CAA News Today

Pay-as-you-Wish Is Back for CAA 2019

posted by February 05, 2019

The Pay-as-you-Wish Day Pass is back for the CAA 2019 Annual Conference in New York City, February 13-16! For the third year in a row we are happy to offer the pass as a way for students, adjunct faculty, or anyone not able to afford a full conference registration to attend any part of the conference for a full day.

Pay-as-you-Wish is available onsite only at the New York Hilton Midtown. It is open to everyone, CAA members and non-members alike, with no advance registration needed. Pay-as-you-Wish purchases can be made with any registration staff or the Pay-as-you-Wish helpers in the registration area. 

Suggested Pay-as-you-Wish Day Pass price: $25 

The Pay-as-you-Wish Day Pass allows for full, one-day access to the conference, and if you want to return the next day, a full day pass must be purchased. 

The Annual Conference will feature over 300 sessions, a bustling Book and Trade Fair, and the free and open to the public Academic and Cultural Network Hall with professional development workshops, Idea Exchange, and booths of leading cultural non-profits and educational institutions.  

Browse the Full Conference Schedule  

The Keynote Speaker for 2019 will be Joyce J. Scott, sculptor, craftsperson, and 2016 MacArthur Fellow. The Distinguished Artist Interviews will feature Julie Mehretu interviewed by Julia Bryan-Wilson and Guadalupe Maravilla interviewed by Sheila Maldonado. The Distinguished Scholar for the 107th CAA Annual Conference is Dr. Elizabeth Boone, the Martha and Donald Robertson Chair in Latin American Studies at Tulane University. 

Meet the 2018 Professional Development Fellows

posted by January 28, 2019

CAA has awarded two 2018 Professional Development Fellowships—one in art history and one in visual art—to graduate students in MFA and PhD programs. In addition, CAA has named one honorable mention in art history and two in visual art. The fellows and honorable mentions both receive a complimentary one-year CAA membership and registration for the 2019 Annual Conference in New York City.

The recipient of the $10,000 fellowship in art history is C.C. McKee, a dual PhD candidate in the Department of Art History at Northwestern University and the École des hautes études en sciences sociales in Paris. Accepting the $10,000 fellowship in visual art is Camila Labarca Linaweaver, a MFA candidate in Printmaking at the University of Oklahoma.

The honorable mention for art history goes to Julia Vázquez, a PhD candidate in the Department of Art History & Archaeology at Columbia University. The honorable mentions in visual art are awarded to Kira Dominguez Hultgren, who is earning a MFA/MA in Fine Arts and Visual and Critical Studies at California College of the Arts, and Rowan Renee, who is currently pursuing their MFA at the University of Michigan.

The two fellows and three honorable mentions will be formally recognized at the 107th Annual Conference during Convocation on Wednesday, February 13, 2019.

CAA’s fellowship program supports promising artists and art historians who are enrolled in MFA and PhD programs nationwide. Awards are intended to help them with various aspects of their work, whether for job-search expenses or purchasing materials for the studio. CAA believes a grant of this kind, without contingencies, can best facilitate the transition between graduate studies and professional careers. The program is open to all eligible graduate students in the visual arts and art history. Applications for the 2019 fellowship cycle will open in the late spring.

FELLOW IN ART HISTORY

C.C. McKee

C.C. McKee is a dual doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History at Northwestern University (advised by Huey Copeland) and the École des hautes études en sciences sociales in Paris (advised by Anne Lafont). McKee received his BA from the University of California, Berkeley as a double major with honors in the history of art and highest honors in history.

McKee’s current dissertation project takes up art and visual culture from the francophone Caribbean during the long nineteenth century, arguing that, on the one hand, painting could bolster imperial authority by eliding the coeval inhumane violence and ecological brutality of colonialism. On the other, these artworks are inadvertent repositories for parallel ecologies opening onto embodied African diasporic knowledge of the Caribbean landscape.

