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Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by June 15, 2012

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

June 2012

Peter Jonathan Bell, a PhD candidate at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, has received the Robert Lehman Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize to study at the American Academy in Rome. Bell will be working on a project titled “The Reinvention of the Bronze Statuette in Renaissance Italy: Presentation, Material, Facture.”

Pat Boas, an artist and graduate of Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland, Oregon, has been awarded the Bonnie Bronson Fellowship from her alma mater. The fellowship includes the purchase of an artwork for permanent installation at Reed College.

Elizabeth Hill Boone, Martha and Donald Robertson Chair in Latin American Art at Tulane University in New Orleans, has been elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a corresponding member of the Academia Mexicana de la Historia.

Bradford R. Collins, associate professor of art history at the University of South Carolina in Columbia, has been listed in the Princeton Review’s 2012 publication The Best 300 Professors.

Sophie Cras, a doctoral candidate at the Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, has been awarded the 2012 Terra Foundation for American Art International Essay Prize for her essay “Art as Investment and ‘Artistic Shareholding’ Experiments in the 1960s,” an examination of how a group of American conceptual artists made money and financial transactions the subject of their work.

Diana H. DePardo-Minsky, assistant professor of art history at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, and a specialist in Italian Renaissance and ancient Roman art and architecture, has been recognized in the Princeton Review’s publication The Best 300 Professors (2012).

Charles Fairbanks, a filmmaker from Eustis, Nebraska, has earned a 2012 fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. In his recent work Fairbanks documents his involvement with Lucha Libre wrestling in Mexico. He is also collaborating with an indigenous Zoque community in Chiapas, Mexico, on a new film.

Margot Fassler, professor of theology and music at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, has been named an American Council of Leaned Societies 2012 Digital Innovation Fellow. Fassler’s project proposal is to create a digitized, sounding model of Hildegard of Bingen conception of the cosmos, utilizing the advanced technology of Notre Dame’s Digital Visualization Theater.

Leonard Folgarait, professor of history of art at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, and a scholar of modern art of Latin America, Mexico, Europe, and America, has been listed in the Princeton Review’s The Best 300 Professors (2012).

Seth Adam Hindin, a historian of medieval art and architecture, has been appointed American Council of Leaned Societies New Faculty Fellow at the University of California, Davis.

Stanya Kahn, a video artist from Los Angeles, California, and an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Intermedia at the University of Southern California, has won a 2012 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship.

Dana Leibsohn, professor of art at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, and Carolyn Dean, professor and associate dean of the arts division at the University of California, Santa Cruz, have been jointly awarded an American Council of Leaned Societies Collaborative Research Fellowship in support of their book project on colonial Spanish America and the art and objects of its indigenous people.

Brenda Longfellow, associate professor of art and art history at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, has been awarded an Andrew Heiskell Post-Doctoral Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome. Longfellow intends to work on a project called “Past Lives, Present Meanings: Reused Statues in Imperial Rome.”

Camille S. Mathieu, a PhD candidate in art history at the University of California, Berkeley, has been granted a second year at the American Academy in Rome via the Donald and Maria Cox/Samuel H. Kress Foundation Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize. Her project is entitled “Revolutionizing the Antique: French Artists and Artistic Community in Napoleonic Rome, 1803–1819.”

Maurie D. McInnis, professor of American art and material culture at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, has been awarded the twenty-fourth Charles C. Eldredge Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in American Art for her book, Slaves Waiting for Sale: Abolitionist Art and the American Slave Trade (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011). In conjunction with the award, McInnis will present the Eldredge Prize lecture at the Smithsonian Museum of American Art in Washington, DC, on October 18, 2012.

Kathryn Blair Moore has been appointed an American Council of Leaned Societies New Faculty Fellow in History of Art and Italian Studies at the University of California, Berkeley.

Jennifer W. Reeves, a painter based in Callicoon, New York, has been awarded a 2012 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship.

Conrad Rudolph and Jeantte Kohl, both professors of art history at the University of California, Riverside, and Amit Roy-Chowdhury, a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Riverside, have received a start-up grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities for “FACES: Faces, Art, and Computerized Evaluation Systems,” a project that will test the use of facial-recognition software in the context of art history, with a long-term goal of assisting in the identification of human subjects in portraiture.

Lisa Saltzman, a professor of art history at Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, has received a 2012 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. Saltzman’s project is entitled “Daguerreotypes: Fugitive Subjects, Contemporary Objects.”

Claudia Sbrissa, a New York–based based artist who works in drawing and collage, has received a residency fellowship from the Constance Saltonstall Art Foundation in Ithaca, New York, for May and June 2012.

Tanya Sheehan, assistant professor of art history at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, has been awarded two fellowships for 2012–13: a research fellowship from the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin; and the Beatrice, Benjamin, and Richard Bader Fellowship in the Visual Arts of the Theatre from Harvard University.

Gesche Würfel, an artist based in New York, has recently been awarded two grants: a Manhattan Community Arts Fund grant from the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council and a Creative Grant from the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance. Both awards will help her to develop a new photography project, Basement Sanctuaries, which documents how superintendents decorate basements of apartment buildings in upper Manhattan.

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by April 15, 2012

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

April 2012

Craig Clunas, a professor of art history at the University of Oxford in England, will deliver the sixty-first A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Clunas’s six-part lecture series, titled “Chinese Painting and Its Audiences,” will take place on Sundays from March 11 to April 22, 2012.

Brianne Cohen, a doctoral student at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, has been awarded a grant from the National Committee for the History of Art to attend the thirty-third International Congress of the History of Art in Nuremberg, Germany, taking place July 15–20, 2012.

Jennifer Cohen, a PhD candidate at the University of Chicago in Illinois, has received a grant from the National Committee for the History of Art to attend the thirty-third International Congress of the History of Art in Nuremberg, Germany, taking place July 15–20, 2012.

Dana Cowen, a doctoral candidate at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, has accepted a travel grant from the National Committee for the History of Art. She will apply the funds to attend the thirty-third International Congress of the History of Art, to be held July 15–20, 2012, in Nuremberg, Germany.

Vidya J. Dehejia, the Barbara Stoler Miller Professor of Indian and South Asian Art at Columbia University in New York, has received a Padma Bhushan award from the government of India. Equivalent to British knighthood, the award recognizes the distinguished service of an individual to the nation, in any field.

Muriel Hasbun, a photographer and associate professor at the Corcoran College of Art and Design in Washington, DC, has been awarded a 2012 Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Award in Photography for encarnado: embodied, a series of color photographs taken in a Mexican slaughterhouse.

John Hawke, a New York–based artist who creates public art installations, has been chosen to attend the 2012 Art and Law Residency, a program developed by Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts in New York. The residency provides a platform for artists, writers, and curators to examine their visual practice and critical writing in the context of contemporary and historical legal issues.

