CAA News Today

Jonathan Fineberg and Art Since 1940

posted by June 22, 2022

A prolific art historian and critic in the fields of 20th and 21st century art and the psychology of art, Jonathan Fineberg has shaped generations of students with his many publications and textbooks. As a long-time member of CAA, Fineberg describes his experience with the organization: 

 “Seymour Slive, one of my favorite art history professors in college told me I should join the College Art Association if I wanted to be an art historian. CAA was (is), he pointed out, my professional association!  I signed up right away (in 1966) and have remained an active member ever since.  I’ve served on the board, I started the “artist interviews” many years ago, I’ve chaired and participated in many sessions and committees over more than fifty years, and until COVID hit I think I only missed one annual conference – my personal protest against the racism and anti LGBTQ+ stance of the state of Louisiana (that was the year we went to New Orleans). I love CAA for the many things it does for artists and art historians.  

 In order to give back this year I decided that I have made my fair share of royalties on my survey book Art Since 1940: Strategies of Being, so I took back the rights from the publisher and have given a high-resolution copy of the last edition to CAA for free download by any students and teachers who want it. You will find it here. I hope it inspires students to love contemporary art as I do and to bring them to join their fellow travelers in the CAA.” 

 CAA is immensely grateful for Fineberg’s generous donation to CAA, a digital version of his seminal work, Art Since 1940: Strategies of Being, 3rd Edition. Fineberg is offering this publication at no-cost access to both members and non-members for three years. A valuable pedagogical resource at many universities, this text is out of print, which presents a problem for many art history professors and students who cannot obtain copies. We are grateful for Fineberg’s donation, and for his fifty-plus-year membership in CAA. 

Pride Month and Art Journal Open

posted by June 08, 2022

 

This Pride Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that center LGBTQ+ topics, as well as gender and sexual identity, in the fields of visual arts and the humanities. This week, we are sharing a bibliography of articles on these topics from our open-access journal Art Journal Open.

 

 

Downey, Kerry. “Creating Good-Enough Containers: Reflections on Queerness in Community-Based Museum Education.” Art Journal Open (January 9, 2019). 

 

Kerry Downey, They said to the ocean, 2016, monotype with chine-collé, 19 x 13.5 in. Printed with Marina Ancona / 10 Grand Press. 

Doyle, Jennifer and David Getsy. “Queer Formalisms: Jennifer Doyle and David Getsy in Conversation.” Art Journal Open (March 31, 2014). 

Math Bass, Body No Body Body, 2012, latex paint on canvas and wood, installation view, Overduin and Kite, Los Angeles, 2012 (artwork © Math Bass; photograph provided by Overduin and Kite) 

Getsy, David J. and Che Gossett, “A Syllabus on Transgender and Nonbinary Methods for Art and Art History.” Art Journal Open (February 4, 2022). Crossover article from Art Journal, 80, no. 4 (Winter 2021). 

Del LaGrace Volcano, Moj of the Antarctic: On the Mountain, Antarctica, 2005, giclée print, 30 x 36 in. (76.2 x 91.4 cm) (artwork © Del LaGrace Volcano)

Latimer, Tirza True. “Introduction: Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives.” Art Journal Open (October 24th, 2013). Crossover article from Art Journal 72, no. 2 (Summer 2013). 

Veronica Friedman, Pages from monthly planners, 1980 and 1981. Veronica Friedman Papers, Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Historical Society, San Francisco (photograph © Barbara McBane)

Queer Caucus for Art.Update from the Queer Caucus for Art.” Art Journal Open (January 26, 2016). 
Rosa, Maria Laura. “Questions of Identity: Photographic Series by Alicia D’Amico, 1983–86.” Art Journal Open (July 2, 2019).Crossover article from Art Journal 78, no. 1 (Spring 2019). 

Alicia D’Amico photograph of Liliana, a performance by Liliana Mizrahi, 1983, scanned copy of original negative, reproduction from original 35mm negative contact (photograph © Archivo Alicia D’Amico, Buenos Aires)

Shvarts, Aliza. “Toward a Reparative Pedagogy: Art as Trigger, Art as Repair.” Art Journal Open (April 7, 2022). 

 

 

Whitener, Brian. “Transiting in Anti-Patriarchal Worlds: The Queer Photography of Fernando Fuentes.” Art Journal Open (November 18, 2021).   

Fernando Fuentes, “Emma” (with Homero Emma Jimenez), 2020 (photograph by Constanza Moctezuma) 

 

Filed under: Advocacy, AJO, Publications

Pride Month and caa.reviews

posted by June 02, 2022

This Pride Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that center LGBTQ+ topics, as well as gender and sexual identity, in the fields of visual arts and the humanities. This week, we are sharing a bibliography of publications and exhibitions on these topics reviewed this past year on our open-access journal caa.reviews.

