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Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by August 18, 2017

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

August 2017

Anila Quayyum Agha, associate professor in the Herron School of Art and Design at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, has won the Schiele Prize from the Cincinnati Art Museum in Ohio.

Michelle Moore Apotsos, assistant professor in the Art Department at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts, has won a research grant from the Graham Foundation. She will use the funds for “Selling South Africa: Architecture, Tourism, and Identity in the Post-Apartheid Era.”

Natalie Beall, an artist based in Salt Point, New York, has won a 2017 fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts in the printmaking/drawing/book arts category.

Jetshri Bhadviya, a recent MFA graduate from the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, has received a 2017–18 Post-Graduate Teaching Fellowship from the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design. She will be placed at College for Creative Studies in Detroit.

Susanneh Bieber, assistant professor in the Departments of Visualization and Architecture at Texas A&M University in College Station, has been awarded the 2017 Terra Foundation for American Art International Essay Prize by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. Her winning essay, “Going Back to Kansas City: The Origins of Judd’s Minimal Art,” will be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal American Art.

Angela Fraleigh, an artist based in New York and Allentown, Pennsylvania, has received studio space in Brooklyn through the 2017 Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program.

Amir Hariri, an artist based in Brooklyn, New York, has received a 2017 fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts in the category for printmaking, drawing, and book arts.

Valerie Hegarty, an artist based in Brooklyn, New York, has won a 2017 fellowship in crafts/sculpture from the New York Foundation for the Arts.

Stacy C. Hollander, deputy director for curatorial affairs, chief curator, and director of exhibitions for the American Folk Art Museum in New York, has won two 2017 Awards for Excellence from the Association of Art Museum Curators. One award is for her exhibition, Securing the Shadow: Posthumous Portraiture in America; the other is for her catalogue essay, “Securing the Shadow: Posthumous Portraiture in America.”

Melissa Huddleston, an artist and assistant conservator at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, has completed an artist’s residency at the Sam and Adele Golden Foundation for the Arts, based in New Berlin, New York.

Sarah Hwang, an art director and designer based in San Leandro, California, has earned the 2017 Art Publishing Residency, awarded by three online publications: Daily Serving, Art Practical, and c3:intiative.

Jennifer Karady, an artist based in Brooklyn, New York, has received a 2017 fellowship in the visual arts from the MacDowell Colony, based in Peterborough, New Hampshire. Karady has also received Art Omi’s Francis Greenburger Fellowship for Mitigating Ethnic and Religious Conflict, which included an artist’s residency in Ghent, New York.

Bahareh Khoshooee, who recently earned an MFA in studio art from the University of South Florida in Tampa, has been appointed an MFA Resident Artist for summer 2017 at the Ox-Bow School of Art and Artists’ Residency in Saugatuck, Michigan.

Sharon Louden, an artist and the editor of The Artist as Cultural Producer, has received studio space in the 2017 Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program, based in Brooklyn, New York.

Forrest McGill, Wattis Senior Curator of South and Southeast Asian Art for the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco in California, has won a 2017 Award for Excellence from the Association of Art Museum Curators for his exhibition catalogue, The Rama Epic: Hero, Heroine, Ally, Foe.

 

Helina Metaferia, a 2015–17 AICAD Post-Graduate Teaching Fellow at the San Francisco Art Institute in California, has been appointed to the 2017 Arts Faculty this summer at the Ox-Bow School of Art and Artists’ Residency in Saugatuck, Michigan

Itohan I. Osayimwese, assistant professor of history of art and architecture at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, has won a grant from the Graham Foundation in the publications category. Her project is editing “‘African Building Types: An Architectural-Ethnographic Study’ and Other Essays by Hermann Frobenius.”

Jim Osman, an artist based in Brooklyn, New York, has received a 2017 fellowship in the category for crafts and sculpture from the New York Foundation for the Arts.

Corinna Ray, who recently completed an MFA at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, has been appointed an MFA Resident Artist for summer 2017 at the Ox-Bow School of Art and Artists’ Residency in Saugatuck, Michigan.

Adam Liam Rose, who earlier this year received an MFA in sculpture from Columbia University in New York, has become an MFA Resident Artist for summer 2017 at the Ox-Bow School of Art and Artists’ Residency in Saugatuck, Michigan.

Felicity D. Scott, director of the PhD Program in Architecture (History and Theory) and codirector of the program in Critical, Curatorial, and Conceptual Practices in Architecture at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation in New York, has won a research grant from the Graham Foundation. She will work on “Vann Molyvann and the Absent Archives of Cambodian Modernism” with Branden W. Joseph and Mark Wasiuta.

Makia Sharp, who earlier this year earned an MFA in sculpture from the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence, has won a 2017–18 Post-Graduate Teaching Fellowship. The Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design will place her at California College of the Arts in San Francisco and Oakland.

Emily Silver, an artist based in Ferndale, California, and a faculty member at the College of the Redwoods in Eureka, has completed a residency at PLAYA at Summer Lake in Summer Lake, Oregon.

Irene V. Small, assistant professor in the Department of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, has won a research grant from the Graham Foundation. Her project is titled “The Organic Line and the Ends of Modernism.

Linda Stein, an artist based in New York, has been recognized as Artist of the Year by the New York City Art Teachers Association and the United Federation of Teachers.

Despina Stratigakos, professor of architecture at the University at Buffalo in Buffalo, New York, has won a research grant from the Graham Foundation. Her project is titled “Hitler’s Northern Dream: Building an Empire in Occupied Norway.”

Dannielle Tegeder, an artist based in New York, has accepted a 2017 fellowship in printmaking, drawing, and book arts category from the New York Foundation for the Arts.

Penelope Umbrico, an artist and faculty member at the School of Visual Arts in New York, has been selected to receive studio space in Brooklyn through the 2017 Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program.

Kristina Wilson, associate professor of art history at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts, has received a 2017 Award for Excellence from the Association of Art Museum Curators for her exhibition Cyanotypes: Photography’s Blue Period, organized with Nancy Kathryn Burns.

Mabel O. Wilson, associate professor for the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation at Columbia University in New York, has won a grant for publications from the Graham Foundation. She and her fellow editors, Irene Cheng and Charles L. Davis II, will work on a book project called “Race and Modern Architecture.”

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Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by June 13, 2017

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

June 2017

Marina Berio, chair of the general studies in photography program at the International Center of Photography in New York, has won a 2017 fellowship in photography from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Noga Bernstein, a doctoral student in art history at Stony Brook University, State University of New York, has received a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies. Her dissertation topic is “Global Age Design: Ruth Reeves and Cross-Cultural Practice.”

Elizabeth Buhe, a doctoral candidate in art history at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts, has been awarded a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies for her dissertation examining Sam Francis and midcentury abstract painting, titled “Sam Francis: Functional Abstraction.”

Jennifer Chuong, a PhD student in the history of art and architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has received a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies. She will continue work on “Surface Experiments in Early America.”

