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New in caa.reviews

posted by January 24, 2020

   

Delia Cosentino reviews The Codex Mexicanus: A Guide to Life in Late Sixteenth-Century New Spain by Lori Boornazian Diel. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Natalie Dupêcher discusses Susan Laxton’s Surrealism at Play. Read the full review at caa.reviews

Jessi DiTillio writes about the exhibition catalog Art and Race Matters: The Career of Robert Colescott, edited by Raphaela Platow and Lowery Stokes Sims. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Filed under: caa.reviews

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 22, 2020

Museum Tour Toolkit: Developing an Inclusive Tour

A free resource from the Minneapolis Institute of Art, this toolkit for developing an inclusive museum tour was compiled through discussions with more than 150 docents and guides over a two-year period. (MIA)

History Shows What’s Wrong With the Idea That War Is ‘Normal’ in the Middle East

“This trope is frequently turned to by those who would have the world believe that war in the Middle East is somehow innate and inevitable.” (Time)

Germany Opens an Official ‘Help Desk’ for Those Seeking to Reclaim Nazi-Looted Art, Simplifying a Long-Opaque Process

The office in Berlin, led by art historian Susanne Meyer-Abich, aims to guide people around the bureaucratic hurdles for claiming back their cultural assets. (artnet News)

Philadelphia Mayor: Museum Should ‘Strengthen’ Sexual Harassment Policy

The mayor’s remarks come after former Philadelphia Museum of Art employee Joshua Helmer was forced to resign from his Erie Art Museum post. (New York Times)

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Meera Sethi and Arti Sandhu

posted by January 20, 2020

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

On this week’s podcast, Canadian contemporary visual artist Meera Sethi and Arti Sandhu, Associate Professor of Fashion Design at the University of Cincinnati, engage in a rich conversation around a 2019 ad campaign by well-known Indian fashion label Raw Mango.

Raw Mango featured a Kashmiri bride to promote their winter festive collection, while at the same time the state of Kashmir was under political lockdown. Meera and Arti speak about issues around politics, privilege, and the use of craft within Indian high-fashion.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

New in caa.reviews

posted by January 17, 2020

      

Joyce S. Cheng discusses The Forces of Form in German Modernism by Malika Maskarinec. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Nikolaus Dietrich reviews The Berlin Painter and His World: Athenian Vase-Painting in the Early Fifth Century B.C., edited by J. Michael Padgett. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Max Koss writes about Jenny Anger’s Four Metaphors of Modernism: From Der Sturm to the Société Anonyme. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Filed under: caa.reviews

Protesters in New Delhi protest against violence at Jawaharlal Nehru University. Photo: Anushree Fadnavis/Reuters, via New York Times

The American Council for Southern Asian Art (ACSAA), a CAA Affiliate Society, has condemned the ongoing assault on democratic institutions and intellectual freedoms in India. Read their statement below.

The American Council of Southern Asian Art (ACSAA), a non-profit organization and a community of academics and humanists, condemns the ongoing assault on democratic institutions and intellectual freedoms in India.

Both the Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA), signed on 11 December 2019, and the National Register of Citizens (NRC) Act, to be implemented in 2021, are openly discriminatory laws. We denounce any attempt at exclusion based on religion, caste, gender, race, or sexual identity, and find both laws to be antithetical to the Indian constitution and its democracy. In particular, as researchers and teachers of India’s art and architecture across millennia, we are committed to preserving the rich contributions of Muslims to its visual culture and intellectual life. We see this commitment as directly threatened by the violent, often state-sanctioned, erasure of such contributions, in instances such as the demolition of the Babri Masjid, the occupation of Kashmir, the renaming of cities, and the rewriting of academic curricula along Hindutva lines.

We stand in full support of the students and teachers at Aligarh Muslim University and the Jamia Millia Islamia, following the events of 15 December 2019; at Jawaharlal Nehru University, following events there on 5 January 2020; and everyone currently participating in peaceful protests and demonstrations across the country. We see the brutal attack at JNU—organized and executed by members of the Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad (ABVP), the student faction of the Hindutva organization, the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) and, with the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), a member of the Sangh Parivar—as one more instance of a widespread denial of the rights of Indian citizens to critique their government peacefully and openly.

The accusations of “anti-nationalism” directed at marginalized communities at these confrontations – particularly Muslims, Dalits, and women – are reminders of the extent to which extremists will go to erode the secular principles on which the country was founded.

To date, there have been no arrests or investigations into the identity of the attackers at JNU, despite indisputable evidence. We deplore the negligence of the Delhi Police, who looked on as the attacks happened, and call for both an immediate investigation and the resignation of JNU’s Vice Chancellor, M. Jagadesh Kumar. Following as it does the instances of police violence at Aligarh Muslim University and Jamia Millia Islamia, as well as long-term interventions including cuts to funding and fee hikes, the JNU attack urgently increases our concern, as part of the global academic community, for public higher education and critical thought in India.

The American Council for Southern Asian Art (ACSAA) is dedicated to advancing the study and awareness of the art of South and Southeast Asia and the Himalayan regions, spanning all periods and forms of artistic production.


