CAA News Today

Meet the 2019 Professional Development Fellows

posted by February 14, 2020

CAA is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2019 Professional Development Fellowships. The recipient of the $10,000 fellowship in art history is Ace Lehner, University of California, Santa Cruz. The recipient of the $10,000 fellowship in visual art is Leah Schretenthaler, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

The honorable mention for art history goes to Anne Marie Butler, Kalamazoo College, and the honorable mention in visual art is awarded to Madelaine Corbin, Cranbrook Academy of Art. All fellows and honorable mentions receive a complimentary one-year CAA membership and registration for the 2020 Annual Conference in Chicago.

2019 Professional Development Fellowship in Art History 

Ace Lehner, University of California, Santa Cruz

Ace Lehner is an interdisciplinary scholar and artist specializing in critical engagement with identity and representation; history, theory, and criticism of contemporary art; photography theory; and queer and trans theory. Lehner’s artistic practice often embraces collaboration and primarily utilizes photography and video to mine the complex relation between representations and the constitution of identities. Lehner was recently a Presidents’ Dissertation-Year Fellow at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where they are completing their dissertation, ”Trans Representations: Contemporary Art Photography and Non-Binary Visual Theory,” and earning their PhD.

Lehner has chaired panels on trans representations at the College Art Association conference has spoken about their research and artistic practice at the International Center of Photography (New York, NY) and has been published in Art JournalREFRACTThe Wattis Institute for Contemporary ArtThe Journal on Images and Culture, and elsewhere. Lehner’s artwork has been exhibited internationally and will be featured in a solo exhibition at Practice Gallery in Philadelphia in June 2020. Lehner currently serves as the editor of the forthcoming book From Self-Portrait to Selfie: Contemporary Art and Self-Representation in the Social Media Age published by MDPI Books and works in the Education Department at the Dia Foundation and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, NY, where they are currently piloting the museums’ first-ever queer tour programs. Lehner holds an MFA/MA in Fine Art/Visual and Critical Studies from California College of the Arts. Lehner is based in Brooklyn, New York.

Honorable Mention in Art History

Anne Marie Butler, Kalamazoo College

Anne Marie Butler is Assistant Professor of Art History and Women, Gender, and Sexuality at Kalamazoo College, Kalamazoo, MI. Her research areas are global contemporary art, Middle East North Africa studies, gender and sexuality studies, and queer theory. Her scholarship considers issues of gender, sexuality, and queerness within the parameters of the nation-state, and the imbrication of state authority within social constructs. She is currently working on a book project about surrealism in Tunisia, in which she considers emerging and ongoing questions about how Tunisian artists critique embedded systems of power by examining surrealism as a methodology by which Tunisian women artists negotiate the discordant demands of the state apparatus and social norms. Additional scholarship in progress on contemporary Tunisian visual art addresses the overlap of surrealism and queerness, sexuality in surrealism, contemporary performance art, and negotiations of repression. She is also an activist who has worked in migrant justice and local LGBTQ history. In 2018, she founded the Middle East Studies Association Queer Studies Interest Group.

Dr. Butler received her MA from New York University and her PhD from the University at Buffalo. Her dissertation, “Unintelligible Bodies: Surrealism and Queerness in Contemporary Tunisian Women’s Art” (2019), revealed that many Tunisian women artists imagine queer bodies, bodily configurations, and bodily relationships that rebuke normative conceptualizations of the body, and argued that surrealism and queerness are strategies by which Tunisian women artists launch critiques of repressive systems that remain embedded within the Tunisian state and society.

2019 Professional Development Fellowship in the Visual Arts 

Leah Schretenthaler, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee  

Leah Schretenthaler was born and raised in Hawaii. After relocating to the mainland, Hawaii continues to be a point of reference for her research and studio practice. Her work uses traditional photography, laser etching, and metal casting to create images. Through her art practice, her research presents a connection between land, material, and performance. Her ongoing series, The Invasive Species of the Built Environment, focuses on the controversial builds of her home state.

Schretenthaler completed her BFA degree from the University of South Dakota and holds a master’s degree in art education from Boston University. She is currently an MFA candidate. Recently she has been named one of LensCulture’s Emerging Talents of 2018 and was awarded second place in the Sony World Photography Awards. In 2019, she was awarded the  Rhonda Wilson Award through FRESH2019 at the Klompching Gallery. In the of fall 2019 she received the Film Photo Award. Her work has been displayed nationally and internationally including Kahilu Theater (Waimea, HI), Washington Pavilion (Sioux Falls, SD), Manifest (Cincinnati, OH), The Rhode Island Center for Photographic Arts (Providence, RI), Center for Fine Art Photography (Fort Collins, CO), and SOHO Gallery (New York, NY), as well as the Somerset House (London).

