CAA News Today

Meet the 2022 Wyeth Award Winners 

posted by November 30, 2022

Anton Refregier, History of San Francisco, 1941-1948, mural, panel 2: “Indians by the Golden Gate,” Rincon Center, San Francisco, California, public domain

Since 2005, the Wyeth Foundation for American Art has supported the publication of books on American art through the Wyeth Foundation for American Art Publication Grant, administered by CAA. The 2022 grantees are:

  • Siobhan Angus, Camera Geologica: Temporality, Materiality, and Mining in Climate Breakdown, Duke University Press
  • Julia Bailey, Painting and Paranoia: The Specter of Communist Art in Cold War USA, University of Illinois Press
  • Janet Berlo, Not Native American Art? Fakes, Replicas, and Invented Traditions, University of Washington Press
  • Stephanie Buhmann, Frederick Kiesler: Galaxies, The Green Box, Berlin
  • Colby Chamberlain, Fluxus Administration: George Maciunas and the Art of Paperwork, University of Chicago Press
  • Jessica L. Horton, Earth Diplomacy: Indigenous American Art and Reciprocity, 1953–1973, Duke University Press
  • Darren Newbury, American Perspectives in Africa: Photographic Diplomacy and the Cold War Imagination, Penn State University Press
  • Louise Siddons, Good Pictures Are a Strong Weapon: Laura Gilpin and Navajo Sovereignty, University of Minnesota Press

The list of all recipients of the Wyeth Foundation for American Art Publication Grant from 2005 to the present can be found here.

Filed under: Awards

George Stubbs, A Lion Attacking a Horse, Oil on canvas, 1762, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

MEET THE GRANTEES

Twice a year, CAA awards grants through the Millard Meiss Publication Fund to support book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of art, visual studies, and related subjects that have been accepted by a publisher on their merits, but cannot be published in the most desirable form without a subsidy.

Thanks to the generous bequest of the late Prof. Millard Meiss, CAA began awarding these publishing grants in 1975.

FALL 2022 GRANTEES

Paloma Checa-Gismero, The Early Biennial Boom and the Making of Global Contemporary Art, Duke University Press 

Denva Gallant, Illustrating the Vitae patrum: The Rise of the Eremitic Ideal in Fourteenth Century Italy, Penn State University Press  

Katie Hornstein, Myth and Menagerie: Seeing Lions in Nineteenth-Century France, Yale University Press  

Sujatha Meegama, Temples to the Buddha and the Gods: The Transnational Drāviḍa Tradition of Architecture in Sri Lanka, University of Hawaii Press  

Morgan Ng, The Stratified City: Military Architecture and Urban Experience in Renaissance Italy, Yale University Press  

Naomi Pitamber, Byzantium and Landscapes of Loss: The Recreation of Constantinople in the Laskarid and Palaiologan Eras, Cambridge University Press  

Filed under: Awards

Finalists for the 2023 Morey and Barr Awards

posted by November 28, 2022

CAA is pleased to announce the 2023 finalists for the Charles Rufus Morey Book Award and the two Alfred H. Barr Jr. Awards. The winners of the three prizes, along with the recipients of other Awards for Distinction, will be announced in January 2023 and presented during Convocation in conjunction with CAA’s 111th Annual Conference, February 15–18, 2023.  

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award Shortlist, 2023 

Cécile Fromont, Images on a Mission in Early Modern Kongo and Angola, Pennsylvania State University Press, 2022  

Sylvia Houghteling, The Art of Cloth in Mughal India, Princeton University Press, 2022

Sonya S. Lee, Temples in the Cliffside: Buddhist Art in Sichuan, University of Washington Press, 2022

Natalia Majluf, Inventing Indigenism: Francisco Laso’s Image of Modern Peru, University of Texas Press, 2021 

Thy Phu, Warring Visions, Duke University Press, 2022 

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award Shortlist, 2023 

Darsie Alexander and Sam Sackeroff, eds., Afterlives: Recovering the Lost Stories of Looted Art, Yale University Press and the Jewish Museum, New York 

Kristin Juarez, Rebecca Peabody, and Glenn Phillips, eds., Blondell Cummings: Dance as Moving Pictures, X Artists’ Books and Art + Practice 

Victoria I. Lyall and Terezita Romo, eds., Traitor, Survivor, Icon: The Legacy of La Malinche, Yale University Press and Denver Art Museum 

Julia Burtenshaw, Héctor García Botero, Diana Magaloni, and María Alicia Uribe Villegas, The Portable Universe / El universo en tus manos: Thought and Splendor of Indigenous Colombia, DelMonico Books and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art 

