CAA News Today

Affiliated Society News: April

posted by April 11, 2022

Affiliated Society News shares the new and exciting things CAA’s affiliated organizations are working on including activities, awards, publications, conferences, and exhibitions.

Interested in becoming an Affiliated Society? Learn more here.


American Society of Appraisers

Publications

Valuing a Business, 6th Edition

The seminal book on business valuation is back and better than ever. Shannon Pratt’s Valuing a Business has been the go-to valuation guide for 40 years and has been updated with need-to-know information about taxes, financial reporting, compliance, and more.  Valuing a Business is still the best resource on the market for both new and experienced business appraisers.  This book fully covers the concepts of business valuation and provides detailed answers to virtually every question on the topic, from executive compensation and lost profits analysis to ESOP issues and valuation discounts.

Events

11th Annual ASA Equipment Valuation Conference

Tuesday, May 24, from 11 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Now in its 11th year, this annual event has grown to become the definitive source for appraisers, equipment management and finance professionals on the latest insights into equipment valuation. Instantly leverage knowledge gained on market trends and spotlighted asset sectors, as well as new contacts made, by incorporating into your practice areas or introducing to your team.

2022 ASA Summer Appraisal Camp

August 2022

Develop the skills you’ll need to build a career in appraising personal property such as fine and decorative art, antiques, vintage cars, furniture, coins, stamps, and more.

The program includes four virtual courses held over four weeks, including:

  • PP201 – Introduction to Personal Property Valuation – August 3-6, 2022
  • PP202 – Development of a Personal Property Appraisal: Research and Analysis – August 10-13, 2022
  • PP203 – Communication of a Personal Property Appraisal: Report Writing – August 17-20, 2022
  • PP204 – Personal Property Valuation: The Legal and Commercial Environments – August 24-27, 2022


Taiwanese Art History Association

Announcements / Events

PHOTOGRAPHY AND TAIWAN: History and Practice

Thursday, April 7

The Taiwan Academy of the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Los Angeles (TECO-LA), the University of Arizona’s School of the Arts (SAUA), and the Center for Creative Photography (CCP) are collaborating for the first time on the “Spotlight Taiwan project” to hold the “Photography and Taiwan: History and Practice” online symposium from April 7 to April 9, 2022 (PST). Nineteen scholars and experts from Korea, the United States, Australia and Taiwan are invited to attend the symposium. They will help the audience understand more about the history, culture and democratization of Taiwan through a historical lens and scholarly debate as recorded in the photography.

Women’s History Month and caa.reviews

posted by March 04, 2022

Each week this Women’s History Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that celebrate women in the fields of visual arts and the humanities. This week, we are sharing a bibliography of publications and exhibitions reviewed this past year on our open-access journal caa.reviews that feature women artists and practitioners.

caa.reviews also houses rosters of dissertation titles in progress and completed since 2002, many of which have been written by women and focus on topics related to women and feminism in the arts.

This Women’s History Month is also especially significant this year, which is the 50th anniversary of feminism at CAA. To learn more about this history, visit this page. CAA is also collecting archival materials to better understand and document the history of its Committee of Women in the Arts, including the committee’s many collaborations with other affiliate committees and groups, such as the Women’s Caucus for Art, The Feminist Art Project, the Queer Caucus, and many more. Visit this page for more information.

Acevedo-Yates, Carla, editor. Carolina Caycedo: From the Bottom of the River. Chicago and New York: Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago and DelMonico Books/D.A.P., 2020. 

Carolina Caycedo: From the Bottom of the River, installation view, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, 2020–21 (photograph by Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago)

Blanchflower, Melissa, Natalia Grabowska, and Melissa Larner, editors. Faith Ringgold. Serpentine Gallery, London, United Kingdom. Cologne: Walther König, 2019.   