This project represents one facet of McKee’s broader investment in the transhistorical relationship between colonialism (particularly during the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries) and its continued effects in the present. These interests include, art of the Atlantic World, contemporary African and African diasporic art, and queer aesthetic practices; all of which are indebted to black feminist, ecocritical, postcolonial, and psychoanalytic theories. McKee has developed these perspectives in various pieces of art criticism; with exhibitions at the Block Museum, Iceberg Projects (Chicago, IL), and the Ghetto Biennale (Port-au-Prince, Haiti); as well as in a forthcoming article for Art Journal. Moving forward, McKee will pursue a scholarly and curatorial practice that challenges the boundaries between the university classroom and the museum, between academic publication and exposing a broad public to the rich artistic traditions of the Caribbean.

FELLOW IN VISUAL ART

Camila Labarca Linaweaver

Camila Labarca Linaweaver was born in Santiago, Chile and immigrated to the United States at the age of 7. She lived and studied in Texas and holds a BFA from The University of Houston Clear Lake. She is a first-generation college graduate and is currently an MFA Printmaking candidate at The University of Oklahoma. While pursuing her graduate studies she has taught undergraduate courses in Printmaking and Drawing. Linaweavers focus within the printmaking medium is almost exclusively on singular and experimental prints. Using the landscape as a metaphor, she crafts narratives of immigrant displacement, loss, and alienation. Recently she has delved into time-based work, subjecting monotypes to various stop motion processes. Her unique approach to confronting her personal history as an immigrant results in highly nuanced imagery that aims to bridge opposing sides and create positive discourse within the context of global immigration issues.

As an emerging artist, Linaweaver has exhibited extensively throughout the US and has chosen to pursue a career in academia. In the future she aspires to participate in residencies and exhibitions that focus on community engagement and the intersection of landscape, identity, and culture.

HONORABLE MENTION IN ART HISTORY

Julia Vázquez

Julia Vázquez is a PhD candidate in the Department of Art History & Archaeology at Columbia University, where she is currently completing a dissertation titled “The Artist as Curator: Diego Velázquez, 1623-1660.” Her dissertation reconsiders the curatorial career of Diego Velázquez at the court of King Philip IV of Spain. It examines the major redecoration projects that Velázquez executed for galleries in the Spanish royal palace, considering the ways that his ambitions and interests as a painter found a new expression in this medium. It also analyzes significant paintings that Velázquez made in response to the royal art collection, considering the impact on his painting practice not only of its contents, but also of its display. Her research therefore proposes the career of Diego Velázquez at the Hapsburg court as a major episode in the history of the artist-curator, ultimately arguing that Velázquez’s simultaneous creative identities as painter to the king and curator of his art collection were mutually transformative.

Previously, Julia has held internships and fellowships at the Musée du Louvre, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Meadows Museum, the Museo Nacional del Prado, and the National Gallery of Art. While at the Meadows, she curated two exhibitions: “Picasso’s Dream and Lie of Franco: The Spanish Civil War in Print” (summer 2017) and “Murillo at the Meadows: A 400th-Anniversary Celebration” (2017-2018). She is currently the Hilla Rebay International Fellow at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Museo Guggenheim Bilbao, and the Collezione Peggy Guggenheim.

HONORABLE MENTIONS IN VISUAL ART

Kira Dominguez Hultgren

Kira Dominguez Hultgren (b. 1980) is a California-, Utah-, and Minnesota-based textile artist. She studied French postcolonial theory and literature at Princeton University (BA Comparative Literature, 2003), and performance and fine arts in Río Negro, Argentina from 2010-2012. While in Patagonia, she apprenticed with master weaver Mary Coronado, where Dominguez Hultgren studied the process and history of indigenous warp-faced weaving of Mallín Ahogado on a Mapuche vertical post loom.