Honorable Mention in Visual Art

Madelaine Corbin, Cranbrook Academy of Art  

Madelaine Corbin is a multi-disciplinary artist based in Detroit, Michigan. She received her BFA from Oregon State University where she was an artist-in-residence in the departments of Inorganic Chemistry and Microbiology. Recent awards include the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts Stuart Thompson Fellowship, the President’s Award in Sustainability bestowed by Cranbrook Academy of Art, and the Sponenburgh Travel Award granted by Oregon State University.

Corbin’s practice is an archaeological journey to unearth the space between home and land, human and non-human, wild and managed landscapes, and the connection to one another through geographic distance. A fleck of ash, drop of blue, grain of salt, speck of dust, and particle of soil—a constellation of meaning is composed from these elements. Corbin’s practice earnestly endeavors to listen to, translate, and contextualize the conversation between the vibrancy of matter sensed by our fingertips and the expansive questions cultivated by the equally vast universe around. Spaces that invite wonder and interdisciplinary research coalesce to question the quotidian materials accepted as ‘normal’ when few things are actually so. Dirt, salt, and dust are not so simple. Interminable investigations into subterranean histories, values, politics, sciences, fictions, and natural phenomena re-evaluate the inherent meanings embedded in matter. Using her own relationship to ecology rooted in a valley town in Oregon as a starting point, Corbin articulates the complexity and range of relationships to the land beneath our feet, that which once was, and that which will never be.

About the Professional Development Fellowship

CAA’s Professional Development Fellowship program supports promising artists and art historians who are enrolled in MFA and PhD programs nationwide. Awards are intended to help them with various aspects of their work, whether for job-search expenses or purchasing materials for the studio. CAA believes a grant of this kind, without contingencies, can best facilitate the transition between graduate studies and professional careers. The program is open to all eligible graduate students in the visual arts and art history. Applications for the 2021 fellowship cycle will open in the late spring. Learn more.

Meet the 2020 Student Scholarship Winners

posted by January 28, 2020

CAA Student Scholarships
with support from tf-logo
blick-utrecht-logo-bw-prof

For the fourth year in a row, CAA is proud to partner with our sponsors, multinational publisher, Routledge, Taylor & Francis, and art materials specialist, Blick Art Materials, on student scholarships to assist CAA student members with conference costs.

Routledge, Taylor & Francis Student Scholarship

CAA Annual Conference Premier Sponsor, Routledge, Taylor & Francis supports four CAA student members with a $250 scholarship. The 2020 winners are:

Samara Johnson

Samara Johnson holds a BFA in Painting and Drawing, BA in French from Sonoma State University, and in May 2020 will complete her MFA in Painting and Drawing from University of Colorado at Boulder. She was born and raised in Moose Pass, Alaska. Her upbringing has inspired her to create artworks that involve use of organic materials and synthetic skins, which brings backwoods aesthetic into a contemporary setting through abstracted dimensional wall works. The artist also volunteers as a horse handler for equine assisted psychotherapy in Boulder, Colorado, which has allowed her to explore, in her work, how systems and relationships of the non-human can help humans better understand their nervous systems and emotions.

Jordan Reznick

Jordan Reznick is an artist and PhD candidate in Visual Studies at University of California Santa Cruz. Their dissertation, “Settler Modernism: Alfred Stieglitz’s The Steerage and the Vicissitudes of American Whiteness, 1890-1930″ traces how one iconic photograph came to be known as the first modernist American photograph and how, at each stage of its trajectory into the modernist canon, it was interpreted through narratives that served to modernize settler colonial myths. Reznick’s Gallery of Illustrious Queers explores transgender identity and life experiences through portrait photography. Their work has been widely exhibited in the United States, including at Aperture Gallery in New York and the Portland Museum of Art in Oregon. Reznick teaches Photography and Art History at San Francisco Art Institute and California College of the Arts. They earned an MFA in Photography and an MA in Visual & Critical Studies from California College of the Arts, and a BFA in Photography from New York University.

Tamara Toledo

Tamara Toledo is a PhD Art History and Visual Culture candidate at York University. Toledo is a Chilean-born Toronto-based scholar, curator and artist, graduate of OCAD University and holds an MFA from York University. Toledo is co-founder of the Allende Arts Festival and of Latin American Canadian Art Projects – LACAP. For over a decade, she has curated numerous exhibitions offering spaces and opportunities to artists of Latin American descent to showcase their work. She designed and has been curating the Latin American Speakers Series for which she has invited internationally renowned contemporary artists and curators to Toronto such as Gerardo Mosquera, Luis Camnitzer, Tania Bruguera, Alfredo Jaar, among many others to articulate and discuss issues of identity and intercultural dynamics in contemporary art. Toledo has presented her work at various conferences in Montreal, New York, Vancouver and Toronto. Her writing has appeared in ARM Journal, C Magazine, Fuse and Canadian Art. Her practice often follows an interdisciplinary approach and touches on notions of memory, identity, Latin American diasporas, transnationalism, issues of power, representation and international artistic-cultural interaction. Toledo is presently the Curator of Sur Gallery, the only space dedicated to contemporary Latin American art in Canada.