Jill Holaday, a doctoral student at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, has been awarded a grant from the National Committee for the History of Art to attend the thirty-third International Congress of the History of Art in Nuremberg, Germany, taking place July 15–20, 2012.

Jennifer A. Morris, a PhD candidate at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, has earned a travel grant from the National Committee for the History of Art. She will use the funds to attend the thirty-third International Congress of the History of Art, which takes place July 15–20, 2012, in Nuremberg, Germany.

Stephanie E. Rozman, a PhD student at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, has received a grant from the National Committee for the History of Art to attend the thirty-third International Congress of the History of Art in Nuremberg, Germany, taking place July 15–20, 2012.

Diana Shpungin, a Brooklyn-based artist who works in installation, drawing, and animation, will take part in the Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts’ 2012 Art and Law Residency. The residency, taking place in New York, provides artists, curators, and writers with an opportunity to examine their art practice and critical writing within a framework of historical and contemporary legal issues.

Erin Sullivan, a PhD student at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, has been awarded a grant from the National Committee for the History of Art to attend the thirty-third International Congress of the History of Art in Nuremberg, Germany, taking place July 15–20, 2012.

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by February 15, 2012

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

February 2012

Blane De St. Croix, an artist and associate professor of sculpture at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, has accepted a 2011 Massachusetts College of Art Alumni Award for Outstanding Accomplishment.

Alexander Dumbadze, assistant professor of art history at George Washington University in Washington, DC, has received an award from the Arts Writers Grant Program, administered by Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, in support of his article, “Jack Goldstein and the Origins of Postmodernism.”

Daniel Eisenberg, professor in the Department of Film, Video, New Media, and Animation at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in Illinois, has been awarded a film/video grant from Creative Capital to help fund The Unstable Object, a film that will address the relationship between factory workers and the objects they produce.

Malik Gaines, a member of the artist collective My Barbarian, has received a grant in visual arts from Creative Capital in support of a series of workshops and public performances, titled Post-Living Ante-Action Theater. His group will collaborate with artists working in Israel and Egypt to stage visual, musical, and theatrical demonstrations.

Ken Gonzales-Day had been awarded a visual-arts grant from Creative Capital in support of Profiled, an ongoing project that uncovers racial stereotypes from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Gonzales-Day will use the grant to produce a series of workshops with middle school students in central Los Angeles that will explore themes of racial and ethnographic categorization in art viewing and making.

Julie Green, an artist and associate professor of art at Oregon State University in Corvallis, has received a 2011 Joan Mitchell Foundation Award for Painters and Sculptors. Green is one of twenty-five artists nationwide to receive the award.

Michele Greet, associate professor of art history at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, has been awarded a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities for her project, “Transatlantic Encounters: Latin American Artists in Paris between the Wars.”

Natilee Harren, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History at the University of California, Los Angeles, is cowinner of the first Art & Education Paper Prize. Harren’s text, “Objects without Objects: The Artwork in Flux,” has been published in Art & Education Papers.

Jane McFadden, associate professor of art and design at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, had received a grant through the Arts Writers Grant Program, a collaboration between Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, in support of her forthcoming book, There and Not There: Walter De Maria.

Christine Mehring, associate professor of art history at the University of Chicago in Illinois, has accepted an award from the Arts Writers Grant Program, administered by Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, that will support her forthcoming book, Munich ‘72: Olympian Art and Architecture. Written in collaboration with Sean Keller, Munich ’72 will examine the lost history of the art and architecture of the 1972 Olympics and its lasting effects on the global art world and the construction on German postwar identity.

Melissa Potter, assistant professor of interdisciplinary arts at Columbia College Chicago in Illinois, has received a faculty development grant to help produce a collaboration with a fellow artist and faculty member, Paul Catanese. Their project, Handmade Media, explores the intersection of electronic media and hand papermaking.

Emily Eliza Scott, an independent artist and scholar, has earned a grant from the Arts Writers Grant Program, administered by Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. The award will support her forthcoming article, “Toxic Gardens: Patricia Johanson’s House and Garden Proposal (1969),” which addresses Patricia Johanson’s radical proposals for New York City parks in the late 1960s and their relationship to Land art, Minimalism, and an emergent ecologically conscious culture.

Roger Shimomura, a painter and professor of art at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, has received a $50,000 United States Artists Fellowship. Shimomura is known for work that investigates Asian American identity and, more recently, Muslim American identity in a post–September 11 world.

Deborah Stratman, a Chicago-based artist and filmmaker, has received a film/video grant from Creative Capital that will help fund her forthcoming film, The Illinois Parables, which explores a series of regional narratives while addressing themes of the rational, the supernatural, the political, and the mystical.

Jesse Sugarmann, an interdisciplinary artist and assistant professor of new genres at California State University, Bakersfield, has received a film/video grant from Creative Capital in support of We Build Excitement, a film about the American automobile industry and the manufacturing of American identity.

Christopher Sullivan, an artist and faculty member in film, video, and new media
at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in Illinois, has been awarded a Creative Capital grant in film/video to help produce The Orbit of Minor Satellites, his forthcoming animated feature.

Meredith Tromble, an artist, writer, and associate professor at the San Francisco Art Institute in California, has earned a grant through the Arts Writers Grant Program, a collaborative venture between Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, in support of her blog Art and Shadows, a platform to address contemporary art and its relationship to theories of mind and consciousness.

Murtaza Vali, a writer, art historian, and curator based in Brooklyn, New York, has accepted a grant for short-form writing through Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts’ Arts collaborative initiative, the Arts Writers Grant Program. Throughout the year Vali will produce critical writing that addresses figures of absence and presence in contemporary political art.

William Wilson has been recognized with a grant from the Arts Writers Grant Program, administered by Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. The funds will help support Ray Johnson: An Illustrated Life in Art, a book that will examine Johnson’s life and work in the context of an extensive personal archive housed in Wilson’s home.

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by December 15, 2011

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

December 2011

Colin B. Bailey, deputy director and Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator of the Frick Collection in New York, has received the insignia of Officer of the Order of Arts and Letters from the French government.

Caetlynn Booth, a recent graduate in painting from Mason Gross School of the Arts Graduate Program in Visual Arts at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, has received a Fulbright scholarship to Berlin, Germany, for academic year 2011–12. She will conduct research for a project titled “The Work of Adam Elsheimer and the Spiritual Power of Painting.”

Andrea Bowers has received a grant from Art Matters to support a video project documenting DREAM-activist youth in California fighting the deportation of undocumented students.

Robert Gero has received a grant from Art Matters to support travel to Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, and Slovakia for research and interviews with the Roma.

Hope Ginsburg has received a grant from Art Matters to support travel her ongoing social artwork project, called Sponge. The artist will travel to the reef atolls off the coast of Belize to study the sea sponges that grow there.

Sheila Pepe has received a grant from Art Matters to support the international iterations of Common Sense, an ongoing installation and participatory performance involving a large-scale crocheted drawing.