Faith Ringgold, Slave Rape, 1972, installation view, Faith Ringgold, Serpentine Gallery, London, 2019 (artwork © 2019 Faith Ringgold; photograph provided by readsreads.info)

Brandow-Faller, Megan. The Female Secession: Art and the Decorative at the Viennese Women’s Academy. University Park, PA: Penn State University Press, 2020.  
Fiell, Charlotte and Clementine Fiell. Women in Design: From Aino Aalto to Eva Ziesel. London: Laurence King Publishing, 2019.  
Harris, Shawnya L. editor. Emma Amos: Color Odyssey. Athens: Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, 2021.  

Emma Amos,  All I Know of Wonder, 2008, oil on linen, African fabric, 70 1/2 x 55 1/2 in. (179.1 x 141 cm), installation view, Emma Amos: Color Odyssey, Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, Athens, 2021 (photograph by the author)

Huebner, Karla. Magnetic Woman: Toyen and the Surrealist Erotic. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2020.  
Kim, Christine Y. and Rujeko Hockley. Julie Mehretu. New York: Whitney Museum of American Art in association with Prestel, 2019.  

Julie Mehretu, Hineni (E. 3:4), 2018, ink and acrylic on canvas, 96 × 120 in. (243.8 x 304.8 cm). Centre Pompidou, Paris, Musée national d’art moderne/Centre de création industrielle, gift of George Economou, 2019 (artwork © Julie Mehretu; photograph by Tom Powel Imaging)

Meijling, Jesper and Tigran Haas, editors. Essays on Jane Jacobs. Stockholm: Bokförlaget Stolpe, 2020.  
Mühling, Matthias and Stephanie Weber, editors. Senga Nengudi: Topologies. Munich: Hirmer, 2021.  

Senga Nengudi, Warp Trance, 2007, multi-channel audio/video installation in collaboration with the Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, with a sound composition by Butch Morris, installation view, Senga Nengudi: Topologies, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2021 (photograph © Aaron Igler, provided by the artist and The Fabric Workshop and Museum)

   Nakajima, Izumi. Anti-Action: Post-War Japanese Art and Women Artists (アンチ・アクション: 日本戦後絵画と女性画家). Tokyo: Brücke, 2019.  
Nelson, Andrea editor. The New Woman behind the Camera. Washington, DC: National Gallery of Art, 2020.  
Rose, Pauline. Working against the Grain: Women Sculptors in Britain c.1885–1950. Liverpool, UK: Liverpool University Press, 2020.  
VanDiver, Rebecca. Designing a New Tradition: Loïs Mailou Jones and the Aesthetics of Blackness. University Park, PA: Penn State University Press, 2020.  
Walker, Anna and Laura Mott, editors. Olga de Amaral: To Weave a Rock. Arnoldsche Art Publishers in association with the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, 2020.  

Olga de Amaral, Brumas, 2013, acrylic, gesso, and cotton on wood, installation view, Olga de Amaral: To Weave a Rock, Cranbrook Art Museum, October 30, 2021–March 20, 2022 (artwork © Olga de Amaral; photograph by P. D. Rearick, image provided by Cranbrook Art Museum)

Filed under: Advocacy, caa.reviews, Publications

Black History Month and Art Journal Open

posted by February 10, 2022

Each week this Black History Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that celebrate, recognize, and interrogate Black art, history, and experience.  This week, we are sharing a bibliography of articles from our online, open-access journal Art Journal Open that addresses these topics.

 

Aranke, Sampada. “Objects Made Black.” Art Journal Open (February 9, 2015). Crossover article from Art Journal 73, no. 3 (Fall 2014) reviewing Huey Copeland, Bound to Appear: Art, Slavery, and the Site of Blackness in Multicultural America, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013.

Baralaye, Ebitenyefa and Glenn Adamson. “The Weight of Matter: Ebitenyefa Baralaye and Glenn Adamson in Conversation.” Art Journal Open (May 20, 2021).

