College Art Association

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New in caa.reviews

posted by June 30, 2017

Kaylee R. Spencer reads Megan O’Neil’s Engaging Ancient Maya Sculpture at Piedras Negras, Guatemala and Alexander Parmington’s Space and Sculpture in the Classic Maya City. Both “introduce elements of time and space in discussing how Maya art and architecture operated and expressed meaning” and “focus on viewer experience as an essential feature of the ways art and architecture construct ideology and manipulate onlookers’ movements.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.
Meta DuEwa Jones reviews the exhibition catalogue James Baldwin in Turkey: Bearing Witness from Another Place, created by the Northwest African American Museum and “based on nearly thirty images of James Baldwin by Sedat Pakay.” Baldwin’s “intimate experiences in Turkey, documented in vivid and arresting images in the book, reveal these as equally important to the complex and composite picture of the artist.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.
Marisa Anne Bass discusses Trading Values in Early Modern Antwerp, edited by Christine Göttler, Bart Ramakers, and Joanna Woodall, and Jan van Kassel I (1629–1679): Crafting a Natural History of Art in Early Modern Antwerp by Nadia Baadj.  The two “successful” publications “attempt to grapple with the question of why Antwerp should matter to the field at large, and they do this by engaging with two trends—the global and the material.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.
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New in caa.reviews

posted by June 23, 2017

Antonella Fenech Kroke reviews Maniera: Pontormo, Bronzino and Medici Florence, an exhibition at the Städel Museum, Frankfurt. “The most substantial exhibition on Mannerism staged in Germany,” the show, with “intellectual exuberance,” “provided a unique opportunity to see the disquieting emergence and flourishing of multiples creative perspectives that the term Mannerism has attempted to unify.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Sally Hickson reads In the Courts of Religious Ladies: Art, Vision, and Pleasure in Italian Renaissance Convents by Giancarla Periti. This volume “about aristocratic nuns and convent patronage offers an interesting characterization of a resulting corpus of ‘seductive images,’” providing “a touchstone for investigations into patrician nuns, their motivations, their artists, and the visual and perhaps didactic functions of such imagery.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.
Maria Fabricius Hansen discusses Malcolm Bull’s Inventing Falsehood, Making Truth: Vico and Neapolitan Painting. With the aim of seeing Giambattista Vico “through the painting of his time in order to present and discuss a series of major themes within art history,” this “accomplished, concise, and intelligently focused” book is “a strong proponent for the relevance of rhetoric as a kind of art theory of its present moment.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.
David Riep examines Repainting the Walls of Lunda: Information Colonialism and Angolan Art by Delinda Collier. Centered on a “discussion of the varied intricacies of analog and digital media by tracking Chokwe mural and sand (sona) arts and symbolism,” the text “successfully engages broad theoretical concepts linking art, cybernetics, and media theory, while maintaining its focus on the shifting iterations of Chokwe iconography. Read the full review at caa.reviews.
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Institutional News

posted by June 14, 2017

Read about the latest news from CAA’s institutional members.

Institutional News is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

June 2017

The Harvard Art Museums in Cambridge, Massachusetts, have been awarded a $250,000 grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art to support the upcoming special exhibition The Philosophy Chamber: Art and Science in Harvard’s Teaching Cabinet, 1766–1820.

The National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, has accepted a $1 million gift from the Edmond J. Safra Foundation to support the Edmond J. Safra Visiting Professorship at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts. Matching funds will permit the professorship to be fully endowed.

The Newark Museum in Newark, New Jersey, has received a $750,000 grant from the Henry Luce Foundation to expand and reinterpret its permanent galleries of American art and to document the collections through two new publications.

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Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by June 13, 2017

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

June 2017

Marina Berio, chair of the general studies in photography program at the International Center of Photography in New York, has won a 2017 fellowship in photography from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Noga Bernstein, a doctoral student in art history at Stony Brook University, State University of New York, has received a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies. Her dissertation topic is “Global Age Design: Ruth Reeves and Cross-Cultural Practice.”

