CAA News Today

Red and White Plum Blossoms, Ogata Kōrin, early 18th century, via Wikimedia Commons

MEET THE GRANTEES

Twice a year, CAA awards grants through the Millard Meiss Publication Fund to support book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of art, visual studies, and related subjects that have been accepted by a publisher on their merits, but cannot be published in the most desirable form without a subsidy.

Thanks to the generous bequest of the late Prof. Millard Meiss, CAA began awarding these publishing grants in 1975.

The Millard Meiss Publication Fund grantees for Spring 2020 are:

  • Sarah BetzerAnimating the Antique: Sculptural Encounter in the Age of Aesthetic Theory, Penn State University Press 
  • Peter ChametzkyTurks, Jews, and Other Germans in Contemporary Art, The MIT Press 
  • Pamela Corey, The City in Time: Contemporary Art and Urban Form in Vietnam and Cambodia, University of Washington Press 
  • Christina Crawford, Spatial Revolution: Architecture and Planning in the Early Soviet Union, Cornell University Press 
  • Frank FeltensOgata Kōrin: Art in Early Modern Japan, Yale University Press 
  • Andrew FinegoldVital Voids: Cavities and Holes in Mesoamerican Material Culture, The University of Texas Press 
  • Marika KnowlesRealism and Role-Play: The Human Figure in French Art from Callot to the Brothers Le Nain, University of Delaware Press 
  • Ginger Nolan, Savage Mind to Savage Machine: Racial Science and Twentieth-Century Design, University of Minnesota Press 
  • Joanna PawlikRemade in America: Surrealist Art, Activism, and Politics 1940–1978, University of California Press 

Read a list of all recipients of the Millard Meiss Publication Fund from 1975 to the present. The list is alphabetized by author’s last name and includes book titles and publishers.

BACKGROUND

Books eligible for a Meiss grant must currently be under contract with a publisher and be on a subject in the arts or art history. The deadlines for the receipt of applications are March 15 and September 15 of each year. Please review the Application Guidelines and the Application Process, Schedule, and Checklist for complete instructions.

CONTACT

Questions? Please contact Cali Buckley, Grants and Special Programs Manager, at cbuckley@collegeart.org.

Filed under: Books, Grants and Fellowships

In 2019, Suzanne Preston Blier, professor of African art at Harvard University and former president of CAA, published a major book on Picasso’s use of global imagery, Picasso’s Demoiselles: The Untold Origins of a Modern Masterpiece. In addition to its scholarship the book is groundbreaking for its reliance on fair use, the principle within US copyright law that permits free reproduction of copyrighted images under certain conditions. CAA led the way among visual arts groups in calling for reliance on fair use, producing in 2015 its Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts.

In this interview with Patricia Aufderheide, university professor and founding director of the Center for Media & Social Impact (CMSI) at American University, and a principal investigator in the CAA fair use project, Blier relates how she became an inadvertent pioneer of fair use in art history.

An Interview with Suzanne Preston Blier, Harvard University

By Patricia Aufderheide, American University

I met Prof. Blier, an award-winning art historian, when CMSI joined others in facilitating the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts for the College Art Association (CAA), with funding from the Samuel H. Kress and Andrew W. Mellon Foundations. Fair use is the well-established US right to use copyrighted material for free, if you are using that material for a different purpose (such as academic analysis, for instance) and in amounts relevant to the new purpose. Blier was the incoming president, as the Code launched.

The project addressed a huge need. Art historians, visual artists, art journal and book editors, and museum staff all have faced major hurdles in accomplishing their work because of copyright. Art historians avoided contemporary art in favor of analyzing public domain material. Visual artists hesitated to undertake innovative projects that reuse existing cultural material. Editors, or sometimes their authors, faced monumental bills for permissions and sometimes those permissions depended on an artist or artist’s estate agreeing with what they say. Museums hesitated to do virtual tours, or use images in their informational brochures, or even to mount group exhibits, because of prohibitive permissions costs. All together, some people in the visual arts called this “permissions culture.”

Once the Code came out, some things changed immediately. Museums rewrote their copyright use policies. Artists made new work. CAA’s publications—some of the leading journals in the field—adopted fair use as a default choice.Yale University Press prepared new author guidelines for fair use of images in scholarly art monographs to encourage fair use. Blier was one of the Code’s champions.

And then she needed it herself. As she began work on her most recent book, which ultimately resulted in Picasso’s Demoiselles: The Untold Origins of a Modern Masterpiece (Duke University Press, 2019, winner of the 2020 Robert Motherwell Book prize for an outstanding publication in the history and criticism of modernism in the arts by the Dedalus Foundation), she realized the subject faced the stiffest possible copyright challenge. To tell her story, she would have to be able to show images from a variety of artists, most challengingly, Picasso. She thought of Duke University Press, a publisher that has been willing to go ahead of others on fair use. So Blier approached them. Duke was very supportive, and they ended up hiring extra legal counsel for this. In the end, Blier said, she had to rewrite certain sections, and redo some images at the suggestion of outside counsel, to strengthen the fair use argument.

Blier tells the story of how the book got out into the world (and won an award), below.

Figure 1. Congo masks published in Leo Frobenius’ 1898 Die Masken und Geheimbünde Afrikas alongside Pablo Picasso’s Study of Man (1907). The Congo mask at the bottom, second from the left is the likely source for the crouching demoiselle. The mask at the top left shows tear lines from the eyes crossing diagonally down the cheeks similar to Picasso’s preliminary study for one of the men in an early compositional drawings for the canvas.

You’re an expert in African art. How did you end up writing a book about one of the most famous modernist artists?

