CAA

CAA News Today

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by CAA — Aug 15, 2011

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

August 2011

Joseph Ackley, a doctoral candidate in the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University focusing on medieval art, issues of translation, and material identity, has recently received a German Academic Exchange Service with a graduate scholarship to support research in Germany.

Andrea Bell, a PhD student in the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University with an interest in eighteenth-century French drawing, has accepted a one-year doctoral fellowship for research in Paris through an inaugural program of the Centre Allemand/Deutsches Kunstforum.

Doris Berger, an independent scholar based in Los Angeles, has earned a postdoctoral fellowship from the Getty Research Institute. She will investigate the avant-garde, contemporary film, and gender studies in her project, “Hans Richter’s Artistic Practice in Painting and Film.”

Susanneh Bieber of the Freie Universität in Berlin, Germany, has been awarded a postdoctoral fellowship from the Smithsonian American Art Museum for research in Washington, DC. Her project is entitled “Construction Sites: American Artists Engage the Built Environment.”

Alan C. Braddock, assistant professor in the Tyler School of Art at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, has received a senior fellowship from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. During academic year 2011–12, he will be in residence at the museum in Washington, DC, to research his project, called “Gun Vision: The Ballistic Imagination of American Art from Homer to O’Keeffe.”

Shira Niamh Brisman, a doctoral candidate at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, has been named an ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellow for her paper on the communicative nature of images and the influence of letters, particularly in the case of Albrecht Durer, entitled “Art and the Epistolary Mode of Address in the Age of Albrecht Dürer.”

Jonathan Brown, Carroll and Milton Petrie Professor of Fine Arts in the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, has received the Bernardo de Galvez Award from the US-Spain Council. The award acknowledges an extreme appreciation and contribution to the comprehension of Spanish art and history.

Kathryn Jane Brown, an assistant professor of art history at Tilburg University in the Netherlands, has received a $5,000 grant from the Shpilman Institute of Photography. Her project is entitled “Photography, Poetry, and Sculpture: ‘La Mort et les statues’ by Pierre Jahan and Jean Cocteau.”

Amy Buono, a scholar of colonial Latin American art and assistant professor in the Art History Department at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, has earned a postdoctoral fellowship through the Getty Research Institute for academic year 2011–12. She will continue her project, “Techniques of Color and Deception: Brazilian Art in Early Modern Europe.”

Derek Scott Burdette, a doctoral candidate at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, has been awarded an ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship to complete his investigation of “Miraculous Crucifixes and the Construction of Mexican Colonialism: The Artistic, Devotional, and Political Lives of Mexico City’s Early-Colonial Cristos.”

Joanna Cannon, a reader in the History of Art Department at the Courtauld Institute of Art in London, England, has received a Los Angeles Architecture fellowship from the Getty Research Institute in the Manuscripts department.

Jenny Carson of the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Maryland, has received a senior fellowship from the Smithsonian American Art Museum for the 2011–12 academic year. She will conduct research at the museum in Washington, DC, for her project, “The Art and Studio of William Henry Rinehart.”

Ignaz Cassar has been awarded a $5,000 grant from the Shpilman Institute of Photography for research on his project, “The Imaginary of the Darkroom: Interiority and the Aesthetics of the Secret.” This project, part of an inaugural Grants Program, will consider the infinite intrigue of the darkroom in the wake of the digital era.

Liam Considine of the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University has been named Sara Roby Predoctoral Fellow in Twentieth-Century American Realism by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. During the 2011–12 academic year, he will conduct research at the museum for his dissertation, titled “Innovation and Disavowal: American Pop Art in France, 1962–1968.”

Alexandra Davis, a doctoral candidate in the History of Art Department at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadephia, has received a 2011 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art. Her winning essay, “The Portrayal of the Artist-as-Celebrity in American Fashion and Lifestyle Magazines, 1923–1952“, analyzes the fusion of artist and celebrity in the media.

Sabina de Cavi, an independent scholar and curator based in Rome, Italy, has received a postdoctoral fellowship through the Getty Research Institute for the 2011–12 academic year. Her project, “Architectural Drawing as a Collaborative Process: Materials, Tools, Workshop Production, and Pattern Transmission in the Sicilian Workshop of Giacomo Amato (1643–1732),” will build on her enthusiasm for aspects of ritual and materiality in art.

Elise Dodeles, a painter based in New Jersey, has been awarded first prize in the William Way LGBTQ Community Center’s sixth annual juried show competition. She will have a solo show at the gallery space in Philadelphia in January 2012.

Ross K. Elfline has been presented with a research grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts. With it he will investigate the photomontages and drawings published by Superstudio, a radical architectural collective established in the 1960s.

