CAA News Today

Attendees at a reception at CAA's 108th Annual Conference in Chicago. Photo: Stacey Rupolo

Attendees at a reception at CAA’s 108th Annual Conference in Chicago. Photo: Stacey Rupolo

The Professional Committees address critical concerns of CAA’s members. Each Professional Committee works from a charge that is put in place by the Board of Directors. For many CAA members, service on a Professional Committee becomes a way to develop professional relationships and community outside of one’s home institution, and to contribute in meaningful ways to the pressing professional issues of our moment.

Candidates must be current CAA members, or be so by the start of and throughout their committee term, and possess expertise appropriate to the committee’s work.

Committee members serve a three-year term, with the term of service beginning and ending at the CAA Annual Conference.

It is expected that once appointed to a committee, a member will attend committee meetings (including an annual business meeting at the conference), participate actively in the work of the committee, and contribute expertise to defining the current and future work of the committee.

All committee members volunteer their services without compensation.

The following Professional Committee are open for terms beginning in February 2022. Please click on the links in order to review the charge of each committee, as well as the roster of current committee leadership and members:

Committee applications are reviewed by the current committees, as well as CAA leadership (CAA’s President, the Vice President for Committees, and Executive Director). Appointments are made by late October, prior to the Annual Conference. New members are introduced to their committees during their respective business meetings at the Annual Conference in February 2022.

In applying to serve on a committee, applicants commit to beginning a term in February 2022, provided that they are selected for committee service.

Questions about the committee charge and current work to the current committee chair and/or to the Vice President of Committees: Lynne Allen (ldallen@bu.edu).

Apply to serve by completing this form. Self-nomination submissions should include a brief statement (no more than 150 words) describing your qualifications and experience, combined with an abbreviated CV (no more than 2–3 pages) into a single PDF document and emailed to committees@collegeart.org. Applications will not be considered complete without a supporting statement and CV.

Deadline for applications: September 13, 2021 (11:59 PM ET)

Apply to serve

Filed under: CAA News, Committees

CWA Picks: June 2021

posted by June 29, 2021

The June Picks from the Committee on Women in the Arts highlight a selection of events, exhibitions and calls for work that include feminist and womxn artists, and address issues about social justice, the visibility of marginalised subjects, and the digitisation of the everyday. Several of the exhibits engage with the question of relations among the human, non-human and other-than-human bodies but also corporeal entanglements that embed us within the world through embodied experiences. 

"Anne Minich: Her Bone" installation view of interior gallery

“Anne Minich: Her Bone” installation view of interior gallery

Anne Minich, Her Bone
May 22 – June 26, 2021
Thomas Erben Gallery

This solo exhibition of the Philadelphia-based artist Anne Minich engages with the materiality of the human body. Working across different media Minich explores the themes of pleasure and sexual desire, memory and intimacy, to develop personal mythologies and question the boundaries of corporeality. Her transversal language emphasizes the lived experience of being in the body, living it and dying in it. The works reveal multiple kinships and invite a closer inspection of bodily experiences. The interrelationality is emphasized by unexpected juxtapositions between the media used by Minich, including drawings, wooden sculptures and three-dimensional paintings, and found objects such as shells, fruit pits or bones. Intimate and fragile, these painterly collages invite the viewer to feel and sense with.


Susanne M. Winterling, TEMPERATE – under your skin, nano carriers through the web of life
May 20 – September 19, 2021
Schering Stiftung

Susanne M. Winterling’s installation TEMPERATE confronts the viewer with a fluorescent bacterium, inviting us to engage with nano-organisms that are invisible to the naked eye. Questioning that which is visible and that which remains invisible, the artist created large projection surfaces that show the bacterium moving across scientific images. Playing with scale, Winterling offers us another perspective in which magnified nano-organisms are larger than the visitors, articulating complex relationships between humans and microorganisms and interrogating the relevance of anthropocentric views. Inspired by research on drug-loaded nanocarriers, Winterling collaborated with Simone Schürle, a biomedical engineer and professor for Responsive Biomedical Systems at ETH Zurich along with her research team to bring awareness to the productive relations between forms of life and specifically bacteria equipped with therapeutic agents.


SHILPA GUPTA: Today Will End
May 21 – September 12, 2021
M HKA – Museum of Contemporary Art Antwerp

Shilpa Gupta’s multimedia works bring visibility to the contemporary art scene in Mumbai Critically engaged with identity politics and psychological discourse, Gupta articulates relationships between human diversity and new aesthetics, exploring entanglements between subjectivity and perception often via interactive installations and audio and visual technologies. Context-related and referring to specific cultural and socio-political framings, her works concern themes that, at the same time, are open to interpretation and may become localised to develop new micro-narratives. Gupta’s interest in conflict, borders and censorship can be seen in this exhibition, in which the artist traces the role of diverse media in the production of fear.