This is a book I never intended to write; it found me. For my previous book, Art and Risk in Ancient Yoruba: Ife History, Power, and Identity, I was doing those last-minute bits of work in the library to check sources, and I pulled out a book adjacent to the book I was looking for, an old book by the German anthropologist, Leo Frobenius. I hadn’t read it since graduate school. As I opened it up, I looked down and I said, Wow, this is a book on African masks and they look like they’d be the ones Picasso used as models for his famous 1907 painting Demoiselles d’Avignon. At the time I had first read the book, Picasso’s drawings for the painting hadn’t been released. This time I saw it differently and as I was looking at it in the library, I saw there was tracing paper over the pictures. There was a line drawing covering each mask, and that seemed significant too.

The next thing I knew, I was hunting for a book from the Harvard library on Dahomey women warriors. It turned out it was in the medical school library, which should have been a sign. When I picked it up at the main library and flipped it open, I thought, Oh my god, it’s pornography! It was photos and line drawings of women around the world, in supposed “evolutionary” order. Photos of naked women begin with so-called “archaic,” in Papua New Guinea, right through to southern Europe, then Denmark. In the library I’m bending over, kind of hiding it, out of embarrassment. I bring it home and realize, Ohhhh!  Here’s another key source for Demoiselles. This volume, which was by Karl Heinrich Stratz, had gone through multiple editions, and one was published about the same time Picasso stopped using living models. Then I found another book, by Richard Burton, which had a rendering that Picasso clearly used for his 1905 sketch Salomé.

What happened next was the clincher. I went to Paris to lecture at Collège de France. The week before my lectures, I went to hear another speaker at the Collège, a medieval historian. One of the first slides he presented was a work from a medieval illustrator, Villard De Honnecourt. This book was a modern edition of an illustrated medieval manuscript, published in the right time frame for Picasso to have seen it. And I thought, Well, here’s another source Picasso used.

Later I was also able to rediscover a photo that allowed me to date the painting to a single night in March 1907. The scene is often identified as a brothel, but bordel in French doesn’t mean bordello, but rather a chaotic or complex situation. It was my belief that Picasso was creating a time-machine kind of image of the mothers of five races, as he understood them from the Stratz ethno-pornography book and other sources, each depicted in the art style of that region or period. My larger argument is not only that Picasso was using book illustration sources, but also that these books invite us to see the canvas in a new light, and that, for Picasso, the painting has its intellectual grounding in colonial-era ideas about human and artistic evolution.

Figure 2. Illustrations from Leo Frobenius’ 1898 Die Masken und Geheimbünde Afrikas showing (top two rows) the visual development of a mask into a human face. The middle illustration ,from the same Frobenius book shows line drawings of ijaw masks from Nigeria. The bottom image is a detail of the standing African figure from Picasso’s 1907, Les Demoiselles d’Avignon which appears to be based on a combination of these two masks.

What a sleuthing job! And so you decided to write the book then?

I wrote the first two chapters while I was in Paris doing the lecture. I saw it not as a coffee-table art book, but the kind of book you put in your knapsack as you head off to a long ride on the subway.

It was easy to write, but it was a very different story for the images. I immediately got a trade publisher in Britain to agree to publish it, and then they said they could not do it, because of problems getting permission to reproduce images from the Picasso Foundation.

The Picasso Foundation is notorious for making it difficult to access Picasso images, isn’t it?

The price of permissions is high, and this Foundation like many estates is interested in guarding the artist’s reputation as well. The difficulties of publishing on Picasso have been manifested in how little publishing was being done, and how scarce the images were in that work. Since 1973, there have been few heavily illustrated books about Picasso, except by wealthy individuals or museums in relation to an exhibition. I had heard about Rosalind Krauss publishing a work without permissions—at least that’s what I heard—anyway, she used very few images. Leo Steinberg apparently had not been able to arrange the rights for a work he wanted to do, a book edition of his two seminal articles on Les Demoiselles.

Although I hadn’t realized it until recently, in September 2019 there was an important case in the US, about a set of illustrated books by Christian Zervos with a wide array of Picasso illustrations. The case was started in France, but a US judge has allowed fair use.

But generally, yes, there’s common wisdom among art historians that the Picasso Foundation is a formidable challenge.

So how did you proceed when the first publisher backed out?

I was disheartened, but I got an agent. He sent it off to ten or twelve trade publishers worldwide—and came up with nothing.

Then I realized I was going to have to go to a university press. That was a big decision. The trade publication will pay for the images, and do all the work on the rights clearance. But with a university press, you’re on your own.

One of the first people I contacted was legendary editor Ken Wissoker at Duke University Press. He was interested, but then came the issue of the images. I may have broached fair use with him from the start. The manuscript had gone through peer review and it was in great shape except for this copyright issue. I had quite a number of images—in the end, it was 338. At Duke, they won’t begin the editorial process until you have all the copyright clearances on images done. So I began the difficult process of deciding how to get the images.

It was easy to write, but it was a very different story for the images.

Were you in contact with the Picasso Foundation directly?

I did contact them, in order to let them know about the project in general. I was doing final research work in Paris. I had framed the book as a travelogue in part addressing my discovery of these sources. I also wanted to find out so much more about Picasso. I’m not a modernist, I’m an outsider to the field. So I worked hard to get as much insight and criticism of the manuscript from specialists as I could.

I made it a point to meet with people at the Picasso Foundation. I had a Powerpoint of the images, which I showed to one of the key people there. Later I wrote to them, “here’s the manuscript, let me know if you have any thoughts.” And I heard nothing back. I had heard that with some manuscripts, they have been concerned one way or another. I didn’t want their permission for the intellectual content, but since they knew this artist and his life and family better than any academic could, I wanted their insights.