Ebitenyefa Baralaye, Portrait I (multiple views), 2020, salt-glazed stoneware, 25 x 12 x 10 in.
(63.5 x 30.5 x 25.4 cm) (artwork © Ebitenyefa Baralaye; photographs provided by the artist)

 

Barber, Tiffany E. “Narcissister, a Truly Kinky Artist.” Art Journal Open (March 11, 2020).

Narcissister, Red Riding Hood, 2014, mixed media (photograph provided by the artist).

 

Best, Makeda. “Interview with Texas Isaiah.” Art Journal Open (April 8, 2021). Crossover article from Art Journal 80, no. 1 (Spring 2021).

Texas Isaiah, don’t kill this vibe, 2018 (artwork © Texas Isaiah; photograph provided by the artist)

 

Childs, Adienne L. Riffs and Relations: African American Artists and the European Modernist Tradition. Washington, DC and New York: Phillips Collection in association with Rizzoli Electa, 2020.

Sanford Biggers, Negerplastik, 2016, repurposed antique quilt, cotton fabric fragments, tar, and glitter, 81 × 76 3/4 in. (205.7 x 195 cm) (photograph by Todd-White Art Photography, provided by Massimo De Carlo, Milan/London/Hong Kong)

 

Cunningham, Nijah. “With Each Other.” Art Journal Open (October 14, 2021). Crossover article from Art Journal 80, no. 3 (Fall 2021) reviewing Nicole R. Fleetwood. Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2020.

Dally, Jenny and Fred Eversley. “The Object and You: Fred Eversley in Conversation with Jenny Dally.” Art Journal Open (February 25, 2021).

Fred Eversley in his Venice Beach studio, 2018 (photograph by Elon Schoenholz; photograph provided by David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles)

 

 Gaines, Malik. “City after Fifty Years’ Living: LA’s Differences in Relation.” Art Journal Open (July 17, 2012).

Ice Cube Celebrates the Eames, poster, 2011 (artwork © J. Paul Getty Trust)

 

Gale, Nikita and Jesús Fuenmayor. “Barricades of Silence: Nikita Gale in Conversation with Jesús Fuenmayor.” Art Journal Open (August 20, 2020).

Nikita Gale, INTERCEPTOR, 2019, installation view, Fall Apart: Nikita Gale & Pat O’Neill, Martos Gallery, New York, January 11–February 24, 2019 (artwork © Nikita Gale; photograph by Charles Benton/Martos Gallery, provided by the artist),

 

Gbadegesin, Olubukola A. “Damon Davis’s Negrophilia: Encounters with Black Death.” Art Journal Open (August 30, 2017).

Damon Davis, Untitled (2), 2015, bookprint, ink, watercolor, adhesive, from the series Negrophilia (artwork © Damon Davis)

 

Majeed, Risham and Blake Bradford. “Just Being.” Art Journal Open (May 22, 2020).

Albrecht Dürer, Portrait of a Black Man (untitled), 1508, black chalk on paper. Original shown here; the NMAAHC has a reproduction in the Middle Passage galleries.

 

Raiford, Leigh. “Burning All Illusion: Abstraction, Black Life, and the Unmaking of White Supremacy.” Art Journal Open (January 14, 2021).

Samuel Levi Jones, Joshua, 2016, deconstructed Illinois law books on canvas, 61½ x 77 in. (156.2 x 195.6 cm) (artwork © Samuel Levi Jones; photograph provided by Galerie Lelong)

 

Sifuentes, Aram Han. “How Internalized White Supremacy Manifests for My BIPOC Students in Art School.” Art Journal Open (July 8, 2021).