Leslie Cozzi, curatorial associate for the Hammer Museum at the University of California, Los Angeles, has won the 2017–18 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation/National Endowment for the Humanities Post-Doctoral Rome Prize in modern Italian studies. During her time at the American Academy in Rome, she will work on “Fra: Relation and Collaboration in Contemporary Italian Art.”

Lisa Deleonardis, Austen-Stokes Professor in the Department of the History of Art at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, has received the 2017–18 Charles K. Williams II Rome Prize in historic preservation and conservation. At the American Academy in Rome, she will continue work on “A Transatlantic Response to Worlds That Shake: Jesuit Contributions to Anti-Seismic Building Design in Early Modern Italy and Peru.”

Cécile Fromont, assistant professor in the Department of Art History at the University of Chicago in Illinois, has won a 2017–18 Rome Prize in Renaissance and early modern studies from the American Academy in Rome. Her project is titled “Images on a Mission: Cross-Cultural Encounters and Visual Mediation in Early Modern Kongo and Angola.”

Jennifer Germann, associate professor in the Department of Art History at Ithaca College in Ithaca, New York, has received a 2017 Summer Stipend of $6,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The funds will support “A Study of the Portrait of Dido Elizabeth Belle and Lady Elizabeth Murray, an Eighteenth-Century British Artwork.”

Ken Gonzales-Day, professor of art at Scripps College in Claremont, California, has been awarded the 2017 fellowship in the category of photography by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Saisha M. Grayson, a PhD candidate in art history at the Graduate Center, City University of New York, has been awarded a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art by the American Council of Learned Societies. She will continue researching “Cellist, Catalyst, Collaborator: The Work of Charlotte Moorman, 1963–1980.”

Sarah B. H. Hamill, assistant professor of art history at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York, has received a 2017 ACLS Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. She will continue work on “Surface Matters: Contemporary Photography and the Metaphor of Sculpture.”

Adam Herring, professor of art history in the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, has received a 2017 fellowship in fine-arts research from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Margaret Grace Innes, a doctoral candidate in the history of art and architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has earned a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies. Her study is titled “Signs of Labor in the American Photographic Press, 1926–1951.”

Margarita Karasoulas, a doctoral student in art history at the University of Delaware in Newark, has accepted a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies. The award will help with “Mapping Immigrant New York: Race and Place in Ashcan Visual Culture.”

Marci Kwon, assistant professor in the Department of Art and Art History at Stanford University in Stanford, California, has received the McNeil Center’s 2017 Zuckerman Prize for best dissertation connecting American history with literature and/or art. The title of her study is “Vernacular Modernism: Joseph Cornell and the Art of Populism.”

Jenna Lucente, assistant professor of visual and performing arts at Salem Community College in Carneys Point, New Jersey, has been commissioned by New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority to design twenty-eight large-scale laminated glass panels at the newly opened Arthur Kill Station on the Staten Island Railway. The works, to be permanently installed, will feature a mix of wildlife and landscape scenes that are unique to the area’s geography and community.

Allison Joan Martino, a doctoral student in the history of art at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, has earned a 2017 Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies. She is completing a study called “Stamping History: Stories of Social Change in Ghana’s Adinkra Cloth.”

Christina Michelon, a doctoral candidate in art history at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, has received a 2017 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies. The funds will support her research project, “Interior Impressions: Printed Material in the Nineteenth-Century American Home.”

Laura Morowitz, professor in the Department of Art, Art History, and Film at Wagner College in Staten Island, New York, has received a 2017 National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend. With the $6,000 funds, she will continue researching “Art Exhibitions in Vienna, Austria, during the Nazi Occupation.”

Christopher J. Nygren, assistant professor of history of art and architecture at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, has won a 2017 ACLS Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. His project is titled “Matter and Similitude in Italian Painting and the Transatlantic Renaissance.”

Sun-Young Park, assistant professor of history and art history at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, has won a 2017 Summer Stipend from the National Endowment for the Humanities. She will use the $6,000 award to develop “A History of French Disability Architecture and Design, 1750–1975.”

Bissera V. Pentcheva, professor in the Department of Art History at Stanford University in Stanford, California, has accepted a 2017 fellowship in fine-arts research from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Pentcheva has also won the 2017–18 Millicent Mercer Johnsen Post-Doctoral Rome Prize in medieval studies from the American Academy in Rome for “Animation in Medieval Art.”

Aviva Rahmani has earned a 2017 fellowship for socially engaged art from A Blade of Grass. She will become the inaugural ABOG Fellow for Contemplative Practice and create Blued Trees Symphony in prospective pipeline locations across the United States, in collaboration with scientists and attorneys involved in copyright, environmental policy, and real estate.

Valerie Rousseau, curator of self-taught art and art brut at the American Folk Art Museum in New York, has received a $50,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to digitize and create broad online access to the Henry Darger Papers.

Margaret Samu, an art historian based in New York, has been awarded a 2017 Franklin Research Grant from the American Philosophical Society. She will use the grant to conduct research in Saint Petersburg and Moscow on art collecting in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Russia.

Carolee Schneemann , an artist based in Hudson Valley, New York, has won the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the fifty-seventh international art exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia – Viva Arte Viva.

Allie Terry-Fritsch, associate professor of art history at Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio, has received a $6,000 Summer Stipend for 2017 from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Her research project is titled “Cosimo de’Medici, Fra Angelico, and the Public Library of San Marco.”

Anne Verplanck, associate professor of American studies at Pennsylvania State University in Harrisburg, has won a 2017 Summer Stipend from the National Endowment for the Humanities. With a $6,000 grant, she will develop “The Business of Art: Transforming the Graphic Arts in an Age of Mechanical Reproduction.”

Oliver M. Wunsch, a PhD student in the history of art and architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has won a 2017 Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies. His research project is titled “Painting against Time: The Decaying Image in the French Enlightenment.”

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by April 11, 2017

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

April 2017

Anna Arabindan-Kesson, assistant professor of African American studies and of art and archeology at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, has accepted a 2017 ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. Her project, in partnership with Mia L. Bagneris, is called “Beyond Recovery: Reframing the Dialogues of Early African Diaspora Art and Visual Culture, 1700–1900.”

Mia L. Bagneris, assistant professor of art at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, has won a 2017 ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. Her project, in partnership with Anna Arabindan-Kesson, is titled “Beyond Recovery: Reframing the Dialogues of Early African Diaspora Art and Visual Culture, 1700–1900.”

Laura Anne Kalba, associate professor of art at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, has earned a 2017 Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. She will be in residence at the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, Irvine, during the 2018–19 academic year to work on “Currencies: Symbolism and Signification in the Golden Age of Finance Capital.”

Jesse Locker has received the 2016 Helen and Howard R. Marraro Prize in Italian History from the Society for Italian Historical Studies for his book Artemisia Gentileschi: The Language of Painting (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015).