Related reading: In Photos: The World’s Largest Democracy Is in Upheaval (Quartz India, December 15, 2019)

Police Fire Tear Gas as Delhi Protesters Decry Citizenship Law (Al Jazeera, December 15, 2019)

I Saw Police Stand by as Masked Men Attacked Students at a Top Delhi University. It Was Yet Another Assault on India’s Intellectuals (Time, January 8, 2020)

Behind Campus Attack in India, Some See a Far-Right Agenda (New York Times, January 10, 2020)

Coffee Gathering: Differentiating Visual Arts Administration and Museum Studies Programs

On Tuesday, February 6 at 2pm (EST) we will be online with Bruce J. Altshuler, Director and Professor of Museum Studies at New York University and Sandra Lang, Director and Professor of Visual Arts Administration at New York University to discuss their respective programs. Joining them will be Visual Arts Administration student Laura Busby and Museum Studies student Olivia Knauss.

For participant bios, see the full post on RAAMP.

To join this Coffee Gathering, please email Cali Buckley at cbuckley@collegeart.org.  

RAAMP Coffee Gatherings are monthly virtual chats aimed at giving participants an opportunity to informally discuss a topic that relates to their work as academic art museum professionals. Learn more here.

Submit to RAAMP

RAAMP (Resources for Academic Art Museum Professionals) aims to strengthen the educational mission of academic art museums by providing a publicly accessible repository of resources, online forums, and relevant news and information. Visit RAAMP to discover the newest resources and contribute.

RAAMP is a project of CAA with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 15, 2020

Mario Moore, Several Lifetimes, 2019. Courtesy of the artist.

Most Paintings on Princeton’s Campus Are of Dead White Men. But One Artist Is Adding Equally Grand Portraits of Its Cooks and Cleaners

Created during a year-long fellowship, artist Mario Moore’s portrait series honors service workers on the Princeton University campus. (artnet News)

Free Your Mind: A Speculative Review of #NewMoMA

“The museum has given over the ground floor to a new childcare facility, available to all its staff. The higher floors of the extension will provide affordable housing for low-income workers in the arts…” From Claire Bishop and Nikki Columbus, a speculative review of the “new MoMA.” (Paper Monument)

Museum Director Forced Out Amid Harassment Complaints

Joshua Helmer was removed at the Erie Art Museum after a recent New York Times article about complaints during his tenure at the museum and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. (New York Times)

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Filed under: CAA News

Jesse Reed and Maggie Paxton

posted by January 13, 2020

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

On this week’s podcast, two young high-profile designers talk about how they use research and create meaning in Fashion and Graphic Design. They also describe concepts for experimental studio projects that could be used in a design curriculum.

Maggie Paxton is a multi-category designer with a focus in footwear, currently working for Marc Jacobs on his runway and contemporary shoe collections. Maggie is a resident of Brooklyn, but travels often to Venehtsia, Italy for shoemaking purposes. Aside from shoes of all kinds, Maggie’s other interests include antiques and oddities, folk art and Americana, mycology, counterculture art and fashion, and logos of all varieties.

Jesse Reed previously worked as an associate partner under Michael Bierut at the New York office of Pentagram. While at Pentagram, his clients included New York University, Hillary for America, Wildlife Conservation Society, Bobby Flay, Syracuse University, and Saks Fifth Avenue, among others. In 2017, Jesse co-founded Order, a design office in Brooklyn, along with fellow partner, Hamish Smyth. He and Hamish are also the co-founders of Standards Manual, an independent publishing imprint focusing on the preservation of graphic design history, such as the NYCTA Graphics Standards Manual, and the NASA Graphics Standards Manual reissues, among others. Jesse has taught at the University of Cincinnati and Parsons New School for Design. His courses covered icon/symbol systems and branding development.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

New in caa.reviews

posted by January 10, 2020

    

Emily Joyce Evans reviews the C/O Berlin exhibition Boris Mikhailov: Before Sleep/After Drinking. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Lyle Massey considers The “Fabrica” of Andreas Vesalius: A Worldwide Descriptive Census, Ownership, and Annotations of the 1543 and 1555 Editions by Dániel Margócsy, Mark Somos, and Stephen N. Joffe. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Marcus B. Burke discusses Felipe Pereda’s Crime and Illusion: The Art of Truth in the Spanish Golden AgeRead the full review at caa.reviews.

Filed under: caa.reviews

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 08, 2020

The archaelogical site and ruins of gates and columns of the Persian Achaemenid dynasty ancient capital city of Persepolis. Photo by Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto via Getty Images, via artnet News

President Trump’s Threat to Bomb Iranian Cultural Sites ‘Must Be Condemned,’ Say Outraged Museum Directors, Politicians, and Scholars

Cultural figures and scholars around the world have condemned Trump’s statements. (artnet News)

Update: The Pentagon Has Rejected Trump’s Threat to Bomb Iran’s Heritage Sites. Here’s What May Have Been Saved (artnet News)

Reimagining Museum Design, With Education at the Forefront

“Education departments have generally been the most imaginative, responsive, and inclusive arms of museums. So, why are they not given the highest consideration in new museum building planning?” (Hyperallergic)

Ten Rules for (Possibly) Succeeding in Academia through Upward Kindness

A satirical article on tips for “upward toxicity” in academia was Times Higher Education’s most-read article of 2019. In response—and in the spirit of the new year—here are ten rules for success through upward kindness. (THE)

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Filed under: CAA News