Margaret Samu, adjunct assistant professor in the Art History Department of Stern College for Women at Yeshiva University, has received a Swann Foundation Fellowship for Caricature and Cartoon at the Library of Congress. The fellowship will enable her to study late-nineteenth-century Russian caricatures about art from the library’s strong holdings of satirical publications. She will use this material for a chapter of her book manuscript entitled Russian Venus.

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by October 15, 2011

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2011

Michael Beitz, an artist based in Attica, New York, has received a 2011 fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts in the crafts and sculpture category.

Sinclair Bell, assistant professor of art history in the School of Art at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, has been awarded a research fellowship from the German Archaeological Institute (Deutsches Archäologisches Institut) and the Archaeological Institute of America. He will conduct research in Berlin this fall.

Rachel Federman of New York University has received a $1,500 library research grant from the Getty Foundation in Los Angeles.

Seth Alexander Feman of the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, has earned a $1,500 library research grant from the Getty Foundation in Los Angeles.

Aglaya Glebova of the University of California, Berkeley, has won the Dedalus Foundation’s 2011 Dissertation Fellowship Award, given annually to a PhD candidate at an American university who is working on a dissertation related to modern art and modernism. The $20,000 award will help support Glebova’s work on her dissertation, “Wilderness and Construction: Three Case Studies of Russian Landscape Representation,” which investigates representations of Russia’s Northern wilderness from the mid-nineteenth century to present.

Wendy Ann Grossman of the University of Maryland in University Park has received a $1,500 library research grant from the Getty Foundation in Los Angeles.

Sonali Gulati, a faculty member teaching photography and film in the School of the Arts at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, has been awarded the Mary Lyon Award from her alma mater, Mount Holyoke College. The award honors a young alumna (no more than fifteen years after graduation) who demonstrates promise or sustained achievement in her life, profession, or community.

Matthew Jesse Jackson has won the Dedalus Foundation’s tenth annual Robert Motherwell Book Award for his The Experimental Group: Ilya Kabakov, Moscow Conceptualism, Soviet Avant-Gardes (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010). The award, which carries a $20,000 prize, honors an outstanding publication in the history and criticism of modernism in the arts. The Experimental Group documents the life and work of the Russian artist Ilya Kabakov and, through him, the milieu of the Moscow Conceptualists: the “unofficial artists” who worked without state sanction in the post-Stalinist Soviet Union.

Sue Johnson, professor of art at Saint Mary’s College of Maryland in Saint Mary’s City, has been awarded a residency at the Centre d’Art Marnay Art Centre in Marnay-sur-Seine, France. Her residency also includes a grant from the Tenot Fondation. In addition, Johnson was selected as a visiting artist by the American Academy in Rome for June 2011. In 2010–11 she has been a visiting scholar in residence at the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies in Oxford, England.

Holger A. Klein, associate professor and director of graduate studies in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University in New York, has been honored with the fiftieth annual Mark Van Doren Award for Teaching, which honors a Columbia professor for commitment to undergraduate instruction and for humanity, devotion to truth, and inspiring leadership. The recipient of the award is selected by the student members of the Academic Awards Subcommittee of the Columbia College Student Council, with administrative support and guidance from the Academic Affairs staff of the college.

JC Lenochan, an artist based in Orange, New Jersey, has received a $6,000 grant from the 2011–12 Franklin Furnace Fund for Decolonizing the Mind, an installation and performance with public interaction that addresses how pedagogy relates to issues of sex, race, and class stratification. For the gallery-based work, Lenochan will hang chalkboards with text and images opposite blank chalkboards for the public’s response. Simultaneously, four high school students will pile of old school desks in the middle of the space and also play sound and audio from Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s book, Decolonizing the Mind.

Margaret Lindauer, an art historian at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, has been recently honored twice, receiving a VCUarts Faculty Achievement Award for 2010–11 and a VCUarts Faculty Award for Distinguished Achievement in Teaching.

Christina Lindholm, associate dean of undergraduate studies in the School of the Arts at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, has earned a 2011 Spirit of Martha Award, which recognizes University of Missouri women who have distinguished themselves in their chosen profession and exemplify the spirit of leadership, particularly in the furtherance of women.

China Marks, an artist based in Long Island City, New York, has been named a Gregory Millard Fellow by the New York Foundation for the Arts. She has also received a 2011 grant in the category for printmaking, drawing, and book arts.

Saloni Mathur, associate professor in the Department of Art History at the University of California, Los Angeles, has received a $44,000 residential grant from the Getty Foundation. As a Getty Scholar, she will work on “Divided Objects: Indian Partition and the Politics of Display.”

Jennifer Ann McComas of Indiana University in Bloomington has accepted a $1,500 library research grant from the Getty Foundation in Los Angeles.

Kristine Nielsen of the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, has received a $661 library research grant from the Getty Foundation in Los Angeles.

Kristina Berrill Paulsen of Ohio State University in Columbus has received a $1,000 library research grant from the Getty Foundation in Los Angeles.

Scott William Perkins of the Bard Graduate Center in New York has received a $1,500 library research grant from the Getty Foundation in Los Angeles.

Corey Piper, curatorial assistant for the Mellon Collections at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, has received a 2011–12 John H. Daniels Fellowship from the National Sporting Library and Museum. She will work on “The Cast and Characters of the British Sporting Ring,” a scholarly essay for the catalogue of an upcoming exhibition, Catching Sight: The World of the British Sporting Print, at her museum.

Anne J. Regan, an artist who earned her MFA last year at the University of Houston in Texas, has become a resident artist at the Lawndale at Center in Houston. The residency comes with nine months of studio space, $1,500 for materials, and a $500 per month stipend; it will also culminate in an exhibition with two other resident artists in May 2012.

Barbara Smith, an artist based in Rosendale, New York, has received a 2011 fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts in the crafts and sculpture category.

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, a highly acclaimed American Indian artist based in New Mexico, has been honored with a 2011 Visionary Woman Award by Moore College of Art and Design in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for her outstanding contributions to the arts. Elaborating on her heritage and worldview, Smith’s richly layered juxtapositions of text and image in large-scale prints and canvases address today’s tribal politics, human rights, and environmental issues with a sophisticated combination of humor and wit.

Juana Valdes, an artist based in New York, has received a 2011 fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts in the crafts and sculpture category.

James Alan Van Dyke of the University of Missouri in Columbia has accepted a $1,500 library research grant from the Getty Foundation in Los Angeles.

P. Gregory Warden, University Distinguished Professor of Art History and associate dean for academic affairs in the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, has received a $200,000 grant from National Endowment for the Humanities to work with the Community College Humanities Organization on a 2012 NEH Summer Institute, called “The Legacy of Ancient Italy: The Etruscan and Early Roman City.” As project director, Warden will lead a group of community college teachers in Italy in June of next year.

