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New in caa.reviews

posted by June 21, 2019

       

Emilie Boone reviews the catalogue I Too Sing America: The Harlem Renaissance at 100, by Wil Haygood, Carole Genshaft, Nannette V. Maciejunes, Anastasia Kinigopoulo, and Drew Sawyer. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Aneta Georgievska-Shine covers the exhibition Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: Inspiration and RivalryRead the full review at caa.reviews.

Farshid Emami discusses the book Persian Art: Collecting the Arts of Iran for the V&A by Moya Carey. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by June 19, 2019

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Andrea Bowers’s artwork Open Secret at Art Basel. Photo: FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images

Artist Andrea Bowers Apologizes Over Tone-Deaf #MeToo Piece at Art Basel

“While I believe Bowers’s work is well-intentioned, to use women’s names and stories—and in Helen [Donahue]’s case, photographs of her face—without their consent in a work about consent strikes me as irresponsible at best.” – Deirdre Coyle (The Cut)

Hong Kong Pavilion at Venice Biennale Closes Amid Extradition Bill Protests

Artists and cultural workers have been among the most vocal critics of the draft law. (South China Morning Post)

Petition Filed to Create First Union for Guggenheim Museum Staff

The pay scales of workers at prestigious museums are gaining increasing attention. (New York Times)

Fifteen Young LGBTQ Artists Driving Contemporary Art Forward

Fifteen artists share the ideas behind their work and their most recent artistic endeavors. (Artsy)

Tate Britain Hangs a Diverse Display of Women Artists Out of Its Permanent Collection

The collection of sixty women artists from the museum’s permanent collection tackles the tricky terrain of museum representation. (Hyperallergic)

Filed under: CAA News

2018 CAA Annual Conference. Photo: Rafael Cardenas

In fall 2018, we announced CAA had received an anonymous gift of $1 million to fund travel for art history faculty and their students to special exhibitions related to their classwork. The generous gift established the Art History Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions.

The jury for the Art History Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions met in May 2019 to select the first group of recipients as part of the gift.

The awardees are:

Catherine Girard, Eastern Washington University
Class: Topics in Art History: Manet Inside Out
Exhibition: Manet and Modern Beauty at The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

Luis Gordo Peláez, California State University Fresno
Class: Arts of the Colonial Andes
Exhibition: Art & Empire: The Golden Age of Spain at The San Diego Museum of Art

Alison Miller, University of the South
Class: Japanese Print Culture
Exhibition: Yoshitoshi: Spirit and Spectacle at the Minneapolis Institute of Art

Rachel Stephens, University of Alabama
Class: American Portraiture
Exhibition: Black Out: Silhouettes Then and Now at the Birmingham Museum of Art

“We’re delighted to announce the inaugural recipients of the Art History Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions, a groundbreaking CAA program designed specifically to enhance students’ first-hand knowledge of works of art,” said Hunter O’Hanian, CAA’s executive director. “The new Fund places a spotlight on the critical work art history scholars are doing to grow the field, with CAA as the go-to organization supporting and advancing their work.”

The Art History Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions supports travel, lodging, and research efforts by art history students and faculty in conjunction with special museum exhibitions in the United States and throughout the world. Awards are made exclusively to support travel to exhibitions that directly correspond to the class content, and exhibitions on all artists, periods, and areas of art history are eligible.

Applications for the second round of grants will be accepted by CAA beginning in fall 2019. Deadlines and details can be found on the Travel Grants page.

New in caa.reviews

posted by June 14, 2019

 

Emily Orr covers two publications on Norman Bel Geddes, The Man Who Designed the Future by B. Alexandra Szerlip, and Nicolas P. Maffei’s Norman Bel Geddes: American Design Visionary. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Sonya S. Lee discusses the exhibition The Jeweled Isle: Art from Sri Lanka, currently on view at Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

James King, FRSC, reviews Higher States: Lawren Harris and His American Contemporaries by Roald Nasgaard and Gwendolyn Owens. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Filed under: caa.reviews

The Millard Meiss Publication Fund is made possible by a generous bequest of the late Prof. Millard Meiss. Two times each year, CAA awards grants to publishers in art history and visual culture to support presses in the publication of projects of the highest scholarly and intellectual merit that may not generate adequate financial return.

The Meiss grantees for spring 2019 are:

Bajorek, Jennifer, Unfixed: Photography and Decolonial Imagination in West Africa, Duke University Press, 2019.

Busbea, Larry, The Responsive Environment: Design, Aesthetics, and the Human in the 1970s, University of Minnesota Press, 2019.