Elizabeth Buhe, a doctoral candidate in art history at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts, has been awarded a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies for her dissertation examining Sam Francis and midcentury abstract painting, titled “Sam Francis: Functional Abstraction.”

Jennifer Chuong, a PhD student in the history of art and architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has received a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies. She will continue work on “Surface Experiments in Early America.”

Leslie Cozzi, curatorial associate for the Hammer Museum at the University of California, Los Angeles, has won the 2017–18 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation/National Endowment for the Humanities Post-Doctoral Rome Prize in modern Italian studies. During her time at the American Academy in Rome, she will work on “Fra: Relation and Collaboration in Contemporary Italian Art.”

Lisa Deleonardis, Austen-Stokes Professor in the Department of the History of Art at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, has received the 2017–18 Charles K. Williams II Rome Prize in historic preservation and conservation. At the American Academy in Rome, she will continue work on “A Transatlantic Response to Worlds That Shake: Jesuit Contributions to Anti-Seismic Building Design in Early Modern Italy and Peru.”

Cécile Fromont, assistant professor in the Department of Art History at the University of Chicago in Illinois, has won a 2017–18 Rome Prize in Renaissance and early modern studies from the American Academy in Rome. Her project is titled “Images on a Mission: Cross-Cultural Encounters and Visual Mediation in Early Modern Kongo and Angola.”

Jennifer Germann, associate professor in the Department of Art History at Ithaca College in Ithaca, New York, has received a 2017 Summer Stipend of $6,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The funds will support “A Study of the Portrait of Dido Elizabeth Belle and Lady Elizabeth Murray, an Eighteenth-Century British Artwork.”

Ken Gonzales-Day, professor of art at Scripps College in Claremont, California, has been awarded the 2017 fellowship in the category of photography by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Saisha M. Grayson, a PhD candidate in art history at the Graduate Center, City University of New York, has been awarded a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art by the American Council of Learned Societies. She will continue researching “Cellist, Catalyst, Collaborator: The Work of Charlotte Moorman, 1963–1980.”

Sarah B. H. Hamill, assistant professor of art history at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York, has received a 2017 ACLS Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. She will continue work on “Surface Matters: Contemporary Photography and the Metaphor of Sculpture.”

Adam Herring, professor of art history in the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, has received a 2017 fellowship in fine-arts research from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Margaret Grace Innes, a doctoral candidate in the history of art and architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has earned a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies. Her study is titled “Signs of Labor in the American Photographic Press, 1926–1951.”

Margarita Karasoulas, a doctoral student in art history at the University of Delaware in Newark, has accepted a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies. The award will help with “Mapping Immigrant New York: Race and Place in Ashcan Visual Culture.”

Marci Kwon, assistant professor in the Department of Art and Art History at Stanford University in Stanford, California, has received the McNeil Center’s 2017 Zuckerman Prize for best dissertation connecting American history with literature and/or art. The title of her study is “Vernacular Modernism: Joseph Cornell and the Art of Populism.”

Jenna Lucente, assistant professor of visual and performing arts at Salem Community College in Carneys Point, New Jersey, has been commissioned by New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority to design twenty-eight large-scale laminated glass panels at the newly opened Arthur Kill Station on the Staten Island Railway. The works, to be permanently installed, will feature a mix of wildlife and landscape scenes that are unique to the area’s geography and community.

Allison Joan Martino, a doctoral student in the history of art at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, has earned a 2017 Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies. She is completing a study called “Stamping History: Stories of Social Change in Ghana’s Adinkra Cloth.”

Christina Michelon, a doctoral candidate in art history at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, has received a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies. The funds will support her research project, “Interior Impressions: Printed Material in the Nineteenth-Century American Home.”

Laura Morowitz, professor in the Department of Art, Art History, and Film at Wagner College in Staten Island, New York, has received a 2017 National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend. With the $6,000 funds, she will continue researching “Art Exhibitions in Vienna, Austria, during the Nazi Occupation.”