 

Arscott, Caroline and Katie Scott, editors. Manifestations of Venus: Art and Sexuality. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2001.
Battcock, Gregory. Oceans of Love: The Uncontainable Gregory Battcock. Ed Joseph Grigely, Cologne, Germany: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther Konig, 2016.
Betancourt, Roland. Byzantine Intersectionality: Sexuality, Gender, and Race in the Middle Ages. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2020.
Black Sheep Feminism: The Art of Sexual Politics. Dallas: Dallas Contemporary, 2016.
Brandt, Amy ed. Tseng Kwong Chi: Performing for the Camera. Norfolk, VA and New York: Chrysler Museum of Art, Grey Art Gallery, New York University, and Lyon Artbooks, 2015.
Butler, Connie. Mark Bradford: Scorched Earth. Exh. cat. Los Angeles: Hammer Museum in association with Prestel, 2015.

Mark Bradford. Lights and Tunnels, 2015 (photograph © 2015 Joshua White; provided by Hauser & Wirth)

Butt, Gavin. Between You and Me: Queer Disclosures in the New York Art World, 1948–1963. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2005.

 

 

De Salvo, Donna. Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again. Exh. cat. New Haven and New York: Yale University Press in association with The Whitney Museum of American Art, 2018.  

Installation view, Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, November 12, 2018–March 31, 2019 (photograph © 2018 by Ron Amstutz, provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Licensed by Artists Rights Society [ARS], New York) 

Corn, Wanda M. and Tirza True Latimer. Seeing Gertrude Stein: Five Stories. Exh. cat. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011.

Henri Matisse. Woman with a Hat (1905). Oil on canvas. 31 3/4 x 23 1/2 in. (80.7 x 59.7 cm). SFMOMA, Bequest of Elise S. Haas. © Succession H. Matisse, Paris / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Ben Blackwell

Doyle, Jennifer. Hold It Against Me: Difficulty and Emotion in Contemporary Art. Durham: Duke University Press, 2013.
Findlen, Paula, Wendy Wassyng Roworth, and Catherine M. Sama, editors. Italy’s Eighteenth Century: Gender and Culture in the Age of the Grand Tour. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2009.
Gallucci, Margaret A. Benvenuto Cellini: Sexuality, Masculinity, and Artistic Identity in Renaissance Italy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.
Gill, Lyndon K. Erotic Islands: Art and Activism in the Queer Caribbean. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2018.
Gómez-Barris, Macarena. Beyond the Pink Tide: Art and Political Undercurrents in the Americas. American Studies Now: Critical Histories of the Present. Oakland: University of California Press, 2018.
Guyton, Wade. One Month Ago. Edition of 500. New York: Karma, 2014.  
Johnson, E. Patrick and Ramón H. Rivera-Servera, editors. Blacktino Queer Performance. Durham: Duke University Press, 2016.
Jones, Amelia. Seeing Differently: A History and Theory of Identification and the Visual Arts. New York: Routledge, 2012.
Jones, Amelia and Erin Silver. Otherwise: Imagining Queer Feminist Art Histories. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016.

With follow-up interview between Amelia Jones and David J. Getsy, Abstract Bodies and Otherwise: A Conversation with Amelia Jones and David Getsy on Gender and Sexuality in the Writing of Art History. February 16, 2018

Junge, Sophie. Art about AIDS: Nan Goldin’s Exhibition Witnesses: Against Our Vanishing  Berlin: De Gruyter, 2017.
Katz, Jonathan David and Rock Hushka, editors. Art AIDS America. Exh. cat. Seattle: Tacoma Art Museum in association with University of Washington Press, 2015.

Courtesy of the Zuckerman Museum of Art. Photos by Mike Jensen

Latimer, Tirza True. Eccentric Modernisms: Making Differences in the History of American Art. Oakland: University of California Press, 2016.
Murray, Derek Conrad. Queering Post-Black Art: Artists Transforming African-American Identity after Civil Rights. London: I.B. Taurus, 2016.
No Wrong Holes: Thirty Years of Nayland Blake. Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, September 29, 2019–January 26, 2020; MIT List Visual Arts Center (online), Cambridge, MA, October 16, 2020–February 14, 2021.