Fozi, Shirin, Romanesque Tomb Effigies: Death and Redemption in Medieval Europe, 1000-1200, Penn State University Press, 2020.

Guinness, Katherine, Schizogenesis: The Art of Rosemarie Trockel, University of Minnesota Press, 2019.

Naoi, Nozomi, Beyond the Modern Beauty: Takehisa Yumeji and the New Mediascape of Early Twentieth-Century Japan, University of Washington Press, 2019.

Newbury, Susanna, Speculations: Art, Real Estate, and the Making of Global Los Angeles, University of Minnesota Press, 2020.

Overton, Keelan, Iran and the Deccan: Persianate Art, Culture, and Talent in Circulation, 1400-1700, Indiana University Press, 2020.

Schwartz, Vanessa R., Jet Age Aesthetic: The Glamour of Media in Motion, Yale University Press, 2020.

Sichel, Kim, Making Strange: The Modernist Photobook in France, Yale University Press, 2020.

Silberstein, Rachel, Embroidered Figures: Fashion and Commerce in Nineteenth-Century China, University of Washington Press, 2020.

VanDiver, Rebecca, Negotiating Traditions: Loïs Mailou Jones and the Composite Aesthetics of Blackness, Penn State University Press, 2020.

Zinman, Gregory Austen, Making Images Move: Handmade Cinema and the Other Arts, University of California Press, 2020.

Learn more about the Millard Meiss Publication Fund.

In commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots and in celebration of Pride Month, we’ve made a collection of articles from Art Journal and The Art Bulletin focused on LGBTQ+ histories and perspectives free to read and explore online.

These articles will remain open access on Taylor & Francis through August 31, 2019.

We wish to thank Edward Rossa, CAA Summer 2018 intern, for his research on this archive. 

Title Author Volume /Issue/Year
Things are Queer Jonathan Weinberg Volume 55/Issue 4/1996
Making Trouble for Art History: The Queer Case of Girodet James Smalls Volume 55/Issue 4/1996
Imminent Domain: Queer Space in the Built Environment Christopher Reed Volume 55/Issue 4/1996
Goodbye Lesbian/Gay History Hello Queer Sensibility Robert Atkins Volume 55/Issue 4/1996
Unmasking Pablo’s Gertrude: Queer Desire and the Subject of Portraiture Robert S. Lubar Volume 79/Issue 1/1997
Biblical Gender Bending in Harlem: The Queer Performance of Nugent’s Salome Ellen McBreen Volume 57/Issue 3/1998
The Melancholia of AIDS: Interview with Douglas Crimp Tina Takemoto Volume 62/Issue 4/2003
Love Among the Ruins: David Cannon Dashiell’s Queer Mysteries Alison Mairi Syme Volume 63/Issue 4/2004
Robert Rauschenberg’s Queer Modernism: The Early Combines and Decoration Tom Folland Volume 92/Issue 4/2010
Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives Tirza True Latimer Volume 72/Issue 2/2013
Imaginary Archives: A Dialogue Julia Bryan-Wilson & Cheryl Dunye Volume 72/Issue 2/2013
Queer Pier: 40 Years Thomas J. Lax, Jeannine Tang, A. Naomi Jackson, Parallel Lines, Ginger Brooks Takahashi & Marvin J. Taylor Volume 72/Issue 2/2013
Queer Formalisms: Jennifer Doyle and David Getsy in Conversation Jennifer Doyle & David J. Getsy Volume 72/Issue 4/2013
Why I Hate Diversity Jonathan D. Katz Volume 76/Issue 3-4/2017
Reading Jack Smith’s The Beautiful Book Reparatively Paisid Aramphongphan Volume 78/Issue 1/2019

Learn more about Art Journal and The Art Bulletin.

Filed under: Art Bulletin, Art Journal, Publications, Research — Tags:

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by June 12, 2019

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Photo Credit: Fay Fox

Facebook to Meet #WeTheNipple Campaigners Amid Nudity Censorship Row

The company’s announcement comes after a protest outside its New York headquarters, co-organized by the National Coalition Against Censorship and artist Spencer Tunick. CAA is one of over 250 signatories on the NCAC’s open letter to Facebook. (CNN)

‘It’s Helpful to Know All Scales’: Online Spreadsheet Discloses Museum Workers’ Salaries

In a sign of increasing demand for transparency at art institutions, hundreds of arts workers have anonymously shared their salary and employment information in an online spreadsheet. (ARTnews)

Protests at Oberlin Labeled a Bakery Racist. Now, the College Has Been Ordered to Pay $11 Million for Libel.