Christopher J. Nygren, assistant professor of history of art and architecture at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, has won a 2017 ACLS Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. His project is titled “Matter and Similitude in Italian Painting and the Transatlantic Renaissance.”

Sun-Young Park, assistant professor of history and art history at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, has won a 2017 Summer Stipend from the National Endowment for the Humanities. She will use the $6,000 award to develop “A History of French Disability Architecture and Design, 1750–1975.”

Bissera V. Pentcheva, professor in the Department of Art History at Stanford University in Stanford, California, has accepted a 2017 fellowship in fine-arts research from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Pentcheva has also won the 2017–18 Millicent Mercer Johnsen Post-Doctoral Rome Prize in medieval studies from the American Academy in Rome for “Animation in Medieval Art.”

Aviva Rahmani has earned a 2017 fellowship for socially engaged art from A Blade of Grass. She will become the inaugural ABOG Fellow for Contemplative Practice and create Blued Trees Symphony in prospective pipeline locations across the United States, in collaboration with scientists and attorneys involved in copyright, environmental policy, and real estate.

Valerie Rousseau, curator of self-taught art and art brut at the American Folk Art Museum in New York, has received a $50,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to digitize and create broad online access to the Henry Darger Papers.

Margaret Samu, an art historian based in New York, has been awarded a 2017 Franklin Research Grant from the American Philosophical Society. She will use the grant to conduct research in Saint Petersburg and Moscow on art collecting in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Russia.

Carolee Schneemann , an artist based in Hudson Valley, New York, has won the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the fifty-seventh international art exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia – Viva Arte Viva.

Allie Terry-Fritsch, associate professor of art history at Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio, has received a $6,000 Summer Stipend for 2017 from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Her research project is titled “Cosimo de’Medici, Fra Angelico, and the Public Library of San Marco.”

Anne Verplanck, associate professor of American studies at Pennsylvania State University in Harrisburg, has won a 2017 Summer Stipend from the National Endowment for the Humanities. With a $6,000 grant, she will develop “The Business of Art: Transforming the Graphic Arts in an Age of Mechanical Reproduction.”

Oliver M. Wunsch, a PhD student in the history of art and architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has won a 2017 Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies. His research project is titled “Painting against Time: The Decaying Image in the French Enlightenment.”

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People in the News

posted by June 12, 2017

People in the News lists new hires, positions, and promotions in three sections: Academe, Museums and Galleries, and Organizations and Publications.

The section is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

June 2017

Academe

Christine Poggi, formerly professor of art history at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, has been named Judy and Michael Steinhardt Director of the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University.

Charles Wright, professor and chair of art at Western Illinois University in Macomb, has become dean of academic affairs at Ferris State University’s Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Museums and Galleries

Wassan Al-Khudhairi, presently curator of modern and contemporary art at the Birmingham Museum of Art in Alabama, has become chief curator of the Contemporary Art Museum Saint Louis in Missouri.

Brooke Davis Anderson has been named Edna S. Tuttleman Director of the museum at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia.

Virginia Brilliant, formerly Ulla R. Searing Curator of Collections at the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, Florida, has been appointed curator-in-charge of European paintings at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco in California.

Emma Imbrie Chubb, a doctoral student and presidential fellow in the Department of Art History at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, has been named the inaugural Charlotte Feng Ford ’83 Curator of Contemporary Art at the Smith College Museum of Art in Northampton, Massachusetts.

Sarah Guernsey, formerly vice president for publishing and design at the Art Institute of Chicago in Illinois, has been appointed deputy director for curatorial affairs at the museum.

Anna Katz, curatorial fellow at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, in California since 2015, has joined the museum as assistant curator.

Christine Sciacca has become associate curator of European art, 300–1400 CE, at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland. She was previously assistant curator in the Manuscripts Department at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, California.

Organizations and Publications

Yolanda Sánchez has retired from her position in the Fine Arts and Cultural Affairs Division of the Miami-Dade Aviation Department and the art program at Miami International Airport in Florida.

