CAA News Today

Brazil CIHA Conference Website: CIHA São Paulo 2021 – Motion Migrations – The CIHA conference aims to describe, to reflect upon and to analyze the different forms of migrations in a concrete, historiographical and theoretical way. (usp.br)

The National Committee of the History of Art (NCHA) is pleased to announce that the 35th World Congress of the International Committee of the History of Art (CIHA) will take place January 17-21, 2022.  Originally planned as an in-person gathering in São Paulo, Brazil, the format has shifted to a hybrid model due to the pandemic and most of the speakers will participate virtually.  Registration for virtual attendance will be free of charge.

Organized around the theme of “Motion: Migrations,” the conference will virtually bring together an international roster of art historians for five days of scholarly exchange. Presentations will reflect on the different forms, theories and historiographies of migration in the history of art and in its contemporary conditions (see the conference page URL). The conference theme is especially relevant to our current period of lockdowns, restricted borders, and global supply chain disruptions.

The São Paulo conference is the second of two paired congresses on the question of “Motion” (the first half took place in Florence, Italy, in 2019). The session themes and the full program are available on the program tab of the CIHA conference website. 39 US-based art historians are scheduled to speak on the program, including 12 graduate students.

The NCHA supports the participation of US art historians at all stages of their career in this important global conversation and is committed to the success of the São Paulo CIHA.  To this end, the NCHA has awarded travel fellowships to students in US doctoral programs so that they can participate in the conference in person.   The Committee encourages US art historians to virtually attend the conference and to share information about it with any interested groups.  Finally, please consider organizing events that enable graduate students or other members of your academic community to watch CIHA sessions together.   Should you have questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to any of the NCHA members.

CIHA is the oldest continuously held art history conference in the world. Quadrennial CIHA Congresses promote innovative art historical research and foster dialogue among scholars from around the globe. NCHA is the US affiliate of CIHA and works to connect scholars in the United States with their counterparts in other countries, in part by encouraging participation in and attendance at CIHA congresses and colloquia. We hope to “see” many art historians at the upcoming conference.

Filed under: Event

As part of CAA’s 10-year anniversary celebration of its publication, The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association, chapter authors reflect on their contributions and how their impressions of the field have changed. Our final video in the series features Judith Brodsky, Mary Garrard, and Ferris Olin, who co-authored chapter 11, “Governance and Diversity.”

Involved not just in CAA, its Annual Conference, and its Committee on Women in the Arts (CWA), but also with CAA’s affiliate society the Women’s Caucus for Art, these three women represent pillars in the field of feminist art history.

In this video, they discuss the first 100 years of CAA’s history representing women and underrepresented groups, and point to the future: 2022 marks fifty years of the first committee to represent women at CAA. CAA is excited to honor this milestone at the 2022 Annual Conference and beyond.

Brodsky and Olin are each presenting at the upcoming 110th Annual Conference. See links underneath their bios below for more information on their sessions, panels, and talks.

 

SPEAKERS BIOGRAPHIES

Judith K. Brodsky is currently distinguished professor emerita at Rutgers University. She founded the Rutgers Center for Innovative Print and Paper, now renamed the Brodsky Center in her honor and located at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. The Center has been instrumental in promoting the recognition of women artists and artists of color. She is also co-founder of the Rutgers Center for Women in the Arts and Humanities and The Feminist Art Project, a national and international program to promote women artists in the cultural milieu. With her colleague, Dr. Ferris Olin, she established the Miriam Schapiro Archives on Women Artists at Rutgers and was curator of the Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series at Rutgers from 2006-2013. Brodsky was the co-founder of the Women Artists Archive National Directory (WAAND), funded initially by the Getty Foundation, a digital directory of archives where the papers of women artists active in the US since 1945 are located. A printmaker and book artist, Judith’s work is in over 100 permanent collections. She has also organized and curated many exhibitions and has published extensively, including contributions to The Power of Feminist Art and SIGNS, A Journal of Women in Culture and Society; Junctures in Women’s Leadership: The Arts. Most recently she published the first book on the impact of feminist theory on digital technology in the arts titled Dismantling the Patriarchy, Bit by Bit: Feminism, Art, and Technology, Bloomsbury, 2021. She served as CAA’s President and received the Annual Recognition Award from CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts, as well as past national president for ArtTable and Women’s Caucus for Art.

Details for Judith Brodsky’s participation in the 2022 Annual Conference: link.