The verdict comes at a time of heightened scrutiny of free speech on college campuses. (Washington Post)

Stonewall: When Resistance Became Too Loud to Ignore

A look at the exhibitions marking the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, in conjunction with LGBTQ Pride Month. (New York Times)

Artists in 18 Major US Museums Are 85% White and 87% Male, Study Says

Researchers surveyed the collections of 18 major US museums to quantify the gender, ethnic, and racial composition of the artists represented in their collections. (Hyperallergic)

Biggest Offender in Outsize Debt: Graduate Schools

New data shows that the market for master’s degrees behaves in strange and erratic ways. (New York Times)

Filed under: CAA News

CAA-Getty Scholars at the 2019 Annual Conference in New York. Photo: Ben Fractenberg

The Getty Foundation has awarded CAA a grant to fund the CAA-Getty International Program for a ninth consecutive year. The Foundation’s support will enable CAA to bring twenty international visual-arts professionals to the 108th Annual Conference, taking place February 12-15, 2020 in Chicago. Fifteen individuals will be first-time participants in the program and five will be alumni, returning to present papers during the conference. The CAA-Getty International Program provides funds for travel expenses, hotel accommodations, per diems, conference registrations, and one-year CAA memberships to art historians, artists who teach art history, and museum curators.

The application portal is now open. Grant guidelines and the 2020 application can be found here.

“The Getty Foundation is proud to continue its commitment to the CAA-Getty International Program and offer support that brings together diverse scholars from around the world,” says Joan Weinstein, acting director of the Getty Foundation. “CAA’s dedication to this joint program strengthens the annual conference and builds the field of art history as a global discipline.”

Since the CAA-Getty International Program’s inception in 2012, it has brought over 120 first-time attendees from 46 countries to CAA’s Annual Conference. Historically, the majority of international registrants at the conference have come from North America, the United Kingdom, and Western European countries. The CAA-Getty International Program has greatly diversified attendance, adding scholars from Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, Africa, Asia, Southeast Asia, the Caribbean, and South America. The majority of the participants teach art history, visual studies, art theory, or architectural history at the university level; others are museum curators or researchers.

One measure of the program’s success is the remarkable number of international collaborations that have ensued, including an ongoing study of similarities and differences in the history of art among Eastern European countries and South Africa, attendance at other international conferences, publications in international journals, and participation in panels and sessions at subsequent CAA Annual Conferences. Former grant recipients have become ambassadors of CAA in their countries, sharing knowledge gained at the Annual Conference with their colleagues at home. The value of attending a CAA Annual Conference as a participant in the CAA-Getty International Program was succinctly summarized by alumnus Nazar Kozak, Senior Researcher, Department of Art Studies, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine “To put it simply, I understood that I can become part of a global scholarly community. I felt like I belong here.”

Read our Member Spotlight with Nazar Kozak.

About the Getty Foundation

The Getty Foundation fulfills the philanthropic mission of the Getty Trust by supporting individuals and institutions committed to advancing the greater understanding and preservation of the visual arts in Los Angeles and throughout the world. Through strategic grant initiatives, it strengthens art history as a global discipline, promotes the interdisciplinary practice of conservation, increases access to museum and archival collections, and develops current and future leaders in the visual arts. It carries out its work in collaboration with the other Getty Programs to ensure that they individually and collectively achieve maximum effect.

CWA Picks for June 2019

posted by June 11, 2019

CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts selects the best in feminist art and scholarship to share with CAA members on a monthly basis. See the picks for June below.

Sara Cwynar, Tracy (Cezanne), 2017. Dye sublimation print. Courtesy of the artist, Cooper Cole, Toronto, Foxy Production, New York. © Sara Cwynar

SARA CWYNAR: IMAGE MODEL MUSE

March 8 – August 4, 2019
Milwaukee Art Museum

Sara Cwynar (b. 1985, Canada) explores both process and the power of the media in a variety of media including photography, collage, book-making and installation. Her first solo exhibition in the US, IMAGE MODEL MUSE at the Milwaukee Art Museum will feature three of her latest films—Soft Film (2016), Rose Gold (2017), and Cover Girl (2018) alongside photographs from her ongoing Tracy series (2008-current). Named for the model in the photographs, the Tracy images acknowledge the history of representation of women with discarded, high-modernist-era designed objects, connecting “the way we treat objects and the way we treat humans,” according to the artist in an Aperture interview. The photographs and films are multi-layered, intricate and deep with eye-catching, bright hues and sharp design, creating bold and successful works aesthetically and substantially. Her films combine these elements with traditions of experimental film and performance video, further questioning issues around imagery and circulation via the internet. Senses and minds are sure to be exercised at this dense exhibit.