Roger Thorp has left Tate Publishing in London, England, for the position of editorial director at Thames and Hudson, also in London.

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Solo Exhibitions by Artist Members

posted by June 09, 2017

See when and where CAA members are exhibiting their art, and view images of their work.

Solo Exhibitions by Artist Members is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

June 2017

Mid-Atlantic

H. K. Anne. Art Hallway, US Geological Survey National Center, Reston, Virginia, May 2–June 29, 2017. H. K. Anne Presents the American Landscape. Oil painting.

Northeast

Jean Bundy. Pleiades Gallery, New York, May 16–June 10, 2017. Underpinnings: Truth Is Found beneath Surfaces. Painting.

Ellen K. Levy. Mid-Manhattan Library, New York Public Library, New York, April 6–June 28, 2017. Meme Machines. Mixed media.

Michael Rich. Mary Castelnovo Gallery, Providence Art Club, Providence, Rhode Island, June 4–23, 2017. Woodcut collage.

Michael Rich. Imago Foundation for the Arts, Warren, Rhode Island, April 6–May 7, 2017. Collage and painting.

South

Jill Withrow Baker. Pennington Gallery, Ekstrom Library, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, April 11–July 31, 2017. Daughters of Leda Illustrations. Oil painting and drawing.

Kyra Belán. Grand Atrium and Conservatory Galleries, Sydney and Berne Davis Art Center, Fort Myers, Florida, April 1–30, 2017. Kyra Belán: Symbolic Magic. Painting, drawing, and mixed media.

West

Michael Azgour. Hohmann Fine Art, Palm Desert, California, January 14–February 15, 2017. Velocity. Painting.

Serena Bocchino. ArtHaus, San Francisco, California, April 6–June 30, 2017. Painting.

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CWA Picks for June 2017

posted by June 09, 2017

Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts selects the best in feminist art and scholarship. The following exhibitions and events should not be missed.

Julia Jacquette: Unrequited and Acts of Play; Playground of My Mind
Ruth and Elmer Wellin Museum of Art
Hamilton College, 198 College Hill Road, Clinton, NY
February 18–July 2, 2017

In her first major museum retrospective, artist Julia Jacquette unveils two exhibitions, Unrequited and Acts of Play and Playground of My Mind, at the Wellin Museum of Art in Clinton, New York. Curated by Tracy L. Adler, the Johnson-Pote Director of the Wellen Museum, Unrequited focuses on commercialized objects of desire, “exposing our seemingly insatiable longing for the ideal.” Known for taking her inspiration from cookbooks and contemporary food magazines, Jacquette presents “these material trappings … often close up, in crisply detailed paintings that both profess and resent such desires and the complications they present personally, socially, and culturally.”

“I feel the gender of food is an under discussed topic. The kind of food images I use are a kind of highly styled food, that I think was and is targeted at women—food that looks like it is achieving a kind of domestic perfection,” Jaquette said in an interview with Maxwell Williams.

Running simultaneously, Playground of My Mind is a graphic memoir based on the “adventure playgrounds” of New York City and Amsterdam during the 1970s. “These structures encouraged constructive, imaginative play and gave renewed life to utopian notions of American and European modernist architecture.” Jacquette’s father codesigned one for Central Park. The body of work, comprised of gouache drawings and an illustrated artist book, explores their influence on Jaquette’s aesthetic.

The exhibit also includes space for community-organized, play-oriented projects based on the project. A schedule is available online.

Michelle Vosper: Creating Across Cultures: Women in the Arts from China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan
Book
ISBN9789881604705
Released February 2017 by Muse Press

Creating Across Cultures: Women in the Arts from China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan presents essays by journalists, scholars, and artists celebrate the artistic achievements of sixteen visionary women. Edited by Michelle Vosper, formerly the Asian Cultural Council Representative, the 360-page, hardback book profiles contemporary artists such as Yin Xiuzhen 尹秀珍, visual artist, and Lulu Hou 侯淑姿, photographic artist.