No Wrong Holes: Thirty Years of Nayland Blake, installation view, MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, MA, 2020–21 (photograph © Charles Mayer, provided by MIT List Visual Arts Center)

 Patel, Alpesh Kantilal. Productive Failure: Writing Queer Transnational South Asian Art Histories. Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 2017.
Rice, Shelley. Inverted Odysseys: Claude Cahun, Maya Deren, Cindy Sherman.  Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1999.
Salter, Gregory. Art and Masculinity in Post-War Britain: Reconstructing Home. London: Routledge, 2019.
Transamerica/n: Gender, Identity, Appearance Today. McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, June 20–September 15, 2019.

Jacolby Satterwhite, How lovly is me being as I am, 2014, neon, installation view from Transamerica/n: Gender, Identity, Appearance Today, McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, 2019 (artwork © Jacolby Satterwhite; photograph provided by the artist and Morán Morán, Los Angeles)

Tony Greene: Room of Advances. MAK Center for Art and Architecture, Schindler House, Los Angeles, June 18–September 7, 2014.

Tony Greene. His Puerile Gestures (1989). Mixed Media. 25 1/2 x 29 3/4 in. Collection of Ray Morales, from the estate of Norm MacNeil

Turner, James Grantham. Eros Visible: Art, Sexuality and Antiquity in Renaissance Italy.  New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017.
Tyburczy, Jennifer. Sex Museums: The Politics and Performance of Display. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016.
Zanele Muholi: Isibonelo/Evidence. Brooklyn Museum, New York, May 1–November 8, 2015.

Zanele Muholi: Isibonelo/Evidence. Installation view. Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum.

 

Filed under: Advocacy, caa.reviews, Publications

Depiction of eryngoes, De materia medica, MS M 652, f. 57r., The Morgan Library & Museum (relates to Griebeler, Botanical Icons: Critical Practices of Illustration in the Premodern Mediterranean)

MEET THE GRANTEES 

Twice a year, CAA awards grants through the Millard Meiss Publication Fund to support book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of art, visual studies, and related subjects that have been accepted by a publisher on their merits, but cannot be published in the most desirable form without a subsidy. 

Thanks to the generous bequest of the late Prof. Millard Meiss, CAA began awarding these publishing grants in 1975. 

SPRING 2022 GRANTEES 

Claudia Calirman, Dissident Bodies: Brazilian Women Artists, (1960s-2020s), Duke University Press 

Karen Mary Davalos and Tatiana Reinoza, Self Help Graphics at Fifty: A Cornerstone of Latinx Art and Collaborative Artmaking, University of California Press 

Andrew Griebeler, Botanical Icons: Critical Practices of Illustration in the Premodern Mediterranean, University of Chicago Press  

Joan Kee, The Geometries of Afro Asia: Art beyond Solidarity, University of California Press  

Miriam Kienle, Queer Connections: Ray Johnson’s Correspondence Art Network, University of Minnesota Press  

Murad Mumtaz, Faces of God: Images of Muslim Devotion in Indian Painting, Brill 

 

Affiliated Society News: April

posted by April 11, 2022

Affiliated Society News shares the new and exciting things CAA’s affiliated organizations are working on including activities, awards, publications, conferences, and exhibitions.

Interested in becoming an Affiliated Society? Learn more here.


American Society of Appraisers

Publications

Valuing a Business, 6th Edition

The seminal book on business valuation is back and better than ever. Shannon Pratt’s Valuing a Business has been the go-to valuation guide for 40 years and has been updated with need-to-know information about taxes, financial reporting, compliance, and more.  Valuing a Business is still the best resource on the market for both new and experienced business appraisers.  This book fully covers the concepts of business valuation and provides detailed answers to virtually every question on the topic, from executive compensation and lost profits analysis to ESOP issues and valuation discounts.

Events

11th Annual ASA Equipment Valuation Conference

Tuesday, May 24, from 11 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Now in its 11th year, this annual event has grown to become the definitive source for appraisers, equipment management and finance professionals on the latest insights into equipment valuation. Instantly leverage knowledge gained on market trends and spotlighted asset sectors, as well as new contacts made, by incorporating into your practice areas or introducing to your team.

2022 ASA Summer Appraisal Camp

August 2022

Develop the skills you’ll need to build a career in appraising personal property such as fine and decorative art, antiques, vintage cars, furniture, coins, stamps, and more.