JORDAN CASTEEL: RETURNING THE GAZE

May 1 – August 18, 2019
Denver Art Museum

This first major museum exhibition of artist Jordan Casteel (b. 1989, Denver) presents almost thirty paintings, from 2014 to present, showing the artist’s evolving practice and themes from cityscapes and subway scenes to women and local business owners. The oversized portraits with bold colors and intentional heavy contrast exude a clear and bold presence of the individuals and places that perhaps often aren’t paid more than a glance. In Benyam (2018), a trio of individuals at what appears to be a wine bar, look square into the viewers, their poses comfortable but intentional, background details like art on the walls and a plant, wine glasses, lacking much detail, complete the aura of the image, questioning who and what this art is about—those in the painting, those looking, or the moment of looking? Figures depicted sometimes vulnerable, sometimes jovial, always at ease, each one staring deeply at the viewer, presenting an intimate exhibition experience.

SAYA WOOLFALK: EXPEDITION TO THE CHIMACLOUD

March 1 – September 1, 2019
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City

Artist Saya Woolfalk (b. 1979, Japan) created ChimaCloud, an alternative digital universe, via an extensive narrative of a fictional race of women she named the Empathics. This exhibition presents an immersive, multi-media experience incorporating themes of cultural hybridization, technology, identity, ceremonial rituals, and science fiction. Especially for this exhibition installation, Woolfalk drew her inspiration directly from the Nelson-Atkins permanent collection, adding a contextual and localized element. “What I hope is to have people feel a little bit distracted…and because they’re so unclear about where they are, they become open…so that, they can take that sense of openness with them into their everyday lives,” said the artist on the museum website. The bright colors, patterns, figures, and lights will likely transport and fulfill the artist’s want.

The 58th International Art Exhibition

May 11 – November 24, 2019
Biennale Arte 2019, Venice, Italy

For the first time in the history of the Venice Biennale half of those artists who contributed to the main exhibition entitled May You Live in Interesting Times, curated by Ralph Rugoff, are women.

Cathy Wilkes
British Pavilion

Cathy Wilkes’ exhibition, featuring new works created for the Biennale Arte 2019 in Venice, occupies the six rooms of the British Pavilion. The viewers are invited to a space filled with melancholy, stillness, and breath-taking natural Venetian daylight. Visiting Venice Biennale can be an overwhelming experience, with the abundance of artworks, the crowds, the queues and the discussions heard almost everywhere. Wilkes, with her characteristic sensibility and attention to the minutiae of matter, created an intimate space that seems to stand still. She stripped the Pavilion of any adornments and insisted on natural light soaking in. The sculptural installations are accompanied by prints and paintings changing hues and tones with the daily and nightly transformations of light. Those variations in colors and textures brought together into intimate relationships and juxtapositions are subtle and interconnected. Wilkes created a space filled with loss but also hope, invoking a sense of daily rituals, scattered across the rooms, disrupted but also complete.

Renate Bertlmann
Austrian Pavilion

For the first time in the history of Austrian contribution to the Venice Biennale, a female artist widely acclaimed in the international feminist avant-garde, Renate Bertlmann, was selected for a solo exhibition in the Austrian Pavilion. Her installation, entitled Discordo Ergo Sum (I disagree, therefore I am), playing on the Descartesian philosophical principle ‘Cogito Ergo Sum’ (I think, therefore I am), is an ironic statement and a subversion of established sociopolitical hierarchies and dichotomies, also within the art world. The artist appropriates a rich vocabulary of social symbols and reviews them from a feminist position encouraging multitude and diversity. At the heart of the exhibition Bertlmann installed a grid of 312 glass roses (hand blown in Murano) out of which protrude razor sharp blades. This is accompanied by a series of works exploring body images and a piece in front of the pavilion, Amo Ergo Sum (I love, therefore I am), which raise issues concerning the transformative potential of art, and gender violence.

Filed under: CWA Picks — Tags:

New in caa.reviews

posted by June 07, 2019

     

Erin Silver discusses Jennifer L. Shaw’s Exist Otherwise: The Life and Works of Claude Cahun. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Megan Driscoll reviews Henry Taylor: The Only Portrait I Ever Painted of My Momma Was Stolen, with contributions by Zadie Smith, Sarah Elizabeth Lewis, Charles Gaines, and Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

John Muse delves into the exhibition Suzanne Bocanegra: Poorly Watched Girls. Read the full review at caa.reviews

Filed under: caa.reviews