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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by July 01, 2020

The Tsai Performance Center on the campus of Boston University, Boston. Photo: Steven Senne/AP, via WGBH

Upheaval Over Race Reaches Met Museum After Curator’s Instagram Post

A post by a longtime department chairman prompted a letter from staff on the museum’s “culture of systemic racism.” (New York Times)

College Leaders Must Explain Why—Not Just How—to Return to Campus

“I haven’t read a single announcement or plan that anchors an institution’s decisionmaking in shared community interests.” (Ed Surge)

What It Means to Be a Social Justice Curator

“Museums and institutions should be for the people; the question museums need to think about is how we can approach new viewers and welcome them into our spaces as active and equal audience members.” (Art in America)

Boston University Gives PhD Students A Choice: Come Back To Campus Or Lose Your Health Insurance And Salary

Doctoral students could be forced to take a leave of absence and lose their health insurance if they do not return to campus in the fall. (WGBH)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by June 10, 2020

The Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, via ARTnews.

Minneapolis’s Walker Art Center Becomes First Major US Museum to Stop Contracting Police for Events

The museum announced last week that it will stop working with the Minneapolis Police Department until it “implements meaningful change.” (ARTnews)

Institutionalized Racism: A Syllabus

A free syllabus of stories to help contextualize, teach, and understand institutionalized racism. (JSTOR Daily)

How Will We Remember the Pandemic? Museums Are Already Deciding

“When everything is an artifact, what is truly historically important—and just whose Covid stories are being told in these archives, and whose are not?” (New York Times)

Mapping Our Social Change Roles in Times of Crisis

A helpful map and reflection guide for individuals or teams to reflect, assess, and plan for the future. (Deepa Iyer on Twitter)

After an Egyptologist Tweeted Instructions on How to Knock Down an Obelisk, Protesters Tried It Out on a Confederate Monument. It Worked

The next time someone tells you art history doesn’t have much to offer in the way of practical, actionable lessons, send them this link. (artnet News)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by June 03, 2020

A makeshift memorial and mural by local artists to honor George Floyd, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP, via CNN

Why Only Race-Conscious Policies Can Fix Racism in Higher Education

“It isn’t enough to just believe that racial inequality is a problem; what policymakers, advocates, and citizens do about it matters most.” (The Education Trust)

Anti-Racism Resources for White Individuals

A list of resources intended specifically for white people to begin or deepen anti-racism work, including social media accounts to follow, books, films, and podcasts. (via Twitter)

National Museum of African American History and Culture Releases “Talking About Race” Web Portal

The museum moved up the release date for their new online portal, which provides digital tools, online exercises, video instructions, and scholarly articles. (NMAAHC)

‘My Emotions Were So Raw’: The People Creating Art to Remember George Floyd

Artists have been responding with works that seek to memorialize, to provoke, and to heal. (CNN)

Culturally-Specific Museums Created by People of Color in the United States

Bookmark Museum Hue’s directory for reference when you’re putting together syllabi, research, and programs. (Museum Hue)

Education After COVID-19 Cannot Be Reimagined Without A Racial Justice Plan

Without a plan to explicitly address racial justice, any post-COVID-19 plan for reopening schools is inherently flawed. (Forbes)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by May 27, 2020

David Litvin checks the tomatoes growing outside the Guggenheim Museum, where he is one of the few people who show up each day for work. Credit: Jeenah Moon for The New York Times

Victoria and Albert Museum to Collect Signs Created during Lockdown

The open call is part of the V&A’s “Pandemic Objects” initiative that “compiles and reflects on objects that have taken on new meaning and purpose during the coronavirus outbreak.” (Artsy)

The Museum Is Closed, but Its Tomato Man Soldiers On

A portion of the Guggenheim’s temporarily shuttered exhibition, Countryside, The Future, is now producing thousands of cherry tomatoes for donation to City Harvest. (New York Times)

A Miniature Gallery Mounts Tiny Artworks, With Big Results

Artist Eben Haines built the maquette and artists submit works to scale, which are photographed with surprisingly realistic results. (Hyperallergic)

The Venice Biennale Will Be Pushed Back a Year, to 2022, as the Coronavirus Knocks the Art Calendar Permanently Off Its Axis

The next edition of the Venice Biennale will now coincide with documenta. (artnet News)

The Case Against Reopening

“The notion that we must choose between saving lives and keeping our institutions open depends on a false dichotomy. Pandemics are a basket of problems, not an either/or scenario.” (Chronicle of Higher Ed)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by May 20, 2020

The managing horticulturist at the Met Cloisters, Marc Montefusco. Photo courtesy of Marc Montefusco, via artnet News

The Daily Call That 200 Arts Groups Hope Will Help Them Survive

“The calls have really been a lifeline. It’s been this remarkable, consistent day-to-day way to touch base with one another.” (New York Times)

Two Dozen Mayors From Across the US Are Urging Congress to Send Urgently Needed Funding for the Arts in Its Next Relief Package

Mayors from 22 cities sent a formal request to Congress last week. (artnet News)

How Coronavirus Is Impacting The Art World

“Creativity is the core of adaptability—our ability to acclimate to the new realities we face.” Listen to an interview with art historian, critic, and former CAA board member Jonathan Fineberg. (WBUR)

‘We’re Holding Down the Fort’: How Guards, Groundskeepers, and Collections Managers Across the US Are Doing Their Jobs in Shuttered Museums

Although institutions remain mostly closed to the public, there is still a lot of work to do on site. (artnet News)

