College Art Association

CAA News Today

The College Art Association (CAA) has been awarded a $132,600 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support the development of Resources for Academic Art Museum Professionals (RAAMP), a free, publicly accessible website that will collect, store, and share resources for professionals in academic art museums. RAAMP will promote scholarship, advocacy, and discussion related to academic art museums and their contributions to the educational mission of their parent institutions. CAA and its Museum Committee will develop RAAMP and manage its peer-generated content with the assistance of project partners, which include the Association for Academic Museums and Galleries (AAMG) and the Association of Art Museum Curators (AAMC).

Linda Downs, CAA executive director, said, “The RAAMP project was initiated by the CAA Museum Committee members N. Elizabeth Schlatter, Deputy Director and Curator of Exhibitions, University of Richmond and Celka Straughn, Andrew W. Mellon Director of Academic Programs at the Spencer Museum of Art who recognized the professional needs of academic art museum to share resources in order to better integrate museum collections into interdisciplinary study through a social community system. CAA is excited about this important initiative that will provide a prototype for similar forums.”

“Through its College and University Art Museums program, the Mellon Foundation has been a long-term supporter of the integration of college and university art museums into the curriculum and research cultures of their host institutions,” said Mariët Westermann, vice president of the Mellon Foundation. “We are therefore pleased to provide a grant to CAA for the creation of an online repository and exchange hub that will further strengthen the collaboration between academic museums and their campus communities.”

RAAMP aims to strengthen the educational mission of academic museums and their parent institutions by providing a dynamic repository of resources, by functioning as a site for news and information, and by supporting public discussion through online forums. The anticipated primary users of RAAMP include academic museum staff: administrators, educators, curators, directors, and conservators. The site would also be a significant asset for university and college administrators, faculty and staff in art and art-history departments, undergraduate and graduate students, and scholars of academic museums. Because RAAMP’s content addresses particular demographic groups—higher education and the visual arts—that are also served by nonacademic museums, the project would be valuable to museum professionals from any institution or background.

RAAMP would specifically benefit users seeking publications, information, research, case studies, professional development, and networking opportunities. Support from the Mellon Foundation will help CAA to determine types of content that would be most beneficial to RAAMP’s audience and contributors, how best to deliver and share this content, and how to facilitate dialogue related to the project’s mission.

DeWitt Godfrey, CAA president and professor of art and art history at Colgate University, said, “This is an important step for the Association to strengthen ties with academic art museums throughout the United States.”

RAAMP was conceived during a 2013 CAA Annual Conference session organized by the Museum Committee, titled “The Position of Academic Programs in Campus Art Museums: What, Why, Who, and Where To?” Session attendees expressed the need to better and more efficiently share information, strategies, and best practices for communicating academic museums’ educational contributions to their parent institutions. Many museums have created innovative programs and practices to serve their campus communities and fully integrate their collections and activities into the academic mission of their college or university. Museums have also worked to apply quantitative and qualitative metrics for mission success.

Leading the project as principal investigators will be: N. Elizabeth Schlatter, deputy director and curator of exhibitions at the University of Richmond Museums in Virginia and a member of CAA’s Museum Committee; and Celka Straughn, Andrew W. Mellon Director of Academic Programs at the University of Kansas’s Spencer Museum of Art and a member of CAA’s Museum Committee. “We are excited to work with colleagues to further develop this accessible resource that reflects that many innovative activities happening at academic museums today. We hope it will serve academic art museums to promote collaboration and demonstrate their educational and scholarly contributions.”

About CAA

The College Art Association is dedicated to providing professional services and resources for artists, art historians, and students in the visual arts. CAA serves as an advocate and a resource for individuals and institutions nationally and internationally by offering forums to discuss the latest developments in the visual arts and art history through its Annual Conference, publications, exhibitions, website, and other programs, services, and events. CAA focuses on a wide range of advocacy issues, including education in the arts, freedom of expression, intellectual-property rights, cultural heritage and preservation, workforce topics in universities and museums, and access to networked information technologies. Representing its members’ professional needs since 1911, CAA is committed to the highest professional and ethical standards of scholarship, creativity, criticism, and teaching. Learn more about CAA at www.collegeart.org.

For more information please contact Nia Page, CAA director of membership, development, and marketing.