Mary D. Garrard, professor emerita of art history at American University, Washington, D. C., is a scholar whose work has combined Italian Renaissance art with feminist studies. Her book, Artemisia Gentileschi: The Image of the Female Hero in Italian Baroque Art (Princeton, 1989), was a groundbreaking contribution to the field, that launched modern studies of the now-famous artist. In Artemisia Gentileschi Circa 1622: The Shaping and Reshaping of an Artistic Identity (University of California, 2001), Garrard addressed new critical issues in Gentileschi studies. Her third book, Artemisia Gentileschi and Early Modern Feminism, positions the artist among the feminist treatises and debates of her time (Reaktion Books, London, 2020). Beyond Artemisia, Garrard has written and spoken extensively on Italian Renaissance, Early Modern art, and feminist art history. With her colleague Norma Broude, Garrard created and edited three books that have become basic texts in art history and women’s studies courses, including Feminism and Art History: Questioning the Litany (1982); The Expanding Discourse: Feminism and Art History (1992); and Reclaiming Female Agency: Feminist Art History After Postmodernism (2005).  Broude and Garrard also created and contributed to The Power of Feminist Art: The American Movement of the 1970s (1994).

Ferris Olin is distinguished professor emerita at Rutgers University, where she was the co-founder and co-director (with Judith K. Brodsky) of Rutgers Center for Women in the Arts and Humanities, and The Feminist Art Project, an international collaboration to make visible the impact of women on the cultural landscape. She also established the Miriam Schapiro Archives on Women Artists at Rutgers as well as the Margery Somers Foster Center, a research center focused on documenting women’s leadership in the public arena, and served as Associate Director of the Institute for Research on Women and earlier, Director of the Art Library. She was curator of the Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series at Rutgers from 1995-2006 and later (with Judith K. Brodsky) from 2006-2013. With Brodsky, Olin also created the Women Artists Archive National Directory (WAAND). Olin has also published broadly. Her most recent book, co-authored with Judith K. Brodsky, is called Junctures in Women’s Leadership: The Arts (Rutgers University Press, fall 2018). Olin has served on the boards of numerous non-profit organizations and was Vice-President of the College Art Association. She is the recipient of numerous awards, among them the Women’s Caucus for Art Lifetime Achievement Award and the College Art Association Committee on Women’s Annual Recognition Award (now known as Distinguished Feminist Award).

Details for Ferris Olin’s participation in the 2022 Annual Conference: link.

Filed under: Advocacy, Event, Publications

Affiliated Society News: December

posted by December 17, 2021

Many of CAA’s affiliated societies will be presenting sessions at our 110th Annual Conference in-person from February 17-19 and virtually from March 3-5. Check out a list of their sessions to preview!

To attend these sessions and more, make sure to register for the conference and learn more at its registration page. Also, make sure to take advantage of the reduced rate and book your hotel room at the Hilton Chicago by January 25Make your reservation here.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA

Announcements

Bibliography Week 2022 Schedule & Registration

From January 25–28, 2022 the Bibliographical Society of America will celebrate Bibliography Week with a series of events designed to demonstrate bibliographical practice and its relevance to interdisciplinary scholarship in the humanities.

Tuesday, January 25, 4-5pm Eastern – Materialities of Tibetan Buddhist Texts
Within the diverse traditions of Tibetan Buddhism, the power of books—both printed and hand-written—lies not only in their contents, but also in their materiality as objects. The three scholars on this panel will share bibliographical studies of Tibetan texts that highlight how text production, circulation, and replication within architectural spaces has been utilized by Tibetan religious and political leaders to assert and solidify their power.

Wednesday, January 26, 4-5pm Eastern – Meet the Editors of Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America
Please join Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America (PBSA) co-editors Dr. Sarah Werner and Dr. Jesse Erickson for an online Q&A session on January 26. Drs. Werner and Erickson will discuss their vision for the journal and how it can be part of an expanded field of bibliographical scholarship. They will also answer questions that you might have about publishing in PBSA, such as the submission and review process, image permissions, special issues, and open access.

Thursday, January 27, 11-12pm Eastern – In-Person, Center for Book Arts Tour
Guests are invited to a tour of the Center for Books Arts in New York (28 W 27th St., 3rd Floor). For nearly 50 years, CBA has supported artists and uplifted the book arts by presenting exhibitions, lectures, readings, and performances; providing opportunities for artists, writers, curators and scholars through residencies, fellowships, publishing, and collecting; and empowering the creation of new book art by providing courses on book art related technique and history.

Thursday, January 27, 2-3pm Eastern – Bound Images: Maps and Books
This panel offers three case studies to explore what changes theoretically and in practice when we dethrone the ‘sovereign map’ and engage with the production, circulation and reading of maps as bound images, a hybrid graphic and textual part of the stories told by authors and publishers which is experienced by readers through materiality, context, and significance: Giuseppe Rosaccio’s Il mondo e sue parti (Florence, 1595), Johann Jakob Scheuchzer’s Physica Sacra (Augsburg and Ulm, 1731), and Jorge Juan and Antonio Ulloa’s Relación Histórica del viage a la América meridional (Madrid, 1748).

