CAA News Today

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by October 14, 2020

Tropenmuseum in Amsterdam. Photo: GerardM on Wikimedia Commons via artnet News

The Netherlands Should Return Cultural Objects Looted From Former Colonies, a New Report Says—and Major Museums Agree

Already, the directors of the Rijksmuseum and Tropenmuseum, a prominent ethnographic museum in Amsterdam, said they support the statements in the report. (artnet News)

This App Can Tell You the Indigenous History of the Land You Live On

Part of a growing movement to honor native land, this app provides a resource for teaching and acknowledgement at public events. (Native Land)

Curator Nancy Spector Out at Guggenheim Museum, Basquiat Investigation Concludes

The Guggenheim announced last week that Nancy Spector, the museum’s highest-ranking curator, is departing after more than 30 years at the institution. (ARTnews)

Decolonizing and Diversifying Are Two Different Things: A Workshop Case Study

A helpful explainer focused on decolonial pedagogical tools, adapted from a CAA 2019 workshop. (AHTR)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by October 07, 2020

Hank Willis Thomas, Colonialism and Abstract Art, 2019, image courtesy the artist via Hyperallergic

The Mellon Foundation Will Invest a Staggering $250 Million Over Five Years to Overhaul America’s Public Monuments

The “Monuments Project” is the biggest initiative in the foundation’s history. (artnet News)

What It Takes to Make Museum Boards More Diverse

“When an institution says that they are down for Black Lives Matter, I know that I, and most of my friends, started looking up who that institution is. Who’s on their corporate board, who are their managers?” (Artsy)

Hank Willis Thomas Gives an Infamous Modern Art Diagram a Postcolonial Update

The conceptual artist updated the well-known chart by Alfred J. Barr, Jr. for a new exhibition in Brussels. (Hyperallergic)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by September 30, 2020

The La Jornada Together We Can Food Pantry at Queens Museum. Photo courtesy of the Queens Museum.

Artists Julie Mehretu, Patrisse Cullors, and Tourmaline Are Among Time Magazine’s Most Influential People of 2020

The annual list recognizes engagement with and contributions to contemporary culture. (Artsy)

Seeing Our Own Reflection in the Birth of the Self-Portrait

This New York Times interactive on Albrecht Dürer is a great teaching tool on self-portraiture and the idea of authorship. (New York Times)

Blackness, Immobility, & Visibility in Europe (1600-1800) – A Collaborative Timeline

Explore a crowdsourced timeline that allows users to cross-reference artworks and historical events in spatial and visual relation to one another. (Journal 18)

During Lockdown, the Queens Museum Became a Food Pantry. Now, It’s Reopening—and Keeping the Kitchen Intact

To date, the museum has fed 9,650 families in Corona, Queens, and hopes to scale up to be able to feed 1,000 families a week. (artnet News)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by September 23, 2020

Change Must Come, Face Me Por Favor, photo by Heather Shirey via Hyperallergic

A Virtual Museum Preserves Black Lives Matter Protest Art

The University of St. Thomas has created the Urban Art Mapping George Floyd & Anti-Racist Street Art database, which has received over 1,000 submissions. (Hyperallergic)

Brooklyn Museum to Sell Twelve Works as Pandemic Changes the Rules

The museum is putting twelve works up for auction at Christie’s next month—including paintings by Cranach, Courbet and Corot—to raise funds for the care of its collection. (New York Times)

The Hard-Hit Arts Sector Is Facing a Brain Drain as Ambitious Workers Seek Greener Pastures

In addition to the financial toll, experts worry that the field has experienced a catastrophic loss of talent and institutional knowledge. (artnet News)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by September 16, 2020

Historically the shrunken head exhibit has been a major visitor attraction at the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford © Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford/Photograph: Hugh Warwick, via The Art Newspaper

Oxford Museum Removes ‘Racist’ Shrunken Heads from Display After 80 Years

Exhibiting Tsantsas “reinforced racist and stereotypical thinking that goes against the museum’s core values,” says the Pitt Rivers Museum’s director. (The Art Newspaper)

Where Does a Work of Art Belong?

