun)

Morris Louis Painting Shown at Jewish Museum, This Time Right-Side-Up

After years of being hung incorrectly, a work by Morris Louis has now been flipped 180 degrees. (New York Times)

PHOTOS: Shaking Up the Idea of What Africa Looks Like

The 11th African Biennale of Photography explores topics of identity and possibility through the theme of “Afrotopia.” (NPR)

Two Rodin Shows Cast the Sculptor’s Legacy in Very Different Lights

In New York, two major Rodin shows are up at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Brooklyn Museum. (Hyperallergic)

Around the World in 14,000 “Do Not Disturb” Signs

Collector Edoardo Flores has amassed a collection of over 14,000 designs from more than 200 countries. (Atlas Obscura)

Languages Prioritized Over Arts in UK Government Teacher Plans

As the UK pushes for 75% of its students to study a foreign language, teaching time devoted to music, drama, art and design in secondary schools is set to drop. (Art Professional)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 24, 2018

Members of activist-artist collective We Make America at the NYC Women’s March. Photo: Deborah Stein, via Hyperallergic.

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Signs of Creative Resistance at the 2018 Women’s March

For the second year in a row, creativity was on full display. (Hyperallergic)

The Artist Questioning Authorship

Danh Vo’s art recasts the historical events and political ideas that have shaped his world. (The New Yorker)

Recovering Our Lost Public Esteem

Three ways higher education leaders can respond to declining public support and confidence. (Inside Higher Ed)

The Farewell to Utopia in Revolutionary Cuban Art

An interview with Rachel Weiss, author and professor of Arts Administration and Policy at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. (Walker Reader)

The Ballets Russes Showcased Some of Picasso’s and Matisse’s Most Experimental Work

A look at the work of the groundbreaking dance company, active between 1909 and 1929. (Artsy)

A Checklist for Transformative Leaders

Transformative leadership is about shared ownership — buy-in rather than buying. (Chronicle of Higher Education)

 

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 17, 2018

MLK Jr. mural at Callowhill and 2nd Avenue, Gift of Life, Philadelphia, 2009. Photo: Camilo José Vergara

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

A Wall Street Giant Makes a $75 Million Bet on Academic Philosophy

The gift appears to be the largest by far to a philosophy department anywhere in the world. (New York Times)

Google App Goes Viral Making an Art Out of Matching Faces to Paintings

The Google Arts & Culture app tapped into the zeitgeist over the weekend, allowing social media users to share their doppelgangers from art history. (NPR)

Artists, Museum Directors, Scholars Voice Concern about Documenta’s Future

An open letter calls for business chief Annette Kulenkampff’s reinstatement and a new budget plan. (The Art Newspaper)

Why These 6 Artists Destroyed Their Own Art

Six stories of artists who chose to destroy their own art, including Michelangelo, Monet, and Georgia O’Keeffe. (Artsy)

The Martin Luther King Jr. Murals of America

Since the 1970s, Camilo José Vergara has documented hand-painted images of the civil rights leader across the US. (Citylab)

Helen Maudsley on How to Read Art: “Learn to Do What the Picture Tells You”

After a career spanning seven decades, the 90-year-old Australian artist expects her audience to put in an effort. (The Guardian)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 10, 2018

Betty Woodman in her studio. The sculptor passed away this week at the age of 87. Photo: Stefano Porcinai, courtesy Salon 94 via artnet News.

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Backlash Building against La Salle University over Art Sale

The American Alliance of Museums and the Association of Art Museum Directors condemned a plan by La Salle University to sell 46 artworks from its collection. (Philadelphia Inquirer)

The Met Museum Is Changing Its Pay-As-You-Wish Admission Policy

Beginning March 1, The Metropolitan Museum of Art will charge a mandatory admission fee to visitors who do not live in New York State. (Huffington Post)

Betty Woodman, Visionary Sculptor of Ceramic Vessels, Has Died at 87

Woodman had been working with her chosen medium since her high school years, in the 1940s. (artnet News)

First Center for Empathy and Art Launched in Minneapolis

The center will bring together researchers, artists, historians and philosophers to learn how art museums can promote empathy and understanding. (Smithsonian Magazine)

As Flow of Foreign Students Wanes, US Universities Feel the Sting

The downturn follows a decade of explosive growth in foreign student enrollment. (New York Times)

Why the Magritte Foundation Still Authenticates Work, as Other Foundations Back Away

The Magritte Foundation was founded in 1998 in Brussels to safeguard the work and reputation of the artist. (Artsy)

 

 

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 03, 2018

Tim Rollins and K.O.S. in 1988. Photo: Mary Boone Gallery via ARTnews

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Tim Rollins, Artist and Activist Whose Work Thrived on Collaboration, Dies at 62

Much of Rollins’s work was produced in collaboration with a group known as the Kids of Survival, or K.O.S. (ARTnews)

Art Historian Finds Missing Monet Painting Through a Google Search

Believed to have been missing since 1895, Monet’s painting Effet de Brouillard (1872) will soon go on view. (Hyperallergic)