Today, Dominguez Hultgren combines her interests in postcolonial theory and weaving in both her art and writing-research practice. In her third year at California College of the Arts, Dominguez Hultgren is earning a dual-degree MFA/MA in Fine Arts and Visual and Critical Studies. Her research interests include material and embodied rhetorics, loom technologies, decolonizing material culture, and analyzing textiles as a performative critique against the visual. She has won numerous awards including California College of the Art’s All College Honors Graduate Fine Art Award, the Edwin Anthony and Adalaine Boudreaux Cadogan Scholarship, and the Lenore Tawney Fiber and Material Studies Scholarship. Dominguez Hultgren is represented by Eleanor Harwood Gallery in San Francisco, where she had her first solo show, Wingspan, in 2018.

Rowan Renee

Rowan Renee is a genderqueer artist who uses photography to interrogate how sexual bodies are gendered, victimized, policed and punished. Through photographic, printmaking and sculptural techniques, they produce and appropriate images that intervene on issues of authorship, the representation of queer and feminine bodies within the art-historical canon, and the intersection of homophobia and misogyny in sex law and copyright law. The disjunctures of pleasure and abjection, felt through jouissance, informs their manipulation of images. Through artistic labor, they see a means to construct transformative meaning from experiences of violence, persecution and erasure that threaten queer and feminine subjects.

Currently pursuing their MFA at the University of Michigan, Renee works between Ann Arbor, Michigan and  Brooklyn, NY. Their career began in 2006, when they joined The Miss Rockaway Armada, a collaborative flotilla of thirty people who floated down the Mississippi river on junk rafts built from NYC construction waste. Recently, they have received awards from the Aaron Siskind Foundation, the Rema Hort Mann Foundation and the Anchorage Museum of Art, as well as fellowships from the Jerome Foundation and the McColl Center for Visual Art. In 2018 they were named an Elsie Choy Lee Scholar by the University of Michigan. Their solo exhibitions include Z at Pioneer Works (2015), Bodies of Wood at The Aperture Foundation (2017), and No Honor No Heart at the Center for Visual Arts Toledo (2019). Their work has been profiled on NPR, in The New York Times, VICE, Hyperallergic, Huffington Post, American Photo Magazine and Guernica, among many other publications.

Meet the 2019 Student Scholarship Winners

posted by January 25, 2019

CAA Student Scholarships
with support from tf-logo
blick-utrecht-logo-bw-prof

For the third year in a row, CAA is proud to partner with our sponsors, multinational publisher, Routledge, Taylor & Francis, and art materials specialist, Blick Art Materials, on student scholarships to assist CAA student members with conference costs.

Routledge, Taylor & Francis Student Scholarship

CAA Annual Conference Premier Sponsor, Routledge, Taylor & Francis supports four CAA student members with a $250 scholarship. The 2019 winners are:

Jonathan Anderson

Jonathan Anderson is an artist and art critic, and is currently working on a PhD at King’s College London. His research focuses on modern and contemporary art, with a particular emphasis on its relations to religion and theology. He is the coauthor of the book Modern Art and the Life of a Culture: The Religious Impulses of Modernism (2016), and he has contributed to various books and journals, including essays on John Cage, Francis Alÿs, Kris Martin, Rachel Whiteread, and others.

Noni Brynjolson

Noni Brynjolson is a PhD Candidate in Art History, Theory & Criticism at the University of California, San Diego. Her research analyzes socially engaged art projects in US cities. She is interested in looking at how artists address the politics of housing and gentrification through their work, as well as the informal communities that emerge within these projects. Noni is a member of the editorial collective of FIELD: A Journal of Socially Engaged Art Criticism, and her writing has been published in FIELD as well as in Hyperallergic, Akimbo, Geist and Craft Journal. She has also published chapters in two edited books: “From Mentorship to Collaboration: Art, Feminism and Community in Winnipeg” (in Desire Change: Contemporary Feminist Art in Canada, McGill Queen’s University Press, 2017), and “The Making of Many Hands: Artisanal Production and Neighbourhood Redevelopment in Contemporary Socially Engaged Art” (in Craft on Demand: The New Politics of the Handmade, I.B. Tauris, forthcoming 2019). Noni’s dissertation research was supported by a SSHRC doctoral fellowship, and she is currently a graduate fellow at UC San Diego’s International Institute as part of the 2018-19 Sawyer Seminar focused on the theme of ‘Reclaiming the City.’