And then you started to look for permissions?

Well, I began to think about the cost of acquiring the images. The process is such that you have to go through the Artists Rights Society (ARS, a US licensing broker). And to get a price, you have to furnish the number of images, how many are color, the size of the print run, the prospective profit, and a whole series of things we could not know. Duke wouldn’t even look at the project editorially without having the rights in hand. I had heard difficult stories—that they were interested in looking at the galleys along the way, and requesting changes, for quality control, but it wasn’t possible to do this and work with the press.

If I had to guess, I would say that it might have cost me something like $80,000 of my own money to purchase the minimum number of images for this scholarly book, from which I expect to make no money, or very little.

Figure 3 from left to right: Pablo Picasso, Nude Combing Her Hair, 1906; Girl braiding hair from C. H. Stratz, La beauté de la femme, 1900 (Paris); Girl from Vienna from C.H. Stratz, La beauté de la femme, 1900; Picasso Seated Female Nude, 1908. Over the course of his long career Picasso would continue to use key visual insights from Frobenius, Stratz, and other illustrated sources he was exploring in this late 1906 to early 1907 period.

So how did you come to the decision to use them under fair use?

I had been president of CAA in 2016-17, and a longtime promoter of fair use and IP issues more generally. I was involved in the creation of the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts. For me, CAA’s role in fair use is one of the most important and radical (in a positive way) things that it has ever done.

I decided that fair use would make the most sense in this context. This was a book about an important modern artist. In addition, I’m a senior scholar—this was not my first publication. If the worst happened, if I had problems, well, I’ve had a great career and this would not harm it. I have tenure and so on. Also, as the then-president of CAA, I thought it was important to do this.

Besides, this to me was part of a larger picture of what I had done in my larger career. I’m very active locally in civic affairs, and really interested in promoting transparency, and democratic ideals. I was also very fortunate to have Peter Jaszi, a foremost legal scholar on fair use (and another principal investigator on the CAA project), working with me. At his suggestion, I took out an insurance policy, which for a fee—I think about $5,000—(with a $10,000 deductible) I was able to lower my anxiety level. I also paid $400 for an attorney to look over the insurance contract. And I had good friends like you, who when I got cold feet assured me it was the right thing to do. And of course, Duke is a publisher that has been willing to go ahead of others on fair use.

For me, CAA’s role in fair use is one of the most important and radical things that it has ever done.

Can you give me an example of something you had to change in the text to strengthen the fair use argument?

With a museum photograph of an African mask, for example, I had to explain why this particular way of photographing the work was critical to the argument in my book. I had to ad a few sentences to justify my selection of several Picasso works as well. I also had to give reasons in my text for why each of the chapter epigraphs was necessary.

Did you have to alter the use of imagery in any way to accommodate fair use?

There are changes the press made, design-wise, that reflected in part the decision to employ fair use. Many of the photos are shown in  black-and-white and the majority are reduced in size. I was constrained by the fact that I could only employ fair use if I could get access to the materials without going through the Picasso Foundation. So I had to acquire nearly all the images from published books, and many of the Picasso images were published in black and white and at a very small size, in a grainy context. I had to spend a lot of time hunting down the best possible images to use. In my book they are shown in relatively small size, along with information on where you can find color versions online.

That didn’t bother me too much, though. For readers and viewers at this juncture in the Internet era, we have become expert at extrapolating the fuller figure from a small image.

There is also a small spread of color images, a couple Picasso works as well as from other artists. For these images color was central to the book.

The decision to publish largely in black-and-white was, I think, also related to the fact that the Picasso Foundation and others are concerned that color representations be incredibly accurate, and it is very hard to get the color exactly right, when copying from books. You also have an issue with paper quality in getting accurate representation.

The cover is a handsome design, and very clever. They broke up the images into thumbnail-like sections, requiring you as a viewer to put them together as one image, similar to how Picasso was thinking in the early stages of cubism, where you as a viewer of an assemblage have to assemble them in your own mind, to make it work for you as a whole.

How was the book received?

It was a finalist for the Prose Prize, a prize of publishers to authors. My previous book won it in 2016. I didn’t expect to win it this time again, in 2019.  I was very honored that it was a finalist. It was also featured in the Wall Street Journal’s holiday art book list. And then, just recently, it won the Robert Motherwell Book Award.

Has the Picasso Foundation seen the book?

To date I’ve heard nothing. I was thinking earlier that the Picasso Foundation might want to stop it pre-publication. So much so that when I came back from travel in Africa, I went first to my academic mailbox, and was relieved when I saw no big legal envelope. But there has been no pushback. I certainly gave them the opportunity to comment on the content while it was still in manuscript. And last April or May, I went to France to meet with the curators at Musée Picasso about contributing an essay to a catalog. I sent them an article draft which they decided not to publish, which is fine, but also sent them a copy of the manuscript, and of course the Musée speaks to the Foundation.

Interestingly, the two cases where the Foundation has sued or prevented publication that I know of have to do with children’s books about Picasso. I don’t know what that means.

I always say, Use fair use. People still don’t trust it or believe it’s more difficult than it is.

Does the wider art history community know about this?

I hope this personal story makes a difference. We still have a lot of educating to do, in spite of the work we did around the Code. I continually get, on the art history listservs, questions—How can I get permission, and I always say, Use fair use. People still don’t trust it or believe it’s more difficult than it is.