Hito Steyerl. I will survive. Physical and virtual spaces
May 19 – July 5, 2021
Centre Pompidou

This exhibition of Hito Steyerl’s major works is a retrospective in reverse, showing the most recent pieces at the beginning, which then lead to the artist’s 1990s films displayed at the end of the show. It is a collaboration between Centre Pompidou and the K21 Düsseldorf. The multimedia installations, some of which have been designed specifically for the exhibition, are a satirical and critical gesture exploring the relationships between the digital worlds, artistic creativity and its presentation, the pandemic and current social conditions. Steyerl’s point of departure is the architecture of the Centre Pompidou, which for over forty years has supported the heritage mission of the museum as a democratic project of a cultural resource centre. Steyerl engages once again in an intimate and astute manner with the invisible contradictions that drive the power structures of global capitalism and interrogates the challenges encountered by cultural institutions in the current moment of crisis.


AD MINOLITI: Biosfera Peluche / Biosphere Plush
July 24, 2021 – May 8, 2022
BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art

The exhibition of works of Ad Minoliti, a contemporary Argentine artist, takes place in the Baltic in the form of an ‘alien lounge’. Imagined as an extra-terrestrial space that goes beyond the idea of nature, it traverses dichotomous gender and anthropocentric narratives exploring non-binary and non-human identifications and embodiments. This first institutional presentation in the UK and the largest exhibition to date in Europe also features Minoliti’s ongoing project The Feminist School of Painting, which transforms part of the gallery space into an active classroom holding bi-weekly painting workshops. In her practice Minoliti activates feminist and queer theory to deconstruct the traditional genre of painting and art historical narratives, and generate alternatives that are intersectional, inclusive and diverse.


A Yellow Rose Project
June 1 – September 15, 2021 (virtual tour available)
BU Art Galleries

A Yellow Rose Project, a collaborative photography project between women from the United States, was initiated in 2019 to mark the 2020 centennial anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment. On that day women wearing yellow roses, symbolising the fight for equal representation, gathered into a concerted bodily collective and waited to hear if their right to a voice in the government would finally be granted. The photographs in the project engage with the complicated narratives attached to the 19th Amendment and its anniversary, and confront a multitude of histories, some of which are more visible than others. A remarkable historical event to celebrate also marks a troubling moment when only some women were given the right to vote. The collection of visions and voices opens up a dialogue on the power of the movement that led to the ratification, but also on erasures and the need to remember. The presented body of work celebrates women’s resilience and bodily gestures, including the gesture of the taking a photograph, that create a visual archive of vulnerability that through a concerted collective effort becomes a strength in the common.


Photo Vogue Festival 2021: REFRAMING HISTORY Open Call

Who is telling the story? The 6th edition of the Photo Vogue Festival ‘REFRAMING HISTORY’ invites projects that propose an alternative, different way of telling a tale. Selected projects will be featured in the exhibition.

Filed under: Artists, CAA News, CWA Picks, Exhibitions

Support CAA using Amazon Smile

posted by June 22, 2021

Did you know that you can make a gift to CAA using Amazon Smile? Amazon donates 0.5% of the price of eligible smile.amazon.com purchases to the organization selected by customers — at no cost to you. Our charity link will automatically direct you to Amazon, where you will be asked to confirm that you would like your Amazon purchases to support CAA.

As a 110-year-old organization, we are proud to serve a global community of artists, designers, students, and scholars through advocacy, intellectual engagement, and a commitment to the diversity of practices and practitioners. During this pivotal moment it is more important than ever that we support our visual arts community. We hope that you will join us in our mission and help us bring our programs and publications to life by using Amazon Smile today.

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by October 14, 2020

Tropenmuseum in Amsterdam. Photo: GerardM on Wikimedia Commons via artnet News

The Netherlands Should Return Cultural Objects Looted From Former Colonies, a New Report Says—and Major Museums Agree

Already, the directors of the Rijksmuseum and Tropenmuseum, a prominent ethnographic museum in Amsterdam, said they support the statements in the report. (artnet News)

This App Can Tell You the Indigenous History of the Land You Live On

Part of a growing movement to honor native land, this app provides a resource for teaching and acknowledgement at public events. (Native Land)

Curator Nancy Spector Out at Guggenheim Museum, Basquiat Investigation Concludes

The Guggenheim announced last week that Nancy Spector, the museum’s highest-ranking curator, is departing after more than 30 years at the institution. (ARTnews)

Decolonizing and Diversifying Are Two Different Things: A Workshop Case Study

A helpful explainer focused on decolonial pedagogical tools, adapted from a CAA 2019 workshop. (AHTR)

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Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by October 07, 2020

Hank Willis Thomas, Colonialism and Abstract Art, 2019, image courtesy the artist via Hyperallergic

The Mellon Foundation Will Invest a Staggering $250 Million Over Five Years to Overhaul America’s Public Monuments

The “Monuments Project” is the biggest initiative in the foundation’s history. (artnet News)

What It Takes to Make Museum Boards More Diverse

“When an institution says that they are down for Black Lives Matter, I know that I, and most of my friends, started looking up who that institution is. Who’s on their corporate board, who are their managers?” (Artsy)

Hank Willis Thomas Gives an Infamous Modern Art Diagram a Postcolonial Update

The conceptual artist updated the well-known chart by Alfred J. Barr, Jr. for a new exhibition in Brussels. (Hyperallergic)

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Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by September 30, 2020

The La Jornada Together We Can Food Pantry at Queens Museum. Photo courtesy of the Queens Museum.