Cute Rage Press (Aram Han Sifuentes and Ishita Dharap), detail of Taking Receipts:
A Log of Aggression for People of Color, 2017, color printed spiral-bound book, 8 x 5½ in.
(20.3 x 14 cm) (artwork © Aram Han Sifuentes and Ishita Dharap; photograph by Aram
Han Sifuentes)

 

Saggese, Jordana Moore, Cauleen Smith, Charles Gaines, Edgar Arceneaux, Howardena Pindell, Michael Ray Charles, and Glenn Ligon. “A Call to Artists.” Art Journal Open (October 26, 2021). Crossover article from Art Journal 80, no. 3 (Fall 2021).

 

Tani, Ellen Y. “Come Out to Show Them: Speech and Ambivalence in the Work of Steve Reich and Glenn LigonSpeech and Ambivalence in the Work of Steve Reich and Glenn Ligon.” Art Journal Open (December 23, 2019).

Glenn Ligon, Come Out Study #13, 2014, silkscreen on canvas on panel, 36 x 47 7/8 in. (91.4 x 121.6 cm) (artwork © Glenn Ligon; photograph by Ronald Amstutz, provided by the artist, Hauser & Wirth, New York, Regen Projects, Los Angeles, Thomas Dane Gallery, London, and Chantal Crousel, Paris)

 

Thompson, Krista. ““I WAS HERE BUT I DISAPEAR”: Ivanhoe “Rhygin” Martin and Photographic Disappearance in Jamaica.” Art Journal Open (August 14, 2018).

Production still from The Harder They Come, 1972, 16mm color film, dir. Perry Henzell, cinematography by Frank St. Juste, David McDonald, and Peter Jessop, produced by International Films / Xenon Pictures (photograph published under fair use)

 

Williams, Stephanie Sparling. “Artful Embodiment: Genealogies of the Impossible.” Art Journal Open (November 27, 2018). Crossover article from Art Journal 77, no. 3 (Fall 2018) reviewing Uri McMillan, Embodied Avatars: Genealogies of Black Feminist Art and Performance, New York: New York University Press, 2015.
Winslow, Margaret. “Pope.L: The Body and Its Void.” Art Journal Open (January 14, 2021). Crossover article from Art Journal 79, no. 4 (Winter 2020) reviewing member: Pope.L, 1978–2001., exhibition organized by Stuart Comer with Danielle A. Jackson. Museum of Modern Art, New York, October 21, 2019–February 1, 2020.

Zorach, Rebecca. “Art and Soul: An Experimental Friendship between Street and Museum .” Art Journal Open (September 4, 2011).

Art & Soul exterior with Rainbow mural by Sachio Yamashita, 1969 (mural now destroyed) (mural artwork © Eileen Petersen Yamashita, all rights reserved, used with permission; photograph © Ann Zelle)

 

 

Filed under: Advocacy, Publications

Black History Month and caa.reviews

posted by February 03, 2022

Each week this Black History Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that celebrate, recognize, and interrogate Black art, history, and experience.  This week, we are sharing a bibliography of publications and exhibitions reviewed on our online, open-access journal caa.reviews from this past year that addresses these topics.

caa.reviews also houses rosters of dissertation titles in progress and completed since 2002 and many long-form essays that intersect with these themes as well, such as current Editor-in-Chief of Art Journal, Eddie Chambers, essay Reflections on African and African Diaspora Art from 2016.

 

Childs, Adienne L. Riffs and Relations: African American Artists and the European Modernist Tradition. Washington, DC and New York: Phillips Collection in association with Rizzoli Electa, 2020.

Sanford Biggers, Negerplastik, 2016, repurposed antique quilt, cotton fabric fragments, tar, and glitter, 81 × 76 3/4 in. (205.7 x 195 cm) (photograph by Todd-White Art Photography, provided by Massimo De Carlo, Milan/London/Hong Kong)

 

 

 

 

Choi, Connie H., Thelma Golden, and Kellie Jones. Black Refractions: Highlights from the Studio Museum in Harlem. New York: Rizzoli Electa, 2019.