Do you have a great thematic lesson plan you want to take some time to codify and share? Funded by a Samuel H. Kress Foundation grant for digital resources, Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR), a peer-populated platform for instructors and a collectively authored online repository of art-history teaching content, seeks contributors for specific thematic subject areas in the art-history survey. This is the third and final call for participation (the first two went out in 2014).

AHTR is particularly interested thematic content, for publication in fall 2015. The following areas are suggestions—ideas for other thematic lesson plans are welcomed and you can see examples of existing lesson plans that engage thematically with, for example, “Race and Identity” and “Globalism and Transnationalism.” Please propose a thematic plan germane to the survey-level class.

Possible themes include but are in no way limited to: Art and Labor, “High” vs. “Low,” Violence, Nature, Manufacture and Industrialization, Queer Art, Globalization, Beyond Europe, Death, Power, Materials, Age, Art Markets, Sex, the Gaze

For each content area, AHTR seeks lecture and lesson plans similar to those developed for its thematic section on Feminism and Art. Full template guidelines will be given for the sections to be included in each plan; writers will be expected to review and amend their plan (if necessary), once edited by AHTR. These plans, which will be posted to the AHTR website in fall 2015, are supported by $250 writing grants made possible by the Kress award.

AHTR is looking for contributors who:

  • Have strong experience teaching the art-history survey and strong interest in developing thoughtful, clear, and detailed lesson plans in particular thematic areas
  • Are committed to delivering lecture content (plan, PowerPoint, resources, activities) for one to two (a maximum of two) thematic content areas in a timely manner. Each content area will be supported by a $250 Kress writing grant
  • Are able to make a September deadline for submission and an early October deadline for any edits
  • Want to engage with a community of peers in conversations about issues in teaching the art-history survey

AHTR’s intention is to offer monetary support for the often-unrewarded task of developing thoughtful lesson plans, to make this work freely accessible (and thus scalable), and to encourage feedback on them so that the website’s content can constantly evolve in tandem with the innovations and best practices in the field. In this way, AHTR wants to encourage new collaborators to the site—both emerging and experienced instructors in art history—who will enhance and expand teaching content. The website also wishes to honor the production of pedagogical content at the university level by offering modest fellowships to support digital means of collaboration among art historians.

Please submit a short, teaching-centered CV and a brief statement of interest that describes which thematic subject area(s) you wish to tackle to teachingarthistorysurvey@gmail.com by April 15, 2015. These initial texts should be delivered to AHTR in June or July 2015.

Filed under: Online Resources, Teaching

The American Council of Learned Societies Humanities E-Book (HEB) released Round 11 of their online collection this August. These 353 titles bring the total of the volumes in the collection to 4,315. The new round includes additional titles from two of HEB’s original publishing partners, Oxford University Press and Harvard University Press, as well as books from new partners such as University of Toronto Press and Michigan State University Press.

All the titles in Humanities E-Book are available to College Art Association members. The American Council of Learned Societies Humanities E-Book (HEB) makes individual subscriptions available through standing membership in any of the 72 ACLS constituent societies.

The subscription offers unlimited access to 4,315 cross-searchable, full-text titles across the humanities and related social sciences. The titles in HEB have been selected and peer reviewed by ACLS constituent learned societies for their continued value in teaching and researching. The collection comprises both in- and out-of-print titles ranging from the 1880s through the present, and includes many prize-winning works. It also includes special series such as the Records of Civilization: http://www.humanitiesebook.org/the-collection/series_ROC.html and the College Art Association Monographs: http://www.humanitiesebook.org/the-collection/series_CAA.html.

Individual subscriptions are ideal for those whose school might not yet have an institutional subscription to HEB or for individual members of a learned society who might not be affiliated with a subscribing institution. (A full list of subscribing institutions can be found on the HEB website, at http://www.humanitiesebook.org/subscriptions-pricing/subscribing-institutions.html.) Individual subscriptions are USD $40.00 for a twelve-month subscription, and College Art Association members can sign up via the HEB website: http://www.humanitiesebook.org/subscriptions-pricing/individuals.html.

For more information about individual subscriptions, contact subscriptions@hebook.org.

Filed under: Online Resources, Publications

JPASS for CAA Members

posted by September 23, 2014

JPASS, a new JSTOR access plan for individuals, is ideal for CAA members who want individual access to JSTOR’s rich archival collections. It is especially valuable for individuals without institutional access; faculty members at institutions with limited access to JSTOR; and adjuncts with irregular access to library resources. Regardless of your professional affiliation, JPASS serves as your personal library card to the expansive selection of journals on JSTOR.