Corina Alexandra Weidinger of the University of Delaware in Newark has earned a $1,500 library research grant from the Getty Foundation in Los Angeles.

Deborah Wing-Sproul, an interdisciplinary artist and a faculty member at Maine College of Art in Portland, has been named a Maine Arts Commission Media and Performing Arts Fellow for 2011. The recognition comes with a $13,000 grant award.

Brian Scott Winkenweder of Linfield College in McMinnville, Oregon, has received a $1,000 library research grant from the Getty Foundation in Los Angeles.

Sandy Winters, an artist based in New York, has received a 2011 fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts in the printmaking, drawing, and book arts category.

Reva Wolf, professor of art history at the State University of New York at New Paltz, has received a 2010–11 State University of New York Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, which recognizes consistently superior teaching and sound scholarship.

Karla Wozniak, an artist based in Brooklyn, New York, has received a 2011 fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts in the category for printmaking, drawing, and book arts.

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by August 15, 2011

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

August 2011

Joseph Ackley, a doctoral candidate in the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University focusing on medieval art, issues of translation, and material identity, has recently received a German Academic Exchange Service with a graduate scholarship to support research in Germany.

Andrea Bell, a PhD student in the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University with an interest in eighteenth-century French drawing, has accepted a one-year doctoral fellowship for research in Paris through an inaugural program of the Centre Allemand/Deutsches Kunstforum.

Doris Berger, an independent scholar based in Los Angeles, has earned a postdoctoral fellowship from the Getty Research Institute. She will investigate the avant-garde, contemporary film, and gender studies in her project, “Hans Richter’s Artistic Practice in Painting and Film.”

Susanneh Bieber of the Freie Universität in Berlin, Germany, has been awarded a postdoctoral fellowship from the Smithsonian American Art Museum for research in Washington, DC. Her project is entitled “Construction Sites: American Artists Engage the Built Environment.”

Alan C. Braddock, assistant professor in the Tyler School of Art at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, has received a senior fellowship from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. During academic year 2011–12, he will be in residence at the museum in Washington, DC, to research his project, called “Gun Vision: The Ballistic Imagination of American Art from Homer to O’Keeffe.”

Shira Niamh Brisman, a doctoral candidate at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, has been named an ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellow for her paper on the communicative nature of images and the influence of letters, particularly in the case of Albrecht Durer, entitled “Art and the Epistolary Mode of Address in the Age of Albrecht Dürer.”

Jonathan Brown, Carroll and Milton Petrie Professor of Fine Arts in the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, has received the Bernardo de Galvez Award from the US-Spain Council. The award acknowledges an extreme appreciation and contribution to the comprehension of Spanish art and history.

Kathryn Jane Brown, an assistant professor of art history at Tilburg University in the Netherlands, has received a $5,000 grant from the Shpilman Institute of Photography. Her project is entitled “Photography, Poetry, and Sculpture: ‘La Mort et les statues’ by Pierre Jahan and Jean Cocteau.”

Amy Buono, a scholar of colonial Latin American art and assistant professor in the Art History Department at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, has earned a postdoctoral fellowship through the Getty Research Institute for academic year 2011–12. She will continue her project, “Techniques of Color and Deception: Brazilian Art in Early Modern Europe.”

Derek Scott Burdette, a doctoral candidate at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, has been awarded an ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship to complete his investigation of “Miraculous Crucifixes and the Construction of Mexican Colonialism: The Artistic, Devotional, and Political Lives of Mexico City’s Early-Colonial Cristos.”

Joanna Cannon, a reader in the History of Art Department at the Courtauld Institute of Art in London, England, has received a Los Angeles Architecture fellowship from the Getty Research Institute in the Manuscripts department.

Jenny Carson of the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Maryland, has received a senior fellowship from the Smithsonian American Art Museum for the 2011–12 academic year. She will conduct research at the museum in Washington, DC, for her project, “The Art and Studio of William Henry Rinehart.”

Ignaz Cassar has been awarded a $5,000 grant from the Shpilman Institute of Photography for research on his project, “The Imaginary of the Darkroom: Interiority and the Aesthetics of the Secret.” This project, part of an inaugural Grants Program, will consider the infinite intrigue of the darkroom in the wake of the digital era.

Liam Considine of the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University has been named Sara Roby Predoctoral Fellow in Twentieth-Century American Realism by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. During the 2011–12 academic year, he will conduct research at the museum for his dissertation, titled “Innovation and Disavowal: American Pop Art in France, 1962–1968.”

Alexandra Davis, a doctoral candidate in the History of Art Department at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadephia, has received a 2011 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art. Her winning essay, “The Portrayal of the Artist-as-Celebrity in American Fashion and Lifestyle Magazines, 1923–1952“, analyzes the fusion of artist and celebrity in the media.

Sabina de Cavi, an independent scholar and curator based in Rome, Italy, has received a postdoctoral fellowship through the Getty Research Institute for the 2011–12 academic year. Her project, “Architectural Drawing as a Collaborative Process: Materials, Tools, Workshop Production, and Pattern Transmission in the Sicilian Workshop of Giacomo Amato (1643–1732),” will build on her enthusiasm for aspects of ritual and materiality in art.

Elise Dodeles, a painter based in New Jersey, has been awarded first prize in the William Way LGBTQ Community Center’s sixth annual juried show competition. She will have a solo show at the gallery space in Philadelphia in January 2012.

Ross K. Elfline has been presented with a research grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts. With it he will investigate the photomontages and drawings published by Superstudio, a radical architectural collective established in the 1960s.

Rachel Federman, a doctoral candidate in art history in the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, has been honored with a $1,500 Getty Research Institute’s Library Research Grant.

Seth Feman of the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, has been named Patricia and Phillip Frost Predoctoral Fellow by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. For academic year 2011–12, he will be in residence at the museum to work on “Paintings in Place: Encountering Art in Washington’s National

Matthew Fisk, a doctoral candidate at the University of California, Santa Barbara, has been awarded a 2011 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art for his essay, “Art, Speculation, and Diplomacy: John Trumbull, A Federalist Painter in Europe, 1780–1816,“ which offers insight into Trumbull’s complex outlook as an artist, speculator, and diplomat living abroad during the American and French revolutions.

Francesco Freddolini has been granted the Display of Art in Roman Palaces Fellowship through the Getty Research Institute for the 2011–12 academic year. A recipient of a PhD from the Universita di Pisa in Italy, he will investigate Italian Baroque sculpture in his project, “Collecting and Displaying Sculpture in Medicean Tuscany, c. 1600–1737.”

Heidi Gearhart, who completed her doctorate in the Department of Art History at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, has earned a postdoctoral fellowship for the 2011–12 academic year from the Getty Research Institute for her project, “Theophilus’ On Diverse Arts: Artists and Art-Making in the High Middle Ages.”