Rachel Federman, a doctoral candidate in art history in the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, has been honored with a $1,500 Getty Research Institute’s Library Research Grant.

Seth Feman of the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, has been named Patricia and Phillip Frost Predoctoral Fellow by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. For academic year 2011–12, he will be in residence at the museum to work on “Paintings in Place: Encountering Art in Washington’s National

Matthew Fisk, a doctoral candidate at the University of California, Santa Barbara, has been awarded a 2011 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art for his essay, “Art, Speculation, and Diplomacy: John Trumbull, A Federalist Painter in Europe, 1780–1816,“ which offers insight into Trumbull’s complex outlook as an artist, speculator, and diplomat living abroad during the American and French revolutions.

Francesco Freddolini has been granted the Display of Art in Roman Palaces Fellowship through the Getty Research Institute for the 2011–12 academic year. A recipient of a PhD from the Universita di Pisa in Italy, he will investigate Italian Baroque sculpture in his project, “Collecting and Displaying Sculpture in Medicean Tuscany, c. 1600–1737.”

Heidi Gearhart, who completed her doctorate in the Department of Art History at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, has earned a postdoctoral fellowship for the 2011–12 academic year from the Getty Research Institute for her project, “Theophilus’ On Diverse Arts: Artists and Art-Making in the High Middle Ages.”

Bridget Gilman, a doctoral candidate in the History of Art Department at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, has received a 2011 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art. Her project, “Re-envisioning Everyday Spaces: Photorealism in the San Francisco Bay Area,” proposes a link between landscape painting and realist painting of the twentieth century that may reveal a new understanding of the American lifestyle.

Michelle Handelman has received a grant from the MAP Fund to generate Triangle of Resistance, an interdisciplinary performance with the musician and composer Miya Masaoka that investigates media’s ability to motivate or frame social action.

Natilee Harren, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History at the University of California, Los Angeles, has received a Getty Research Institute Predoctoral Fellowship for the 2011–12 academic year. She will continue her project, “Objects without Object: The Artwork in Flux, 1958–1969.”

Elizabeth W. Hutchinson, associate professor of art history at Barnard College in New York, has been granted a 2011 ACLS Fellowship for her paper, “Muybridge’s Pacific Coast: Landscape Photographs and Cultural Topography,” a comprehensive study of Eadweard Muybridge’s early interaction with the Pacific coast.

Timothy Hyde has secured a 2011 publications grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts for his book manuscript, A Constitutional Modernism: Architecture and Civil Society in the Cuban Republic, which proposes the significance of architecture and urban planning in modernism in Cuba between 1933 and 1959.

Sharon Irish has been awarded a 2011 research grant from the Graham Foundation of Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts to investigate the interdisciplinary innovations of the London-based artist Stephen Willats and his exploration of social interactions, power structures, and distinct behavior in particular cities.

Barthèlèmy Jobert, professor of history of contemporary art at the Universitè Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV), has been appointed a guest scholar at the Getty Research Institute for spring 2011 to work on “Delacroix: Romantic Artists and the Drawing Album.”

Karolina Karlic, an artist based in Los Angeles, California, has been named a 2011 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow in photography.

Sonya S. Lee, assistant professor of art history at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, has been presented with a 2011 ACLS Fellowship. Her research project, “Between Culture and Nature: Cave Temples of Sichuan,” analyzes the cultural foundation of China’s sacred grounds and their contribution to aesthetic, historical, and religious dialogues.

Sarah Lepinski, a scholar who recently received her doctorate from the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Archeology at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania, has been awarded a postdoctoral fellowship from the Getty Research Institute. For the 2011–12 academic year she will work on her project, titled “Painting Practices in Roman and Late Antique Corinth, Greece.”

Emily Liebert of Columbia University in New York has received a predoctoral fellowship at the Archives of American Art, awarded through the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. She will conduct research in 2011–12 on her project, called “Roles Recast: Eleanor Antin and the 1970s.”

Anne Lindberg, an artist based in Kansas City, Missouri, has earned a grant from the Lighton International Artists Exchange Program to facilitate a three-month residency at Kunstnerhuset i Lofoten in Svolvaer, Norway. She departs in September 2011.

Michael Lobel, associate professor of art history at Purchase College, State University of New York, has been awarded a Getty scholarship with an emphasis on artistic practice. His research project examines “Becoming an Artist: John Sloan, the Ashcan School, and Popular Illustration.”

Natalia Majluf, director of the Museo de Arte de Lima and academic coordinator of the MA program in art history at Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, has been honored as a 2011 Fellow in Latin American and Caribbean studies by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. She will complete a book during her tenure on the Peruvian painter Francisco Laso and his portrayal of the nineteenth-century Peruvian native.