As part of your CAA membership, you may purchase a one-year JPASS access plan for $99—a 50 percent discount on the listed rate!

JPASS includes unlimited reading and up to 120 article downloads—not only to The Art Bulletin and Art Journal but also to more than 1,500 humanities, social science, and science journals in the JSTOR archival collections, including Design Issues, Gesta, Muqarnas, and October.

CAA invites you to review the JPASS collections at http://jpass.jstor.org/collections, where you can view all the journal titles and date ranges that are available to JPASS subscribers, as well as filter titles by subject to help you discover publications of interest to you.

Dedicated support personnel for JPASS are available Monday–Friday, 8:30 AM–5:30 PM EDT. You can also get real-time support via Twitter: @JSTORSupport. Here are other ways to learn more:

To use your member discount to sign up for JPASS, log into your CAA account and click the Member Benefits link on the left and then refer to the JPASS instructions which includes the JSTOR custom link. This will admit you to the JPASS purchase website for CAA members.

JSTOR provides access to the complete back runs of CAA’s journals and preserves them in a long-term archive. Users may search, browse, view, and print full-text, high-resolution PDFs of articles from The Art Bulletin (published since 1913) and Art Journal (published since 1929). Coverage in JSTOR includes the journals’ previous titles from their first issues through 2010. Because of a moving wall that changes annually, the most recent three years (2011–13) are not yet available.

The Art Bulletin and Art Journal are available through JSTOR’s Arts & Sciences III Collection. Users at participating institutions can gain access to these two journals through their institutions—contact your librarian to find out if you are eligible and, if so, how to access the journals. In a separate benefit, CAA offers online access to back issues of its two print publications for CAA members unaffiliated with an institution for $20 a year through a special arrangement with JSTOR. Please contact CAA’s Member Services if you have questions about this benefit.

You can review the tables of contents for The Art Bulletin (1996–present) on the CAA website and for Art Journal (1998–present) on its own website.

Do you have a great lesson plan you want to take some time to codify and share? Funded by a Samuel H. Kress Foundation grant for digital resources, Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR), a peer-populated platform for instructors and a collectively authored online repository of art-history teaching content, seeks contributors for specific subject areas in the art-history survey. This is the second call for participation (the first went out in early 2014).

AHTR is particularly interested the following sections in art and architecture for publication in early fall 2014:

  • Jewish and Early Christian Art and Architecture
  • Byzantine Art and Architecture
  • Islamic Art and Architecture
  • Chinese Art and Architecture (early/pre-1279)
  • Chinese Art and Architecture (after 1279)
  • Japanese Art and Architecture (early)
  • Japanese Art and Architecture (modern)
  • Korean Art (early)
  • Korean Art and Architecture (modern)
  • Art and Architecture of Africa
  • Early Medieval Art in Europe
  • Romanesque Art and Architecture
  • Gothic Art and Architecture
  • Art of Pacific Cultures
  • Eighteenth- and Early-Nineteenth-Century Art in Europe and North America
  • Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Sculpture
  • Twentieth-Century Sculpture

AHTR is also interested in receiving proposals for thematic art-history survey lesson plans. The editors have already received plans that engage with, for example, “Race and Identity” and “Transnationalism and Citizenship.” Please propose a thematic plan germane to the survey-level class.

For each content area, AHTR seeks lecture and lesson plans similar to those developed for its sections on the Americas (pre-1300) and Feminist Art. (Please see a great example here.) Full template guidelines will be given for the sections to be included in each plan; writers will be expected to review and amend their plan (if necessary), once edited by AHTR. These plans, which will be posted to the AHTR website in fall 2014, are supported by $250 writing grants made possible by the Kress award.