Anton Lee

Anton Lee teaches in the Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, where he completed his doctorate in November 2018. A specialist in the history and theory of photography, his work focuses on the contested understandings of the medium’s identities in European and Anglo-American countries from the early 20th century to the present. His current research prioritizes transforming his doctoral dissertation into a book, provisionally titled Nouvelle Photographie Amériaine: The Rise of Photographic Sequence in the United States and France, 1968–1989. Lee was the Kenneth J. Botto Research Fellow at the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson in 2016 and a Visiting Researcher at the Université Paris-Sorbonne in 2015.

Candace Smith

Candace Smith currently studies Art History at the University of North Texas where she is working towards an MA under Dr. Nada Shabout in the field of Modern and Contemporary Art of the Middle East. Her current research explores issues of power, identity politics, and built space in the context of postwar Lebanese Art institutions and reconstruction (1990-present). Smith has presented and lectured on politics, power, and space, both as a university level and at the Texas Sculpture Symposium with NY-based artist Wafaa Bilal. She has also spent time abroad meeting and working directly with some of Beirut’s most prominent art collectors and foundations as well as emerging Beirut-based artists such as Hiba Kalache. Smith received a BA from Texas Tech University after completing undergraduate thesis work on 21st-Century street art created during times of conflict in central Cairo and the West Bank. Working directly with published photojournalists and prominent, local artists, Smith addressed local agency and perceptions of space in direct contrast with American and European activity in the area. Smith was the director of social media for AMCA and collaborated with Selections Magazine on their Winter 2018 Art Pages.

Blick Art Materials Student Scholarship

CAA Annual Conference Supporter Sponsor, Blick Art Materials supports four CAA student members with a $250 scholarship. The 2019 winners are:

Margot Bernstein

Margot Bernstein is an advanced PhD candidate at Columbia University with a specialization in eighteenth-century art and material culture. Her dissertation, “Carmontelle’s Profile Pictures and the Things that Made Them Modern,” examines hundreds of portraits on paper by Louis Carrogis called Carmontelle (1717-1806), a French amateur draftsman. Margot holds a BA (2010) in art history and history from Williams College and an MA (2012) in the History of Art from the Courtauld Institute of Art. She also holds an MA (2014) and an MPhil (2015) in art history from Columbia University. In recent years, she has worked at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Frick Collection, the Morgan Library & Museum, the New-York Historical Society, the Calder Foundation, and the Williams College Museum of Art. Currently, Margot is a Chester Dale Fellow in the Department of Drawings and Prints at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Jessica Crocker

Jessica Rae Crocker lives and works in Prescott, AZ. She is currently pursuing her PhD in Philosophy, Aesthetics, and Art Theory through IDSVA (Institute for Doctoral Studies in the Visual Arts). She is a ceramic artist focusing on the role of craft as a means to develop intimacy. Her recent work explores relationships and limerence through the use of imbedded interactive technologies. She works in both figurative and functional paradigms embracing the historical symbolism of the clay material in its many forms. This generous gift is allowing her to attend the CAA conference for the first time.

Kimberly Minor

Kimberly Minor is a doctoral candidate in Art History at the University of Oklahoma. Her research broadly focuses on American art, with interests in material culture, art of the early American West, and Northern Plains Indian drawings. Her dissertation “Pictographic Motifs: Memory and Masculinity on the Upper Missouri” engages the visual, material, and experiential sources of military imagery produced by the Mandan and Hidatsa during the early nineteenth-century. She studies how indigenous male identity was negotiated through constant confrontation (both physical and spiritual) with war and warriors, adding to a growing body of scholarship that emphasizes and affirms the importance of indigenous histories. Her research has been supported by the Smithsonian Institute of Museum Anthropology and the ACLS/Luce Dissertation Fellowship in American Art.