Alexander Nemerov, Carl and Marilynn Thoma Provostial Professor in the Arts and Humanities at Stanford University in California, has been chosen to deliver the sixty-sixth A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. His talks will take place on March 26, April 2, 9, 23, and 30, and May 7, 2017.

Julia B. Rosenbaum, associate professor of art history at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, has received a 2017 Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. She will be in residence at the Charles Warren Center for American History at Harvard University during academic year 2019–20 to work on “Unruly Bodies? Portraying Science and Citizenry in Post–Civil War America.

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by February 15, 2017

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

February 2017

Tatiana Flores, associate professor in the Department of Art History at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, with a joint appointment in the Department of Latino and Caribbean Studies, has won a 2016 award from the Arts Writers Grant Program, coordinated by Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Her grant will support a book, titled Art and Visual Culture under Chávez.

Marina Kassianidou, an artist and writer based in Boulder, Colorado, has received a $25,000 award from the Joan Mitchell Foundation’s 2016 Painters and Sculptors Grant Program.

Beili Liu, an artist based in Austin, Texas, has accepted a $25,000 grant from the Joan Mitchell Foundation through the 2016 Painters and Sculptors Grant Program.

Christina Michelon, a doctoral candidate in art history at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, has received a $8,500 project grant via the 2016–17 Craft Research Fund, supervised by the Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design. The funds will support a dissertation focused on print’s relationship to domestic craft and interior design from 1830 to 1890.

Anya Montiel, a PhD student in American studies at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, has accepted a $4,500 project grant from the Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design through the 2016–17 Craft Research Fund. The funds will support dissertation research on government-funded basketry, pottery, and woodworking craft workshops in the 1960s and 1970s among the Florida Seminole, Mississippi Choctaw, and North Carolina Cherokee.

Klaus Ottmann, deputy director for curatorial and academic affairs at the Phillips Collection in Washington, DC, has been conferred the insignia of chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters by Bénédicte de Montlaur, cultural counselor of the French Embassy in New York, on behalf of the French government.

Betsy Redelman, a student pursuing an MFA in craft studies at the Oregon College of Art and Craft in Portland, has received a $3,705 graduate research grant from the Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design through the 2016–17 Craft Research Fund. The award will support thesis research on the neglected history of indigenous women potters in San Marcos Tlapaola, a small pueblo in Oaxaca, Mexico.

Margaret Samu, a freelance art historian based in New York, has been awarded the 2016 Mary Zirin Prize for independent scholarship from the Association for Women in Slavic Studies.

Maureen G. Shanahan, professor of history of art for the School of Art, Design, and Art History at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia, has received a Fulbright Award for research in France from March to June 2017. The grant, entitled “World War I and the Colonial Legacy: Sites of Memory, Traces of Forgetting,” will support two projects: planning for a conference on the representation of the colonial subject during and after WWI; and archival research on a monograph, tentatively entitled Silence, Surveillance, and Psychiatry: Gaëtan Gatian de Clérambault and the French Colonial Subject (1914–34).

Andrew Uroskie, director of graduate studies for the MA/PhD program in art history and criticism at Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, New York, has won a 2016 award from the Arts Writers Grant Program, administered by Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. The grant will support his book, titled The Kinetic Imaginary: Robert Breer and the Animation of Postwar Art.

Laura A. L. Wellen, a writer and curator based in Houston, Texas, has earned a 2016 award from the Arts Writers Grant Program, coordinated by Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. The grant will support a blog called Piedrín.

Soyoung Yoon, program director and assistant professor of art history and visual studies in the Department of the Arts at the New School’s Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts in New York, has received a 2016 awards via the Arts Writers Grant Program, supervised by Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. The funds will support an article titled “The Evidence of Things Not Heard: On Mendi + Keith Obadike’s Numbers Station.”

 

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by December 15, 2016

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

December 2016

Devon Baker, a PhD student in art history at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, has been awarded a 2016–17 Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellowship by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. She will conduct research for her dissertation, which explores print culture in Renaissance Lombardy, using printmaking to examine larger themes of mobility, north-south exchange, and transmateriality.

Amy Beecher, an artist based in New York and Providence, Rhode Island, has received a fall 2016 fellowship from the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire, in the interdisciplinary artist category.

Daniella Berman, a doctoral candidate at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts, has been awarded a 2016–17 Theodore Rousseau Fellowship by the Metropolitan Museum of Art to work on her dissertation, which considers the unfinished history paintings of the French Revolution and identifies an emergent aesthetic of “unfinishedness” developed by artists in response to the shifting sociopolitical landscape.

Douglas Brine, associate professor of art history at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas, has accepted a 2016–17 J. Clawson Mills Scholarship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to undertake research and writing for his book project, “The Art of Brass in the Burgundian Netherlands: Makers, Markets, Patrons, Products.”

Emily Casey, a PhD candidate in art history at the University of Delaware in Newark, has been given a Sylvan C. Coleman and Pam Coleman Memorial Fund Fellowship for 2016–17 by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. She will examine representations of oceanic space in American art and material culture to show how colonial and early national identities were constructed in relation to these.

Joshua Cohen, assistant professor at City College, City University of New York, has received a 2016–17 Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellowship from the Metropolitan Museum of Art to complete a book that tracks modernist appropriations of African sculpture by European and African artists between 1905 and 1980.

Joelle Dietrick, assistant professor of art and digital studies at Davidson College in Davidson, North Carolina, has accepted a Pollock-Krasner Foundation award to support her studio production during the 2016–17 academic year before she goes to Hamburg, Germany, for her Fulbright Global Award (April–July 2017). As part of the Fulbright, Dietrick will travel to Santiago, Chile, and Hong Kong, China, during the next two winter breaks.

Brad Hostetler, who earned a PhD in art history last year at Florida State University in Tallahassee, has been awarded a 2016–17 Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellowship from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to complete revisions for a book project, “Enshrining Sacred Matter: The Form, Function, and Meaning of Reliquaries in Byzantium, 843–1204.”

Amy Huang, a doctoral candidate in the history of art and architecture at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, and an adjunct lecturer for Boston University in Massachusetts, has received a 2016–17 Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellowship from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. She will research visual modes of remembrance in Chinese paintings through seventeenth-century Nanjing and investigate how memory operated through texts, images, and historic sites.

Frances Jacobus-Parker, a PhD student in art and archaeology at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, has been given a Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellowship for 2016–17 by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, where he will work on the first comprehensive study of the oeuvre of the pivotal American artist Vija Celmins.

Samuel Johnson, who earned his PhD in the history of art and architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 2015, has been awarded a Leonard A. Lauder Fellowship by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. In 2016–17 Johnson will study the effects of the papiers collés of Georges Braques and Pablo Picasso on the photographs of El Lissitzky, László Moholy-Nagy, and Man Ray.

Anna Jozefacka, an adjunct professor at Hunter College, City University of New York, has been awarded a 2016–17 Leonard A. Lauder Fellowship by the Metropolitan Museum of Art to conduct research on Cubism’s relationship to the evolution of modern architectural and interior design in the first three decades of the twentieth century.