Jordan Casteel, Kevin the Kiteman, 2016, oil on canvas, 78 x 78 in. (198.1 x 198.1 cm). The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, Museum purchase with funds provided by the Acquisition Committee 2016.37 (artwork © Jordan Casteel; photograph by Adam Reich, provided by American Federation of Arts)

 

 

 

 

Cohen, Joshua I. The “Black Art” Renaissance: African Sculpture and Modernism across Continents. Oakland: University of California Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Driskell: Icons of Nature and History. Atlanta and New York: High Museum of Art and Rizzoli Electa, 2021.

David Driskell, Young Pines Growing, 1959, oil on canvas. Clark Atlanta University Art Museum, John Hope Franklin Purchase Award (artwork © Estate of David C. Driskell; photograph provided by High Museum of Art)

 

 

 

 

Diouf, Mamadou and Maureen Murphy, editors. Déborder la négritude: Arts, politique et société à Dakar. Dijon. France: Les presses du réel, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

Fleetwood, Nicole R. Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gonzalez, Aston. Visualizing Equality: African American Rights and Visual Culture in the Nineteenth Century. John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hank Willis Thomas: All Things Being Equal . . . New York and Portland, OR: Aperture Foundation in association with Portland Art Museum, 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harris, Shawnya L.,editor. Emma Amos: Color Odyssey. Athens: Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, 2021.

Emma Amos, All I Know of Wonder, 2008, oil on linen, African fabric, 70 1/2 x 55 1/2 in. (179.1 x 141 cm), installation view, Emma Amos: Color Odyssey, Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, Athens, 2021 (photograph by the author)

 

 

 

Jarrell, Wadsworth A. AFRICOBRA: Experimental Art toward a School of Thought. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monahan, Anne. Horace Pippin, American Modern. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mühling, Matthias and Stephanie Weber, editors. Senga Nengudi: Topologies. Munich: Hirmer, 2021.

Senga Nengudi, Warp Trance, 2007, multi-channel audio/video installation in collaboration with the Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, with a sound composition by Butch Morris, installation view, Senga Nengudi: Topologies, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2021 (photograph © Aaron Igler, provided by the artist and The Fabric Workshop and Museum)

 

 

 

No Wrong Holes: Thirty Years of Nayland Blake. Los Angeles and Cambridge, MA: Institute of Contemporary Art and MIT List Visual Arts Center (online), 2020.

No Wrong Holes: Thirty Years of Nayland Blake, installation view, MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, MA, 2020–21 (photograph © Charles Mayer, provided by MIT List Visual Arts Center)

 

 

 

Oliver, Valerie Cassel. The Dirty South: Contemporary Art, Material Culture, and the Sonic Impulse. Richmond, VA and Durham, NC: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in association with Duke University Press, 2021.

Rodney McMillian, Asterisks in Dockery (Blues for Smoke), 2021, vinyl, thread, wood, paint, lightbulb, installation view, The Dirty South: Contemporary Art, Material Culture, and the Sonic Impulse, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 2021 (photograph © Sandra Sellars, provided by Virginia Museum of Fine Arts)

 

 

Powell, Richard J. Going There: Black Visual Satire. Cambridge, MA and New Haven, CT: Hutchins Center for African & African American Research in association with Yale University Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas, Sarah. Witnessing Slavery: Art and Travel in the Age of Abolition. London and New Haven: Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art in association with Yale University Press, 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuite, Diana, editor. Bob Thompson: This House Is Mine. Waterville, ME and New Haven, CT: Colby College Museum of Art in association with Yale University Press, 2021.

Bob Thompson, The Snook (The Sack), 1961, oil on canvas, 23 1/2 x 36 in. (59.7 x 91.4 cm). Collection of Andrew Nelson (© Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York)

 

 

 

VanDiver, Rebecca. Designing a New Tradition: Loïs Mailou Jones and the Aesthetics of Blackness. University Park, PA: Penn State University Press, 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As part of CAA’s 10-year anniversary celebration of its publication, The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association, chapter authors reflect on their contributions and how their impressions of the field have changed. Our final video in the series features Judith Brodsky, Mary Garrard, and Ferris Olin, who co-authored chapter 11, “Governance and Diversity.”