“These courageous women often had to defy cultural expectations in order to heed their artistic drive. Their artworks delve into the social realities of their times, and their personal stories provide an intimate portrait of the historical trajectory of Greater China over three generations.”

Other artists profiled include Nieh Hualing 聶華苓, author; Liao Wen 廖雯, art critic and curator; Candace Chong 莊梅岩, playwright; Choi Yan Chi 蔡仞姿 , artist and educator; Jaffa Lam 林嵐, installation artist; Yang Lina 楊荔鈉, filmmaker; Bun-Ching Lam 林品晶, composer; Wang Xinxin 王心心, Nanguan performer; Tian Mansha 田蔓莎, Sichuan Opera performer; Wu Na 巫娜, guqin musician; Yang Meiqi 楊美琦, modern dance pioneer; Pisui Ciyo 碧斯蔚 .梓佑, dancer/choreographer/vocalist; Mui Cheuk Yin 梅卓燕, dancer/choreographer; and Wen Hui 文慧, dancer/choreographer.

The essay authors include Liza Bielby, Christina Yuen Zi Chung, Samantha Culp, Valerie C. Doran, Jennifer Feeley, Georg Kochi, Tina Li Ying Ma, Terry O’Reilly, Ralph Samuelson, Clare Tyrrell-Morin, and Sasha Su-Ling Welland.

Octavia E. Butler: Telling My Stories
Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road, San Marino, CA
April 8–August 7, 2017

Last year, Julia Meltzer (curator and director of the Clockshop) invited twelve artists and writers to mine the archives of Pasadena-based sci-fi writer Octavia E. Butler, who had passed away some ten years before. Because Butler gave her archive to the Huntington, much of the research for the new works and writings occasioned by Meltzer’s show happened in the Huntington’s library. Entitled Radio Imagination, that exhibition was a meditation on some of the key themes in Butler’s works (disenfranchisement, survival, the power of the mind) as well as the tricky business of re-presenting stories, documents, and a life that remains under recognized.

Now the Huntington has entered the fray with their own exhibition, this one tightly focused on the contents of Butler’s archives. It includes some of the early writings (and a really wonderful drawing of two horses) the author composed while still a child, as well as drafts of books and stories. Butler had a habit of color coding her documents, making notes with brightly colored highlighters—so these pieces of paper often have a striking visual quality. But it is the words, the prose, and the bare-bones reflections of an author working arduously to always do better that are really the stars here. In a letter sent to her mother from a pit of despair while at (what would be the first of many visits to) the Clarion Science Fiction and Fantasy Writer’s Workshop, Butler beats herself up for being blocked, and for not getting more accomplished. For a writer who was fairly private while she lived, these documents can be a revelation regarding the vulnerabilities of process, the messiness of affect, and the rigor of a brilliant mind and storyteller.

Pia Camil: Bara Bara Bara
Dallas Contemporary
161 Glass Street, Dallas, TX
April 8–August 20, 2017

“Bara! Bara! Bara!” is the cry that vendedores make in the markets in Itzapalapa, one of the sixteen boroughs of Mexico City, to lure in buyers with the promise of cheap (“barato”) goods. For her solo exhibition at the Dallas Contemporary, Mexico-based artist Pia Camil transforms some of the most ubiquitous materials from these markets, T-shirts, into expansive fields of color. These shirts are often made in Mexico (and many other countries outside the US), sold to US consumers, and then, after trickling through second-hand stores, they are eventually shipped by the tonnage back to Mexico and Central America, where they are sold to new markets. The global circuit of vestments is well-trod ground in contemporary art, one example being Shinique Smith’s Bale Variants series (2009–14). But Camil’s project is differently expansive, both formally and conceptually.