The program includes four virtual courses held over four weeks, including:

  • PP201 – Introduction to Personal Property Valuation – August 3-6, 2022
  • PP202 – Development of a Personal Property Appraisal: Research and Analysis – August 10-13, 2022
  • PP203 – Communication of a Personal Property Appraisal: Report Writing – August 17-20, 2022
  • PP204 – Personal Property Valuation: The Legal and Commercial Environments – August 24-27, 2022


Taiwanese Art History Association

Announcements / Events

PHOTOGRAPHY AND TAIWAN: History and Practice

Thursday, April 7

The Taiwan Academy of the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Los Angeles (TECO-LA), the University of Arizona’s School of the Arts (SAUA), and the Center for Creative Photography (CCP) are collaborating for the first time on the “Spotlight Taiwan project” to hold the “Photography and Taiwan: History and Practice” online symposium from April 7 to April 9, 2022 (PST). Nineteen scholars and experts from Korea, the United States, Australia and Taiwan are invited to attend the symposium. They will help the audience understand more about the history, culture and democratization of Taiwan through a historical lens and scholarly debate as recorded in the photography.

Women’s History Month and caa.reviews

posted by March 04, 2022

Each week this Women’s History Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that celebrate women in the fields of visual arts and the humanities. This week, we are sharing a bibliography of publications and exhibitions reviewed this past year on our open-access journal caa.reviews that feature women artists and practitioners.

caa.reviews also houses rosters of dissertation titles in progress and completed since 2002, many of which have been written by women and focus on topics related to women and feminism in the arts.

This Women’s History Month is also especially significant this year, which is the 50th anniversary of feminism at CAA. To learn more about this history, visit this page. CAA is also collecting archival materials to better understand and document the history of its Committee of Women in the Arts, including the committee’s many collaborations with other affiliate committees and groups, such as the Women’s Caucus for Art, The Feminist Art Project, the Queer Caucus, and many more. Visit this page for more information.

Acevedo-Yates, Carla, editor. Carolina Caycedo: From the Bottom of the River. Chicago and New York: Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago and DelMonico Books/D.A.P., 2020. 

Carolina Caycedo: From the Bottom of the River, installation view, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, 2020–21 (photograph by Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago)

Blanchflower, Melissa, Natalia Grabowska, and Melissa Larner, editors. Faith Ringgold. Serpentine Gallery, London, United Kingdom. Cologne: Walther König, 2019.   

Faith Ringgold, Slave Rape, 1972, installation view, Faith Ringgold, Serpentine Gallery, London, 2019 (artwork © 2019 Faith Ringgold; photograph provided by readsreads.info)

Brandow-Faller, Megan. The Female Secession: Art and the Decorative at the Viennese Women’s Academy. University Park, PA: Penn State University Press, 2020.  
Fiell, Charlotte and Clementine Fiell. Women in Design: From Aino Aalto to Eva Ziesel. London: Laurence King Publishing, 2019.  
Harris, Shawnya L. editor. Emma Amos: Color Odyssey. Athens: Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, 2021.  

Emma Amos,  All I Know of Wonder, 2008, oil on linen, African fabric, 70 1/2 x 55 1/2 in. (179.1 x 141 cm), installation view, Emma Amos: Color Odyssey, Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, Athens, 2021 (photograph by the author)

Huebner, Karla. Magnetic Woman: Toyen and the Surrealist Erotic. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2020.  
Kim, Christine Y. and Rujeko Hockley. Julie Mehretu. New York: Whitney Museum of American Art in association with Prestel, 2019.  

Julie Mehretu, Hineni (E. 3:4), 2018, ink and acrylic on canvas, 96 × 120 in. (243.8 x 304.8 cm). Centre Pompidou, Paris, Musée national d’art moderne/Centre de création industrielle, gift of George Economou, 2019 (artwork © Julie Mehretu; photograph by Tom Powel Imaging)

Meijling, Jesper and Tigran Haas, editors. Essays on Jane Jacobs. Stockholm: Bokförlaget Stolpe, 2020.  
Mühling, Matthias and Stephanie Weber, editors. Senga Nengudi: Topologies. Munich: Hirmer, 2021.  

Senga Nengudi, Warp Trance, 2007, multi-channel audio/video installation in collaboration with the Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, with a sound composition by Butch Morris, installation view, Senga Nengudi: Topologies, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2021 (photograph © Aaron Igler, provided by the artist and The Fabric Workshop and Museum)

   Nakajima, Izumi. Anti-Action: Post-War Japanese Art and Women Artists (アンチ・アクション: 日本戦後絵画と女性画家). Tokyo: Brücke, 2019.  
Nelson, Andrea editor. The New Woman behind the Camera. Washington, DC: National Gallery of Art, 2020.  
Rose, Pauline. Working against the Grain: Women Sculptors in Britain c.1885–1950. Liverpool, UK: Liverpool University Press, 2020.  
VanDiver, Rebecca. Designing a New Tradition: Loïs Mailou Jones and the Aesthetics of Blackness. University Park, PA: Penn State University Press, 2020.  
Walker, Anna and Laura Mott, editors. Olga de Amaral: To Weave a Rock. Arnoldsche Art Publishers in association with the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, 2020.  