Friday, January 28, 12:00 pm Eastern – 2022 BSA Annual Meeting & New Scholars Program

  • Christopher Adams, Malkin New Scholar – ‘Could you make it rather more of a He and She picture?’: The Queer Dust-Jacket and Postwar British Fiction
  • Eve Houghton, Pantzer New Scholar – ‘I am always sorry to antagonize collectors’: Henrietta Bartlett and the 1916 Census of Shakespeare Quartos
  • Liza Mardoyan, BSA New Scholar – Decorative Bird Initials in the Medieval Armenian Manuscript Culture
  • Learn more about the 2022 New Scholars and read their talk abstracts here.

Friday, January 28, 1:30 pm Eastern – Keynote Lecture by Dr. Elizaveta Strakhov: What Makes Bibliography Critical? A Medievalist’s Response
What makes bibliography critical for a Western manuscripts scholar? Medievalists have, after all, enshrined bibliography to the point of developing the specialized subdisciplines of paleography and codicology. How does a Western medievalist breathe new life into bibliography, that bread-and-butter of their scholarly pursuits? This talk offers a case study of two manuscripts of bilingual Anglo-French poet Charles d’Orléans’s work: not the two collections notoriously supervised by him, but two later fifteenth-century, largely neglected manuscripts of his work, one made for European humanist circles and the other circulating with English Tudor royal audiences.

 


AHNCA (Association of Historians of Nineteenth-Century Art)

Events

Virtual Salon Series: Rethinking the Visual and Material Culture of Enslavement
January 19, 2022 at 7 pm EST

The Association of Historians of Nineteenth-Century Art and the Dahesh Museum of Art present a Virtual Salon, “Rethinking the Visual and Material Culture of Enslavement,” featuring Jennifer Van Horn (University of Delaware), Adrienne L. Childs (The Phillips Collection), and Phillip Troutman (George Washington University). Register at this link.

Virtual Salon: Decorative Arts and Materiality
February 9, 2022 at 7 pm EST

Please join us on Wednesday, February 9, at 7 pm EST for our Virtual Salon on the Decorative Arts and Materiality. This series of online events is co-sponsored by the Association of Historians of Nineteenth-Century Art (AHNCA) and the Dahesh Museum of Art. The panel will feature Amy F. Ogata (University of Southern California), Lee Talbot (The Textile Museum, George Washington University), and Christine Garnier (Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts/Harvard University). Registration information forthcoming!

 


SOCIETY FOR THE HISTORY OF COLLECTING

Event

As part of its continuing series of Zoom lectures focusing on the collections of university museums, the next Society for the History of Collecting–West Coast chapter event will take place on January 28, 2022:

Collectors’ Clothing Caches: Selections from the Texas Fashion Collection
Annette Becker
28 January 2022, 10:00 AM, PST; 6 PM BST

This talk traces the history of the Texas Fashion Collection through three collections and collectors who have shaped its holdings. The Collection was originally conceived by Stanley and Edward Marcus, of the Neiman Marcus luxury department stores, who in 1938 created the Neiman Marcus award to recognize national and international talent in all areas of fashion and design. The talk then focuses on Claudia Heard de Osborne, whose passion for Balenciaga resulted in a gift of hundreds of garments by the designer. The final spotlight will be on brothers Scott and Stuart Gentling, visual artists who collected historic garments as part of their artistic practice.

Annette Becker is a material culture historian and arts educator committed to bridging popular and academic understandings of fashion history. She currently serves as the director and curator of the Texas Fashion Collection, an archive of nearly 20,000 garments and accessories housed at the University of North Texas.

To register for this event please email: events@societyhistorycollecting.org

Filed under: Affiliated Societies, Event

As part of CAA’s 10-year anniversary celebration of its publication The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association, chapter authors reflect on their contributions and how their impressions of the field have changed. Our second video in the series features Craig Houser, who wrote Chapter 5, “The Changing Face of Scholarly Publishing: CAA’s Publication Program.”

Craig Houser is the director of the MA in Art History and its concentration in Art Museum Studies at the City College of New York. His scholarship has addressed institutional politics related to studio art and art history, as well as issues in gender and sexuality in modern and contemporary art.  

CAA has produced this reel with a compilation of events, scholarship, programs, and initiatives CAA from the last year. See below for a full list of each item (in order of appearance in the video) with links to learn more.