Jessica Zeglin

Jessica Zeglin uses sound, drawing, textiles, and installation to engage skills of attentiveness, listening, and care for ourselves, our human, and our other-than-human kin. Her work is field and research-based, combining perspectives from ecology, biology, fine art, craft art, and decolonial critique of these fields, with emphasis on the nuances of everyday life. She has shown work at the Weisman Art Museum, the Tamarind Institute, the University of New Mexico Art Museum, and in parks, plazas, city, and country, to audiences of many and audiences of one. Originally from rural and small-town Wisconsin, she is currently a candidate for the MFA in Art and Ecology at the University of New Mexico. You can see more of her work at www.jessicazeglin.com.

Blick Art Materials Student Scholarship

CAA Annual Conference Advocate Sponsor, Blick Art Materials supports four CAA student members with a $250 scholarship. The 2020 winners are:

Noah Cox

Noah Cox is a third year, Art History student studying at New College of Florida. He has recently begun research for his baccalaureate thesis focusing on the art, architecture, and landscape of Bok Tower Gardens in Lake Wales, Florida. His undergraduate research in the past has focused on public art around the New College campus with a focus on student mural work. He currently works as an intern at the Sarasota Art Museum and is planning on furthering his career in the museum field.

Amanda Kendrick 

Amanda Kendrick is from Michigan where she received her BFA in Studio Art from Albion College in 2017. She is currently a second year Painting MFA student at Purdue University, where she teaches Foundations Drawing. Her work is rooted in familial relationships and childhood memories. She lives with her fiancé in Lafayette, Indiana.  

Defne Kırmızı 

Defne Kırmızı is a PhD candidate Boston University in the History of Art & Architecture Department. Her dissertation focuses on the conceptual art practices and exhibition histories in Turkey between the years 1974-1994.

Anna Paluch

Anna (Ania) Paluch is a Polish-Canadian PhD student in Cultural Mediations at Carleton University, situated on unceded Algonquin territory in Ottawa, Canada. Her research focus is on Indigenous and Slavic Futurism, spaces of cultural hybridity, and post-memory in the diaspora, specifically around diasporic and mixed identity. She is a curator, mixed-media artist and co-director of the Indigenous+Diasporic Friendship Festival in Ottawa, connecting diasporic/immigrant communities with local Indigenous communities through art, academia and culture.

Criteria for the Scholarship

Awardees were chosen at random and fulfilled the following criteria:

  • Individuals were registered for the Annual Conference by the Early Registration deadline
  • Individuals are current CAA members with proof of student status
  • Individuals did not receive conference registration or travel reimbursement from their institution or employer

We look forward to seeing you in Chicago next month! The 108th Annual Conference is February 12-15, 2020. Click here to explore the conference program.

Sign Up for Mock Interviews at CAA 2020

posted by January 06, 2020

Interview booths at the 2018 Annual Conference in Los Angeles. Photo: Rafael Cardenas

Each year at CAA, the Students and Emerging Professionals Committee (SEPC) offers 30-minute mock interviews for those looking to develop and refine interviewing skills, including job-seekers. Participants practice one-on-one with a seasoned interviewer and receive candid feedback.

SEPC makes every effort to accommodate all applicants, however, space is limited. Interviews are available by appointment via the pre-conference Google Registration Form. Registration is Monday,  January 6 to Friday, January 31. Participants will be notified of their slot by e-mail. With confirmation, we’ll request a CV and cover letter for your interviewer. On-site registration will be available at the conference, but pre-registering is strongly recommended for those whose conference plans are confirmed to get more tailored training and feedback.

Free of charge, CAA members only. Sign up via the pre-conference Google Registration Form.

CAA Internship Program

posted by September 12, 2019

Starting in September 2018, CAA introduced a new internship program in its New York office for undergraduate and graduate students and recent graduates. Specifically, the program is designed for those who wish to gain experience and develop skills in the following areas:

  • Events and Conference Programming
  • Publications and Digital Publications
  • Marketing & Communications
  • Membership Development

Each intern will be assigned a discrete, clearly defined project (or projects) to be completed during the internship period.

The number of hours will depend on the preference of the CAA department, but will generally expected to work 20-30 hours per week in CAA’s New York office sometime between the hours of 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM, Monday to Friday. All internships require a commitment of eight consecutive weeks. Interns are expected to be commit three days per week

Eligibility

  • Candidates must have successfully completed their junior year at an undergraduate college in any field of study.
  • Candidates must have secure housing in the New York area which will allow them to complete the entire internship period.
  • Candidates should have had some office experience and should be generally familiar with Microsoft Office, especially Word and Excel. Familiarity with Microsoft Office 365 preferable.