Involved not just in CAA, its Annual Conference, and its Committee on Women in the Arts (CWA), but also with CAA’s affiliate society the Women’s Caucus for Art, these three women represent pillars in the field of feminist art history.

In this video, they discuss the first 100 years of CAA’s history representing women and underrepresented groups, and point to the future: 2022 marks fifty years of the first committee to represent women at CAA. CAA is excited to honor this milestone at the 2022 Annual Conference and beyond.

Brodsky and Olin are each presenting at the upcoming 110th Annual Conference. See links underneath their bios below for more information on their sessions, panels, and talks.

 

SPEAKERS BIOGRAPHIES

Judith K. Brodsky is currently distinguished professor emerita at Rutgers University. She founded the Rutgers Center for Innovative Print and Paper, now renamed the Brodsky Center in her honor and located at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. The Center has been instrumental in promoting the recognition of women artists and artists of color. She is also co-founder of the Rutgers Center for Women in the Arts and Humanities and The Feminist Art Project, a national and international program to promote women artists in the cultural milieu. With her colleague, Dr. Ferris Olin, she established the Miriam Schapiro Archives on Women Artists at Rutgers and was curator of the Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series at Rutgers from 2006-2013. Brodsky was the co-founder of the Women Artists Archive National Directory (WAAND), funded initially by the Getty Foundation, a digital directory of archives where the papers of women artists active in the US since 1945 are located. A printmaker and book artist, Judith’s work is in over 100 permanent collections. She has also organized and curated many exhibitions and has published extensively, including contributions to The Power of Feminist Art and SIGNS, A Journal of Women in Culture and Society; Junctures in Women’s Leadership: The Arts. Most recently she published the first book on the impact of feminist theory on digital technology in the arts titled Dismantling the Patriarchy, Bit by Bit: Feminism, Art, and Technology, Bloomsbury, 2021. She served as CAA’s President and received the Annual Recognition Award from CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts, as well as past national president for ArtTable and Women’s Caucus for Art.

Details for Judith Brodsky’s participation in the 2022 Annual Conference: link.

Mary D. Garrard, professor emerita of art history at American University, Washington, D. C., is a scholar whose work has combined Italian Renaissance art with feminist studies. Her book, Artemisia Gentileschi: The Image of the Female Hero in Italian Baroque Art (Princeton, 1989), was a groundbreaking contribution to the field, that launched modern studies of the now-famous artist. In Artemisia Gentileschi Circa 1622: The Shaping and Reshaping of an Artistic Identity (University of California, 2001), Garrard addressed new critical issues in Gentileschi studies. Her third book, Artemisia Gentileschi and Early Modern Feminism, positions the artist among the feminist treatises and debates of her time (Reaktion Books, London, 2020). Beyond Artemisia, Garrard has written and spoken extensively on Italian Renaissance, Early Modern art, and feminist art history. With her colleague Norma Broude, Garrard created and edited three books that have become basic texts in art history and women’s studies courses, including Feminism and Art History: Questioning the Litany (1982); The Expanding Discourse: Feminism and Art History (1992); and Reclaiming Female Agency: Feminist Art History After Postmodernism (2005).  Broude and Garrard also created and contributed to The Power of Feminist Art: The American Movement of the 1970s (1994).