At the CAA conference I just went to in Chicago, there seems to be a division between presses. Presses at private universities–Yale, Princeton, MIT, Duke—seem to feel more comfortable exploring this. But for university presses at some public institutions, these legal issues have to be taken up with the state attorney general, and there can be real nervousness stepping outside a narrow parameter. I learned this speaking to an editor at a state university press in a progressive state, who believes they’re being held back because of this fear.

I was pleased to see at this same conference a pamphlet on fair use by Duke University Press’s former Director, Steve Cohn. In his essay, he mentions my Picasso book and how happy he is that Duke chose to publish it this way. I figured, if Steve is openly talking about this fair use project, then the proverbial cat is out of the bag, and I could be more open and provide some of the back story from my end.

CAA’s scholarly publications, The Art Bulletin, Art Journal, and Art Journal Open rely on fair use as a matter of policy, and indicate when they do so in their photo credits. View a complete discussion of fair use and CAA’s Code of Best Practices.

2020 TERRA FOUNDATION FOR AMERICAN ART INTERNATIONAL PUBLICATION GRANT WINNERS

CAA is pleased to announce the 2020 recipients of the Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grant.

This program, which provides financial support for the publication of book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of American art, is made possible by a generous grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art. For this grant, “American art” is defined as art (circa 1500–1980) of what is now the geographic United States.

The four Terra Foundation grantees for 2020 are:

  • Monica Bravo, Greater American Modernism: U.S. Photographers and the Mexican Cultural Renaissance, Yale University Press
  • José E. Muñoz, Cruising Utopia: The Then and There of Queer Futurity, Brook, translation from English to French
  • Craig Owens, Craig Owens: The Indignity of Speaking for Others. Selected Essays, Même pas l’hiver, translation from English to French
  • Mona Schieren, Transcultural Translation in the Oeuvre of Agnes Martin: The Construction of Asianistic Aesthetics in American Art after 1945, Columbia University Press and Transcript Verlag, translation from German to English

The International Author Conference Subventions confer two non-US authors of top-ranked books travel funds and complimentary registration to attend CAA’s 2021 Annual Conference in New York, February 10-13; they also received one-year CAA memberships.

The two author awardees for 2020 are:

  • Gaëtan Thomas
  • Alice Wambergue

Learn More About the Terra Publication Grant

Filed under: Books, Grants and Fellowships

Honorees this year include Eleanor Antin, Joseph Leo Koerner, Maud K. Lavin, Annet Couwenberg, Harriet Senie, Kyle Staver, and many other scholars, artists, and teachers

CAA Annual Conference, Chicago, February 12-15, 2020

Eleanor Antin

We are pleased to announce the recipients and finalists of the 2020 CAA Awards for Distinction. Among the winners this year is Eleanor Antin, recipient of the 2020 Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement. Born in the Bronx in 1935 to immigrant parents, Antin is an innovator and pioneer as a feminist artist, a performance and installation artist, a conceptual artist, filmmaker, and writer. She is an emeritus Professor of Visual Arts at the University of California, San Diego and author of several books including An Artist’s Life by Eleonora Antinova and Conversations with Stalin. Antin’s solo museum exhibitions have appeared at the MoMA, the Whitney Museum, and, in 2019, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art with her retrospective, Eleanor Antin: Time’s Arrow. Her awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship and a 2006 Women’s Caucus for Art Lifetime Achievement Award.

Joseph Leo Koerner

Joseph Leo Koerner is the recipient of the 2020 Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award for Writing on Art. His achievements include four landmark books on sixteenth-century paintings: The Moment of Self-Portraiture in German Renaissance Art (University of Chicago Press, 1993), The Moment of Self-Portraiture in German Renaissance Art (University of Chicago Press, 2003), The Reformation of the Image (Reaktion Books, 2004), and Bosch and Bruegel: From Enemy Painting to Everyday Life (Princeton University Press, 2016). Koerner has also written widely on more recent artists, from Caspar David Friedrich to Paul Klee, and explored early-twentieth century Vienna through a documentary project and a semi-autobiographical film.

Maud K. Lavin

Dr. Maud K. Lavin is the recipient of the 2020 Distinguished Feminist Award for scholarship. Over the course of three decades, Lavin has worked tirelessly as a key pioneer in the field of feminist art history and visual studies. She is the author of numerous books including the first English-language book on Berlin Dada artist Hannah Hoch, Cut with the Kitchen Knife: The Weimar Photomontages of Hannah Hoch (Yale University Press, 1993), and most recently,  Boys’ Love, Cosplay, and Androgynous Idols: Queer Fan Cultures in Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, co-edited with Ling Yang and Jamie Zhao (Hong Kong University Press, 2017). She is a professor of Visual and Critical Studies and Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

The Awards for Distinction will be presented during Convocation at the CAA Annual Conference on Wednesday, February 12 at 6:00 PM at the Hilton Chicago. This event is free and open to the public.