Suspended from the vast ceiling of the Dallas Contemporary’s warehouselike space, Camil’s t-shirt sheets look like low-hanging clouds, droopy body parts (bellies, breasts, asses), or, in a call-back to the site of acquisition, the informal coverings of outdoor markets. Because each of these works is called Divisor Pirata, they bear some relation to Lygia Pape’s Divisor, first performed in 1967–68. In that performance, participants from the streets of Rio de Janeiro filled in the holes of a large white piece of fabric and then travelled as a communal body through the streets. Indeed, Camil’s sheets are full-up with performance potential: viewers are invited to stick their heads through the neck holes, thus changing their perspective and relationship to these forms. What once operated like a covering now functions as a shifting new ground, rolling and roiling.

We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965–85
Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, New York 11238-6052
April 21–September 17, 2017

After almost fifty years after the groundbreaking show of contemporary black women artists, Where We At, the Brooklyn Museum has organized a landmark exhibition to honor and extend the work of these art activists. As its organizers proudly proclaim, We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965–85 “is the first exhibition to highlight the voices and experiences of women of color—distinct from the primarily white, middle-class mainstream feminist movement—in order to reorient conversations around race, feminism, political action, art production, and art history in this significant historical period.” Featuring a wide array of media—film, performance, conceptual and video art, as well as painting, sculpture, photography, and print media—We Wanted a Revolution captures the energy and vitality of these critical interventions into the art practices of this formative era. Simply put, this exhibition is a must-see.

The artists represented in the exhibition include Emma Amos, Camille Billops, Kay Brown, Vivian E. Browne, Linda Goode Bryant, Beverly Buchanan, Carole Byard, Elizabeth Catlett, Barbara Chase-Riboud, Ayoka Chenzira, Christine Choy and Susan Robeson, Blondell Cummings, Julie Dash, Pat Davis, Jeff Donaldson, Maren Hassinger, Janet Henry, Virginia Jaramillo, Jae Jarrell, Wadsworth Jarrell, Lisa Jones, Loïs Mailou Jones, Barbara Jones-Hogu, Carolyn Lawrence, Samella Lewis, Dindga McCannon, Barbara McCullough, Ana Mendieta, Senga Nengudi, Lorraine O’Grady, Howardena Pindell, Faith Ringgold, Alva Rogers, Alison Saar, Betye Saar, Coreen Simpson, Lorna Simpson, Ming Smith, and Carrie Mae Weems.

The exhibition is accompanied by a sourcebook, edited by Catherine Morris and Rujeko Hockley and published by Duke University Press, which reprints important essays, correspondence, critiques, and manifestoes from key figures in this movement. Authors include Gloria Anzaldúa, James Baldwin, bell hooks, Lucy R. Lippard, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Lowery Stokes Sims, Alice Walker, Michelle Wallace, and others.

Peju Alatise: Flying Girls, Nigerian Pavilion, 57th Venice Biannale
Scoletta dei Battioro e dei Tiraoro
Campo San Stae, 1980 30135, Venice, Italy
May 13–November 26, 2017

In this historic exhibition, the first-ever Nigerian Pavilion at the Venice Biannale, artist Peju Alatise takes the theme “How About NOW?” seriously. Her contribution to the Nigerian pavilion is an installation titled Flying Girls. Made over a three-year period from 2013–16, it is composed of eight black-painted and life-sized figures of girls, standing in a circle, who appear to have sprouted wings. Above them hovers a flock of birds. The work is a clear reference to the ongoing kidnapping and sexual enslavement of the Nigerian girls by Boko Haram. Flying Girls alludes to a character in one of Alatise’s books, a Yoruban girl who has been sold into domestic servitude and who dreams she belongs to no one but herself and can escape her imprisonment through flight.

Alatise, who was trained as an architect and is a renowned poet and novelist as well as a visual artist, is committed to producing works that addresses the social, political, and gender issues facing her country, with particular attention to what womanhood means within these contemporary contexts. She said this of her contribution to the Nigerian Pavilion: “I thought I would give a voice to the most vulnerable, which is the young black girl—especially in Nigeria,” she says. “It’s not necessarily focusing on that label, but the vulnerability of the girl child and the fact we do not have the government, cultural knowledge and aspiration to do something to help the girl child.”