Ferris Olin is distinguished professor emerita at Rutgers University, where she was the co-founder and co-director (with Judith K. Brodsky) of Rutgers Center for Women in the Arts and Humanities, and The Feminist Art Project, an international collaboration to make visible the impact of women on the cultural landscape. She also established the Miriam Schapiro Archives on Women Artists at Rutgers as well as the Margery Somers Foster Center, a research center focused on documenting women’s leadership in the public arena, and served as Associate Director of the Institute for Research on Women and earlier, Director of the Art Library. She was curator of the Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series at Rutgers from 1995-2006 and later (with Judith K. Brodsky) from 2006-2013. With Brodsky, Olin also created the Women Artists Archive National Directory (WAAND). Olin has also published broadly. Her most recent book, co-authored with Judith K. Brodsky, is called Junctures in Women’s Leadership: The Arts (Rutgers University Press, fall 2018). Olin has served on the boards of numerous non-profit organizations and was Vice-President of the College Art Association. She is the recipient of numerous awards, among them the Women’s Caucus for Art Lifetime Achievement Award and the College Art Association Committee on Women’s Annual Recognition Award (now known as Distinguished Feminist Award).

Details for Ferris Olin’s participation in the 2022 Annual Conference: link.

Filed under: Advocacy, Event, Publications

As part of CAA’s 10-year anniversary celebration of its publication The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association, chapter authors reflect on their contributions and how their impressions of the field have changed. Our second video in the series features Craig Houser, who wrote Chapter 5, “The Changing Face of Scholarly Publishing: CAA’s Publication Program.”

Craig Houser is the director of the MA in Art History and its concentration in Art Museum Studies at the City College of New York. His scholarship has addressed institutional politics related to studio art and art history, as well as issues in gender and sexuality in modern and contemporary art.  

CAA has produced this reel with a compilation of events, scholarship, programs, and initiatives CAA from the last year. See below for a full list of each item (in order of appearance in the video) with links to learn more.

Programming:

CAA’s first virtual Annual Conference

Mariam Ghani in conversation with Laura Anderson Barbata

In Conversation with Dr. Nancy Odegaard

Theresa Avila, Annual Conference Program Chair in conversation with Meme Omogbai

An Inaugural Evening with CAA Distinguished Awardees and Artists

CAA Then & Now: Reflections on the Centennial Book and the Next Century

Karen Leader, author of Chapter 12: Advocacy

 

Opportunities:

Publication, travel, and support grants

 

Publications and Publications Programming:

Artist Project, Elana Mann for Art Journal Open

Roundtable discussion for Art Journal Open, Holding Space…

Art Journal and The Art Bulletin

caa.reviews book and exhibition reviews

caa.reviews’s dissertation roster, 2020

 

Global Programs

CAA-Getty International Program

CAA-Getty 10-Year International Program online publication

 

Podcasts

CAA Conversations by CAA’s Education Committee

 

CAA’s 110th Annual Conference will take place in Chicago from February 17-19, followed by virtual live sessions to be held in Zoom from March 3-5. For more information and to register go to this link.

As part of CAA’s 10-year anniversary celebration of its publication The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association, chapter authors reflect on their contributions and how their impressions of the field have changed. Our second video in the series features Ellen Levy, who wrote Chapter 8, “Art in an Academic Setting: Contemporary CAA Exhibitions.”

Ellen K. Levy, PhD, is a multimedia artist and writer known for exploring art, science and technology interrelationships since the mid-1980s. Levy highlights their importance through exhibitions, educational programs, publications and curatorial opportunities. Her graduate studies were at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston following a B.A. from Mount Holyoke College in Zoology. She was President of the College Art Association (2004-2006) before earning her doctorate (2012) from the University of Plymouth (UK) on the art and neuroscience of attention. She then was Special Advisor on the Arts and Sciences at the Institute for Doctoral Studies in the Visual Arts. She was a Distinguished Visiting Fellow in Arts and Sciences at Skidmore College (1999) and taught many transdisciplinary classes and workshops (e.g., the New School, Cooper Union, Brooklyn College, Banff). She was recipient of an AICA award and an arts commission from NASA following a solo exhibition at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1985).