The full list of 2020 CAA Awards for Distinction Recipients

Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement

Eleanor Antin

Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award for Writing on Art

Joseph Leo Koerner

Distinguished Feminist Award—Scholar

Maud K. Lavin

Distinguished Teaching of Art Award

Annet Couwenberg

Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award

Harriet Senie

Artist Award for Distinguished Body of Work

Kyle Staver

CAA/AIC Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation

Jeanne Marie Teutonico

Award for Excellence in Diversity

3Arts

Outstanding Leadership in Philanthropy Award

Terra Foundation for American Art

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award

J. P. Park
A New Middle Kingdom: Painting and Cultural Politics in Late Chosŏn Korea (1700–1850)
University of Washington Press, 2018

Finalists

Chanchal B. Dadlani
From Stone to Paper: Architecture as History in the Late Mughul Empire
Yale University Press, 2019

Barbara Furlotti
Antiquities in Motion: From Excavation Sites to Renaissance Collections
Getty Publications, 2019

Matthew Looper
The Beast Between: Deer in Maya Art and Culture
University of Texas Press, 2019

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award

Karl Kusserow and Alan C. Braddock
Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment
Princeton University Art Museum, 2019
with contributions by Miranda Belarde-Lewis, Teddy Cruz, Rachael Z. DeLue, Mark Dion, Fonna Forman, Laura Turner Igoe, Robin Kelsey, Anne McClintock, Timothy Morton, Rob Nixon, Jeffrey Richmond-Moll, Kimia Shahi, and Jaune Quick-to-See-Smith

Honorable Mention

Esther Gabara
Pop América, 1965–1975
Duke University Press, 2018

Finalists

Cathleen Chaffee
Introducing Tony Conrad: A Retrospective
Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY, in association with Koenig Books, London, 2019

Jessica Morgan and Alexis Lowry
Charlotte Posenenske: Work in Progress
Dia Art Foundation and Walther König, 2019

Elizabeth Morrison
Book of Beasts: The Bestiary in the Medieval World
Getty Publications, 2019

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums, Libraries, Collections, and Exhibitions

Denise Murrell
Posing Modernity: The Black Model from Manet and Matisse to Today
Yale University Press in association with The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery, Columbia
University in the City of New York, 2018

Honorable Mention

Phillip Earenfight
Shan Goshorn: Resisting the Mission
Trout Gallery, Dickinson College, 2019

Finalists

Tracy L. Adler
Jeffery Gibson: This is The Day
Prestel Publishing, 2018

Faith Brower, Heather Ahtone, and Seth Hopkins
Warhol and the West
University of California Press, 2019

Frank Jewett Mather Award for Art Criticism

Darby English
To Describe a Life: Notes from the Intersection of Art and Race Terror
Yale University Press, 2019

Art Journal Award

Philip Glahn and Cary Levine
“The Future Is Present: Electronic Café and the Politics of Technological Fantasy”
Art Journal, vol. 78, no. 3 (Fall 2019): 100–121

Arthur Kingsley Porter Prize

Claudia Brittenham
“Architecture, Vision, and Ritual: Seeing Maya Lintels at Yaxchilan Structure 23″
The Art Bulletin, vol. 101, no. 3 (September 2019): 8–36

Learn about the juries that select the recipients of the CAA Awards for Distinction.

VISIT THE CONFERENCE SITE

Finalists for the 2020 Morey and Barr Awards

posted by December 09, 2019

CAA is pleased to announce the 2020 finalists for the Charles Rufus Morey Book Award and two Alfred H. Barr Jr. Awards. The winners of the three prizes, along with the recipients of other Awards for Distinction, will be announced in January 2020 and presented during Convocation in conjunction with CAA’s 108th Annual Conference, taking place in Chicago, February 12-15, 2020.

The Charles Rufus Morey Book Award Shortlist 2020

Chanchal B. Dadlani, From Stone to Paper: Architecture as History in the Late Mughal Empire, Yale University Press, 2019

Barbara Furlotti, Antiquities in Motion: From Excavation Sites to Renaissance Collections, Getty Publications, 2019

Matthew Looper, The Beast Between:  Deer in Maya Art and Culture, University of Texas Press, 2019

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award Shortlist 2020

Cathleen Chaffee, Introducing Tony Conrad: A Retrospective, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY, in association with Koenig Books, London, 2019

Karl Kusserow and Alan C. Braddock, Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment, Princeton University Art Museum in association with Yale University Press, 2018

Esther Gabara, Pop América, 1965-1975, Duke University Press, 2018

Elizabeth Morrison, Book of Beasts: The Bestiary in the Medieval World, Getty Publications, 2019

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums, Libraries, Collections, and Exhibitions Shortlist 2020

Denise Murrell, Posing Modernity: The Black Model from Manet and Matisse to Today, Yale University Press in association with the Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery, Columbia University in the City of New York, 2018

Phillip Earenfight, Shan Goshorn: Resisting the Mission, Trout Gallery, the Art Museum of Dickinson College, 2019

Tracy L. Adler, Jeffery Gibson: This is The Day, Prestel Publishing, 2018

Faith Brower, Heather Ahtone, and Seth Hopkins, Warhol and the West, University of California Press, 2019

The presentation of the 2020 Awards for Distinction will take place during CAA Convocation on Wednesday evening, February 12, 2020 from 6-7:30 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom at the Hilton Chicago. The event is free and open to the public. For more information about CAA’s Awards for Distinction, please contact nyoffice@collegeart.org

Filed under: Awards, Books

Meet the Meiss Fund Recipients for Fall 2019

posted by November 21, 2019

Carvings at the Kailāsanātha Temple in Kāñcīpuram. Photo by mckaysavage, CC BY 2.0

MEET THE GRANTEES

Twice a year, CAA awards grants through the Millard Meiss Publication Fund to support book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of art, visual studies, and related subjects that have been accepted by a publisher on their merits, but cannot be published in the most desirable form without a subsidy.

Thanks to the generous bequest of the late Prof. Millard Meiss, CAA began awarding these publishing grants in 1975.