Laura Stowell

Laura Stowell is a third-year PhD Student in Art History at the University of Washington, Seattle. She received her MA in Contemporary Art from Sotheby’s Institute of Art, New York. Her research explores intersections of performance, affect, aesthetics, and trauma in art from 1945 to the present, with specific emphasis on feminist approaches to the body. In 2018 she presented a paper titled “Listening to the Body in Pain: Regina José Galindo’s (279) Golpes” at UC San Diego’s Graduate Visual Arts Symposium, and a paper titled “Pathography and the work of Alina Szapocznikow” at the Legacies of the Enlightenment Workshop at Michigan State University. She worked as the Curatorial Assistant at the Henry Art Gallery, Seattle, and plans on continuing to work in the curatorial field.

Criteria for the Scholarship

Awardees were chosen at random and fulfilled the following criteria:

  • Individuals were registered for the Annual Conference by the Early Registration deadline
  • Individuals are current CAA members with proof of student status
  • Individuals did not receive conference registration or travel reimbursement from their institution or employer

We look forward to seeing you in New York City next month! The 107th Annual Conference is February 13-16, 2019. Click here to explore the conference program. 

Attendee at 2018 CAA Annual Conference in Los Angeles. Photo: Rafael Cardenas

The Art History Special Exhibition Travel Fund jury is looking for members.

The deadline is January 31, 2019.

In August, we announced that CAA received a major anonymous gift of $1 million to fund travel for art history faculty and their students to special exhibitions related to their classwork. The fund is designed to award up to $10,000 to qualifying undergraduate and graduate art history classes to cover students’ and instructors’ costs (travel, accommodations, and admissions fees) associated with attending museum special exhibitions throughout the United States and worldwide. The purpose of the grants is to enhance students’ first-hand knowledge of original works of art.

Jury members will review applications in February 2019 and confer by conference call or in person if necessary. After staggering jury cycles are established, jurors serve for a three-year term.

Jury members are comprised of art historians and a museum curator. Candidates must be CAA members and should not currently serve on another CAA editorial board or committee. CAA’s president appoints jury members for service. Jury members may not themselves apply for a grant in this program during their term of service. Members shall be entitled to a nominal honorarium in recognition of their service.

Nominators should ascertain their nominee’s willingness to serve before submitting a name; self-nominations are also welcome.

Please send a letter describing your interest in and qualifications for appointment, along with a CV (two pages maximum) to Cali Buckley, Grants and Special Programs Manager, at cbuckley@collegeart.org.

Filed under: Art History, Students

Meet the 2018 CAA Campus Ambassadors

posted by December 05, 2018

Launched this fall, the CAA Ambassador Program is now in full swing. CAA Ambassadors are representing the organization in New York and Chicago and giving presentations to their fellow classmates and students in nearby schools. Meet the inaugural class of ambassadors below.

Interested in becoming a future CAA Ambassador? Learn more here.

Rikki Byrd

Rikki Byrd is a writer, educator and scholar, with research interests in Black studies, visual culture, fashion history and cultural studies. Her research has appeared at Art Basel: Miami and has been published or is forthcoming in various academic journals and books. She has also written for Teen Vogue, Art.sy, and Hyperallergic, among several other media outlets. She has lectured and participated in panel discussions with Google and The Council of Fashion Designers of America, Parsons School of Design, Junior High! in Los Angeles and Saint Louis Art Museum. Most recently, Rikki was a faculty member at Washington University in St. Louis in the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts and the African and African American Studies department. She is currently a PhD student in African American Studies at Northwestern University. 

J. English Cook

J. English Cook is a PhD candidate at the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU, where she specializes in intersections between architecture, cinema, and urban theory. Her dissertation examines the impact of cinema on the postwar spread of phenomenology, particularly as expressed in architects’ re-articulation of notions of spatial experience. She previously received an MA with distinction from the Institute of Fine Arts and a BA with highest honors from Williams College. A native of Atlanta, Georgia, she is currently the Graduate Curatorial Assistant at the Grey Art Gallery, NYU, and has worked as a Curatorial Assistant in Modern and Contemporary Art at the High Museum, Atlanta, and as the Commissioner’s Assistant for the US Pavilion at the 2010 Venice Architecture Biennale. She has produced performances at Momentum Worldwide, a time-based media gallery in Berlin, and has interned in curatorial departments at the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Williams College Museum of Art.