Bridget Gilman, a doctoral candidate in the History of Art Department at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, has received a 2011 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art. Her project, “Re-envisioning Everyday Spaces: Photorealism in the San Francisco Bay Area,” proposes a link between landscape painting and realist painting of the twentieth century that may reveal a new understanding of the American lifestyle.

Michelle Handelman has received a grant from the MAP Fund to generate Triangle of Resistance, an interdisciplinary performance with the musician and composer Miya Masaoka that investigates media’s ability to motivate or frame social action.

Natilee Harren, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History at the University of California, Los Angeles, has received a Getty Research Institute Predoctoral Fellowship for the 2011–12 academic year. She will continue her project, “Objects without Object: The Artwork in Flux, 1958–1969.”

Elizabeth W. Hutchinson, associate professor of art history at Barnard College in New York, has been granted a 2011 ACLS Fellowship for her paper, “Muybridge’s Pacific Coast: Landscape Photographs and Cultural Topography,” a comprehensive study of Eadweard Muybridge’s early interaction with the Pacific coast.

Timothy Hyde has secured a 2011 publications grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts for his book manuscript, A Constitutional Modernism: Architecture and Civil Society in the Cuban Republic, which proposes the significance of architecture and urban planning in modernism in Cuba between 1933 and 1959.

Sharon Irish has been awarded a 2011 research grant from the Graham Foundation of Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts to investigate the interdisciplinary innovations of the London-based artist Stephen Willats and his exploration of social interactions, power structures, and distinct behavior in particular cities.

Barthèlèmy Jobert, professor of history of contemporary art at the Universitè Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV), has been appointed a guest scholar at the Getty Research Institute for spring 2011 to work on “Delacroix: Romantic Artists and the Drawing Album.”

Karolina Karlic, an artist based in Los Angeles, California, has been named a 2011 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow in photography.

Sonya S. Lee, assistant professor of art history at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, has been presented with a 2011 ACLS Fellowship. Her research project, “Between Culture and Nature: Cave Temples of Sichuan,” analyzes the cultural foundation of China’s sacred grounds and their contribution to aesthetic, historical, and religious dialogues.

Sarah Lepinski, a scholar who recently received her doctorate from the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Archeology at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania, has been awarded a postdoctoral fellowship from the Getty Research Institute. For the 2011–12 academic year she will work on her project, titled “Painting Practices in Roman and Late Antique Corinth, Greece.”

Emily Liebert of Columbia University in New York has received a predoctoral fellowship at the Archives of American Art, awarded through the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. She will conduct research in 2011–12 on her project, called “Roles Recast: Eleanor Antin and the 1970s.”

Anne Lindberg, an artist based in Kansas City, Missouri, has earned a grant from the Lighton International Artists Exchange Program to facilitate a three-month residency at Kunstnerhuset i Lofoten in Svolvaer, Norway. She departs in September 2011.

Michael Lobel, associate professor of art history at Purchase College, State University of New York, has been awarded a Getty scholarship with an emphasis on artistic practice. His research project examines “Becoming an Artist: John Sloan, the Ashcan School, and Popular Illustration.”

Natalia Majluf, director of the Museo de Arte de Lima and academic coordinator of the MA program in art history at Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, has been honored as a 2011 Fellow in Latin American and Caribbean studies by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. She will complete a book during her tenure on the Peruvian painter Francisco Laso and his portrayal of the nineteenth-century Peruvian native.

George H. Marcus has been awarded a publications grant from the Graham Foundation of Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts for The Houses of Louis Kahn, a book manuscript written with William Whitaker that will analyze the historical framework and spatial details of nine homes designed by Louis Kahn between 1940 and 1973.

Areli Marina has received a publications grant from the Graham Foundation of Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts. Her book manuscript, The Italian Piazza Transformed: Parma in the Communal Age, explores the development of civic centers in the northern Italian city of Parma and their cultural significance.

Tara Cooke McDowell, a doctoral candidate in the History of Art Department at the University of California, Berkeley, has been awarded a Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art 2011. Her study, “Image Nation: The Art of Jess 1951–1991,” investigates the San Francisco–based artist Jess and his cross-disciplinary practice in the atomic age.

Jonathan Mekinda has been awarded a publication grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts to produce Chicago in the World, a collection of essays written with Alexander Eisenschmidt that reveal the city’s significance as an incubator of architectural and urban innovation.

Kimberli Meyer has received a 2011 research grant from the Graham Foundation of Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts for “Hyper House and Home”, a project exploring how domestic space mingles with do-it-yourself design, digital technology, and the public.

Cynthia J. Mills, an independent scholar, has been granted an ACLS Fellowship for research at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. She will conduct a study of figurative sculpture produced at the end of the nineteenth century for American cemeteries in an essay called “Beyond Grief: Art, Mourning, and Mystery in the Gilded Age.”

Nicholas Mirzoeff, a professor of media, culture, and communication at New York University, has been awarded a $5,000 grant from the Shpilman Institute of Photography for a research project entitled “The Photographic Common and Authoritarian Realism: A Genealogy of the 2011 Revolutions.”

Kate Mondloch, assistant professor of art history at the University of Oregon in Eugene, has earned a 2011 ACLS Fellowship for “Eye Desire: Media Art after Feminism,” a paper that presents a theoretical and historical analysis of media arts since 1990 that have been informed by feminism.

Iris Moon, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, has been awarded a predoctoral fellowship through the Getty Research Institute. During the 2011–12 academic year, she will research “Charles Percier and Pierre-François-Lèonard Fontaine’s Interior Decoration Practice in Napoleonic France, ca. 1800.”

Emily L. Moore, a doctoral candidate in the History of Art Department at the University of California, Berkeley, has earned a 2011 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art for her research on “‘For Future Generations’: Transculturation and the Totem Parks of the New Deal, 1938–1942,“ which uncovers the intricacies of the New Deal’s interactions with Alaskan “totem parks.”

Steven Nelson, associate professor of art history at the University of California, Los Angeles, has earned a Getty scholarship for academic year 2011–12 and has also qualified as the Consortium Scholar. His research project, “Dakar: The Making of an African Metropolis,” pivots on Africa’s diasporas and history, queer studies, and the urban environment in Africa.

Linda Nochlin, Lila Acheson Wallace Professor of Modern Art in the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, has been honored with a 2011 Icon Award from the Bruce Museum in Greenwich, Connecticut for her commitment to the arts and art history.

Bibiana Obler, a doctoral student at George Washington University in Washington, DC, has been named James Renwick Postdoctoral Fellow in American Craft by the Smithsonian American Art Museum. She will further develop her project, “The Anti-Craft Tradition,” in residence at the museum during the 2011–12 academic year.