George H. Marcus has been awarded a publications grant from the Graham Foundation of Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts for The Houses of Louis Kahn, a book manuscript written with William Whitaker that will analyze the historical framework and spatial details of nine homes designed by Louis Kahn between 1940 and 1973.

Areli Marina has received a publications grant from the Graham Foundation of Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts. Her book manuscript, The Italian Piazza Transformed: Parma in the Communal Age, explores the development of civic centers in the northern Italian city of Parma and their cultural significance.

Tara Cooke McDowell, a doctoral candidate in the History of Art Department at the University of California, Berkeley, has been awarded a Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art 2011. Her study, “Image Nation: The Art of Jess 1951–1991,” investigates the San Francisco–based artist Jess and his cross-disciplinary practice in the atomic age.

Jonathan Mekinda has been awarded a publication grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts to produce Chicago in the World, a collection of essays written with Alexander Eisenschmidt that reveal the city’s significance as an incubator of architectural and urban innovation.

Kimberli Meyer has received a 2011 research grant from the Graham Foundation of Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts for “Hyper House and Home”, a project exploring how domestic space mingles with do-it-yourself design, digital technology, and the public.

Cynthia J. Mills, an independent scholar, has been granted an ACLS Fellowship for research at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. She will conduct a study of figurative sculpture produced at the end of the nineteenth century for American cemeteries in an essay called “Beyond Grief: Art, Mourning, and Mystery in the Gilded Age.”

Nicholas Mirzoeff, a professor of media, culture, and communication at New York University, has been awarded a $5,000 grant from the Shpilman Institute of Photography for a research project entitled “The Photographic Common and Authoritarian Realism: A Genealogy of the 2011 Revolutions.”

Kate Mondloch, assistant professor of art history at the University of Oregon in Eugene, has earned a 2011 ACLS Fellowship for “Eye Desire: Media Art after Feminism,” a paper that presents a theoretical and historical analysis of media arts since 1990 that have been informed by feminism.

Iris Moon, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, has been awarded a predoctoral fellowship through the Getty Research Institute. During the 2011–12 academic year, she will research “Charles Percier and Pierre-François-Lèonard Fontaine’s Interior Decoration Practice in Napoleonic France, ca. 1800.”

Emily L. Moore, a doctoral candidate in the History of Art Department at the University of California, Berkeley, has earned a 2011 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art for her research on “‘For Future Generations’: Transculturation and the Totem Parks of the New Deal, 1938–1942,“ which uncovers the intricacies of the New Deal’s interactions with Alaskan “totem parks.”

Steven Nelson, associate professor of art history at the University of California, Los Angeles, has earned a Getty scholarship for academic year 2011–12 and has also qualified as the Consortium Scholar. His research project, “Dakar: The Making of an African Metropolis,” pivots on Africa’s diasporas and history, queer studies, and the urban environment in Africa.

Linda Nochlin, Lila Acheson Wallace Professor of Modern Art in the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, has been honored with a 2011 Icon Award from the Bruce Museum in Greenwich, Connecticut for her commitment to the arts and art history.

Bibiana Obler, a doctoral student at George Washington University in Washington, DC, has been named James Renwick Postdoctoral Fellow in American Craft by the Smithsonian American Art Museum. She will further develop her project, “The Anti-Craft Tradition,” in residence at the museum during the 2011–12 academic year.

Erin Pauwels of Indiana University in Bloomington has received a Wyeth Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship to conduct research at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC, during academic year 2011–12. Her dissertation is called “Impersonating Identity: Celebrity, Costume, and Dramatic Realism in the Gilded Age American Portraiture.”

Lauren Hackworth Petersen, associate professor of art history at the University of Delaware in Newark, has been awarded an ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowship for The Material Life of Roman Slaves, a forthcoming book coauthored with Sandra R. Joshel on the presence of slaves through archeological findings in the Roman landscape and textual references.

Cory Pillen, a PhD candidate at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, has received a predoctoral fellowship from the Smithsonian American Art Museum to research his project, “WPA Posters: A New Deal for Design,” at the museum in Washington, DC, for the 2011–12 academic year.

Amy Powell, assistant professor of art history at the University of California in Irvine, has received an ACLS Fellowship for 2011. She will generate a paper on “The Whitewashed Image: Iconoclasm and Seventeenth-Century Dutch Landscapes.”

Miguel Rivera, an artist and director of the Printmaking Department at the Kansas City Art Institute in Missouri, has been awarded a three-week residency at Proyecto’ACE in Buenos Aires, Argentina, to develop his project, “Cities’ Dialogues and Paranoia.”

Iraida Rodríguez-Negrón is a PhD candidate in the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, has received a 2011–12 The Meadows/Kress Prado Fellowship, to conduct research at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, and the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid, Spain.