She has exhibited her art internationally and in such landmark exhibitions as Weather Report (Boulder Museum, cur Lucy Lippard) and Gregor Mendel: Planting the Seeds of Genetics (Field Museum, Chicago, adv. Martin Kemp). Levy has published widely on art and complex systems. With Berta Sichel, she guest edited and contributed to CAA’s special issue of Art Journal (spring 1996), likely the first widely distributed academic publication on contemporary art and the genetic code. With Charissa Terranova, she is co-editor of D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson’s Generative Influences in Art, Design: From Forces to Forms (2021, Bloomsbury Press). Levy has also curated a related exhibition for Pratt Manhattan’s gallery. Levy and Barbara Larson co-edit the “art and science since 1750” book series of Routledge Press. Levy and Patricia Olynyk co-direct the NY LASER program, a central initiative of Leonardo/ISAST. She was twice an invited participant in Watermill’s Art and Consciousness Workshop, led by stage director and playwright, Robert Wilson.

Filed under: Event, Exhibitions, Publications

A letter from CAA’s Executive Director

posted by October 28, 2021

Dear CAA members,

Since March of 2020, we have been continually navigating through change—both internally and externally––at CAA. We’ve used this time to gather information from membership and listen to constituencies to position CAA for the future.

I am writing to address the matter of a publications restructuring document that was recently shared publicly. The document was created as a preliminary proposal meant for internal discussion following a first-stage period of discovery. The document remains a work in progress. Our next steps in the process will be:
  • A committee will be formed to develop these ideas further in consultation with the Publications Committee and other members. No proposal will be adopted without consultation with the membership. The timeline for implementation will depend on the outcome of the committee’s deliberations.
  • There will be an opportunity for members to provide feedback through open forums and a town hall meeting held during the Annual Conference, both in-person and virtually.
CAA values the voices and expertise of our community and respective constituencies. I will continue to create ongoing opportunities for engagement and dialogue.

Thank you for your continued support. I look forward to providing you with a more detailed monthly report of CAA’s activities in the coming week. In the meantime, please feel free to contact CAA at programs@collegeart.org to share any further comments.
Sincerely,

Meme Omogbai
Executive Director and CEO
Filed under: Publications

We’re pleased to announce the appointment of two new editors for CAA publications: Christy Anderson, was selected to be Editor-in-Chief of The Art Bulletin. Balbir Singh will take the post as Reviews Editor of Art Journal. They begin their three-year terms July 1, 2022. Learn more about their work below.

EDITOR BIOGRAPHIES

Christy Anderson | Incoming Editor-in-Chief of The Art Bulletin

Christy Anderson Christy Anderson is an architectural historian with a special interest in the buildings of Renaissance and Baroque Europe. Professor Anderson has taught at Yale University, the Courtauld Institute, MIT, and the University of Toronto. At Yale she received a Morse Faculty Fellowship as well as numerous teaching prizes. She received her Ph.D. from the School of Architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. As a Kress Fellow at the Courtauld Institute of Art and later as a Research Fellow at Worcester College, Oxford University, she studied the annotations made by the English architect Inigo Jones (1573–1652) in his collection of treatises and humanist literature. This work on literacy, architectural language, and the construction of the professional architect appeared in her book Inigo Jones and the Classical Tradition (Cambridge, 2006).

 

Learn more about The Art Bulletin.

Balbir Singh | Incoming Reviews Editor of Art Journal

Balbir SinghBalbir Singh’s scholarship focuses on the convergence of racial, gendered, and religious embodiment, with migration and policing under violent conditions of imperial and domestic security technologies. She is at work on her first book, “Militant Bodies: Violence and Visual Culture under Islamophobia,” which is rooted in questions that center post-9/11 racial and religious hyper-policing of Muslims and Sikhs, especially as they relate to bodily comportment and the donning of religious garments. Additionally, she is beginning research on a second book project — “Whose Terror? Vexed Attachments and the Contradictions of Freedom.”

Learn more about Art Journal.