Rebecca Pollack

Rebecca Pollack is a doctoral candidate in art history at the CUNY Graduate Center. Her dissertation “Contextualizing British Holocaust Memorials and Museums: Form, Content, Politics,” examines the publicly funded Holocaust commemorative projects in Britain. She currently holds fellowships from the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture, the Jewish Studies Center at the CUNY Graduate Center, and the Paul Mellon Centre for British Art.  

Mia Rubin

Mia Rubin is a recent Parsons School of Design graduate. Mia is the Events and Conference Programming Intern at CAA and one of CAA’s newest ambassadors. She will assist with planning the Annual Conference. Mia will help organize pre-conference workshops, key conversation panels, events for students, and museum tours. She will research and help develop workshops and programs throughout the year.  

Urooj Shakeel

Urooj Shakeel is a graduate student at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in the Master of Arts in Arts Administration & Policy program. She is also the Leadership Investment and Communications Field Fellow at The Field Foundation of Illinois. Currently, Urooj is working on her thesis project and is designing a library exchange box in the shape of a Pakistani truck that is painted in the traditional art form known as Truck Art. This project examines activating public space for educative functions on Chicago’s Devon Avenue for preadolescents. As a leader, Urooj also serves on the SAIC Graduate Advisory Panel, working closely with the Graduate Dean’s Office to bring attention to graduate student interests through information sharing and problem solving. She earned her BS in Marketing and BA in Art History from Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan.

CAA Announces Campus Ambassador Program

posted by September 24, 2018

CAA 2018 Annual Conference attendees. Photography by Rafael Cardenas

Students have always been vital to CAA. Our student membership, which is nearly one quarter of our entire membership, has always been vocal, engaged, and eager. This fall we are looking to our students to help carry CAA into the future with the launch of the CAA Ambassador Program.

CAA is seeking Ambassadors in the New York, Boston, and Chicago areas to represent CAA and give short talks about the organization to their fellow classmates and students in nearby schools. The six selected Ambassadors will be compensated for each talk and given a complimentary CAA Annual Conference registration and one-year CAA membership at the student level. Ambassadors will collect feedback at their talks and have check-ins with CAA staff leading the project.

To be considered for the CAA Ambassador role, applicants must be currently enrolled in a visual arts-focused program at a university or college in the New York, Boston, or Chicago area. Applicants should be in their junior year or higher. Master’s degree, Master of Fine Arts, and PhD candidates are encouraged to apply. Familiarity with CAA and its programs is necessary for this role. Candidates should feel enthusiastic about spreading the word about CAA and feel comfortable speaking in front of groups. The Ambassador role is a two-semester commitment (fall and spring) with a maximum of five talks given on campuses each semester.

To be considered for the CAA Ambassador Program, please submit your resume or CV, cover letter expressing your interest, and one reference to Alison Chang at achang@collegeart.org.

Applications will be accepted until the positions are filled.

CAA Internship Program

posted by May 31, 2018

Attendees (art historian Julia Elizabeth Neal on the right) at the 2018 CAA Annual Conference in Los Angeles. Photo: Rafael Cardenas

Starting in September 2018, CAA will begin a new internship program in its New York office for undergraduate and graduate students and recent graduates. Specifically, the program is designed for those who wish to gain experience and develop skills in the following areas:

  • Events and Conference Programming
  • Publications and Digital Publications
  • Marketing & Communications
  • Membership Development

Each intern will be assigned a discrete, clearly defined project (or projects) to be completed during the internship period.

The number of hours will depend on the preference of the CAA department, but will generally expected to work 20-30 hours per week in CAA’s New York office sometime between the hours of 9:00AM to 6:00PM, Monday to Friday. All internships require a commitment of eight consecutive weeks. Interns are expected to be commit three days per week.