Olga de Amaral, Brumas, 2013, acrylic, gesso, and cotton on wood, installation view, Olga de Amaral: To Weave a Rock, Cranbrook Art Museum, October 30, 2021–March 20, 2022 (artwork © Olga de Amaral; photograph by P. D. Rearick, image provided by Cranbrook Art Museum)

Filed under: Advocacy, caa.reviews, Publications

Black History Month and Art Journal Open

posted by February 10, 2022

Each week this Black History Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that celebrate, recognize, and interrogate Black art, history, and experience.  This week, we are sharing a bibliography of articles from our online, open-access journal Art Journal Open that addresses these topics.

 

Aranke, Sampada. “Objects Made Black.” Art Journal Open (February 9, 2015). Crossover article from Art Journal 73, no. 3 (Fall 2014) reviewing Huey Copeland, Bound to Appear: Art, Slavery, and the Site of Blackness in Multicultural America, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013.

Baralaye, Ebitenyefa and Glenn Adamson. “The Weight of Matter: Ebitenyefa Baralaye and Glenn Adamson in Conversation.” Art Journal Open (May 20, 2021).

Ebitenyefa Baralaye, Portrait I (multiple views), 2020, salt-glazed stoneware, 25 x 12 x 10 in.
(63.5 x 30.5 x 25.4 cm) (artwork © Ebitenyefa Baralaye; photographs provided by the artist)

 

Barber, Tiffany E. “Narcissister, a Truly Kinky Artist.” Art Journal Open (March 11, 2020).

Narcissister, Red Riding Hood, 2014, mixed media (photograph provided by the artist).

 

Best, Makeda. “Interview with Texas Isaiah.” Art Journal Open (April 8, 2021). Crossover article from Art Journal 80, no. 1 (Spring 2021).

Texas Isaiah, don’t kill this vibe, 2018 (artwork © Texas Isaiah; photograph provided by the artist)

 

Childs, Adienne L. Riffs and Relations: African American Artists and the European Modernist Tradition. Washington, DC and New York: Phillips Collection in association with Rizzoli Electa, 2020.

Sanford Biggers, Negerplastik, 2016, repurposed antique quilt, cotton fabric fragments, tar, and glitter, 81 × 76 3/4 in. (205.7 x 195 cm) (photograph by Todd-White Art Photography, provided by Massimo De Carlo, Milan/London/Hong Kong)

 

Cunningham, Nijah. “With Each Other.” Art Journal Open (October 14, 2021). Crossover article from Art Journal 80, no. 3 (Fall 2021) reviewing Nicole R. Fleetwood. Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2020.

Dally, Jenny and Fred Eversley. “The Object and You: Fred Eversley in Conversation with Jenny Dally.” Art Journal Open (February 25, 2021).

Fred Eversley in his Venice Beach studio, 2018 (photograph by Elon Schoenholz; photograph provided by David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles)

 

 Gaines, Malik. “City after Fifty Years’ Living: LA’s Differences in Relation.” Art Journal Open (July 17, 2012).

Ice Cube Celebrates the Eames, poster, 2011 (artwork © J. Paul Getty Trust)

 

Gale, Nikita and Jesús Fuenmayor. “Barricades of Silence: Nikita Gale in Conversation with Jesús Fuenmayor.” Art Journal Open (August 20, 2020).

Nikita Gale, INTERCEPTOR, 2019, installation view, Fall Apart: Nikita Gale & Pat O’Neill, Martos Gallery, New York, January 11–February 24, 2019 (artwork © Nikita Gale; photograph by Charles Benton/Martos Gallery, provided by the artist),

 

Gbadegesin, Olubukola A. “Damon Davis’s Negrophilia: Encounters with Black Death.” Art Journal Open (August 30, 2017).

Damon Davis, Untitled (2), 2015, bookprint, ink, watercolor, adhesive, from the series Negrophilia (artwork © Damon Davis)

 

Majeed, Risham and Blake Bradford. “Just Being.” Art Journal Open (May 22, 2020).

Albrecht Dürer, Portrait of a Black Man (untitled), 1508, black chalk on paper. Original shown here; the NMAAHC has a reproduction in the Middle Passage galleries.

 

Raiford, Leigh. “Burning All Illusion: Abstraction, Black Life, and the Unmaking of White Supremacy.” Art Journal Open (January 14, 2021).