Julia McHugh, a doctoral student in art history at the University of California, Los Angeles, has accepted a Douglass Foundation Fellowship in American Art for 2016–17 from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to work on her dissertation, which examines the ways in which patrons used tapestries and other textiles to adorn interiors, both domestic and sacred, in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Peru.

Patricia Miranda, an artist, curator, educator, and founder of MAPSpace, a gallery in Port Chester, New York, has completed an October 2016 residency at I-Park Residency in East Haddam, Connecticut.

Jiha Moon, an artist who lives and works in Atlanta, Georgia, has received a 2016 Artadia Award.

Elyse Nelson, a PhD candidate in the history of art at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts, has been given a Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellowship by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. During 2016–17 she will work on a dissertation that explores the Italian neoclassical sculptor Antonio Canova’s renewed relationship with his British patrons after Napoleon’s defeat in 1814.

Giulia Paoletti, a core lecturer at Columbia University in New York, has been awarded a 2016–17 Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellowship by the Metropolitan Museum of Art to research and assist with the development and preparation for a planned reinstallation and renovation of the African art galleries.

John Richardson, professor of art and chair of the James Pearson Duffy Department of Art and Art History at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan, has received the 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Mid America College Art Association.

Miriam Said, a doctoral student in the history of art at the University of California, Berkeley, has accepted a 2016–17 Frances Markoe Fellowship by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to explore material-based mechanisms of ritual affect as it was manifested in and between the Near East and Greece in the first millennium BC.

John A. Tyson, a recent recipient of a PhD in art history from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, has joined the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, as a 2016–17 participant in the fellowship and internships program. He will assist the Department of Modern Art with research for the upcoming Rachel Whiteread retrospective and lead tours in the newly reinstalled East Building permanent and special exhibition galleries.

Aaron Wile, a PhD candidate in the history of art and architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has accepted a Chester Dale Fellowship from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. During 2016–17 he will complete his dissertation, “Painting, Authority, and Experience at the Twighlight of the Grand Siècle, 1690–1721,” and begin transforming it into a book manuscript, consulting materials at the museum.

Katharine Wright, who earned her PhD in art history at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, in 2015, has been awarded an Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Research/Collections Specialist Fellowship for 2016–17 by the Metropolitan Museum of Art to catalogue the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art’s collection of American modernism.

Tara Zanardi, an associate professor at Hunter College, City University of New York, has accepted a 2016–17 Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellowship from the Metropolitan Museum of Art to research the Porcelain Room at the Royal Palace in Aranjuez, a tour-de-force in its implementation and display of porcelain, the interior exemplifies Charles III’s innovative artistic and political strategies at court.

 

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by October 15, 2016

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2016

Dustin Chad Alligood, curator for the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, was a participant in NextGen 2016, a program of the Getty Leadership Institute at Claremont Graduate University in Claremont, California.

Alex Arzt, an artist based in Adamstown, Maryland, has been awarded a 2016 residency at the Artists’ Cooperative Residency and Exhibitions (ACRE) program in Steuben, Wisconsin.

Renzo Baldasso, assistant professor of art history for the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University in Tempe, has been named a Paul Mellon Visiting Senior Fellow for fall 2016–winter 2017 by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. His research project is “A New Aesthetics for Print: The Emergence of the Visuality of the Printed Page from Gutenberg to Ratdolt.”

Caitlin Beach, a PhD candidate in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University in New York, has earned a 2016–18 Wyeth Fellowship from the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. As a nonresident predoctoral dissertation fellow, Beach will work on “Sculpture, Slavery, and Commodity in the Nineteenth-Century Atlantic World.”

John Richard Blakinger has accepted a two-year postdoctoral fellowship with the USC Society of Fellows in the Humanities at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.

Andrianna Campbell, a doctoral student in art history at the Graduate Center, City University of New York, has received a Twelve-Month Chester Dale Fellow for 2016–17 from the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. She will research “Norman Lewis: Linearity, Pedagogy, and Activism in His Abstract Expressionism, 1946–1964” during her time as a nonresident predoctoral dissertation fellow.

Natalie Campbell, an independent curator based in Washington, DC, has received a 2017 Curatorial Fellowship from the Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design in Asheville, North Carolina. With Carissa Carman, she will work on an exhibition called Tie Up, Draw Down, scheduled for summer 2017.

Carissa Carman, lecturer and area head of textiles in the Department of Studio Art at Indiana University in Bloomington, has received a 2017 Curatorial Fellowship from the Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design in Asheville, North Carolina. She will work on an exhibition called Tie Up, Draw Down, scheduled for summer 2017, with Natalie Campbell.

Peter Christensen, assistant professor of art history in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Rochester in Rochester, New York, has won a 2016 SAH/Mellon Author Award from the Society of Architectural Historians. His book Germany and the Ottoman Railways: Art, Empire, and Infrastructure will be published by Yale University Press.

Grace Chuang, a doctoral candidate in art history at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts, has been appointed a 2016–18 Samuel H. Kress Fellow by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. As a nonresident predoctoral dissertation fellow, Chuang will work on “The Furniture of Bernard II Vanrisamburgh, Master Cabinetmaker in Eighteenth-Century Paris.”

Lee Ann Custer, a PhD student in the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of History of Art in Philadelphia, has accepted an Ailsa Mellon Bruce Predoctoral Fellowship for Historians of American Art to Travel Abroad. The award was presented by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC.

Catherine Damman, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University in New York, has earned a Twenty-Four-Month Chester Dale Fellow for 2016–18 from the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. During her time as a nonresident predoctoral dissertation fellow, she will research “Unreliable Narrators: Laurie Anderson, Julia Heyward, and Jill Kroesen Perform the 1970s.”

Maggie Dethloff, a PhD student in the Department of Art History at the University of California, Irvine, has completed a 2016 summer internship at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. For her project, Dethloff assisted with research and organization for an upcoming exhibition on the photographs of Sally Mann.

Jill Johnson Deupi, director and chief curator of the University of Miami’s Lowe Art Museum in Coral Gables, Florida, was a 2016 participant in the Getty Leadership Institute at Claremont Graduate University in Claremont, California.

Rachel Epp Buller, associate professor of visual arts and design at Bethel College in Mishawaka, Indiana, has been awarded one of the two Mary McMullan Grants given in the United States by the National Art Education Foundation. The grant will fund the development of a new course on activism, art, and design.

Jennifer Foley, director of education and community engagement for the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York, was a participant in NextGen 2016, a program of the Getty Leadership Institute at Claremont Graduate University in Claremont, California.

Sarah E. Fraser, professor of Chinese art history and deputy head of the Institute of East Asian Art History at Heidelberg University in Heidelberg, Germany, has been appointed Ailsa Mellon Bruce Senior Fellow at the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. Fraser’s research concerns “Chinese as Subject: Genres in Nineteenth-Century Photography and the Migration of European Chinoiseries.”