Artists Julie Mehretu, Patrisse Cullors, and Tourmaline Are Among Time Magazine’s Most Influential People of 2020

The annual list recognizes engagement with and contributions to contemporary culture. (Artsy)

Seeing Our Own Reflection in the Birth of the Self-Portrait

This New York Times interactive on Albrecht Dürer is a great teaching tool on self-portraiture and the idea of authorship. (New York Times)

Blackness, Immobility, & Visibility in Europe (1600-1800) – A Collaborative Timeline

Explore a crowdsourced timeline that allows users to cross-reference artworks and historical events in spatial and visual relation to one another. (Journal 18)

During Lockdown, the Queens Museum Became a Food Pantry. Now, It’s Reopening—and Keeping the Kitchen Intact

To date, the museum has fed 9,650 families in Corona, Queens, and hopes to scale up to be able to feed 1,000 families a week. (artnet News)

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Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by September 23, 2020

Change Must Come, Face Me Por Favor, photo by Heather Shirey via Hyperallergic

A Virtual Museum Preserves Black Lives Matter Protest Art

The University of St. Thomas has created the Urban Art Mapping George Floyd & Anti-Racist Street Art database, which has received over 1,000 submissions. (Hyperallergic)

Brooklyn Museum to Sell Twelve Works as Pandemic Changes the Rules

The museum is putting twelve works up for auction at Christie’s next month—including paintings by Cranach, Courbet and Corot—to raise funds for the care of its collection. (New York Times)

The Hard-Hit Arts Sector Is Facing a Brain Drain as Ambitious Workers Seek Greener Pastures

In addition to the financial toll, experts worry that the field has experienced a catastrophic loss of talent and institutional knowledge. (artnet News)

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Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by September 16, 2020

Historically the shrunken head exhibit has been a major visitor attraction at the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford © Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford/Photograph: Hugh Warwick, via The Art Newspaper

Oxford Museum Removes ‘Racist’ Shrunken Heads from Display After 80 Years

Exhibiting Tsantsas “reinforced racist and stereotypical thinking that goes against the museum’s core values,” says the Pitt Rivers Museum’s director. (The Art Newspaper)

Where Does a Work of Art Belong?

“To whom does a significant work of art belong? To humanity at large? To the culture that created it? To its current owner?” (Hyperallergic)

Burning Out

Professors say faculty burnout is always a real threat, but especially now, and that institutions should act before it’s too late. (Inside Higher Ed)

Yale University Decides Not to Accept New Graduate Students to the Art History Department in 2021

The school has announced it will hold off on bringing new students into the program until 2022, in order “to adequately support its students during the COVID-19 pandemic.” (artnet News)

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Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by September 09, 2020

The British Museum recently reopened after a five-month closure due to coronavirus. Photo: Tom Jamieson for The New York Times

The British Museum Reopens to a World That Has Changed

A look at the museum’s attempts to alter several exhibitions to clarify its links to slavery and colonialism. (New York Times)

What to Know About College Reopening in a Pandemic

A discussion and reading list focused on how the decisions are being made to reopen higher ed. (WBUR)

Responding to Widespread Demands, Museums Are Acquiring More Works by Artists of Color. But How They Do So Matters More Than Ever

“The controversy that erupted last week over the Whitney Museum’s planned—and quickly cancelled—exhibition of works, many by Black artists, that the museum acquired through a fundraiser in June has shined a spotlight on a simmering issue.” (artnet News)

What Should a Museum Look Like in 2020?

Artists, curators, and administrators imagine templates for change. (Vanity Fair)

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Filed under: CAA News

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by August 26, 2020

Black Lives Matter, Philly Real Justice, and thousands of Philadelphians rallied on the steps of the Philadelphia Art Museum. Photo: Cory Clark/NurPhoto via Getty Images, via artnet News

The George Floyd Protests Spurred Museums to Promise Change. Here’s What They’ve Actually Done So Far

A look at the changes museums are putting into practice. (artnet News)

Higher Ed’s Moment of Truth

Throughout the summer, faculty members and students have raised concerns about various aspects of colleges’ reopening plans, with many of the concerns centered on the safety of returning to campus and about the adequacy of testing. (Inside Higher Ed)

Museums Have a Docent Problem

Inside the struggle to train a mostly white, unpaid tour guide corps to talk about race. (Slate)

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Filed under: CAA News