The Millard Meiss Publication Fund grantees for Fall 2019 are:

  • Anneka Lenssen, Beautiful Agitation: Modern Painting in Syria and the Arab East, University of California Press
  • Padma Kaimal, A Balance of Opposites: Reading Material Form at the Kailāsanātha Temple in Kāñcīpuram, University of Washington Press
  • Babette Bohn, Women Artists, Their Patrons, and Their Publics in Early Modern Bologna, Penn State University Press
  • Elina Gertsman, Nothing is the Matter: Spaces of Absence in Late Medieval Art, Penn State University Press
  • Lucy Donkin, Standing on Holy Ground in the Middle Ages, Cornell University Press
  • Adrian Anagnost, Spatial Orders, Social Forms: Art and City Space in Modern Brazil, 1928-69, Yale University Press

Read a list of all recipients of the Millard Meiss Publication Fund from 1975 to the present. The list is alphabetized by author’s last name and includes book titles and publishers.

BACKGROUND

Books eligible for a Meiss grant must currently be under contract with a publisher and be on a subject in the arts or art history. The deadlines for the receipt of applications are March 15 and September 15 of each year. Please review the Application Guidelines and the Application Process, Schedule, and Checklist for complete instructions.

CONTACT

Questions? Please contact Cali Buckley, Grants and Special Programs Manager, at cbuckley@collegeart.org.

Filed under: Books, Grants and Fellowships

Meet the 2019 Wyeth Award Winners

posted by November 19, 2019

The Aztec Tonalpohualli Calendar, 1585, attributed to the 16th-century Mexican Jesuit Juan de Tovar. Image: Wikimedia Commons

Meet the Grantees

Since 2005, the Wyeth Foundation for American Art has supported the publication of books on American art through the Wyeth Foundation for American Art Publication Grant, administered by CAA. The 2019 grantees are:

  • Lucy Bradnock, No More Masterpieces: Modern Art After Artaud, Yale University Press
  • Elizabeth Ferrer, Critical Lens: A History of Latinx Photography, University of Washington Press
  • Kimberly Beil, Good Pictures: A History of Popular Photography, Stanford University Press
  • Elizabeth Boone, Descendants of Aztec Pictography: The Cultural Encyclopedias of Sixteenth Century Mexico, The University of Texas Press

Read a list of all recipients of the Wyeth Foundation for American Art Publication Grant from 2005 to the present.

BACKGROUND

For the Wyeth Foundation for American Art Publication Grant, “American art” is defined as art created in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. Eligible for the grant are book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of American art, visual studies, and related subjects that have been accepted by a publisher on their merits but cannot be published in the most desirable form without a subsidy. The deadline for the receipt of applications is September 15 of each year.

Guidelines
Process, Materials, and Checklist

CONTACT

Questions? Please contact Cali Buckley, Grants and Special Programs Manager, at cbuckley@collegeart.org.

Filed under: Books, Grants and Fellowships

Announcing CAA Publication Fund Award Winners

posted by March 13, 2019

2019 TERRA FOUNDATION FOR AMERICAN ART INTERNATIONAL PUBLICATION GRANT WINNERS

CAA is pleased to announce the 2019 recipients of the Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grant. This program, which provides financial support for the publication of book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of American art, is made possible by a generous grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art. For this grant, “American art” is defined as art (circa 1500–1980) of what is now the geographic United States.

The ten Terra Foundation grantees for 2019 are:

  • Anni Albers, On Weaving, translation in French, Les Presses du Réel
  • Anna Arabindan-Kesson, Black Bodies, White Gold: Art, Cotton and Commerce in the Atlantic World, Duke University Press
  • François Brunet, La naissance de l’idée de photographie [The Birth of the Idea of Photography], translation from French into English, Ryerson Image Center
  • Julia Bryan-Wilson, Art Workers: Radical Practice in the Vietnam War Era, translation in Korean, Youlhwadang Press
  • Eddie Chambers, ed., The Routledge Companion to African American Art History, Taylor & Francis
  • Julia Drost, ed., Networks, Museums and Collections. Surrealism in the U.S., translation from French to English, Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte Paris
  • Natilee Harren, Fluxus Forms: Scores, Multiples and the Eternal Network, University of Chicago Press
  • Elaine de Larminat, Houses and Homes. Photographier la maison américaine, Le Point du Jour
  • Jody Patterson, Modernism for the Masses: Painters, Politics, and Public Murals in New Deal New York, Yale University Press
  • Laurence Schmidlin, La spatialisation du dessin dans l’art américain des années 1960 et 1970, Les Presses du Réel

The International Author Conference Subventions confer two non-US authors of top-ranked books travel funds and complimentary registration to attend CAA’s 2020 Annual Conference in Chicago, February 12-15; they also received one-year CAA memberships.

The two author awardees for 2019 are:

  • Elaine de Larminat
  • Laurence Schmidlin

See a list of recent recipients

2018 WYETH AWARD WINNERS

Since 2005, the Wyeth Foundation for American Art has supported the publication of books on American art through the Wyeth Foundation for American Art Publication Grant, administered by CAA. For the grant, “American art” is defined as art created in the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

The 2018 grantees are:

  • Bellion, Wendy, The Great Fall: Iconoclasm in New York City since the American Revolution (Penn State University Press)
  • Boone, M. Elizabeth, “The Spanish Element in Our Nationality”: Spain and America at the World’s Fairs and Centennial Celebrations, 1876-1915 (Penn State University Press)
  • Coffey, Mary, Orozco’s American Epic: Myth, History, and the Melancholy of Race (Duke University Press)
  • Deloria, Philip, Becoming Mary Sully: Toward an American Indian Abstract (University of Washington Press)
  • Diack, Heather, Marks of Contingency: The Photographic Conditions of Conceptual Art (University of Minnesota Press)
  • Jentleson, Katherine, Gatecrashers: The Rise of the Self-Taught Artist in America (University of California Press)
  • Monahan, Anne, Horace Pippin, American Modern (Yale University Press)
  • Senf, Rebecca A., Making a Photographer: The Early Work of Ansel Adams (Yale University Press)
  • Strathman, Nicole D., Through a Native Lens: American Indian Photography (University of Oklahoma Press)
  • Taylor, Sue, Grant Wood’s Secrets (University of Delaware Press)