Samuel Levi Jones, Joshua, 2016, deconstructed Illinois law books on canvas, 61½ x 77 in. (156.2 x 195.6 cm) (artwork © Samuel Levi Jones; photograph provided by Galerie Lelong)

 

Sifuentes, Aram Han. “How Internalized White Supremacy Manifests for My BIPOC Students in Art School.” Art Journal Open (July 8, 2021).

Cute Rage Press (Aram Han Sifuentes and Ishita Dharap), detail of Taking Receipts:
A Log of Aggression for People of Color, 2017, color printed spiral-bound book, 8 x 5½ in.
(20.3 x 14 cm) (artwork © Aram Han Sifuentes and Ishita Dharap; photograph by Aram
Han Sifuentes)

 

Saggese, Jordana Moore, Cauleen Smith, Charles Gaines, Edgar Arceneaux, Howardena Pindell, Michael Ray Charles, and Glenn Ligon. “A Call to Artists.” Art Journal Open (October 26, 2021). Crossover article from Art Journal 80, no. 3 (Fall 2021).

 

Tani, Ellen Y. “Come Out to Show Them: Speech and Ambivalence in the Work of Steve Reich and Glenn LigonSpeech and Ambivalence in the Work of Steve Reich and Glenn Ligon.” Art Journal Open (December 23, 2019).

Glenn Ligon, Come Out Study #13, 2014, silkscreen on canvas on panel, 36 x 47 7/8 in. (91.4 x 121.6 cm) (artwork © Glenn Ligon; photograph by Ronald Amstutz, provided by the artist, Hauser & Wirth, New York, Regen Projects, Los Angeles, Thomas Dane Gallery, London, and Chantal Crousel, Paris)

 

Thompson, Krista. ““I WAS HERE BUT I DISAPEAR”: Ivanhoe “Rhygin” Martin and Photographic Disappearance in Jamaica.” Art Journal Open (August 14, 2018).

Production still from The Harder They Come, 1972, 16mm color film, dir. Perry Henzell, cinematography by Frank St. Juste, David McDonald, and Peter Jessop, produced by International Films / Xenon Pictures (photograph published under fair use)

 

Williams, Stephanie Sparling. “Artful Embodiment: Genealogies of the Impossible.” Art Journal Open (November 27, 2018). Crossover article from Art Journal 77, no. 3 (Fall 2018) reviewing Uri McMillan, Embodied Avatars: Genealogies of Black Feminist Art and Performance, New York: New York University Press, 2015.
Winslow, Margaret. “Pope.L: The Body and Its Void.” Art Journal Open (January 14, 2021). Crossover article from Art Journal 79, no. 4 (Winter 2020) reviewing member: Pope.L, 1978–2001., exhibition organized by Stuart Comer with Danielle A. Jackson. Museum of Modern Art, New York, October 21, 2019–February 1, 2020.

Zorach, Rebecca. “Art and Soul: An Experimental Friendship between Street and Museum .” Art Journal Open (September 4, 2011).

Art & Soul exterior with Rainbow mural by Sachio Yamashita, 1969 (mural now destroyed) (mural artwork © Eileen Petersen Yamashita, all rights reserved, used with permission; photograph © Ann Zelle)

 

 

Filed under: Advocacy, Publications

Black History Month and caa.reviews

posted by February 03, 2022

Each week this Black History Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that celebrate, recognize, and interrogate Black art, history, and experience.  This week, we are sharing a bibliography of publications and exhibitions reviewed on our online, open-access journal caa.reviews from this past year that addresses these topics.

caa.reviews also houses rosters of dissertation titles in progress and completed since 2002 and many long-form essays that intersect with these themes as well, such as current Editor-in-Chief of Art Journal, Eddie Chambers, essay Reflections on African and African Diaspora Art from 2016.

 

Childs, Adienne L. Riffs and Relations: African American Artists and the European Modernist Tradition. Washington, DC and New York: Phillips Collection in association with Rizzoli Electa, 2020.

Sanford Biggers, Negerplastik, 2016, repurposed antique quilt, cotton fabric fragments, tar, and glitter, 81 × 76 3/4 in. (205.7 x 195 cm) (photograph by Todd-White Art Photography, provided by Massimo De Carlo, Milan/London/Hong Kong)

 

 

 

 

Choi, Connie H., Thelma Golden, and Kellie Jones. Black Refractions: Highlights from the Studio Museum in Harlem. New York: Rizzoli Electa, 2019.