Internship sessions

  • Fall 2019 – 8 weeks (September 15 through December 15)
  • Spring 2020 – 8 weeks (January 15 through May 15)
  • Summer 2020 – 8 weeks (June 1 through August 15)

There will be two interns per session.

Compensation

Each intern will receive a stipend of $500 per month paid bimonthly along with CAA’s regular payroll. Interns will be viewed as independent contractors and no deductions will be made, however a 1099 will be issued and interns are expected to pay all taxes as required under law.

Course credit

CAA will make every effort to assist successful candidates to obtain college credit, if applicable.  Please coordinate with your institution’s administrator for semester credit. CAA can provide letters of confirmation and/or complete necessary forms.

To apply

Please submit a cover letter indicating your departmental interests (please rank two preferred departments), and CV to Daniel Tsai, CAA Programs and Publications Administrator: dtsai@collegeart.org. Please also list two professional references and the means to contact them via telephone or email. No phone calls please.

Applications will be accepted until positions are filled.

Events and Conference Programming Internship Tasks:

Assists with Annual Conference Special Events/Special Projects

  • pre-conference workshops
  • Key Conversation Panels
  • events for students and emerging professionals
  • Museum visits and tours

Assists with the research and facilitation of the Network Hall programming.

Assists with the research and development and implementation of workshops and programs throughout the year.

Publications and Digital Publications Internship Tasks:

  • Assisting with checking layouts and copyediting
  • Proofreading the reviewsadmin site to ensure uniformity of titles, format
  • Checking all the links on Art Journal Opensite to make sure they work

Marketing & Communications Internship Tasks:

  • Editing and proofreading
  • Visual design and layout assistance
  • Social media
  • Assembling press files
  • Website review and content review
  • Assembling press hits files
  • Assembling digital metrics files
  • General communications and strategy research

Membership Development Internship Tasks:

  • Database cleanup
  • Assist with membership growth strategy
  • Renewal address file clean up
  • Membership card file address clean up, folding cards, post office delivery
  • Updating IP addresses indiv/org claims for missing issues
  • Returned publications for indiv/orgs
  • Adding/updating primary contacts for organizations
  • Possible outreach to lapsed organizational members

The CAA is an equal opportunity employer and considers all candidates for employment regardless of race, color, sex, age, national origin, creed, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender expression, or political affiliation.

Poster sessions at the 2018 CAA Annual Conference in Los Angeles. Photo: Rafael Cardenas

We’re excited to announce a Call for Participation for a special poster session dedicated to undergraduate research for the 2020 Annual Conference in Chicago, February 12-15. 

Organized by Alexa Sand, Chair of the Division of Arts and Humanities for the Council on Undergraduate Research, and Professor of Art History and Director of Undergraduate Research at Utah State University, this session is one of several events planned for CAA 2020 to provide more opportunities for undergraduate participation.

Submissions should be sent via this google form by October 31, 2019.

Selected presenters will be notified by December 1 and will need to join CAA at the student membership rate prior to participation in the conference. Participants will also be required to register for the conference.

Undergraduate research—whether part of a faculty-directed project, class-based, or an individual pursuit on the part of a student—is an ideal example of active and engaged learning. Students in art history identify questions, evaluate source material, test ideas and theories, and produce reports in some form, usually including a significant written component. In the studio art and design fields, research can take a different form, with creative practice being one way outcomes of a project can be delivered.

This poster session will be dedicated to presenting outstanding examples of undergraduate research. Submissions are invited from students conducting research such as object and/or medium studies, text-based analysis, experimental archaeology, thesis research, and/or creative inquiry. Students may choose to present findings from ongoing research or from recently completed projects.

We also encourage submissions from faculty and museum professionals who have experience with mentoring undergraduate research in Art History, Studio Art, Graphic Design, Visual Communication, and other creative fields. Faculty posters may address specific projects or case studies of student research projects, assessment of undergraduate research, characteristics of successful programs, or other approaches that addresses the challenges and benefits to students of undergraduate research.

This project proposal is part of CAA’s Undergraduate Outreach Initiative organized collaboratively by CAA’s Education Committee, Committee on Diversity Practices, Students and Emerging Professionals Committee, and the Division of Arts and Humanities, Council on Undergraduate Research.

Please contact Alexa Sand directly at alexa.sand@usu.edu with any questions.

Filed under: Annual Conference, Students

Apply to be a CAA Campus Ambassador

posted by May 02, 2019

CAA 2018 Annual Conference attendees. Photo: Rafael Cardenas

CAA is seeking Ambassadors in the New York, Boston, and Chicago areas to represent CAA and give short talks about the organization to their fellow classmates and students in nearby schools.