Sarah Ross has been awarded a 2011 grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts for her traveling exhibition, Global Cities, Model Worlds, organized with Ryan Griffis and Lize Mogel. Each incarnation of the show, scheduled to appear through 2013 in cities that have hosted or bid for the Olympics or a World’s Fair, explores the ideological and social impact of such major events.

Vimalin Rujivacharakul has accepted a 2011 research grant from the Graham Foundation of Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts to develop his project, “The Orient of the East and the West of the Ocean,” which examines the perception of world architecture from the standpoint of a leading Japanese intellectual, Ito Chuta.

Tanya Sheehan, assistant professor of art history at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, has received a short-term research fellowship from the New York Public Library and a fellowship from the W E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University to examine references to race in photographic humor from 1839 through the twentieth century.

Elena Shtromberg, assistant professor of art and art history at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, has been awarded a 2011 ACLS Fellowship to conduct research for her paper, “Art and Information: Political Encounters in Brazil, 1968–1978,” which examines the relation of art production to social spheres, information theory, and international discourse during Brazil’s most violently tyrannical decade.

Molly Springfield, an artist based in Washington, DC, has received a $5,000 grant from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities via its the 2011 Artist Fellowship program.

Allison Stagg of University College London in England has been awarded a postdoctoral fellowship at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC, by the Smithsonian American Art Museum. She will conduct research her project, “The Art of Wit: Political Caricature in the United States, 1780–1830.”

Nathaniel Stein, a professor at the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence, has been awarded a $5,000 research grant from the Shpilman Institute of Photography for a paper titled “Authorities of Presence: Robert Gill, Survey Photography, and the Colonial Sublime.”

Helena Katalin Szepe, associate professor of art history at the University of South Florida in Tampa, has been honored with a fellowship for scholarly research from ACLS. Her project, “Privilege and Duty in the Serene Republic: Illuminated Manuscripts of Renaissance Venice,” investigates the duality of illuminated civic manuscripts and their role in memorializing and glorifying statesmen of the Renaissance.

Penelope Umbrico, an artist and a faculty member at the School of Visual Arts in New York and in the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, has received a 2011 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in photography.

Catharine H. Walsh, a doctoral candidate in the Art History Department at University of Delaware in Newark, has received a 2011 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art. Her research, titled “Tell Me a Story: Narrative and Orality in Nineteenth Century American Visual Culture,” investigates the multisensory experience of art produced between 1830 and 1870.

P. Gregory Warden, University Distinguished Professor of Art History and associate dean for academic affairs in the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, has been accepted into the Order of the Star of Italian Solidarity and received the title of cavaliere in the name of the president of the Italian republic. Warden’s contributions include spearheading the excavation of Poggio Colla, an Etruscan site, since 1995; organizing an extensive exhibition of Etruscan art for his institution in 2009; and enhancing the prestige and understanding of Etruscan and Roman art since joining the Art History Department in 1982.

Srdjan Jovanovic Weiss has received a 2011 publications grant from the Graham Foundation of Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts for Socialist Architecture: The Vanishing Act, a collaborative project with Armin Linke that documents the dismissed architecture of Croatia, Macedonia, and Serbia left vacant since the dissolution of the Socialist Federation of Yugoslavia.

Kelly Whitford, a graduate student in the Department of Art History at the University of Oregon in Eugene, has accepted a $5,000 award via the 2010–11 Dean’s Graduate Fellowship for her research and scholarship in the final phase of her dissertation, called “A Re-Performance: Viewing Stefano Madern’s St. Cecilia during the Jubilee of 1600.”

John M. Willis, an artist and professor of photography at Marlboro College in Marlboro, Vermont, has received a 2011 photography fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Hannah Wong of the University of Texas at Austin has accepted predoctoral fellowship at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC, awarded by the Smithsonian Museum of American Art. During academic year 2011–12, she will conduct research on “A ‘Funny Guy’ Visits America: The Role of Humor in the Works of Francis Picabia, 1913–17.”

Cassie Wu, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History at the University of California, Los Angeles, has been awarded a 2011 Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art for her study, “Perfect Objects: The Lives of Allan McCollum’s Work.” Her monographic study of this American artist reveals an aggressive critique of commoditization through his production of dynamic objects.

Kathryn Wysocki, a doctoral candidate in the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University whose research explores bronze installations by the King of Benin in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, has accepted a graduate scholarship from the German Academic Exchange Service, which will allow for study in Germany.

Tatsiana Zhurauliova, a graduate student in art history at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, has accepted a Terra Foundation for American Art Predoctoral Fellowship from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. She will conduct research at the museum during academic year 2011–12 for her project, “Arcadia Americana: Landscape in the Art of Arshile Gorky, Pavel Tchelitchew, and Yasuo Kuniyoshi during World War II.”