Jordan Casteel, Kevin the Kiteman, 2016, oil on canvas, 78 x 78 in. (198.1 x 198.1 cm). The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, Museum purchase with funds provided by the Acquisition Committee 2016.37 (artwork © Jordan Casteel; photograph by Adam Reich, provided by American Federation of Arts)

 

 

 

 

Cohen, Joshua I. The “Black Art” Renaissance: African Sculpture and Modernism across Continents. Oakland: University of California Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Driskell: Icons of Nature and History. Atlanta and New York: High Museum of Art and Rizzoli Electa, 2021.

David Driskell, Young Pines Growing, 1959, oil on canvas. Clark Atlanta University Art Museum, John Hope Franklin Purchase Award (artwork © Estate of David C. Driskell; photograph provided by High Museum of Art)

 

 

 

 

Diouf, Mamadou and Maureen Murphy, editors. Déborder la négritude: Arts, politique et société à Dakar. Dijon. France: Les presses du réel, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

Fleetwood, Nicole R. Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gonzalez, Aston. Visualizing Equality: African American Rights and Visual Culture in the Nineteenth Century. John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hank Willis Thomas: All Things Being Equal . . . New York and Portland, OR: Aperture Foundation in association with Portland Art Museum, 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harris, Shawnya L.,editor. Emma Amos: Color Odyssey. Athens: Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, 2021.

Emma Amos, All I Know of Wonder, 2008, oil on linen, African fabric, 70 1/2 x 55 1/2 in. (179.1 x 141 cm), installation view, Emma Amos: Color Odyssey, Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, Athens, 2021 (photograph by the author)

 

 

 

Jarrell, Wadsworth A. AFRICOBRA: Experimental Art toward a School of Thought. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monahan, Anne. Horace Pippin, American Modern. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mühling, Matthias and Stephanie Weber, editors. Senga Nengudi: Topologies. Munich: Hirmer, 2021.

Senga Nengudi, Warp Trance, 2007, multi-channel audio/video installation in collaboration with the Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, with a sound composition by Butch Morris, installation view, Senga Nengudi: Topologies, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2021 (photograph © Aaron Igler, provided by the artist and The Fabric Workshop and Museum)

 

 

 

No Wrong Holes: Thirty Years of Nayland Blake. Los Angeles and Cambridge, MA: Institute of Contemporary Art and MIT List Visual Arts Center (online), 2020.

No Wrong Holes: Thirty Years of Nayland Blake, installation view, MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, MA, 2020–21 (photograph © Charles Mayer, provided by MIT List Visual Arts Center)

 

 

 

Oliver, Valerie Cassel. The Dirty South: Contemporary Art, Material Culture, and the Sonic Impulse. Richmond, VA and Durham, NC: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in association with Duke University Press, 2021.

Rodney McMillian, Asterisks in Dockery (Blues for Smoke), 2021, vinyl, thread, wood, paint, lightbulb, installation view, The Dirty South: Contemporary Art, Material Culture, and the Sonic Impulse, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 2021 (photograph © Sandra Sellars, provided by Virginia Museum of Fine Arts)

 

 

Powell, Richard J. Going There: Black Visual Satire. Cambridge, MA and New Haven, CT: Hutchins Center for African & African American Research in association with Yale University Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas, Sarah. Witnessing Slavery: Art and Travel in the Age of Abolition. London and New Haven: Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art in association with Yale University Press, 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuite, Diana, editor. Bob Thompson: This House Is Mine. Waterville, ME and New Haven, CT: Colby College Museum of Art in association with Yale University Press, 2021.

Bob Thompson, The Snook (The Sack), 1961, oil on canvas, 23 1/2 x 36 in. (59.7 x 91.4 cm). Collection of Andrew Nelson (© Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York)

 

 

 

VanDiver, Rebecca. Designing a New Tradition: Loïs Mailou Jones and the Aesthetics of Blackness. University Park, PA: Penn State University Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As part of CAA’s 10-year anniversary celebration of its publication, The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association, chapter authors reflect on their contributions and how their impressions of the field have changed. Our final video in the series features Judith Brodsky, Mary Garrard, and Ferris Olin, who co-authored chapter 11, “Governance and Diversity.”

Involved not just in CAA, its Annual Conference, and its Committee on Women in the Arts (CWA), but also with CAA’s affiliate society the Women’s Caucus for Art, these three women represent pillars in the field of feminist art history.

In this video, they discuss the first 100 years of CAA’s history representing women and underrepresented groups, and point to the future: 2022 marks fifty years of the first committee to represent women at CAA. CAA is excited to honor this milestone at the 2022 Annual Conference and beyond.