Faye Raquel Gleisser, assistant professor of contemporary art in the Department of Art History of the Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts at Indiana University in Bloomington, has received a 2017 Academic Fellowship from the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Research Center in Santa Fe, New Mexico. In fall 2017 Gleisser will work on “Guerilla Tactics:  Performance Art and the Aesthetics of Resistance in American Visual Culture, 1967–83.”

Aaron M. Hyman, a doctoral candidate in the History of Art Department at the University of California, Berkeley, has earned a 2015–17 Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship from the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. During his time as a resident predoctoral dissertation fellow, Hyman will research “Rubens in a New World: Prints, Authorship, and Transatlantic Intertextuality.”

Frances Jacobus-Parker, a doctoral student in the Department of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, has earned a 2017 Academic Fellowship from the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Research Center in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Her dissertation is titled “Redescription: Vija Celmins and the Replica in Postwar American Art.”

Hagi Kenaan, associate professor in the Department of Philosophy at Tel Aviv University in Israel, has been named William C. Seitz Senior Fellow by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. He will work on “The Origins of Photography and the Future of the Image.”

Bahareh Khoshooee, an MFA candidate in studio art at the University of South Florida in Tampa, has earned a 2016 residency in the Artists’ Cooperative Residency and Exhibitions (ACRE) program in Steuben, Wisconsin.

David Young Kim, assistant professor in the Department of History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, has been appointed Paul Mellon Senior Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts by the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. His project will examine “The Groundwork of Painting: Background, Materiality, and Composition in Italian Renaissance Art.”

Dale Kinney, Eugenia Chase Guild Professor Emeritus in the Humanities and Research Professor at Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, has been named 2016–17 Samuel H. Kress Professor at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts by the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.

Estelle Lingo, associate professor of art history and Donald E. Petersen Endowed Fellow at the University of Washington in Seattle, has been appointed Andrew W. Mellon Professor for 2016–17 at the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC.

Melissa Ming-Hwei Lo, assistant curator for the Huntington Library, Art Collection, and Botanical Gardens in San Marino, California, was a participant in NextGen 2016, a program of the Getty Leadership Institute at Claremont Graduate University in Claremont, California.

Fernando Loffredo has been selected as an A. W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow for 2015–17 by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. He is working on “A Sea of Marble: Traveling Fountains in the Early Modern Mediterranean.”

Joseph Madrigal, assistant professor of art at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa, has earned a 2016 residency at the Artists’ Cooperative Residency and Exhibitions (ACRE) program in Steuben, Wisconsin.

Michelle McCoy, a PhD student in the History of Art Department at the University of California, Berkeley, has been named Ittleson Fellow for 2015–17 by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. During her residency as a predoctoral dissertation fellows, McCoy will explore “Astrology and Astronomy in the Art of Liao-Yuan China and Inner Asia.”

Patricia Miranda, an artist, curator, and educator based in New York, has become the fall 2016 artist in residence at the I-Park Foundation in East Haddam, Connecticut.

Mary G. Morton, curator and head of the National Gallery of Art’s Department of French Paintings in Washington, DC, has been appointed 2016–17 Ailsa Mellon Bruce National Gallery of Art Sabbatical Curatorial Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts. Her exhibition will be titled Considering Caillebotte.

Itohan I. Osayimwese, assistant professor of the history of art and architecture at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, has won a 2016 SAH/Mellon Author Award from the Society of Architectural Historians. Her book Colonialism and the Archive of Modern Architecture in Germany will be published by the University of Pittsburgh Press.

Hannah Patterson, an artist based in Maryville, Tennessee, has accepted a 2016 residency from the Artists’ Cooperative Residency and Exhibitions (ACRE) program in Steuben, Wisconsin.

Giancarla Periti, associate professor of Italian Renaissance art at the University of Toronto in Ontario, Canada, has been honored with a Samuel H. Kress Senior Fellowship. During her time at the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC, she will work on “Correggio: Borders, Frames, and the Center of Painting.”

Lisa Pon, professor of art history in the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, has received a Paul Mellon Visiting Senior Fellowship for fall 2016–winter 2017. Her research project at the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC, is called “Raphael and the Renaissance Arts of Collaboration.”

Aviva Rahmani, an artist based in New York, has won a 2016 award in architecture/environmental structures/design category through the Artists’ Fellowship Program of the New York Foundation for the Arts.

Jennifer Reynolds-Kaye, Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman-Payson Postdoctoral Fellow at the Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut, was a participant in NextGen 2016, a program of the Getty Leadership Institute at Claremont Graduate University in Claremont, California.

Jeff Robinson, instructor of art and director of the Visual Arts Gallery at the University of Illinois in Springfield, has accepted a 2016 residency at the Artists’ Cooperative Residency and Exhibitions (ACRE) program in Steuben, Wisconsin.

Kristine Ronan, who recently earned her PhD in art history from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, has been awarded a 2017 Academic Fellowship from the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Research Center in Santa Fe, New Mexico. As a postdoctoral fellow, Ronan will continue work on “Indian – Pop – Politics: The Rise and Fall of a Native/American Art Movement.”

Margaret Samu, a freelance art historian based in New York, has become writer in residence at New York University’s Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia. She will work on her manuscript “Russian Venus” during the 2016–17 academic year.

Elke Seibert, a postdoctoral researcher, has been awarded a two-year fellowship at the German Center for the History of Art in Paris, France, sponsored by the German Research Foundation. She will continue researching “Prehistoric Rock Paintings and the Genesis of Contemporary Art in New York and Paris (1930–60).”

Zeynep Simavi, program specialist in public and scholarly engagement for the Smithsonian Institution’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington, DC, was a participant in NextGen 2016, a program of the Getty Leadership Institute at Claremont Graduate University in Claremont, California.

Anna P. Sokolina has become the first Milka Bliznakov Scholar in recognition and support of her research proposal, “Life to Architecture: Milka Bliznakov Academic Papers and Records of Russian Women Architects at the IAWA.” The Milka Bliznakov Research Prize Jury 2016 at the International Archive of Women in Architecture, facilitated at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, created a new designation that includes a stipend to cover a two-year period (2016–18).

Phil Taylor, a doctoral student in the Department of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, has been appointed David E. Finley Fellow for 2014–17 by the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. His research, to be undertaken as a resident predoctoral dissertation fellow, examines “Raoul Ubac’s Photographic Surrealism.”

Jill Vaum, a PhD candidate in the Department of History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, has received an Ailsa Mellon Bruce Predoctoral Fellowship for Historians of American Art to Travel Abroad, awarded by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC.

Leslie Wilson, a graduate student in the Department of Art History at the University of Chicago in Illinois, has received a Twenty-Four-Month Chester Dale Fellow for 2015–17 from the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. While a resident predoctoral dissertation fellow, Wilson will consider “Past Black and White: The Color of Post-Apartheid Photography in South Africa, 1994‒2004.”