Saddle Up: 7 Trends in Higher Education Coming in 2018

Lisa M. Rudgers and Julie A. Peterson predict the challenges that higher education will face in the coming year. (Inside Higher Ed)

37 Museums in Southern California Will Be Free on January 28

Institutions including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Pasadena Museum of California Art, and the Craft & Folk Art Museum are participating in the free admission initiative. (Hyperallergic)

A Look Inside Cézanne’s Studio, Through the Eyes of Joel Meyerowitz

A fitting homage to an artist who once wrote, “Painting is first and foremost an optical affair. The stuff of our art is there, in what our eyes are thinking.” (The New Yorker)

Eight of Art History’s Greatest Mysteries—from Stonehenge to Banksy

The study of artworks and objects of visual culture is a tantalizing exercise in unraveling the unknown. (Artsy)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by December 20, 2017

An MIT student perusing works available through the school’s Student Loan Art Program (courtesy MIT List Visual Arts Center, photo by John Kennard)

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

8 US Colleges Lending Their Art Collections to Students

Making art collections available to students has grown in popularity on campuses across the country. (Hyperallergic)

Is Higher Education Really Losing the Public?

New public opinion data suggest that despite significant concerns about prices, most Americans (and many Republicans) believe a postsecondary education is essential. (Inside Higher Ed)

Culture Track ’17 Finds American Definition of Culture Changing

A new study shows the distinction between fine art and pop art becoming blurred, as Benjamin Millepied, 2018 CAA Keynote Speaker Charles Gaines, and other city arts leaders discuss the implications for museums and creators. (The Hollywood Reporter)

On Neuroaesthetics, or the Productive Exercise of Looking at Art

Jonathan Fineberg is director of an emerging art-science PhD program at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. (Hyperallergic)

Documents Reveal How the Berkshire Museum Manipulated Its Board Into Liquidating Its Collection

How does a museum end up deciding to sell off substantially all of its most valuable artworks? (Artnet News)

CEOs Are Going to Art School to Think More Creatively

RISD launched a continuing education program in 2016 aimed at today’s global leaders. (Artsy)

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by December 13, 2017

“The Director and the Pharaoh: How Thomas Hoving Created the Museum Blockbuster.” Photo from Bettmann Archive, via Vulture.

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

How Medieval Manuscript Makers Experimented with Graphic Design

Designing English: Graphics on the Medieval Page at the University of Oxford considers how early English manuscripts approached graphic design. (Hyperallergic)

Is Culture in the Americas in Big Trouble? Arts Leaders Say Yes

Takeaways from a recent panel with artist Jordan Casteel, Brooklyn Museum director Anne Pasternak, Contemporary Arts Museum Houston director Bill Arning, and writer and photographer Teju Cole. (Artsy)

Archaeologists Are Using Drones to Map Ancient Venezuelan Rock Art

The Cotúa Island-Orinoco Reflexive Archaeology Project is mapping some of the world’s best-known petroglyphs in unprecedented detail. (Artnet News)

Basel Baby: A Local’s First Journey Into the Madness of Miami Art Week

“When you grow up here, you see Basel as a kind of abstract happening.” (Miami New Times)

Documenting Nostalgia on Route 66

Filmmaker and photographer Phil Donohue shot scenes along the famed US highway to explore what we long for and leave behind. (CityLab) 

The Director and the Pharaoh: How Thomas Hoving Created the Museum Blockbuster

The Treasures of Tutankhamun, which landed at the Metropolitan Museum in 1978 at the end of a six-city American tour, abounded in riches of every kind. (Vulture)

 

Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by December 06, 2017

Pieter de Hooch, Woman Weighing Coins (c. 1664), oil on canvas (image courtesy of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie, property of Kaiser Friedrich Museumsverein), included in Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting.

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Academics and Artists Weigh In on Controversial City Monuments

Over 120 academics and artists have urged Mayor Bill de Blasio to remove five public monuments and markers they say celebrate racism. (New York Times)

The High Life of Vermeer and his Contemporaries

An exhibition at the National Gallery of Art reinserts Vermeer into the tradition in which he worked, both demystifying his paintings and lending force to his take on the genre. (Hyperallergic)

Seven of the Met’s Tiniest Masterpieces

From a 19th-century necklace of miniature portraits to an ancient Egyptian scarab, here are seven of the Met’s tiniest works of art. (Artsy)

Teenagers in Maryland Create a Pop-Up Museum to Explain Their Lives and Struggles

The Museum of Contemporary American Teenagers (MoCAT) is scheduled to open today. (Washington Post)

A Whale’s Tale: Longest Painting in North America Restored

A museum has restored the longest painting in North America so it can share the story of American whaling. (Associated Press)

UK Museums’ Right to Charge Image Fees is Called into Question

A campaign for institutions to free up photographs of out-of-copyright works is backed by legal experts. (The Art Newspaper)

Filed under: CAA News