Jessica Niebel, Hayao Miyazaki, DelMonico Books and the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures 

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums, Libraries, Collections, and Exhibitions Shortlist, 2023 

Katherine D. Alcauskas, ed., Michael Rakowitz: Nimrud, DelMonico Books and Wellin Museum of Art, Hamilton College 

Janet Dees, ed., A Site of Struggle: American Art against Anti-Black Violence, Princeton University Press and The Block Museum of Art, Northwestern University 

Adriano Pedrosa and Tomás Toledo, eds., Afro-Atlantic Histories, DelMonico Books and the Museu de Arte de São Paulo Assis Chateaubriand 

Janice Glowski, ed., The Pandemic Portraits by Nicholas Hill, The Frank Museum of Art, Otterbein University 

 

Filed under: Annual Conference, Awards

Announcing the 2023 Distinguished Scholar

posted by November 15, 2022

We are delighted to announce the Distinguished Scholar Session at the 111th CAA Annual Conference will honor Edward J. Sullivan. This session will highlight his career and provide an opportunity for dialogue between and among colleagues. This event will be held in-person at the New York Hilton Midtown during the 111th Annual Conference, February 16, 2022 at 4:30–6:00 pm.

Established in 2001, the Distinguished Scholar Session illuminates and celebrates the contributions of senior art historians. The Annual Conference Committee identifies a distinguished scholar each year who then invites a group of colleagues to create the session. The honoree’s involvement is fundamental to the series, which has become a tradition that gives voice to the continuities and ruptures that have shaped art-historical scholarship from the twentieth century into the new millennium.

Access to this program requires registration and is included with an All Access–level registration. Recordings will be accessible to registrants after the event. Register here.

Sullivan’s work has been transformative for the field of art history, especially in relation to the study and elevation of Latin American and Caribbean, Latina/o/x art and artists, and for the advancement of women and the BIPOC and LGBTQIA+ communities in these regions.

Edward J. Sullivan is the Helen Gould Shepard Professor in the History of Art at New York University (Institute of Fine Arts and the Department of Art History). Since receiving his PhD from NYU’s Institute of Fine Arts in 1979 (with a dissertation on painting in Madrid after the death of Velázquez) he has taught at Hunter College, Williams College, the University of Miami, and Trinity College, Dublin. However, his service as professor and administrator at New York University has been the defining aspect of his professional career. Sullivan has mentored hundreds of students at the undergraduate and graduate levels. His fields of research and teaching focus on a wide variety of geographical and temporal areas from Viceregal art in the Americas and the Philippines, to nineteenth-, twentieth-, and twenty-first-century art in Mexico, Central and South America, the United States, and the Caribbean. Sullivan has also had a parallel career as an independent curator and has worked on exhibitions in museums and cultural institutions throughout the US, Latin America, and Europe. He is the author of more than thirty books and exhibition catalogs, among which are The Language of Objects in the Art of the Americas (Yale University Press, 2007), Fragile Demon: Juan Soriano in Mexico 1935–1950 (Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2008), Continental Shifts: The Art of Edouard Duval Carrié (Haitian Cultural Institute 2008), Nueva York 1613–1945 (Scala Books, 2010), From San Juan to Paris and Back: Francisco Oller and Caribbean Art in the Era of impressionism (Yale University Press, 2014), Making the Americas Modern: Hemispheric Art 1910–1960 (Laurence King, 2018), and Brazilian Modern: The Living Art of Roberto Burle Marx (New York Botanical Garden, 2018).

The panel will include Ilona Katzew (Los Angeles County Museum of Art), Estrellita Brodsky (Another Space), Sean Nesselrode-Moncada (Rhode Island School of Design), Joseph Shaikewitz (Institute of Fine Arts), and Lynda Klich (City University of New York, Hunter College) as moderator.

Filed under: Annual Conference, Awards

Every year at its Annual Conference in February, CAA gives its prestigious Distinguished Awards to professionals in the visual arts. With these annual awards, CAA seeks to honor individual artists, art historians, authors, curators, and critics whose accomplishments transcend their individual disciplines and contribute to the profession as a whole and to the world at large. We share a closer look at the careers of two individuals who received Distinguished Awards, Zahira Véliz Bomford and Fred Hagstrom.

Watch this video to learn more about Zahira Véliz Bomford, who received CAA’s 2022 CAA/American Institute for Conservation Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation, and her career as an art conservator and art historian. The CAA/American Institute for Conservation Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation recognizes outstanding contributions by one or more persons who, individually or jointly, have enhanced understanding of art through the application of knowledge and experience in conservation, art history, and art. The joint award with AIC was first presented in 2016. Between 1991 and 2015, the award was known as the “CAA/Heritage Preservation Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation.”