Oliver M. Wunsch, a PhD candidate in the Department of History of Art and Architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been appointed Robert H. and Clarice Smith Fellow for 2016–17 by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. As a nonresident predoctoral dissertation fellow, he will research “Painting against Time: The Decaying Image in the French Enlightenment.”

Irini Zervas, who recently earned an MA in art history from Hunter College, City University of New York, has completed work as a 2016 National Gallery of Art Summer Intern. For her project in Washington, DC, Zervas assisted with research and organization for an upcoming exhibition on women photographers working from the 1920s through the 1940s.

 

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by August 15, 2016

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

August 2016

Paul Catanese, director of the interdisciplinary arts and media MFA program at Columbia University Chicago in Illinois, has embarked on a three-month residency at the Chicago Cultural Center’s Sidney R. Yates Gallery.

Ruth Ezra, a doctoral candidate in the Department of History of Art and Architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has accepted a 2016–17 Henry Moore Institute Visiting Research Fellowship. She will work on “Eliding Sculpture and Plane in German Art, 1490–1523.”

Chiara Fabi from the City Council of Milan in Italy has been chosen as a short-term research scholar by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. She will continue researching “American Sculptors in Italy, 1911–1949.”

Christine Göttler, professor of history of early modern art at the University of Bern in Switzerland, has completed a fellowship in residence at the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities and Social Sciences in Amsterdam.

Mary Beth Heffernan, professor of art in the Department of Art and Art History at Occidental College in Los Angeles, California, has become an artist in residence at the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens in San Marino.

Patricia A. Johnston, chair of Department of Visual Arts at College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts, has been awarded a Terra Foundation Senior Fellowship in American Art for the 2016–17 academic year by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. Her project is titled “Art and Global Knowledge in Early America.”

Kelly Kaczynski, an artist and lecturer for the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in Illinois, has been awarded a 2015 biennial grant from the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation in the amount of $20,000.

Margarita Karasoulas, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History at the University of Delaware in Newark, has received the Douglass Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship in American Art from the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. She will work on “Mapping Immigrant New York: Race and Place in Ashcan Visual Culture” during the 2016–17 academic year.

R. Tess Korobkin, a graduate student in the Department of the History of Art at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, has earned a 2016–17 predoctoral fellowship from the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. Her project is called “Sculptural Bodies of the Great Depression.”

Laurette E. McCarthy, an independent scholar based in Indianapolis, Indiana, has been named George Gurney Senior Fellow for 2016–17 at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. She will research “Anarchists, Mormons, Blue Bloods, and the Armory Show: Sculpting America.”

Helina Metaferia, an interdisciplinary artist, has been placed at the San Francisco Art Institute in California for a second consecutive year as part of the Post-Graduate Teaching Fellowship program, organized by the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design. She will teach in the school’s New Genres program in fall 2016.

Alexander Nemerov, Carl and Marilynn Thoma Provostial Professor in the Arts and Humanities and chair of the Department of Art and Art History at Stanford University in Stanford, California, has been tapped to give the sixty-sixth annual A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. His series of talks, “The Forest: America in the 1830s,” will take place in spring 2017.

Joshua O’Driscoll, assistant curator in the Department of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts at the Morgan Library and Museum in New York, has received the prestigious Paul Clemen Prize, which promotes the study of art from Germany’s Rhineland area. O’Driscoll’s submission, in the form of his 2015 doctoral dissertation on illuminated manuscripts produced in Cologne around the year 1000, is the first English-language study to receive the award.

Corey Piper, a PhD candidate in art history in the University of Virginia’s McIntire Department of Art in Charlottesville, has been appointed a 2016–17 Wyeth Foundation Predoctoral Fellow by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. Her project is called “Animal Pursuits: Hunting and the Visual Arts in Nineteenth-Century America.”

William L. Pressly, professor emeritus of art history for the University of Maryland in College Park, has become a 2016–17 senior fellow at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. He will research “America’s Paper Money: A Canvas for an Emerging Nation.”

Sheryl E. Reiss, president of the Italian Art Society and former editor-in-chief of caa.reviews, has become the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference Fellow at the Newberry Library in Chicago, Illinois, for spring 2017. Her project is titled “A Portrait of a Medici Maecenas: Giulio de’ Medici (Pope Clement VII) as Patron of Art.”

Fabiola Martínez Rodríguez, coordinator of art history for Saint Louis University in Madrid, Spain, has been selected as a short-term research scholar by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC.

James Rosenow, a PhD candidate in the Department of Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Chicago in Illinois, has been named a 2016–17 predoctoral fellow by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. His research topic is “‘For God’s Sake Don’t Call It Art’: The 1930s American Laboratory and Its Film Experiments.”

Claudia Sbrissa, professor of art and design at St. John’s University in Jamaica, New York, has accepted an artist’s fellowship from the Institute of Culture Brazil Italy Europe in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, for July and August 2016.

Emily Thames, a graduate student in the Department of Art History at Florida State University in Tallahassee, has been named Joe and Wanda Corn Predoctoral Fellow at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. During the 2016–17 academic year, she will research “The Life and Art of José Campeche: Enlightenment, Reform, and Identity in Late Eighteenth-Century Puerto Rico.”

Sajda van der Leeuw from the University of Oxford in England has been appointed Terra Foundation Predoctoral Fellow in American Art by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. During the 2016–17 academic year, she will work on “Earth in Focus: The Origins of Land Art through the Lens of Photography and Film.”

Nancy L. Wicker, professor of art history at the University of Mississippi, has been named Allen W. Clowes Fellow by the National Humanities Center in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Between September 2016 and May 2017, Wicker will work on a project focusing on the roles of people—patrons, artists, consumers, and subjects—in Viking art.

Nancy L. Wicker, professor of art history at the University of Mississippi, has been awarded a Digital Humanities Start-Up Grant by the National Endowment for the Humanities, codirected with colleagues at the Catholic University of America and the University of Virginia. The grant will support pilot implementation of Project Andvari, an online portal that will aggregate digital collections of northern European early medieval art.

Hannah Yohalem, a graduate student in the Department of Art and Archeology at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, has been awarded a 2016–17 predoctoral fellowship from the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. Her research project is called “The Johns Device: Bodies, Words, and Objects in Jasper Johns’s Art, 1954–1968.”

 

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by June 15, 2016

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

June 2016

Kim Bobier, a doctoral candidate in art history at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, has won a 2016 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies. Her research project is titled “Representing and Refracting the Civil Rights Movement in Late Twentieth-Century Art.”

Judith K. Brodsky, distinguished professor emerita of the Visual Arts Department at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, has received an honorary doctor of fine arts degree from Rider University in Lawrence Township, New Jersey.

Sinem Arcak Casale, assistant professor of art history at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, has been named a 2016 ACLS Fellow by the American Council of Learned Societies. Her project is titled “Courtly Encounters in War and Peace: Ottoman-Safavid Gift Exchange, 1501–1660.”

Zirwat Chowdhury, visiting faculty member in art history at Bennington College in Bennington, Vermont, has been named a 2016–17 National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow by the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Chowdhury will work on “The Vociferant Image: Sound and the Ethics of Empire in 18th-Century British Art and Visual Culture” from September 2016 to April 2017.