See a list of recent recipients

FALL 2018 MEISS FUND RECIPIENTS 

Twice a year, CAA awards grants through the Millard Meiss Publication Fund to support book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of art, visual studies, and related subjects that have been accepted by a publisher on their merits, but cannot be published in the most desirable form without a subsidy. Thanks to the generous bequest of the late Prof. Millard Meiss, CAA began awarding these publishing grants in 1975.

The Millard Meiss Publication Fund grantees for Fall 2018 are:

  • Amstutz, Nina, Caspar David Friedrich: Landscape, Science, and the Self, (Yale University Press)
  • Campbell, Aurelia, Architecture and Empire in the Reign of Yongle, 1402-1424, (University of Washington Press)
  • Chanchani, Nachiket, Mountain Temples and Temple Mountains: Architecture, Religion, and Nature in the Central Himalayas, (University of Washington Press)
  • Deloria, Philip, Becoming Mary Sully: Toward an American Indian Abstract, (University of Washington Press)
  • Gerschultz, Jessica, Decorative Arts of the Tunisian École: Fabrications of Modernism, Gender, and Power, (Penn State University Press)
  • Mahon, Alyce, The Sadean Imagination: The Marquis de Sade, Terror, and the Avant-Garde (Princeton University Press)
  • McDowell, Tara, The Householders: Robert Duncan and Jess, (MIT Press)
  • Tsultemin, Uranchimeg, A Monastery on the Move: Art and Politics in Later Buddhist Mongolia, (University of Hawai‘i Press)

See a list of recipients from 1975 to the present

CONTACT

Questions? Please contact Cali Buckley, CAA grants and special programs manager, at 212-392-4435.

Filed under: Books, Grants and Fellowships

Honorees this year include Howardena Pindell, Ursula von Rydingsvard, Anna C. Chave, Senga Nengudi, Nancy S. Steinhardt, Edward Sullivan, Molly Nesbit, and many other scholars, artists, authors, and teachers

CAA Annual Conference, New York City, February 13-16, 2019

CAA is pleased to announce the recipients and finalists of the 2019 Awards for Distinction. Awardees this year were chosen from a pool of scholars, artists, teachers, and authors who are constantly pushing our understanding of the visual arts. The CAA Awards for Distinction are presented during Convocation at the CAA Annual Conference on Wednesday, February 13 at 6:00 PM at the New York Hilton Midtown. The CAA Annual Conference runs from February 13-16, 2019.

Howardena Pindell. Courtesy the artist and Garth Greenan Gallery.

Among the winners this year is Howardena Pindell, recipient of the 2019 Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement. Pindell studied painting at Boston University and received her MFA from Yale University. Since 1979, she has been a professor of painting and conceptual drawing at SUNY Stony Brook University. Pindell is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, two National Endowment for the Arts grants, a Joan Mitchell Foundation grant, and a Studio Museum in Harlem Artist Award. In 1990, CAA awarded her the Most Distinguished Body of Work or Performance Award. Pindell’s work is in the permanent collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Yale University Art Gallery, the Fogg Museum at Harvard University, and the Rhode Island School of Design Museum, among many others.

Ursula von Rydingsvard. Photo: Zack Garlitos

Ursula von Rydingsvard is the winner of the 2019 Artist Award for Distinguished Body of Work. Von Rydingsvard is best known for her unmistakable towering sculptures with mountainous topographic surfaces created from carved cedar wood. She has also explored other mediums in her work, such as bronze, paper, and resin. Over an artistic career spanning more than forty years, Von Rydingsvard’s work has been in solo exhibitions at Galerie Lelong, SCAD Museum of Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and Dieu Donné. Her work has been included in numerous group exhibitions and is in the permanent collections of more than thirty museums. She is the recipient of a Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Sculpture Center, the Skowhegan Medal for Sculpture, a Joan Mitchell Foundation grant, and an Academy Award in Art from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, among other awards and recognitions. A major exhibition of her work, Ursula von Rydingsvard: The Contour of Feeling, was presented at the Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia (April 27 – August 26, 2018) and will travel to the National Museum of Women in the Arts in March 2019.

The Award for Excellence in Diversity recognizes the work of an individual or organization in the visual arts whose commitment to inclusion in scholarship or practice stands out as groundbreaking and unifying. The winner of the Award for Excellence in Diversity for 2019 is the Chicano Studies Research Center at UCLA. The work of the center entails five distinct areas: a library, an academic press, collaborative research projects, public programs and community partnerships, and a grant and fellowship program.

Each year, CAA awards two Distinguished Feminist Awards, one to a visual artist and one to a scholar. The two winners for 2019 are Senga Nengudi for visual artist, and Anna C. Chave for scholar.