Erin Pauwels of Indiana University in Bloomington has received a Wyeth Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship to conduct research at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC, during academic year 2011–12. Her dissertation is called “Impersonating Identity: Celebrity, Costume, and Dramatic Realism in the Gilded Age American Portraiture.”

Lauren Hackworth Petersen, associate professor of art history at the University of Delaware in Newark, has been awarded an ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowship for The Material Life of Roman Slaves, a forthcoming book coauthored with Sandra R. Joshel on the presence of slaves through archeological findings in the Roman landscape and textual references.

Cory Pillen, a PhD candidate at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, has received a predoctoral fellowship from the Smithsonian American Art Museum to research his project, “WPA Posters: A New Deal for Design,” at the museum in Washington, DC, for the 2011–12 academic year.

Amy Powell, assistant professor of art history at the University of California in Irvine, has received an ACLS Fellowship for 2011. She will generate a paper on “The Whitewashed Image: Iconoclasm and Seventeenth-Century Dutch Landscapes.”

Miguel Rivera, an artist and director of the Printmaking Department at the Kansas City Art Institute in Missouri, has been awarded a three-week residency at Proyecto’ACE in Buenos Aires, Argentina, to develop his project, “Cities’ Dialogues and Paranoia.”

Iraida Rodríguez-Negrón is a PhD candidate in the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, has received a 2011–12 The Meadows/Kress Prado Fellowship, to conduct research at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, and the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid, Spain.

Sarah Ross has been awarded a 2011 grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts for her traveling exhibition, Global Cities, Model Worlds, organized with Ryan Griffis and Lize Mogel. Each incarnation of the show, scheduled to appear through 2013 in cities that have hosted or bid for the Olympics or a World’s Fair, explores the ideological and social impact of such major events.

Vimalin Rujivacharakul has accepted a 2011 research grant from the Graham Foundation of Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts to develop his project, “The Orient of the East and the West of the Ocean,” which examines the perception of world architecture from the standpoint of a leading Japanese intellectual, Ito Chuta.

Tanya Sheehan, assistant professor of art history at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, has received a short-term research fellowship from the New York Public Library and a fellowship from the W E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University to examine references to race in photographic humor from 1839 through the twentieth century.

Elena Shtromberg, assistant professor of art and art history at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, has been awarded a 2011 ACLS Fellowship to conduct research for her paper, “Art and Information: Political Encounters in Brazil, 1968–1978,” which examines the relation of art production to social spheres, information theory, and international discourse during Brazil’s most violently tyrannical decade.

Molly Springfield, an artist based in Washington, DC, has received a $5,000 grant from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities via its the 2011 Artist Fellowship program.

Allison Stagg of University College London in England has been awarded a postdoctoral fellowship at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC, by the Smithsonian American Art Museum. She will conduct research her project, “The Art of Wit: Political Caricature in the United States, 1780–1830.”

Nathaniel Stein, a professor at the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence, has been awarded a $5,000 research grant from the Shpilman Institute of Photography for a paper titled “Authorities of Presence: Robert Gill, Survey Photography, and the Colonial Sublime.”

Helena Katalin Szepe, associate professor of art history at the University of South Florida in Tampa, has been honored with a fellowship for scholarly research from ACLS. Her project, “Privilege and Duty in the Serene Republic: Illuminated Manuscripts of Renaissance Venice,” investigates the duality of illuminated civic manuscripts and their role in memorializing and glorifying statesmen of the Renaissance.

Penelope Umbrico, an artist and a faculty member at the School of Visual Arts in New York and in the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, has received a 2011 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in photography.

Catharine H. Walsh, a doctoral candidate in the Art History Department at University of Delaware in Newark, has received a 2011 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art. Her research, titled “Tell Me a Story: Narrative and Orality in Nineteenth Century American Visual Culture,” investigates the multisensory experience of art produced between 1830 and 1870.

P. Gregory Warden, University Distinguished Professor of Art History and associate dean for academic affairs in the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, has been accepted into the Order of the Star of Italian Solidarity and received the title of cavaliere in the name of the president of the Italian republic. Warden’s contributions include spearheading the excavation of Poggio Colla, an Etruscan site, since 1995; organizing an extensive exhibition of Etruscan art for his institution in 2009; and enhancing the prestige and understanding of Etruscan and Roman art since joining the Art History Department in 1982.

Srdjan Jovanovic Weiss has received a 2011 publications grant from the Graham Foundation of Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts for Socialist Architecture: The Vanishing Act, a collaborative project with Armin Linke that documents the dismissed architecture of Croatia, Macedonia, and Serbia left vacant since the dissolution of the Socialist Federation of Yugoslavia.

Kelly Whitford, a graduate student in the Department of Art History at the University of Oregon in Eugene, has accepted a $5,000 award via the 2010–11 Dean’s Graduate Fellowship for her research and scholarship in the final phase of her dissertation, called “A Re-Performance: Viewing Stefano Madern’s St. Cecilia during the Jubilee of 1600.”

John M. Willis, an artist and professor of photography at Marlboro College in Marlboro, Vermont, has received a 2011 photography fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Hannah Wong of the University of Texas at Austin has accepted predoctoral fellowship at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC, awarded by the Smithsonian Museum of American Art. During academic year 2011–12, she will conduct research on “A ‘Funny Guy’ Visits America: The Role of Humor in the Works of Francis Picabia, 1913–17.”

Cassie Wu, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History at the University of California, Los Angeles, has been awarded a 2011 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art for her study, “Perfect Objects: The Lives of Allan McCollum’s Work.” Her monographic study of this American artist reveals an aggressive critique of commoditization through his production of dynamic objects.

Kathryn Wysocki, a doctoral candidate in the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University whose research explores bronze installations by the King of Benin in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, has accepted a graduate scholarship from the German Academic Exchange Service, which will allow for study in Germany.

Tatsiana Zhurauliova, a graduate student in art history at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, has accepted a Terra Foundation for American Art Predoctoral Fellowship from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. She will conduct research at the museum during academic year 2011–12 for her project, “Arcadia Americana: Landscape in the Art of Arshile Gorky, Pavel Tchelitchew, and Yasuo Kuniyoshi during World War II.”

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by June 15, 2011

Grants, Awards, and Honors

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

June 2011

Elizabeth Bolman, associate professor of art history in the Tyler School of Art at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, has received a 2011 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in fine-arts research. She will study magnificence and asceticism in Upper Egypt via the Red Monastery Church.

Michele Brody, an artist based in New York, has been awarded a summer residency at Quimby Colony in Portland, Maine, where she will focus on her Drawing Roots series.

Carissa Carman, an MFA student in fibers at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec, has received a $2,000 Textile Society of America Travel Grant to attend and participate in the International Symposium and Exhibition on Natural Dyes, which took place April 24–30, 2011, in La Rochelle, France.

Mary D. Garrard, professor emerita of American University in Washington, DC, has received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters.