The selected Ambassadors will be compensated for each talk and given a complimentary CAA Annual Conference registration and one-year CAA membership at the student level. Ambassadors will collect feedback at their talks and have check-ins with CAA staff leading the project.

To be considered for the CAA Ambassador role, applicants must be currently enrolled in a visual arts-focused program at a university or college in the New York, Boston, or Chicago area. Applicants should be in their junior year or higher. Master’s degree, Master of Fine Arts, and PhD candidates are encouraged to apply. Familiarity with CAA and its programs is necessary for this role. Candidates should feel enthusiastic about spreading the word about CAA and feel comfortable speaking in front of groups. The Ambassador role is a two-semester commitment (fall and spring) with a maximum of five talks given on campuses each semester.

To be considered for the CAA Ambassador Program, please submit your resume or CV, cover letter expressing your interest, and one reference to Alison Chang at achang@collegeart.org.

Applications will be accepted until the positions are filled.

Pay-as-you-Wish Is Back for CAA 2019

posted by February 05, 2019

The Pay-as-you-Wish Day Pass is back for the CAA 2019 Annual Conference in New York City, February 13-16! For the third year in a row we are happy to offer the pass as a way for students, adjunct faculty, or anyone not able to afford a full conference registration to attend any part of the conference for a full day.

Pay-as-you-Wish is available onsite only at the New York Hilton Midtown. It is open to everyone, CAA members and non-members alike, with no advance registration needed. Pay-as-you-Wish purchases can be made with any registration staff or the Pay-as-you-Wish helpers in the registration area. 

Suggested Pay-as-you-Wish Day Pass price: $25 

The Pay-as-you-Wish Day Pass allows for full, one-day access to the conference, and if you want to return the next day, a full day pass must be purchased. 

The Annual Conference will feature over 300 sessions, a bustling Book and Trade Fair, and the free and open to the public Academic and Cultural Network Hall with professional development workshops, Idea Exchange, and booths of leading cultural non-profits and educational institutions.  

Browse the Full Conference Schedule  

The Keynote Speaker for 2019 will be Joyce J. Scott, sculptor, craftsperson, and 2016 MacArthur Fellow. The Distinguished Artist Interviews will feature Julie Mehretu interviewed by Julia Bryan-Wilson and Guadalupe Maravilla interviewed by Sheila Maldonado. The Distinguished Scholar for the 107th CAA Annual Conference is Dr. Elizabeth Boone, the Martha and Donald Robertson Chair in Latin American Studies at Tulane University. 

Meet the 2018 Professional Development Fellows

posted by January 28, 2019

CAA has awarded two 2018 Professional Development Fellowships—one in art history and one in visual art—to graduate students in MFA and PhD programs. In addition, CAA has named one honorable mention in art history and two in visual art. The fellows and honorable mentions both receive a complimentary one-year CAA membership and registration for the 2019 Annual Conference in New York City.

The recipient of the $10,000 fellowship in art history is C.C. McKee, a dual PhD candidate in the Department of Art History at Northwestern University and the École des hautes études en sciences sociales in Paris. Accepting the $10,000 fellowship in visual art is Camila Labarca Linaweaver, a MFA candidate in Printmaking at the University of Oklahoma.

The honorable mention for art history goes to Julia Vázquez, a PhD candidate in the Department of Art History & Archaeology at Columbia University. The honorable mentions in visual art are awarded to Kira Dominguez Hultgren, who is earning a MFA/MA in Fine Arts and Visual and Critical Studies at California College of the Arts, and Rowan Renee, who is currently pursuing their MFA at the University of Michigan.

The two fellows and three honorable mentions will be formally recognized at the 107th Annual Conference during Convocation on Wednesday, February 13, 2019.

CAA’s fellowship program supports promising artists and art historians who are enrolled in MFA and PhD programs nationwide. Awards are intended to help them with various aspects of their work, whether for job-search expenses or purchasing materials for the studio. CAA believes a grant of this kind, without contingencies, can best facilitate the transition between graduate studies and professional careers. The program is open to all eligible graduate students in the visual arts and art history. Applications for the 2019 fellowship cycle will open in the late spring.

FELLOW IN ART HISTORY

C.C. McKee

C.C. McKee is a dual doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History at Northwestern University (advised by Huey Copeland) and the École des hautes études en sciences sociales in Paris (advised by Anne Lafont). McKee received his BA from the University of California, Berkeley as a double major with honors in the history of art and highest honors in history.

McKee’s current dissertation project takes up art and visual culture from the francophone Caribbean during the long nineteenth century, arguing that, on the one hand, painting could bolster imperial authority by eliding the coeval inhumane violence and ecological brutality of colonialism. On the other, these artworks are inadvertent repositories for parallel ecologies opening onto embodied African diasporic knowledge of the Caribbean landscape.