AHTR is looking for contributors who:

  • Have strong experience teaching the art-history survey and strong interest in developing thoughtful, clear, and detailed lesson plans in particular subject areas
  • Are committed to delivering lecture content (plan, PowerPoint, resources, activities) for one to two (a maximum of two) content areas in a timely manner. Each content area will be supported by a $250 Kress writing grant.
  • Are able to make a September deadline for submission and an early October deadline for any edits.
  • Want to engage with a community of peers in conversations about issues in teaching the art-history survey

AHTR’s intention is to offer monetary support for the often-unrewarded task of developing thoughtful lesson plans, to make this work freely accessible (and thus scalable), and to encourage feedback on them so that the website’s content can constantly evolve in tandem with the innovations and best practices in the field. In this way, AHTR wants to encourage new collaborators to the site—both emerging and experienced instructors in art history—who will enhance and expand teaching content. It also wishes to honor the production of pedagogical content at the university level by offering modest fellowships to support digital means of collaboration among art historians.

Please submit a short, teaching-centered CV and a brief statement of interest that describes which subject area(s) you wish to tackle to teachingarthistorysurvey@gmail.com. These initial texts should be delivered to AHTR in September 2014. Collaboration on content for further subject areas will be solicited throughout 2014.

Creating a strong online presence is the key to a successful career. During this special workshop for CAA, to be held on Wednesday, February 5, 2014, 3:00–4:00 PM EST, representatives from Wix.com will go over the fundamentals for creating a personal online brand. They will also explain how to choose the best social channels, visual branding, and website creation with Wix.com, a no-code, visual drag-and-drop editor that uses the latest HTML5 technology to help you build the best website possible. With Wix you can have a beautiful, free website in just a few hours.

Filed under: Online Resources, Webinars

Join CAA this Monday for a live video chat and Q&A about the upcoming Annual Conference in Chicago.

WHEN: Monday, January 27, 2014, 3:00 PM (EST)
WHERE: RSVP and watch online here

Want to learn the ins and outs of CAA’s 102nd Annual Conference in advance so you can make the most of the four-day event? Join us online this Monday for a live, interactive Google+ Hangout to get practical tips and advice, as well as answers to all your questions! Whether you’re a job seeker, a first-time attendee, or still trying to decide whether to attend, this event will be a valuable resource for anyone hoping to learn more about the Chicago conference.

In addition to covering the basics of how to register and navigate the conference, this Hangout will cover many frequently asked questions, including:

  • How do I choose among the hundreds of great sessions and events?
  • What resources are available for students and emerging professionals?
  • What’s the best way to make new professional contacts?
  • What is the dress code? What do I need to bring with me?
  • What are this year’s “can’t miss” events and sessions?
  • How can the free mobile app and social media enhance my experience?

Submit your questions in advance to conferenceqs@collegeart.org or on Twitter with the hashtag #CAAConferenceQ.

The presenters will be:

  • Emmanuel Lemakis, Director of Programs, CAA
  • Lauren Stark, Manager of Programs and Archivist, CAA
  • Paul B. Jaskot, Professor, Art History, DePaul University; Past President, CAA
  • Jacqueline Francis, Professor, Visual and Critical Studies, Painting and Drawing, California College of the Arts; Vice President for Annual Conference, CAA
  • Sabina Ott, Professor, Fine Art, Columbia College Chicago; Board of Directors, CAA
  • Laurel O. Peterson, Doctoral Candidate, History of Art, Yale University

Not free on Monday? Don’t worry! The conversation will be archived on CAA’s YouTube page, where you can also watch our last Hangout on CAA’s publishing grant program.

CAA and Routledge are pleased to announce that caa.reviews, an online journal of book and exhibition reviews in the visual arts, is now open access. Born digital in 1998, caa.reviews fosters intellectual and creative engagement with critical issues in art history, museum scholarship, curatorial studies, and studio practice. Published on a continual basis, the content of caa.reviews—assessing scholarly books and catalogues, art exhibitions in museums and galleries around the world, academic conference and symposia, thematic essays, and more—is now freely available to all interested readers worldwide.

Becoming an open-access journal greatly enhances the reach and impact of caa.reviews, which averages approximately 150 texts a year covering all areas and periods of art history and visual studies. Readers will also be able to access several thousand reviews published since the journal’s inception. caa.reviews also publishes a list of recently published books in the arts and a compilation of dissertation titles—both completed and in progress—from graduate programs in the United States, Canada, and Great Britain.

“By offering an open-access caa.reviews, CAA can now share the expertise of its authors across a broad international spectrum of readers. Because the publication provides critical analyses of recent scholarly publications and exhibitions, caa.reviews can introduce the world to a broad range of scholarly, artistic, and curatorial projects,” said Anne Collins Goodyear, president of the CAA Board of Directors.