Eligibility

  • Candidates must have successfully completed their junior year at an undergraduate college in any field of study.
  • Candidates must have secure housing in the New York area which will allow them to complete the entire internship period.
  • Candidates should have had some office experience and should be generally familiar with Microsoft Office, especially Word and Excel. Familiarity with Microsoft Office 365 preferable.

Internship sessions

  • Fall 2018 – 8 weeks (September 15 through December 15)
  • Spring 2019 – 8 weeks (January 15 through May 15)
  • Summer 2019 – 8 weeks (June 1 through August 15)

There will be two interns per session.

Compensation

Each intern will receive a stipend of $500 per month paid bimonthly along with CAA’s regular payroll. Interns will be viewed as independent contractors and no deductions will be made, however a 1099 will be issued and interns are expected to pay all taxes as required under law.

Course credit

CAA will make every effort to assist successful candidates to obtain college credit, if applicable.  Please coordinate with your institution’s administrator for semester credit. CAA can provide letters of confirmation and/or complete necessary forms.

To apply

Please submit a cover letter indicating your departmental interests (please rank two preferred departments), and CV to Daniel Tsai, CAA Programs and Publications Administrator: dtsai@collegeart.org. Please also list two professional references and the means to contact them via telephone or email. No phone calls please.

Applications will be accepted until positions are filled.

Events and Conference Programming Internship Tasks:

Assists with Annual Conference Special Events/Special Projects

  • pre-conference workshops
  • Key Conversation Panels
  • events for students and emerging professionals
  • Museum visits and tours

Assists with the research and facilitation of the Network Hall programming.

Assists with the research and development and implementation of workshops and programs throughout the year.

Publications and Digital Publications Internship Tasks:

  • Assisting with checking layouts and copyediting
  • Proofreading the reviews admin site to ensure uniformity of titles, format
  • Checking all the links on Art Journal Open site to make sure they work

Marketing & Communications Internship Tasks:

  • Editing and proofreading
  • Visual design and layout assistance
  • Social media
  • Assembling press files
  • Website review and content review
  • Assembling press hits files
  • Assembling digital metrics files
  • General communications and strategy research

Membership Development Internship Tasks:

  • Database cleanup
  • Assist with membership growth strategy
  • Renewal address file clean up
  • Membership card file address clean up, folding cards, post office delivery
  • Updating IP addresses indiv/org claims for missing issues
  • Returned publications for indiv/orgs
  • Adding/updating primary contacts for organizations
  • Possible outreach to lapsed organizational members

The CAA is an equal opportunity employer and considers all candidates for employment regardless of race, color, sex, age, national origin, creed, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender expression, or political affiliation.

Meet the 2018 Student Scholarship Winners

posted by January 30, 2018

CAA Student Scholarships
with support from tf-logo
blick-utrecht-logo-bw-prof

For the second year in a row, CAA is proud to partner with our sponsors, multinational publisher, Routledge, Taylor & Francis, and art materials specialist, Blick Art Materials, on student scholarships to assist CAA student members with conference costs.

Routledge, Taylor & Francis Student Scholarship

CAA’s Annual Conference Partner Sponsor, Routledge, Taylor & Francis supports four CAA student members with complimentary registration and an additional $250 in scholarship money to help with conference expenses such as travel, housing, or meals. The 2018 winners are:

Painting by 2018 Scholarship Winner Patricia Chow, Outremer (detail), 2017

Patricia Chow
“Sustainability and Public Good,” MFA Exhibition at California State University, Los Angeles

Xinran Guo
Session: The Poetics and Politics of “Anonymous” Craft, February 21, 4:00 – 5:30 PM

Kira Jones
Session: He, She, and the In-Between: Reassessing Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Mediterranean Art, February 21, 8:30 – 10:00 AM

Chris Rioux

2018 Scholarship Winner Xinran Guo

2018 Scholarship Winner Kira Jones

Blick Art Materials Student Scholarship

CAA’s Annual Conference Presenter Sponsor, Blick Art Materials supports conference registration fees for four CAA student members. The 2018 winners are:

Merih Cantarella
Session: The Elements and Elementality in Art of the Premodern World, February 21, 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Indie Choudhury
Session: New Directions in Black-British Art History, February 24, 4:00 – 5:00 PM

Alyssa Fridgen
Member of CAA Committee on Women in the Arts
Meeting: February 21, 10:00 AM -12:00 PM

Yi Yi Mon Kyo
Session: Making Things Modular, February 24, 8:30 – 10:00 AM

2018 Scholarship Winner Merih Cantarella

2018 Scholarship Winner Yi Yi Mon Kyo

2018 Scholarship Winner Alyssa Fridgen

See Us Pick the Winners at the CAA Offices

Criteria for the Scholarship

Awardees were chosen at random and fulfilled the following criteria:

  • Individuals were registered for the Annual Conference by the Early Registration deadline
  • Individuals are current CAA members with proof of student status
  • Individuals did not receive conference registration or travel reimbursement from their institution or employer

We look forward to seeing you in Los Angeles! The 106th Annual Conference is February 21-14, 2018. Click here to explore the conference program. 

Yesterday, the House of Representatives passed a tax reform bill, titled the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act,” that harms the lower and middle class, and puts harsh financial burdens on college students and recent graduates of college. Additionally, the House bill contains a provision that would end the deduction of student loan interest for tax payers. Nearly 12 million people claimed this deduction in 2015.

“This is a very cynical approach to higher education,” said CAA executive director Hunter O’Hanian. “To tax students on money they don’t earn and not allow them to deduct the amount of their student loans will have a chilling effect on higher education in America. These are the future scholars of this country. They are the ones who will preserve our cultural heritage as a nation.  It is absurd to imagine that the US House of Representatives seeks to dumb-down future generations in this way. Everyone needs to contact their representatives in the House and Senate and strongly advocate that that this measure never becomes law.”

Under the House version of the bill, graduate students and doctoral candidates would be taxed on the waivers their schools provide them in return for working on campus as part of their professional development in their fields. The New York Times published a piece yesterday by Erin Rousseau, a graduate student at M.I.T., who receives nearly $50,000 in waivers each year. These waivers make school affordable for students, a financial support lifeline to those who otherwise would not be able to pursue graduate educations. The new House tax bill would increase Erin’s taxable income to an imaginary $80,000 a year, pushing her tax burden up by $10,000 a year.

With Congress aiming to pass this bill just as quickly as the House did, it is urgent to speak out now.

Click here to urge Congress to oppose this provision

Read more on the issue:

The House just passed its big tax bill. Here’s what is in it. (The Washington Post)

The House Just Voted to Bankrupt Graduate Students (New York Times)

The Republican Tax Plan Could Financially Devastate Graduate Students (The Verge)

Filed under: Advocacy, Higher Education, Students

Take Action to Keep Graduate Education Affordable

posted by November 10, 2017

Image: University of Washington

“The idea of taxing people on money they don’t get is absurd.”
Hunter O’Hanian, CAA Executive Director, Nov 10, 2017

On November 2, the House of Representatives Ways and Means Committee released the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.” Among many provisions that would affect higher education, their version of the bill would treat tuition waivers as taxable income, increasing the tax liability of hundreds of thousands of graduate students.

While the Senate’s version, released on November 9, does not consider tuition waivers taxable income, the House plan could still become law.

This potential additional tax burden would cut into the modest stipends with which many graduate students already struggle to make ends meet. It would make graduate school unaffordable to many, and seriously deplete future generations of scholars and leaders.

With Congress aiming to pass this bill by Thanksgiving, it is urgent to speak out against the House’s provision.

Click here to urge Congress to oppose this provision

Read more on the issue:

Why Graduate Students Are Worried about the Republican Tax Plan (Artsy)

The GOP Tax Plan Will Destroy Graduate Education (Forbes)

The Republican Tax Plan Could Financially Devastate Graduate Students (The Verge)

We thank our colleagues at the National Humanities Alliance for their advocacy on this issue.

Filed under: Advocacy, Higher Education, Students