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Exhibitions Curated by CAA Members

posted by June 09, 2017

Check out details on recent shows organized by CAA members who are also curators.

Exhibitions Curated by CAA Members is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

June 2017

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Books Published by CAA Members

posted by June 06, 2017

Publishing a book is a major milestone for artists and scholars—browse a list of recent titles below.

Books Published by CAA Members appears every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

June 2017

Jeffrey Abt. Valuing Detroit’s Art Museum: A History of Fiscal Abandonment and Rescue (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017).

Matthew BaigellThe Implacable Urge to Defame: Cartoon Jews in the American Press, 1877–1935 (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 2017).

Thea BurnsThe “Compositiones variae”: A Late Eighth-Century Craftsman’s Technical Treatise Reconsidered (London: Archetype, 2017).

Kim GrantAll about Process: The Theory and Discourse of Modern Artistic Labor (University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2017).

James Housefield. Playing with Earth and Sky: Astronomy, Geography, and the Art of Marcel Duchamp (Lebanon, NH: University Press of New England; Hanover, NH: Dartmouth College Press, 2016).

Ruth E. Iskin, ed., Re-envisioning the Contemporary Art Canon: Perspectives in a Global World (New York: Routledge, 2017).

Tirza True LatimerEccentric Modernisms: Making Differences in the History of American Art (Oakland: University of California Press, 2016).

Chari PradelFabricating the Tenjukoku Shūchō Mandara and Prince Shōtoku’s Afterlives (Leiden, the Netherlands: Brill, 2016).

Athena TachaVisualizing the Universe: Athena Tacha’s Proposals for Public Art Commissions 1972–2012, ed. Richard E. Spear, introduction by Glenn Harper and Twylene Moyer (Washington, DC: Grayson, 2017).

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A scene from the fair-use workshop at the UCLA Library (photograph by Sharon E. Farb)

On May 5, 2017, CAA hosted “Fair Use and the Visual Arts,” a presentation and panel discussion at the UCLA Library. The event was made possible by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Speakers on the panel included Peter Jaszi, the lead investigator on the CAA Code of Best Practices in Fair Use in the Visual Arts and Professor at American University Washington College of Law in the Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property, and Janet Landay, Program Manager of the Fair Use Initiative at CAA. The pair, who have given presentations across the U.S. and internationally as part of the CAA Fair Use Initiative, talked about why it was important for CAA to undertake the project, their methodology, and the resulting Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts.

The second half of the event was devoted to a Q&A with the audience of approximately fifty-five people. Question topics ranged from addressing the issue of how the size at which an illustration is produced impacts fair use to indicating in a caption or illustration credits section that I am claiming fair use in the reproduction of an illustration.

A second discussion on CAA’s Fair Use Initiative took place at the American Alliance of Museum’s 2017 Annual Meeting and MuseumExpo in Saint Louis, Missouri. The panel discussion, titled “Copyrighted Material in the Museum: A Path to Fair Use,” took place on May 9. The panel brought together esteemed colleagues from the museum and publishing worlds and was comprised of Patricia Fidler, publisher of art and architecture at Yale University Press; Anne Collins Goodyear, codirector of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art; Judy Metro, editor in chief for the National Gallery of Art; and Joseph Newland, director of publishing for the Menil Collection. Hunter O’Hanian, CAA executive director, was the chair and moderator.

A presenter at AAM’s annual meeting discussed Andrea Wallace’s Still Life Pixel + Metadata Dress (photograph by Anne Young)

About seventy-five to one hundred people attended the standing-room only session and discussion revolved around fair-use issues for museums who want to use their own materials: catalogues, brochures, websites—even wall texts. A key takeaway from the session: museum representatives need to maintain good relations with donor and lenders, and getting approval from their own legal counsel, who tend to approach these matters with caution.

Later in the day Hunter O’Hanian spoke to faculty and students in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Washington University in Saint Louis.

Learn more about the CAA Fair Use Initiative
Learn more about the 106th CAA Annual Conference in Los Angeles, February 21-24, 2018