Earlier this year, Routledge and CAA began a new copublishing partnership. Routledge will now publish and distribute CAA’s journals, The Art Bulletin and Art Journal—both in print and online—and provide a platform for the online journal, caa.reviews. Start exploring caa.reviews today by visiting www.caareviews.org.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities, and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks, and reference works, Taylor & Francis offers content that spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, Technology, and Medicine.

From a network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi, and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff members provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact Tara Golebiewski, journals marketing associate for Taylor & Francis Group.

WHEN: Wednesday, January 15, 3:00 PM (EST)
WHERE: RSVP and watch online here

Whether you’re in the middle of a grant application or just thinking about applying, this live Google Hangout will be a valuable resource for you.

The College Art Association offers a robust program of publishing grants to authors and publishers of scholarly books in art history, visual studies, and related subjects. Join CAA’s director of publications Betty Leigh Hutcheson and editorial manager Alex Gershuny to get practical tips and advice about CAA’s grants, as well as answers to all your questions! You’ll also hear from former juror Susan Higman Larsen (Director of Publishing and Collections Information, Detroit Institute of Arts) about how the awards committee evaluates proposals, and from past grant recipient Karl Whittington (Assistant Professor, Ohio State University) about his experience of the application process.

Submit your questions in advance to caabook@collegeart.org or on Twitter with the hashtag #caapubgrants. Meiss/Mellon Author’s Book Award, the Millard Meiss Publication Fund, and the Wyeth Foundation for American Art Publication Grant.

Learn more about CAA’s publishing grants at www.collegeart.org/publications/pgrants. The spring deadline for the Meiss/Mellon Author’s Book Award and the Millard Meiss Publication Fund is March 15, 2014. The deadline for the Wyeth Foundation for American Art Publication Grant is September 15, 2014. This event will cover all three grants.

Do you have a great lesson plan you want to take some time to codify and share? Following a recently awarded Kress grant for digital resources, Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR), a peer-populated platform for instructors that is home to a constantly evolving, collectively authored online repository of art-history teaching content, seeks contributors for specific subject areas in the art-history survey.

AHTR is particularly interested the following sections in art and architecture for publication in early spring 2014:

  • Ancient Egyptian
  • Ancient Aegean
  • Ancient Greek
  • Ancient Etruscan and Roman
  • Proto-Renaissance and Fourteenth Century Italian Renaissance
  • Fifteenth-Century Italian Renaissance
  • Fifteenth-Century Northern Renaissance

For each content area, AHTR seeks lecture and lesson plans similar to those developed for its sections on Prehistory and Prehistoric Art in Europe and Art of the Ancient Near East. These plans, which will be posted to the AHTR website in early 2014, are supported by $250 writing grants made possible by the Kress award.

All parts in the art-history survey, however, will eventually need to be populated. If your area of interest is not listed above, AHTR is still interested in hearing from you. Let us know which area(s) you’d like to cover: a full list can be found under Survey 1: Prehistory to Gothic and Survey 2: Renaissance to Modern and Contemporary. In addition, we welcome suggestions on how to fill the gaps in these chronologies.

AHTR is looking for contributors who:

  • Have strong experience teaching the art-history survey and strong interest in developing thoughtful, clear, and detailed lesson plans in particular subject areas
  • Are committed to delivering lecture content (plan, PowerPoint, resources, activities) for one to two (a maximum of two) content areas in a timely manner. Each content area will be supported by a $250 Kress writing grant
  • Want to engage with a community of peers in conversations about issues in teaching the art-history survey

AHTR’s intention is to offer monetary support for the often-unrewarded task of developing thoughtful lesson plans, to make this work freely accessible (and thus scalable), and to encourage feedback on them so that the website’s content can constantly evolve in tandem with the innovations and best practices in the field. In this way, AHTR wants to encourage new collaborators to the site—both emerging and experienced instructors in art history—who will enhance and expand teaching content. It also wishes to honor the production of pedagogical content at the university level by offering modest fellowships to support digital means of collaboration among art historians.

Please submit a short, teaching-centered CV and a brief statement of interest that describes which subject area(s) you wish to tackle to teachingarthistorysurvey@gmail.com. These initial texts should be delivered to AHTR in February 2014. Collaboration on content for further subject areas will be solicited throughout 2014.