This project represents one facet of McKee’s broader investment in the transhistorical relationship between colonialism (particularly during the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries) and its continued effects in the present. These interests include, art of the Atlantic World, contemporary African and African diasporic art, and queer aesthetic practices; all of which are indebted to black feminist, ecocritical, postcolonial, and psychoanalytic theories. McKee has developed these perspectives in various pieces of art criticism; with exhibitions at the Block Museum, Iceberg Projects (Chicago, IL), and the Ghetto Biennale (Port-au-Prince, Haiti); as well as in a forthcoming article for Art Journal. Moving forward, McKee will pursue a scholarly and curatorial practice that challenges the boundaries between the university classroom and the museum, between academic publication and exposing a broad public to the rich artistic traditions of the Caribbean.

FELLOW IN VISUAL ART

Camila Labarca Linaweaver

Camila Labarca Linaweaver was born in Santiago, Chile and immigrated to the United States at the age of 7. She lived and studied in Texas and holds a BFA from The University of Houston Clear Lake. She is a first-generation college graduate and is currently an MFA Printmaking candidate at The University of Oklahoma. While pursuing her graduate studies she has taught undergraduate courses in Printmaking and Drawing. Linaweavers focus within the printmaking medium is almost exclusively on singular and experimental prints. Using the landscape as a metaphor, she crafts narratives of immigrant displacement, loss, and alienation. Recently she has delved into time-based work, subjecting monotypes to various stop motion processes. Her unique approach to confronting her personal history as an immigrant results in highly nuanced imagery that aims to bridge opposing sides and create positive discourse within the context of global immigration issues.

As an emerging artist, Linaweaver has exhibited extensively throughout the US and has chosen to pursue a career in academia. In the future she aspires to participate in residencies and exhibitions that focus on community engagement and the intersection of landscape, identity, and culture.

HONORABLE MENTION IN ART HISTORY

Julia Vázquez

Julia Vázquez is a PhD candidate in the Department of Art History & Archaeology at Columbia University, where she is currently completing a dissertation titled “The Artist as Curator: Diego Velázquez, 1623-1660.” Her dissertation reconsiders the curatorial career of Diego Velázquez at the court of King Philip IV of Spain. It examines the major redecoration projects that Velázquez executed for galleries in the Spanish royal palace, considering the ways that his ambitions and interests as a painter found a new expression in this medium. It also analyzes significant paintings that Velázquez made in response to the royal art collection, considering the impact on his painting practice not only of its contents, but also of its display. Her research therefore proposes the career of Diego Velázquez at the Hapsburg court as a major episode in the history of the artist-curator, ultimately arguing that Velázquez’s simultaneous creative identities as painter to the king and curator of his art collection were mutually transformative.

Previously, Julia has held internships and fellowships at the Musée du Louvre, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Meadows Museum, the Museo Nacional del Prado, and the National Gallery of Art. While at the Meadows, she curated two exhibitions: “Picasso’s Dream and Lie of Franco: The Spanish Civil War in Print” (summer 2017) and “Murillo at the Meadows: A 400th-Anniversary Celebration” (2017-2018). She is currently the Hilla Rebay International Fellow at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Museo Guggenheim Bilbao, and the Collezione Peggy Guggenheim.

HONORABLE MENTIONS IN VISUAL ART

Kira Dominguez Hultgren

Kira Dominguez Hultgren (b. 1980) is a California-, Utah-, and Minnesota-based textile artist. She studied French postcolonial theory and literature at Princeton University (BA Comparative Literature, 2003), and performance and fine arts in Río Negro, Argentina from 2010-2012. While in Patagonia, she apprenticed with master weaver Mary Coronado, where Dominguez Hultgren studied the process and history of indigenous warp-faced weaving of Mallín Ahogado on a Mapuche vertical post loom.

Today, Dominguez Hultgren combines her interests in postcolonial theory and weaving in both her art and writing-research practice. In her third year at California College of the Arts, Dominguez Hultgren is earning a dual-degree MFA/MA in Fine Arts and Visual and Critical Studies. Her research interests include material and embodied rhetorics, loom technologies, decolonizing material culture, and analyzing textiles as a performative critique against the visual. She has won numerous awards including California College of the Art’s All College Honors Graduate Fine Art Award, the Edwin Anthony and Adalaine Boudreaux Cadogan Scholarship, and the Lenore Tawney Fiber and Material Studies Scholarship. Dominguez Hultgren is represented by Eleanor Harwood Gallery in San Francisco, where she had her first solo show, Wingspan, in 2018.

Rowan Renee

Rowan Renee is a genderqueer artist who uses photography to interrogate how sexual bodies are gendered, victimized, policed and punished. Through photographic, printmaking and sculptural techniques, they produce and appropriate images that intervene on issues of authorship, the representation of queer and feminine bodies within the art-historical canon, and the intersection of homophobia and misogyny in sex law and copyright law. The disjunctures of pleasure and abjection, felt through jouissance, informs their manipulation of images. Through artistic labor, they see a means to construct transformative meaning from experiences of violence, persecution and erasure that threaten queer and feminine subjects.