Charles Goldman, an artist based in Brooklyn, New York, has been award a 2011 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in fine arts.

Michelle Handelman has been awarded a 2011 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in film and video. She will spend the fellowship period working on her new project, Irma Vep, the last breath, a three-channel video installation based on the life of the actress and film director Musidora, and the silent-film character she was best known for, Irma Vep, from Les Vampires (1915, directed by Louis Feuillade).

Jen P. Harris, a New York–based artist, has been awarded a $2,500 grant from the Astraea Visual Arts Fund, which promotes the work of contemporary lesbian visual artists.

Anne D. Hedeman, professor of art and medieval studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, has received a 2011 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in medieval history.

Corin Hewitt, an artist and assistant professor of sculpture and extended media at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, has been awarded a 2011 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in fine arts.

Alison Luchs has been tapped by the Italian Art Society to deliver the 2011 Italian Art Society–Kress Foundation Lecture in Florence, Italy, taking place on June 8, 2011.

Billie Grace Lynn has received the 2011 West Grand Prize. A $25,000 award will assist her project, called Mad Cow Motorcycle, in which she will develop a biodiesel motorcycle to raise awareness for greenhouses gases coming from commercial cattle farms.

Richard Minsky has received the 2011 Worldwide Books Award for Publications for The Art of American Book Covers, 1875–1930 (New York: George Braziller, 2010). The Art Libraries Society of North America awarded him a certificate and a $1,000 prize for his book at its recent annual conference, held jointly with the Visual Resources Association.

Linda Nochlin, Lila Acheson Wallace Professor of Modern Art at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, has received a 2011 Icon Award in the Arts from the Bruce Museum in Greenwich, Connecticut.

Jennifer Ellen Robertson, professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, has received a 2011 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in East Asian studies.

Allison Smith, a sculptor based in Oakland, California, has been awarded a $50,000 USA Fellowship for artistic excellence from United States Artists.

Susan Webster, Jane Williams Mahoney Professor of Art History and American Studies at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, has received a 2011 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in fine-arts research. She will study European architecture and Andean masters in colonial Quito, Ecuador.

Bradley Wester, an artist based in New York, has been awarded two residencies. From September to November 2011, he will be a resident artist at AIR Antwerpen in Belgium. In February 2012, he will take part in the Hermitage Artist Retreat, based in Englewood, Florida, and comprised of writers, painters, composers, playwrights, poets, choreographers, performance artists, sculptors, and other artists whose work defies categorization. (He was also a resident there in March 2011).

Kristina Wilson, associate professor of art history at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts, has received the twenty-third Charles C. Eldredge Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in American Art, awarded by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC, for her book, The Modern Eye: Stieglitz, MoMA, and the Art of the Exhibition, 1925–1934 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009).

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by April 15, 2011

Grants, Awards, and Honors

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

April 2011

Benjamin Carpenter, an artist based in San Francisco, California, has received a $1,500 alumni grant from the Maine College of Art’s Belvedere Fund for Professional Development to purchase a new welder for Backbone Metals, his metal-smithing and fabrication business.

Henry John Drewal, the Evjue-Bascom Professor in the Department of Art History at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, has won the 2011 Arnold Rubin Outstanding Publication Award from the Arts Council of the African Studies Association for his edited volume, Sacred Waters: Arts for Mami Wata and other Divinities in Africa and the Diaspora (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2008).

Rebecca Hackemann, an artist based in New York, has received a 2011 grant from the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Manhattan Community Arts Fund for her project Visionary Sightseeing Binoculars, consisting of eight altered sightseeing binoculars containing stereoscopic images of the past and future of that site to be installed in unlikely places that have traditionally been underserved by public art.

Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann, the Frederick Marquand Professor of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, has been awarded an honorary doctorate (Doctor Philosophiae Honoris Causae) by Technische Universität Dresden in Germany on the basis of the quality of his research and because of his service to international art historical exchange.

Karen Lang, associate professor of art history at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles and editor-in-chief of The Art Bulletin, has been awarded a prestigious Leverhulme Visiting Professorship at the University of Warwick in England. Lang delivered four Leverhulme Lectures in February and March 2011.

Heather Hyde Minor, assistant professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, has won the 2010 Helen and Howard Marraro Prize in Italian History for her book, The Culture of Architecture in Enlightenment Rome (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2010). The Marraro Prize is conferred annually by the Society for Italian Historical Studies.

Lili White, an artist based in New York, has received a 2011 grant from the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Manhattan Community Arts Fund to hold a screening of women’s experimental films that feature underrepresented themes and issues distinct to women and girls.

Nancy L. Wicker, professor of art history the University of Mississippi in Oxford, has been invited to participate in a Getty Foundation Seminar on “The Arts of Rome’s Provinces.” The seminar comprises two intensive two-week sessions: first in Great Britain in May 2011 and second in Greece in January 2012.

ArtTable, a national organization for professional women in the visual arts celebrating its thirtieth anniversary, has recognized the achievements of thirty women whose contributions have transformed the field. Among the honorees are the following CAA members: Elizabeth Easton, cofounder and director, Center for Curatorial Leadership; Ann Sutherland Harris, professor of art history, Frick Department of the History of Art and Architecture, University of Pittsburgh; Mary Jane Jacob, professor and executive director of exhibitions and exhibition studies, School of the Art Institute of Chicago; Margo Machida, associate professor, Department of Art and Art History, University of Connecticut; and Susan Fisher Sterling, director, National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC.

The Pollock-Krasner Foundation, based in New York, has awarded grants to artists for 2009–10. The list includes to the following CAA members: Francis Cape, Russell Floersch, Cynthia Knott, Matthew Kolodziej, Eve Laramee, G. Daniel Massad, Shona McDonald, Natalie Moore, Margaret Murphy, Stephen Nguyen, Diana Puntar, James Stroud, and June Wayne.

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by February 15, 2011

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

February 2011

Blane De St. Croix, an artist based in Brooklyn, New York, has been selected to participate in the 2011 Art and Law Residency Program, a new initiative from the Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts in New York. She will join other resident artists, writers, and curators for semimonthly seminars exploring intersections of art and law; their projects and papers will culminate in an exhibition and symposium.

Mazie McKenna Harris, a doctoral student in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, has been selected to participate in the 2011 Art and Law Residency Program, a new initiative from the Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts in New York. She will join other resident artists, writers, and curators for semimonthly seminars exploring intersections of art and law; their projects and papers will culminate in an exhibition and symposium.

Corin Hewitt, an artist based in Richmond, Virginia, has received a $25,000 grant in the Joan Mitchell Foundation’s 2010 Painters and Sculptors Grant Program, established in 1993 to assist individual artists creating work of exceptional quality.

Darryl Lauster, an artist and assistant professor of intermedia and sculpture at the University of Texas at Arlington, has received a $25,000 grant in the Joan Mitchell Foundation’s 2010 Painters and Sculptors Grant Program, established in 1993 to assist individual artists creating work of exceptional quality.