Brodsky and Olin are each presenting at the upcoming 110th Annual Conference. See links underneath their bios below for more information on their sessions, panels, and talks.

 

SPEAKERS BIOGRAPHIES

Judith K. Brodsky is currently distinguished professor emerita at Rutgers University. She founded the Rutgers Center for Innovative Print and Paper, now renamed the Brodsky Center in her honor and located at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. The Center has been instrumental in promoting the recognition of women artists and artists of color. She is also co-founder of the Rutgers Center for Women in the Arts and Humanities and The Feminist Art Project, a national and international program to promote women artists in the cultural milieu. With her colleague, Dr. Ferris Olin, she established the Miriam Schapiro Archives on Women Artists at Rutgers and was curator of the Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series at Rutgers from 2006-2013. Brodsky was the co-founder of the Women Artists Archive National Directory (WAAND), funded initially by the Getty Foundation, a digital directory of archives where the papers of women artists active in the US since 1945 are located. A printmaker and book artist, Judith’s work is in over 100 permanent collections. She has also organized and curated many exhibitions and has published extensively, including contributions to The Power of Feminist Art and SIGNS, A Journal of Women in Culture and Society; Junctures in Women’s Leadership: The Arts. Most recently she published the first book on the impact of feminist theory on digital technology in the arts titled Dismantling the Patriarchy, Bit by Bit: Feminism, Art, and Technology, Bloomsbury, 2021. She served as CAA’s President and received the Annual Recognition Award from CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts, as well as past national president for ArtTable and Women’s Caucus for Art.

Details for Judith Brodsky’s participation in the 2022 Annual Conference: link.

Mary D. Garrard, professor emerita of art history at American University, Washington, D. C., is a scholar whose work has combined Italian Renaissance art with feminist studies. Her book, Artemisia Gentileschi: The Image of the Female Hero in Italian Baroque Art (Princeton, 1989), was a groundbreaking contribution to the field, that launched modern studies of the now-famous artist. In Artemisia Gentileschi Circa 1622: The Shaping and Reshaping of an Artistic Identity (University of California, 2001), Garrard addressed new critical issues in Gentileschi studies. Her third book, Artemisia Gentileschi and Early Modern Feminism, positions the artist among the feminist treatises and debates of her time (Reaktion Books, London, 2020). Beyond Artemisia, Garrard has written and spoken extensively on Italian Renaissance, Early Modern art, and feminist art history. With her colleague Norma Broude, Garrard created and edited three books that have become basic texts in art history and women’s studies courses, including Feminism and Art History: Questioning the Litany (1982); The Expanding Discourse: Feminism and Art History (1992); and Reclaiming Female Agency: Feminist Art History After Postmodernism (2005).  Broude and Garrard also created and contributed to The Power of Feminist Art: The American Movement of the 1970s (1994).

Ferris Olin is distinguished professor emerita at Rutgers University, where she was the co-founder and co-director (with Judith K. Brodsky) of Rutgers Center for Women in the Arts and Humanities, and The Feminist Art Project, an international collaboration to make visible the impact of women on the cultural landscape. She also established the Miriam Schapiro Archives on Women Artists at Rutgers as well as the Margery Somers Foster Center, a research center focused on documenting women’s leadership in the public arena, and served as Associate Director of the Institute for Research on Women and earlier, Director of the Art Library. She was curator of the Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series at Rutgers from 1995-2006 and later (with Judith K. Brodsky) from 2006-2013. With Brodsky, Olin also created the Women Artists Archive National Directory (WAAND). Olin has also published broadly. Her most recent book, co-authored with Judith K. Brodsky, is called Junctures in Women’s Leadership: The Arts (Rutgers University Press, fall 2018). Olin has served on the boards of numerous non-profit organizations and was Vice-President of the College Art Association. She is the recipient of numerous awards, among them the Women’s Caucus for Art Lifetime Achievement Award and the College Art Association Committee on Women’s Annual Recognition Award (now known as Distinguished Feminist Award).

Details for Ferris Olin’s participation in the 2022 Annual Conference: link.

Filed under: Advocacy, Event, Publications

As part of CAA’s 10-year anniversary celebration of its publication The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association, chapter authors reflect on their contributions and how their impressions of the field have changed. Our second video in the series features Craig Houser, who wrote Chapter 5, “The Changing Face of Scholarly Publishing: CAA’s Publication Program.”

Craig Houser is the director of the MA in Art History and its concentration in Art Museum Studies at the City College of New York. His scholarship has addressed institutional politics related to studio art and art history, as well as issues in gender and sexuality in modern and contemporary art.