Carolyn Dean, professor of history of art and visual culture at the University of California, Santa Cruz, has been named a 2016–17 Getty Scholar by the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles. Dean will work on her project, “The Non-Image Challenge to Art History and Anthropology,” between September 2016 and June 2017.

Elisa Dainese, an architect and lecturer in the University of Pennsylvania’s History of Art Department in Philadelphia, has won a 2016 Membership Grant from the Society of Architectural Historians.

Nancy Demerdash of Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, has accepted the 2016 Spiro Kostof Fellowship from the Society of Architectural Historians.

Yvonne Elet has earned a 2016 SAH/Mellon Author Award from the Society of Architectural Historians.

Savannah Esquivel of Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, has won the the 2016 Edila and Francois-Auguste de Montequin Junior Fellowship from the Society of Architectural Historians.

Keith Garubba, a faculty member of the Baum School of Art in Allentown, Pennsylvania, has won a 2016 Arts Ovation Award in the emerging-artist category from the Allentown Arts Commission and the city of Allentown.

Dale Allen Gyure, professor of architecture at Lawrence Technological University in Southfield, Michigan, and adjunct assistant professor of historic preservation at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland, has been awarded a 2016 publication grant from the Graham Foundation for his book Serenity and Delight: The Architecture of Minoru Yamasaki, to be published by Yale University Press.

Patrick Thomas Hajovsky, associate professor in the Sarofim School of Fine Arts at Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas, has been named a 2016–17 Getty Scholar by the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. He will work on “Currencies of Wealth and Fame: The Social Lives of Luxury Objects in Aztec Mexico” from April to June 2017.

Grace T. Harpster, a PhD candidate in the History of Art Department at the University of California, Berkeley, has been named a 2016–17 Getty Predoctoral Fellow by the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. She will work on “Carlo Borromeo’s Itineraries” between September 2016 and June 2017.

Leslie Hewitt, an artist based in New York, has won a publication grant from the Graham Foundation for Untitled (Structures), a book to be produced with Bradford Young and published by Dancing Foxes Press.

Michael Ann Holly, consulting director and Starr Director Emeritus of the Research and Academic Program at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts, has been named a 2016–17 Guest Scholar by the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. She will research “At the Back of the Painted Beyond / At the Still Point of the Painted World” from January to March 2017.

Shih-shan Susan Huang, associate professor of art history at Rice University in Houston, Texas, has won a 2016 Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. She will be in residence at the Huntington Library, Art Collection, and Botanical Gardens in San Marino, Califorina, during academic year 2017–18, working on “First Impressions: Chinese Religious Woodcuts and Cultural Transformation.”

H. H. Joyce of the University of Oxford in England has accepted the 2016 Scott Opler Emerging Scholar Fellowship from the Society of Architectural Historians.

Kate M. Kocyba has won a 2016 Membership Grant from the Society of Architectural Historians.

Lauren Kroiz, assistant professor in the History of Art Department at the University of California, Berkeley, has won the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s 2015 Patricia and Phillip Frost Essay Award. Kroiz’s article, “‘A Jolly Lark for Amateurs’: John Steuart Curry’s Pedagogy of Painting,” appeared in the spring 2015 issue of American Art.

Anneka Lenssen, assistant professor of global modern art in the History of Art Department at the University of California, Berkeley, has been named a 2016–17 Getty Postdoctoral Fellow by the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles. She will continue work on “Being Mobilized: The Vitality of Arab Art, 1930–1960” between September 2016 and June 2017.

Michael Lobel, professor of art history at Hunter College, City University of New York, has been awarded the twenty-eighth Charles C. Eldridge Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in American Art for his book John Sloan: Drawing on Illustration (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014).

Maura Lucking, an architectural historian pursuing a PhD in critical studies from the Department of Architecture and Urban Design at the University of California, Los Angeles, has won a 2016 film grant from the Graham Foundation for Church of Schindler, a project in collaboration with the Los Angeles–based documentary filmmaker Andrea Lewis.

Ellen Macfarlane, a doctoral candidate in art and archaeology at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, has won a 2016 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies for her study, “Group f.64 Photography and the Object World.”

Luciana Martins, reader in Latin American visual studies at Birkbeck, University of London, in England, has been awarded a 2016 Leverhulme Research Fellowship for two years for a project entitled “Drawing Together: The Visual Archive of Expeditionary Fieldwork.”

Jeffrey A. Miller has won a 2016 Membership Grant from the Society of Architectural Historians.

Kimberly Minor, a doctoral candidate in art and art history at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, has won a 2016 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies. Her project is titled “Pictographic Motifs: Memory and Masculinity on the Upper Missouri.”

Keith Moxey, Barbara Novak Professor in the Department of Art History at Barnard College in New York, has been named a 2016–17 Guest Scholar by the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Moxey will research “Temporalities of Art History” between September and December 2016.

John Murphy has been awarded the 2016 Amy P. Goldman Foundational Fellowship in Pre-Raphaelite Studies from the Delaware Art Museum and the University of Delaware Library, both in Wilmington.

Stella Nair, associate professor in the Department of Art History at the University of California, Los Angeles, has won the Charles K. Williams II Rome Prize from the American Academy of Rome. She will continue work on “Rome in the Andes: The Impact of the Classical World on Inca Architectural History.”

Elisabeth Narkin, a PhD candidate in the Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, has received the 2016 Carter Manny Award for doctoral dissertation research from the Graham Foundation. Her project is called “Rearing the Royals: Architecture and the Spatialization of Royal Childhood in France, 1499–1610.”

Lawrence Nees, professor in the Department of Art History at the University of Delaware in Newark, has been named a 2016–17 Museum Guest Scholar by the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Research for his project, “Host Department: Manuscripts,” will take place between April and June 2017.

Christina Neilson, assistant professor of Renaissance and Baroque art history at Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio, has been named a 2016 ACLS Fellow by the American Council of Learned Societies. She will continue research on “Living Devotion: Animating Sculpture in Early Modern Europe.”

Fernando Martínez Nespral from the University of Buenos Aires in Argentina has accepted a place in the 2016 SAH-Getty International Program by the Society of Architectural Historians.

Emily Neumeier of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia has won the 2016 Keepers Preservation Education Fund Fellowship from the Society of Architectural Historians.

Amy F. Ogata, associate professor at the Bard Graduate Center: Decorative Arts, Design History, Material Culture in New York, has won the 2016 Alice Davis Hitchcock Book Award from the Society of Architectural Historians for Designing the Creative Child: Playthings and Places in Midcentury America (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2013).

Pauline Ayumi Ota, associate professor of art and art history at DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana, has accepted a 2016 Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. She will work on “Seeing Is Knowing: Visual Perception, Painting, and Cityscapes in Mid-Eighteenth Century Japan” at the Asian Studies Program at the University of Hawai‘i in Manoa during academic year 2016–17.