Programming:

CAA’s first virtual Annual Conference

Mariam Ghani in conversation with Laura Anderson Barbata

In Conversation with Dr. Nancy Odegaard

Theresa Avila, Annual Conference Program Chair in conversation with Meme Omogbai

An Inaugural Evening with CAA Distinguished Awardees and Artists

CAA Then & Now: Reflections on the Centennial Book and the Next Century

Karen Leader, author of Chapter 12: Advocacy

 

Opportunities:

Publication, travel, and support grants

 

Publications and Publications Programming:

Artist Project, Elana Mann for Art Journal Open

Roundtable discussion for Art Journal Open, Holding Space…

Art Journal and The Art Bulletin

caa.reviews book and exhibition reviews

caa.reviews’s dissertation roster, 2020

 

Global Programs

CAA-Getty International Program

CAA-Getty 10-Year International Program online publication

 

Podcasts

CAA Conversations by CAA’s Education Committee

 

CAA’s 110th Annual Conference will take place in Chicago from February 17-19, followed by virtual live sessions to be held in Zoom from March 3-5. For more information and to register go to this link.

As part of CAA’s 10-year anniversary celebration of its publication The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association, chapter authors reflect on their contributions and how their impressions of the field have changed. Our second video in the series features Ellen Levy, who wrote Chapter 8, “Art in an Academic Setting: Contemporary CAA Exhibitions.”

Ellen K. Levy, PhD, is a multimedia artist and writer known for exploring art, science and technology interrelationships since the mid-1980s. Levy highlights their importance through exhibitions, educational programs, publications and curatorial opportunities. Her graduate studies were at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston following a B.A. from Mount Holyoke College in Zoology. She was President of the College Art Association (2004-2006) before earning her doctorate (2012) from the University of Plymouth (UK) on the art and neuroscience of attention. She then was Special Advisor on the Arts and Sciences at the Institute for Doctoral Studies in the Visual Arts. She was a Distinguished Visiting Fellow in Arts and Sciences at Skidmore College (1999) and taught many transdisciplinary classes and workshops (e.g., the New School, Cooper Union, Brooklyn College, Banff). She was recipient of an AICA award and an arts commission from NASA following a solo exhibition at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1985).

She has exhibited her art internationally and in such landmark exhibitions as Weather Report (Boulder Museum, cur Lucy Lippard) and Gregor Mendel: Planting the Seeds of Genetics (Field Museum, Chicago, adv. Martin Kemp). Levy has published widely on art and complex systems. With Berta Sichel, she guest edited and contributed to CAA’s special issue of Art Journal (spring 1996), likely the first widely distributed academic publication on contemporary art and the genetic code. With Charissa Terranova, she is co-editor of D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson’s Generative Influences in Art, Design: From Forces to Forms (2021, Bloomsbury Press). Levy has also curated a related exhibition for Pratt Manhattan’s gallery. Levy and Barbara Larson co-edit the “art and science since 1750” book series of Routledge Press. Levy and Patricia Olynyk co-direct the NY LASER program, a central initiative of Leonardo/ISAST. She was twice an invited participant in Watermill’s Art and Consciousness Workshop, led by stage director and playwright, Robert Wilson.

Filed under: Event, Exhibitions, Publications

 Dr. Nancy Odegaard discusses a strategy of pottery condition reporting with interns as a type of triage, or assignment of conservation treatments based on the types of damage or documentation need when a large volume of vessels are involved. The annual activity known as the Pottery Blitz has been a regular summer activity for many years at the Arizona State Museum.

Dr. Nancy Odegaard discusses a strategy of pottery condition reporting with interns as a type of triage, or assignment of conservation treatments based on the types of damage or documentation need when a large volume of vessels are involved. The annual activity known as the Pottery Blitz has been a regular summer activity for many years at the Arizona State Museum.

Watch the recording of our virtual celebration of Dr. Nancy Odegaard, this year’s recipient of the CAA/American Institute for Conservation (AIC) Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation.

Dr. Odegaard’s scholarship and gracious leadership have been central to modeling collaboration between disciplines, advancing conservation discourse, and fostering a more inclusive and nuanced understanding of art and cultural heritage. She has authored several publications that have become standards in the field for conservators, academics in the arts, and students.

The CAA/AIC Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation annually recognizes outstanding contributions by one or more persons who, individually or jointly, have enhanced understanding of art through the application of knowledge and experience in conservation, art history, and art.

This event was produced in partnership with CAA’s affiliate organization, the American Institute for Conservation (AIC) in tandem with their 2021 AIC/SPNHC Joint Virtual Annual Meeting.

Watch the Recording

Filed under: Awards, Conservation, Event, Video — Tags: ,