Currently pursuing their MFA at the University of Michigan, Renee works between Ann Arbor, Michigan and  Brooklyn, NY. Their career began in 2006, when they joined The Miss Rockaway Armada, a collaborative flotilla of thirty people who floated down the Mississippi river on junk rafts built from NYC construction waste. Recently, they have received awards from the Aaron Siskind Foundation, the Rema Hort Mann Foundation and the Anchorage Museum of Art, as well as fellowships from the Jerome Foundation and the McColl Center for Visual Art. In 2018 they were named an Elsie Choy Lee Scholar by the University of Michigan. Their solo exhibitions include Z at Pioneer Works (2015), Bodies of Wood at The Aperture Foundation (2017), and No Honor No Heart at the Center for Visual Arts Toledo (2019). Their work has been profiled on NPR, in The New York Times, VICE, Hyperallergic, Huffington Post, American Photo Magazine and Guernica, among many other publications.

Meet the 2019 Student Scholarship Winners

posted by January 25, 2019

CAA Student Scholarships
with support from tf-logo
blick-utrecht-logo-bw-prof

For the third year in a row, CAA is proud to partner with our sponsors, multinational publisher, Routledge, Taylor & Francis, and art materials specialist, Blick Art Materials, on student scholarships to assist CAA student members with conference costs.

Routledge, Taylor & Francis Student Scholarship

CAA Annual Conference Premier Sponsor, Routledge, Taylor & Francis supports four CAA student members with a $250 scholarship. The 2019 winners are:

Jonathan Anderson

Jonathan Anderson is an artist and art critic, and is currently working on a PhD at King’s College London. His research focuses on modern and contemporary art, with a particular emphasis on its relations to religion and theology. He is the coauthor of the book Modern Art and the Life of a Culture: The Religious Impulses of Modernism (2016), and he has contributed to various books and journals, including essays on John Cage, Francis Alÿs, Kris Martin, Rachel Whiteread, and others.

Noni Brynjolson

Noni Brynjolson is a PhD Candidate in Art History, Theory & Criticism at the University of California, San Diego. Her research analyzes socially engaged art projects in US cities. She is interested in looking at how artists address the politics of housing and gentrification through their work, as well as the informal communities that emerge within these projects. Noni is a member of the editorial collective of FIELD: A Journal of Socially Engaged Art Criticism, and her writing has been published in FIELD as well as in Hyperallergic, Akimbo, Geist and Craft Journal. She has also published chapters in two edited books: “From Mentorship to Collaboration: Art, Feminism and Community in Winnipeg” (in Desire Change: Contemporary Feminist Art in Canada, McGill Queen’s University Press, 2017), and “The Making of Many Hands: Artisanal Production and Neighbourhood Redevelopment in Contemporary Socially Engaged Art” (in Craft on Demand: The New Politics of the Handmade, I.B. Tauris, forthcoming 2019). Noni’s dissertation research was supported by a SSHRC doctoral fellowship, and she is currently a graduate fellow at UC San Diego’s International Institute as part of the 2018-19 Sawyer Seminar focused on the theme of ‘Reclaiming the City.’

Anton Lee

Anton Lee teaches in the Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, where he completed his doctorate in November 2018. A specialist in the history and theory of photography, his work focuses on the contested understandings of the medium’s identities in European and Anglo-American countries from the early 20th century to the present. His current research prioritizes transforming his doctoral dissertation into a book, provisionally titled Nouvelle Photographie Amériaine: The Rise of Photographic Sequence in the United States and France, 1968–1989. Lee was the Kenneth J. Botto Research Fellow at the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson in 2016 and a Visiting Researcher at the Université Paris-Sorbonne in 2015.

Candace Smith

Candace Smith currently studies Art History at the University of North Texas where she is working towards an MA under Dr. Nada Shabout in the field of Modern and Contemporary Art of the Middle East. Her current research explores issues of power, identity politics, and built space in the context of postwar Lebanese Art institutions and reconstruction (1990-present). Smith has presented and lectured on politics, power, and space, both as a university level and at the Texas Sculpture Symposium with NY-based artist Wafaa Bilal. She has also spent time abroad meeting and working directly with some of Beirut’s most prominent art collectors and foundations as well as emerging Beirut-based artists such as Hiba Kalache. Smith received a BA from Texas Tech University after completing undergraduate thesis work on 21st-Century street art created during times of conflict in central Cairo and the West Bank. Working directly with published photojournalists and prominent, local artists, Smith addressed local agency and perceptions of space in direct contrast with American and European activity in the area. Smith was the director of social media for AMCA and collaborated with Selections Magazine on their Winter 2018 Art Pages.