John Ott, professor of art history at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia, has received a 2016 Summer Stipend from the National Endowment for the Humanities to work on his book project, “Mixed Media: The Visual Culture of Racial Integration, 1931–1954.”

Nina Rowe, associate professor of art history and music at Fordham University in Bronx, New York, has been named a 2016 ACLS Fellow by the American Council of Learned Societies. She will work on “The World in a Book: Weltchroniken and Society at the End of the Middle Ages.”

Corine Schleif, a professor for the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University in Tempe, has received the 2015–16 Berlin Prize and is currently John P. Birkelund Fellow in the Humanities at the American Academy in Berlin, where she is completing the book Bending Stone: Adam Kraft and the Sculpting of Art’s History.

Emma Rose Silverman, a doctoral candidate in history of art at the University of California, Berkeley, has won a 2016 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art from the American Council of Learned Societies for her research project, “From Eyesore to Icon: Outsider Art, Racial Politics, and the Watts Towers.”

Kristel Smentek, associate professor of architecture for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been named a 2016 ACLS Fellow by the American Council of Learned Societies. Her research project is called “Objects of Encounter: China in Eighteenth-Century France.”

Giulia S. Smith, a PhD candidate in the History of Art Department at University College London, England, has been named a 2016–17 Getty Predoctoral Fellow by the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. She will work on her project, titled “An Anthropology of Ourselves: The Independent Group from Urban Fieldwork to Global Ecology, 1929–1973,” from September 2016 to June 2017.

Joseph Williams, a PhD candidate in the Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, has won the Phyllis W. G. Gordan/Lily Auchincloss/Samuel H. Kress Foundation Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome. He will continue researching “The Practice and Production of Architecture during the Mediterranean Commercial Revolution: The Church of S. Corrado in Molfetta (ca. 1185–1303).”

Fo Wilson, an artist and associate professor at Columbia College Chicago in Illinois, has won a 2016 exhibition grant from the Graham Foundation. He will use the funds to produce Eliza’s Peculiar Cabinet of Curiosities, on view at the Lynden Sculpture Garden in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, from June 26 to October 30, 2016.

Mary N. Woods, Michael A. McCarthy Professor of Architectural Theory at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, has been awarded a publication grant from the Graham Foundation for her book Women Architects in India: Histories of Practice in Mumbai and Delhi, to be published by Routledge.

Daniel M. Zolli, a PhD candidate in the History of Art and Architecture Department at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been named a 2016–17 Getty Predoctoral Fellow by the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. He will work on “Voices in the Workshop: Donatello and Theories of Making in Fifteenth-Century Oral Culture” from September 2016 to June 2017.

 

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by April 15, 2016

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

April 2016

Bill Arning, director of the Contemporary Art Museum Houston in Texas, has been named a fellow in a new program that supports art writing in underrepresented regions of the country by the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation and Art in America.

Suzanne Preston Blier, Allen Whitehill Clowes Professor of Fine Arts and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has received the 2016 Prose Award for an outstanding book in art history and criticism for Art and Risk in Ancient Yoruba: Ife History, Power, and Identity c. 1300 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2015).

Vidya Dehejia, Barbara Stoler Miller Professor of Indian and South Asian Art at Columbia University in New York, will deliver the sixty-fifth annual A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Her series of talks, titled “The Thief Who Stole My Heart: The Material Life of Sacred Bronzes in Chola India, c. 850–1280,” will take place between April 3 and May 8, 2016.

Kevin D. Murphy, Andrew W. Mellon Chair in the Humanities and professor and chair of the Department of History of Art at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, has received a $6,500 project grant from the Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design’s Craft Research Fund.

Therese O’Malley, associate dean of the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, has been named a 2016 SAH Fellow by the Society of Architectural Historians.

David M. Stone, professor of art history at the University of Delaware in Newark, has been appointed spring 2016 resident at the American Academy in Rome.

Hélène Valance has won the inaugural American Art in Translation Book Prize, a partnership between the Terra Foundation for American Art and Yale University Press, for her volume Nuits américaines: l’art du nocturne aux États-Unis, 1809–1917 (Paris: Presses du l’université Paris-Sorbonne, 2015).

Jina Valentine, an artist based in Durham, North Carolina, has received a 2016 grant from Creative Capital in the category of emerging fields. Her project, The Black Lunch Table, is a collaboration with Heather Hart, an artist based in Brooklyn, New York.

 

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by February 15, 2016

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

February 2016

Jay A. Clarke, Manton Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts, has been named a 2016 curatorial fellow by the Center for Curatorial Leadership.

Lily Cox-Richard, an artist based in Houston, Texas, has received a 2015 Houston Artadia Award, which comes with an unrestricted grant of $12,000.

Claire Daigle, associate professor and chair of the MA program in the history and theory of contemporary art at the San Francisco Art Institute in California, has won a 2015 award from the Arts Writers Grant Program, administered by Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, for her blog, Figuring Fiction.

Susan Fisher, executive director and chief curator at the Renee and Chaim Gross Foundation in New York, has been chosen by the Center for Curatorial Leadership to join its 2016 class of curatorial fellows.

Johanna Gosse, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow and Lecturer in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University in New York, has accepted a 2015 award from the Arts Writers Grant Program, overseen by Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. She will work on her book, On Site: Ray Johnson’s New York.

Valerie Hillings, curator and manager of curatorial affairs for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation’s Abu Dhabi Project in the United Arab Emirates, has been selected as a 2016 curatorial fellow by the Center for Curatorial Leadership.

Elise Kirk, an artist based in Brooklyn, New York, has accepted a Working Artist Photography Award. Kirk was selected for the month of September 2015.

Courtney Martin, assistant professor in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, has won a 2015 award from the Arts Writers Grant Program, steered by Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. She will work on her book, A Critical Language: Lawrence Alloway’s Words to the Art World.

Theresa Papanikolas, curator of European and American art at the Honolulu Museum of Art in Hawai‘i, has been named a 2016 curatorial fellow by the Center for Curatorial Leadership.

Melissa Ragain, assistant professor of art history at Montana State University in Bozeman, has received a 2015 award from the Arts Writers Grant Program, administered by Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. She will use the funds to work on her article, “Environmental Aesthetics in the Postwar University.”

Daniel Schulman, director of visual art for the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events in Illinois, has been chosen to be a 2016 curatorial fellow by the Center for Curatorial Leadership.

Martha Schwendener, an art critic for the New York Times and a PhD candidate in art history at the Graduate Center, City University of New York, has received a 2015 award in short-form writing from the Arts Writers Grant Program, administered by Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Deborah Stratman, an artist and filmmaker based in Chicago, Illinois, has been named a USA Collins Fellow for 2015 in the media category by United States Artists. The award comes with an unrestricted grant of $50,000.

Deborah Willis, a photographer, curator, author, historian, and chair of the Department of Photography and Imaging at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, has received an honorary degree from the Institute for Doctoral Studies in the Visual Arts.