Kamau Amu Patton has been named a winner of the 2010 SECA Art Award from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in California. Administrated by the Society for the Encouragement of Contemporary Art (SECA), the biennial award honors four Bay Area artists who are working independently at a high level of artistic maturity but who have not yet received substantial recognition. Artists receive a modest cash prize and will be featured in a museum exhibition, with a catalogue, in fall 2011.

Nicole Pietrantoni has been awarded a Fulbright grant to Iceland for the 2010–11 academic year. She has also been awarded a Leifur Eiríksson Foundation Scholarship, receiving a $25,000 grant for scholarly exchange and research between the United States and Iceland. While in Iceland, she will teach art workshops and create a new body of work, which will explore layers of narratives and histories that shape the way in which one pictures and frames the natural world, at the Icelandic Printmaker’s Association in Reykjavik.

Piotr Piotrowski, Polish art historian and theoretician, has won the 2010 Igor Zabel Award for Culture and Theory, initiated and funded by the ERSTE Foundation, based in Vienna, Austria. The biennial prize, which comes with a €40,000 cash award, acknowledges a cultural protagonist whose work is dedicated to broadening international knowledge of Central and South Eastern European visual culture.

Christine Poggi, professor of modern and contemporary art at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, has received the twenty-first Howard R. Marraro Prize from the Modern Language Association for her book, Inventing Futurism: The Art and Politics of Artificial Optimism (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009). The biennial prize recognizes an outstanding book in Italian literature or comparative literature involving Italian.

Liz Rodda, an artist and assistant professor of media art and video in the School of Art and Art History at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, has been chosen as one of five artists to receive the Art 365 Award from the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition. She will receive a $12,000 grant and one year of guidance from a guest curator, Shannon Fitzgerald, in preparation for a group exhibition to be held March 25–May 7, 2011, at Artspace at Untitled in Oklahoma City.

Allison Smith, an artist based in Oakland, California, has been named a USA Friends Fellow by United States Artists, a national grant-making and advocacy organization. As one of fifty-two artists receiving the honor, she will be given an unrestricted grant of $50,000.

Lynne Yamamoto, an artist based in Northampton, Massachusetts, has received a $25,000 grant in the Joan Mitchell Foundation’s 2010 Painters and Sculptors Grant Program, which was established in 1993 to assist individual artists creating work of exceptional quality.

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by December 15, 2010

Grants, Awards, and Honors

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

To learn more about submitting a listing, please see the instructions on the main Member News page.

December 2010

James Cahill, professor emeritus at the University of California in Berkeley, has been awarded the Charles Lang Freer Medal by the Smithsonian Institution’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. The medal recognizes Cahill’s lifetime of contributions to the history of Chinese and Japanese art.

Henry Drewal, the Evjue-Bascom Professor of African and African Diaspora Arts at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, has been awarded a senior fellowship at the Institute for Research in the Humanities at his school. During the four-year appointment he will research and write a book on art and the senses.

Nancy Feldman has received the 2010 Founding Presidents Award from the Textile Society of America for “Shipibo Textile Practices 1950–2010,” a paper written with Claire Odland and presented at the society’s twelfth biennial symposium in October.

Ruth Fine, curator of special projects in modern art at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, has been honored for curatorial excellence by the Print Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The November 2010 celebration was the first of five annual events leading to the center’s one-hundredth anniversary in 2015.

Hal Foster, the Townsend Martin ’17 Professor of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, has received the 2010 Clark Prize for Excellence in Arts Writing by the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts. Established in 2006 and awarded every two years, the Clark Prize recognizes individuals whose critical or art-historical writing has had a significant impact on public understanding and appreciation of the visual arts.

William R. Levin,
professor emeritus of art history
at Centre College in
Danville, Kentucky, has received two prestigious award from the Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC) at its October meeting: the Award for Excellence in Teaching, granted each year to a member “who demonstrates an exceptional command of his or her discipline through the ability to teach effectively, impart knowledge, and inspire students”; and the occasionally bestowed Award for Exemplary Achievement, “the organization’s most prestigious award, given in recognition of personal and professional development as well as long-standing service to SECAC.”

Beili Liu, an artist based in Austin, Texas, has received third place in the 2010 ArtPrize, an annual competition established last year, for her installation Lure/Wave, Grand Rapids at the Urban Institute of Contemporary Arts in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Her award includes a $50,000 prize.

Jules Prown, the Paul Mellon Professor Emeritus of the History of Art at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, has been recognized by the Bookbuilders of Boston for his book, The Architecture of the Yale Center for British Art (New Haven: Yale Center for British Art, 2009). The title won Best of Category in Professional Illustrated Books at the fifty-third annual New England Book Show, which recognizes outstanding work by New England publishers, printers, and graphic designers.

Shelley Rice, Arts Professor in the Department of Art History and in Department of Photography and Imaging at the Tisch School of the Arts, both at New York University, has been named a Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters by the French government.

Alicia Weisberg-Roberts, assistant curator of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century art at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, has received the thirtieth annual George Wittenborn Memorial Book Award from the Art Libraries Society of North America for Mrs. Delany and Her Circle (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009), an exhibition catalogue coedited with Mark Laird.

The Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program has announced the recipients of its 2010 grant cycle. Among the winners are these CAA members and their projects: Douglas Crimp, for his book Before Pictures; Clare Davies, for short-form writing; Matthew Jesse Jackson, for his blog Our Literal Speed; Raphael Rubinstein, for his blog The Silo; Irene Small, for her book Hélio Oiticica: Folding the Frame; and Sandra Zalman, for her article “Whose Modern Art? Huntington Hartford, MoMA, and the Fight for Modern Art’s Legacy.” Participating in the program’s 2010 Writing Workshop, which pairs a practicing writer with an established critic through the International Association of Art Critics/USA Section, are Colin Edgington of New Brunswick, New Jersey, and Christina Schmid of Minneapolis, Minnesota.

The National Academy Museum and School in New York has elected eighteen American artists and architects as members of the 185-year-old institution. Two are CAA members: Garth Evans, an abstract sculptor; and Nancy Friese, a landscape painter and printmaker.

The Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, a nine-week summer-residency program for emerging visual artists in Skowhegan, Maine, hosted the following CAA members in 2010: Yui Kugimiya, for video and film; Anna Chiaretta Lavatelli, for installation; Abraham Storer, for painting; and Cullen Washington Jr., for drawing.

The Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts, has named its 2010–11 fellows. Among the recipients are these CAA members: Adrienne Childs, University of Maryland, College Park; Dario Gamboni, Université de Genève; Michèle Hannoosh, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Mark Ledbury, Power Institute, University of Sydney; Griselda Pollock, University of Leeds; Susan Siegfried, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; and Adrian Sudhalter, independent scholar.