“To whom does a significant work of art belong? To humanity at large? To the culture that created it? To its current owner?” (Hyperallergic)

Burning Out

Professors say faculty burnout is always a real threat, but especially now, and that institutions should act before it’s too late. (Inside Higher Ed)

Yale University Decides Not to Accept New Graduate Students to the Art History Department in 2021

The school has announced it will hold off on bringing new students into the program until 2022, in order “to adequately support its students during the COVID-19 pandemic.” (artnet News)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by September 09, 2020

The British Museum recently reopened after a five-month closure due to coronavirus. Photo: Tom Jamieson for The New York Times

The British Museum Reopens to a World That Has Changed

A look at the museum’s attempts to alter several exhibitions to clarify its links to slavery and colonialism. (New York Times)

What to Know About College Reopening in a Pandemic

A discussion and reading list focused on how the decisions are being made to reopen higher ed. (WBUR)

Responding to Widespread Demands, Museums Are Acquiring More Works by Artists of Color. But How They Do So Matters More Than Ever

“The controversy that erupted last week over the Whitney Museum’s planned—and quickly cancelled—exhibition of works, many by Black artists, that the museum acquired through a fundraiser in June has shined a spotlight on a simmering issue.” (artnet News)

What Should a Museum Look Like in 2020?

Artists, curators, and administrators imagine templates for change. (Vanity Fair)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by August 26, 2020

Black Lives Matter, Philly Real Justice, and thousands of Philadelphians rallied on the steps of the Philadelphia Art Museum. Photo: Cory Clark/NurPhoto via Getty Images, via artnet News

The George Floyd Protests Spurred Museums to Promise Change. Here’s What They’ve Actually Done So Far

A look at the changes museums are putting into practice. (artnet News)

Higher Ed’s Moment of Truth

Throughout the summer, faculty members and students have raised concerns about various aspects of colleges’ reopening plans, with many of the concerns centered on the safety of returning to campus and about the adequacy of testing. (Inside Higher Ed)

Museums Have a Docent Problem

Inside the struggle to train a mostly white, unpaid tour guide corps to talk about race. (Slate)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by August 12, 2020

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Photo: Hakim Bishara for Hyperallergic

Metropolitan Museum Will Now Pay All Interns

A $5 million gift from philanthropist Adrienne Arsht will be used to pay future interns at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. (Hyperallergic)

Where Should Art History Go in the Future? As Survey Courses Change, the Past Evolves

“[W]e instead have to take on a project that is less comfortable: constantly studying our own ignorance.” Dushko Petrovich offers his view on the future of art history. (ARTnews)

Afro-Latin American and Afro-Latinx Art Historical Resources

As part of their initiative to uplift scholarship on Afro-Latin American art history, the Association for Latin American Art has put together a bibliography of resources for research and teaching. (via Ananda Cohen-Aponte on Twitter)

What Is a Museum? A Dispute Erupts Over a New Definition

“It is easy to characterize this as a huge furor over the notion of museum definitions. But that is erroneous. What it really reflects are fundamental, transformational earth-moving changes that are taking place in museums.” – Rick West, president of the Autry National Center of the American West (New York Times)

UNC Tenured Faculty Tell Students to Stay Home Amid COVID Concerns: ‘It Is Not Safe for You to Come to Campus’

The signees encouraged everyone who could safely and financially remain at home in the fall to do so, adding that they would be choosing to teach all of their classes online. (Newsweek)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by July 29, 2020

A nearly empty Harvard Yard at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts on July 8, 2020. Photo: Tony Luong/NYT

US Rescinds Plan to Strip Visas From International Students in Online Classes

Since our last newsletter, the Trump administration said it would no longer require foreign students to attend in-person classes during the coronavirus pandemic in order to remain in the country. (New York Times)

Pushed to Address Systemic Racism, Museums Face a Reckoning

The past month has been a period of reckoning for museums and art institutions across the United States and beyond. (Artsy)

The Job Market for Young Academics Was Already Bleak—Then the Pandemic Hit. Here’s How Art-History Grad Students Are Coping With the Fallout

Some universities are finding creative ways to aid students during this period of unprecedented hardship. (artnet News)

A Call to Action: Supporting Women Faculty in the Time of COVID-19 and Beyond

Already, there are signals that the current conditions will have a differential impact on women in academe. (Medium)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by July 01, 2020

The Tsai Performance Center on the campus of Boston University, Boston. Photo: Steven Senne/AP, via WGBH

Upheaval Over Race Reaches Met Museum After Curator’s Instagram Post

A post by a longtime department chairman prompted a letter from staff on the museum’s “culture of systemic racism.” (New York Times)

College Leaders Must Explain Why—Not Just How—to Return to Campus

“I haven’t read a single announcement or plan that anchors an institution’s decisionmaking in shared community interests.” (Ed Surge)

What It Means to Be a Social Justice Curator

“Museums and institutions should be for the people; the question museums need to think about is how we can approach new viewers and welcome them into our spaces as active and equal audience members.” (Art in America)

Boston University Gives PhD Students A Choice: Come Back To Campus Or Lose Your Health Insurance And Salary

Doctoral students could be forced to take a leave of absence and lose their health insurance if they do not return to campus in the fall. (WGBH)

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