Blick Art Materials Student Scholarship

CAA Annual Conference Supporter Sponsor, Blick Art Materials supports four CAA student members with a $250 scholarship. The 2019 winners are:

Margot Bernstein

Margot Bernstein is an advanced PhD candidate at Columbia University with a specialization in eighteenth-century art and material culture. Her dissertation, “Carmontelle’s Profile Pictures and the Things that Made Them Modern,” examines hundreds of portraits on paper by Louis Carrogis called Carmontelle (1717-1806), a French amateur draftsman. Margot holds a BA (2010) in art history and history from Williams College and an MA (2012) in the History of Art from the Courtauld Institute of Art. She also holds an MA (2014) and an MPhil (2015) in art history from Columbia University. In recent years, she has worked at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Frick Collection, the Morgan Library & Museum, the New-York Historical Society, the Calder Foundation, and the Williams College Museum of Art. Currently, Margot is a Chester Dale Fellow in the Department of Drawings and Prints at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Jessica Crocker

Jessica Rae Crocker lives and works in Prescott, AZ. She is currently pursuing her PhD in Philosophy, Aesthetics, and Art Theory through IDSVA (Institute for Doctoral Studies in the Visual Arts). She is a ceramic artist focusing on the role of craft as a means to develop intimacy. Her recent work explores relationships and limerence through the use of imbedded interactive technologies. She works in both figurative and functional paradigms embracing the historical symbolism of the clay material in its many forms. This generous gift is allowing her to attend the CAA conference for the first time.

Kimberly Minor

Kimberly Minor is a doctoral candidate in Art History at the University of Oklahoma. Her research broadly focuses on American art, with interests in material culture, art of the early American West, and Northern Plains Indian drawings. Her dissertation “Pictographic Motifs: Memory and Masculinity on the Upper Missouri” engages the visual, material, and experiential sources of military imagery produced by the Mandan and Hidatsa during the early nineteenth-century. She studies how indigenous male identity was negotiated through constant confrontation (both physical and spiritual) with war and warriors, adding to a growing body of scholarship that emphasizes and affirms the importance of indigenous histories. Her research has been supported by the Smithsonian Institute of Museum Anthropology and the ACLS/Luce Dissertation Fellowship in American Art.

Laura Stowell

Laura Stowell is a third-year PhD Student in Art History at the University of Washington, Seattle. She received her MA in Contemporary Art from Sotheby’s Institute of Art, New York. Her research explores intersections of performance, affect, aesthetics, and trauma in art from 1945 to the present, with specific emphasis on feminist approaches to the body. In 2018 she presented a paper titled “Listening to the Body in Pain: Regina José Galindo’s (279) Golpes” at UC San Diego’s Graduate Visual Arts Symposium, and a paper titled “Pathography and the work of Alina Szapocznikow” at the Legacies of the Enlightenment Workshop at Michigan State University. She worked as the Curatorial Assistant at the Henry Art Gallery, Seattle, and plans on continuing to work in the curatorial field.

Criteria for the Scholarship

Awardees were chosen at random and fulfilled the following criteria:

  • Individuals were registered for the Annual Conference by the Early Registration deadline
  • Individuals are current CAA members with proof of student status
  • Individuals did not receive conference registration or travel reimbursement from their institution or employer

We look forward to seeing you in New York City next month! The 107th Annual Conference is February 13-16, 2019. Click here to explore the conference program. 

Attendee at 2018 CAA Annual Conference in Los Angeles. Photo: Rafael Cardenas

The Art History Special Exhibition Travel Fund jury is looking for members.

The deadline is January 31, 2019.

In August, we announced that CAA received a major anonymous gift of $1 million to fund travel for art history faculty and their students to special exhibitions related to their classwork. The fund is designed to award up to $10,000 to qualifying undergraduate and graduate art history classes to cover students’ and instructors’ costs (travel, accommodations, and admissions fees) associated with attending museum special exhibitions throughout the United States and worldwide. The purpose of the grants is to enhance students’ first-hand knowledge of original works of art.

Jury members will review applications in February 2019 and confer by conference call or in person if necessary. After staggering jury cycles are established, jurors serve for a three-year term.

Jury members are comprised of art historians and a museum curator. Candidates must be CAA members and should not currently serve on another CAA editorial board or committee. CAA’s president appoints jury members for service. Jury members may not themselves apply for a grant in this program during their term of service. Members shall be entitled to a nominal honorarium in recognition of their service.

Nominators should ascertain their nominee’s willingness to serve before submitting a name; self-nominations are also welcome.

Please send a letter describing your interest in and qualifications for appointment, along with a CV (two pages maximum) to Cali Buckley, Grants and Special Programs Manager, at cbuckley@collegeart.org.

Filed under: Art History, Students