Women’s Research Plummets during Lockdown, but Articles from Men Increase

“In April Dr. Elizabeth Hannon, deputy editor of the British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, noticed that the number of article submissions she was receiving from women had dropped dramatically. Not so from men.” (The Guardian)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by May 13, 2020

Ross Sinclair’s The Real Life Declaration of Arbroath 1320–2720, 2020, one of the works in the Royal Scottish Academy’s annual exhibition, which went entirely online because of the pandemic. Image: Royal Scottish Academy, via New York Times

When the Virus Came, Some Museum Curators Lost Years of Work

As shutdowns continue, it has become clear that some shows will not reopen, and many more are in limbo. (New York Times)

Podcast: Museum Directors on COVID-19 and Its Impact on Museums, Part 1

Listen to a conversation with Max Hollein of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Kaywin Feldman of the National Gallery of Art, and James Rondeau of the Art Institute of Chicago. (The Getty)

What Is College Without the Campus?

The pandemic has not only exacerbated college’s underlying economic instability but has, at least for now, upended the form of the university itself. (New York Magazine)

Lesson of the Day: ‘Now Virtual and in Video, Museum Websites Shake Off the Dust’

In this step-by-step lesson, students take a virtual field trip through some of the world’s most renowned museums. (New York Times)

The CDC’s Misappropriation of a Chinese Textile, and Why It Matters

“The textile in question is indeed a striking piece of art. It also has nothing whatsoever to do with respiratory disease.” (Hyperallergic)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by May 06, 2020

Steven Zucker and Beth Harris, the two art historians behind Smarthistory, look at a bronze scuplture by Auguste Rodin at the Brookyln Museum in 2014. Photo: Lisa Fisher, via Washington Post

How Two Professors Transformed the Teaching of Art History

Meet the team behind the popular online resource Smarthistory. (Washington Post)

A New Emergency Grant Benefits Non-Salaried Art Workers in NY, NJ, and CT

The Tri-State Relief Fund will give $2,000 grants to freelance and contracted workers, including art handlers, archivists, and others. (NYFA)

To Survive After This Is Over, Cultural Institutions Need to Redefine the Value of Art. Here’s How to Do It

“We could learn to embrace nuance instead of crave spectacle. We could invest more in the history that connects art practice to community organizing and movement building. We could even make more art ourselves.” (artnet News)

Museums Worldwide Prepare to Reopen Their Doors After Lockdown

International museums provide a glimpse into what the “new normal” of the US museum experience could look like post-lockdown. (Hyperallergic)

Prominent Scholars Threaten to Boycott Colleges That Don’t Support Contingent Faculty During Pandemic

More than 70 scholars are among the initial signatories to the statement. (Chronicle of Higher Ed)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by March 25, 2020

As Art Schools Cancel Student Shows, One Instagram Account Pledges to Give Them Life

A new Instagram account is highlighting work from now-canceled BFA and MFA thesis shows, and students and faculty are encourage to submit. (ARTnews)

Curators Impacted by COVID-19 Can Apply for This Emergency Grant

The Kinkade Family Foundation grants will award up to $5,000 for “unexpected emergencies related to the COVID-19 epidemic.” (Hyperallergic)

Financial Relief Resources for Artists During COVID-19

Artwork Archive has compiled a list of emergency resources and crowdfunding efforts. (Artwork Archive)

New York Foundations Create $75 M. Fund to Support Arts Nonprofits and Social Services Impacted by Coronavirus

A consortium of 18 foundations has created a $75 million fund to support small and midsize nonprofit arts and cultural organizations. (ARTnews)

As Curricula Moves Online, Yale Art Students Demand Tuition Refund

Over one hundred MFA students from the Yale School of Art have called for a partial tuition refund. (Artforum)

Open-Access JSTOR Materials Accessible to the Public

JSTOR Open Access has over 6,000 ebooks and over 150 journals accessible without the need for an online login. (University Times)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by March 18, 2020

Screenshot via Google Arts & Culture, one of MCN’s recommendations for virtual museum resources.

The Coronavirus and the Ruptured Narrative of Campus Life

“I think of students whose identities needed the entirety of spring to play out. What will they face when sent abruptly home? They’d just got started.” (The New Yorker)

Pritzker Architecture Prize Goes to Two Women for the First Time

Dublin-based architects Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara are the recepients of the 2020 Pritzker Prize, making them the first two women to share the profession’s highest honor. (New York Times)

Opinion: Please Do a Bad Job of Putting Your Courses Online

“You are NOT building an online class. You are NOT teaching students who can be expected to be ready to learn online…Release yourself from high expectations right now, because that’s the best way to help your students learn.” (Rebecca Barrett-Fox)

The Ultimate Guide to Virtual Museum Resources, E-Learning, and Online Collections

A comprehensive guide to resources for e-learning and virtual retreats to art, culture, and history around the globe. (Museum Computer Network)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by March 11, 2020

Image via Twitter, @payusmoreucsc

UC Graduate Students Threaten More Strikes as Movement Grows

Students and faculty members across University of California campuses took action last week in support of UC Santa Cruz graduate students demanding cost-of-living adjustments. (Los Angeles Times)

Online Resource: Women in World History

In honor of International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month, explore an online resource of educational materials for teaching the history of women in the world. (NEH)

Griselda Pollock Becomes First Art Historian to Win Esteemed $646,000 Holberg Prize

The feminist art historian has won one of the world’s biggest awards for contributions to the humanities. (ARTnews)

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