The full list of 2019 CAA Awards for Distinction Recipients

Artist Award for Distinguished Body of Work

Ursula von Rydingsvard

Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement

Howardena Pindell

Distinguished Teaching of Art Award

Susanne Slavick

Distinguished Feminist Award—Visual Artist

Senga Nengudi

Distinguished Feminist Award—Scholar

Anna C. Chave

Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award

Nancy S. Steinhardt

Edward Sullivan

Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award for Writing on Art

Molly Nesbit

Award for Excellence in Diversity

Chicano Studies Research Center (CSRC)

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award

Zeynep Çelik Alexander
Kinaesthetic Knowing: Aesthetics, Epistemology, Modern Design
University of Chicago Press, 2017

Finalists

Olga Bush
Reframing the Alhambra: Architecture, Poetry, Textiles and Court Ceremonial 
Edinburgh University Press, 2018

Linda Kim
Race Experts: Sculpture, Anthropology, and the American Public in Malvina Hoffman’s Races of Mankind
University of Nebraska Press, 2018

Carolyn Yerkes
Drawing after Architecture
Princeton University Press, 2017

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award

Wendy Kaplan
Design in California and Mexico 1915–1985: Found in Translation
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 2017

Finalists

Jeffrey Spier and Timothy Potts
Beyond the Nile: Egypt and the Classical World
J. Paul Getty Trust, 2018

Christophe Cherix
Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions 1965–2016
Museum of Modern Art, 2018

Naoko Takahatake and Jonathan Bober
The Chiaroscuro Woodcut in Renaissance Italy
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 2018

Cecilia Fajardo-Hill, Andrea Giunta, and Rodrigo Alonso
Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985
Hammer Museum, University of California, 2017

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums, Libraries, Collections, and Exhibitions

Andrew C. Weislogel and Andaleeb Badiee Banta
Lines of Inquiry: Learning from Rembrandt’s Etchings
Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, 2017

Finalists

Patrick A. Polk, Roberto Conduru, Sabrina Gledhill, and Randal Johnson
Axé Bahia: The Power of Art in an Afro-Brazilian Metropolis
Fowler Museum at UCLA, 2018

Antonio Sergio Bessa and Jessamyn Fiore
Gordon Matta-Clark: Anarchitect
Bronx Museum of Art, 2017

Mark Sloan
Fahamu Pecou: Visible Man
Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, 2016

Frank Jewett Mather Award for Art Criticism

Julia Bryan-Wilson
Fray: Art + Textile Politics
University of Chicago Press, 2017

Rebecca M. Schreiber
The Undocumented Everyday: Migrant Lives and the Politics of Visibility
University of Minnesota Press, 2018

Art Journal Award

Mara Polgovsky Ezcurra
“Beyond Evil: Politics, Ethics, and Religion in Léon Ferrari’s Illustrated Nunca más
Art Journal, Fall 2018

Arthur Kingsley Porter Prize

Nathan T. Arrington
“Touch and Remembrance in Greek Funerary Art”
The Art Bulletin, September 2018

CAA/AIC Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation

Karl D. Buchberg

Jodi Hauptman

Learn about the juries that select the recipients of the CAA Awards for Distinction.

Contacts

Nick Obourn, Director of Communications, Marketing, and Membership
nobourn@collegeart.org, 212-392-4401

Joelle Te Paske, Media and Content Manager
jtepaske@collegeart.org, 212-392-4426

IMAGES AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

Hashtags: #CAA2019 #CAANYC

Finalists for the 2019 Morey and Barr Awards

posted by November 29, 2018

CAA is pleased to announce the 2019 finalists for the Charles Rufus Morey Book Award and two Alfred H. Barr Jr. Awards. The winners of the three prizes, along with the recipients of other Awards for Distinction, will be announced in January 2019 and presented during Convocation in conjunction with CAA’s 107th Annual Conference, taking place in New York, February 13-16, 2019.

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award

Zeynep Çelik Alexander, Kinaesthetic Knowing: Aesthetics, Epistemology, Modern Design (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2017)

Olga Bush, Reframing the Alhambra: Architecture, Poetry, Textiles and Court Ceremonial (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2018)

Linda Kim, Race ExpertsSculptureAnthropology, and the American Public in Malvina Hoffman’s Races of Mankind (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2018)

Carolyn Yerkes, Drawing after Architecture (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017)

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award

Christophe Cherix, Cornelia Butler, and David Platzker, Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions 1965-2016 (New York: Museum of Modern Art, 2018)

Jeffrey Spier and Timothy Potts, Beyond the Nile: Egypt and the Classical World (Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Trust, 2018)

Naoko Takahatake and Jonathan Bober, The Chiaroscuro Woodcut in Renaissance Italy (Los Angeles: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 2018)

Cecilia Fajardo-Hill and Andrea Giunta, Radical Women:  Latin American Art, 1960-1985 (Los Angeles : Hammer Museum, University of California, 2017)

Wendy Kaplan, Design in California and Mexico 1915-1985: Found in Translation (Los Angeles: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 2017)

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums, Libraries, Collections, and Exhibitions

Antonio Sergio Bessa and Jessamyn Fiore, Gordon Matta-Clark: Anarchitect (New York: The Bronx Museum of Art, 2017)

Andrew C. Weislogel and Andaleeb Badiee Banta, Lines of Inquiry: Learning from Rembrandt’s Etchings (Ithaca: Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, 2017)

Mark Sloan, Fahamu Pecou: Visible Man (Charleston, SC: Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, 2016)

Patrick Arthur Polk, Axe Bahia: The Power of Art in an Afro-Brazilian Metropolis (Los Angeles: Fowler Museum at UCLA, 2018)

The presentation of the 2019 Awards for Distinction will take place on Wednesday evening, February 13, 2019 from 6-7:30pm in the Grand Ballroom East at the New York Hilton Midtown. The event is free and open to the public. For more information about CAA’s Awards for Distinction, please contact nyoffice@collegeart.org

Filed under: Awards, Books