 

This video looks at the career of Fred Hagstrom, recipient of CAA’s 2022 Distinguished Teaching of Art award. The Distinguished Teaching of Art Award, established in 1972, is presented to an individual who has been actively engaged in teaching art for most of their career. This award is presented to an artist of distinction who has developed a philosophy or technique of instruction based on their experience as an artist; has encouraged their students to develop their own individual abilities; and/or has made some contribution to the body of knowledge loosely called theory and understood as embracing technical, material, aesthetic, and perceptual issues.

 


Do you know a colleague or a mentor who deserves recognition for their work? Nominate someone today who you feel should be honored for their work in the field.

CAA’s Distinguished Awards to individuals include the following areas:

All nominations are due  September  1.

Filed under: Awards

 

 

The CAA-GOLDEN Scholarship Program supports artists whose mission it is to give back to their communities through teaching, while nurturing and developing their own talents and capabilities as artists. Funded by Golden Artist Colors, Inc., CAA grants two unrestricted scholarships of $8,000 each on an annual basis to artists with an MFA who are pursuing a career in K-12 education. Grantees will also receive two weeks at the Sam and Adele Golden Foundation Residency Program, $1000 towards GOLDEN products, registration to the 2023 CAA Annual Conference, and one year of CAA membership.   

MEET THE GRANTEES  

Mick Bodnar  

Having grown up between two dairy farms in rural New York State, Mick Bodnar is something of an anomaly in the art world. He has over two decades of experience as a working-class graphic designer. After being displaced from that career, he embarked on a formal education. His collegiate career began at SUNY Broome Community College, where he gained an AS in Visual Communication Arts, and received the BCC Foundation Scholarship for Excellence in Liberal Arts, the Robert R. Cotten II Award in Graphic & Editorial Design, plus the SUNY Broome Second Chance Scholar Award. With those achievements, he was offered a generous scholarship to attend an elite private college. From that institution, Bard College, he earned a BA in Studio Arts, the Studio Arts Award, and the Bard Center for the Study of Hate Fellowship Award. In 2022, he gained an MFA in Painting & Drawing from SUNY New Paltz, as well as the Outstanding Graduate Award in Studio Arts and the Sojourner Truth Fellowship Award. In 2022, he plans to pursue a master’s degree in Art Education from Adelphi University. 

Mick is proud that his work to date has been well-received equally by the layman as well as by academics. He believes that art is the purest form of communication between humans, crossing the barriers of time, culture, and language — and that everyone should have access to it, regardless of background. He is committed to making art available to the general population. 

 

Beth Reitmeyer


Beth Reitmeyer. Photo by Krystal Henriquez / Assets for Artists. 

Beth Reitmeyer is a visual artist based in Nashville, TN who likes to make people happy with her colorful installations. Her work investigates landscapes and the joy of unexpected yet beautiful spaces and places that are discovered as one explores the land and structures within it: clouds, rivers, caves, geodes, stars. These environments allow viewers to explore the land and get to know one another in a more profound way, providing space for renewal and hope for persevering. 

Beth was born in Colorado Springs, CO and raised in Louisville, KY. She attended Northwestern University (MFA), The School of the Art Institute (Post Baccalaureate program), and the Pennsylvania State University (BFA). In the fall of 2022, she will be pursuing a Master’s in Education/Teaching at Western Kentucky University or Lipscomb University. 

Beth teaches with the Frist Art Museum, Western Kentucky University, Cheekwood Estates and Gardens, and Nashville School of The Arts. 

Beth’s work has been exhibited at the Frist Art Museum, Nashville; Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, New York; OZ Arts, Nashville; 1708 Gallery/Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA; FIGMENT, Chicago; The Downing Museum, Bowling Green, KY; Kindling Arts Festival, Nashville; Zg Gallery, Chicago; Ground Floor Gallery, Brooklyn, NY; Institute of Contemporary Arts, London. Beth has been an artist-in-residence at The Studios at MASS MoCA, ChaNorth/ChaShaMa Foundation, The Ragdale Foundation, CONVERGE, and Mineral House Media. Recent awards include grants from the Metro Nashville Arts Commission/National Endowment for the Arts and a finalist for a Burning Man grant. 

 

 

Filed under: Artists, Artists’ Materials, Awards

Call for Student Videographer

posted by February 23, 2022

CAA is seeking student videographer(s) interested in creating short video profiles on select recipients of our 2022 Distinguished Awards, to be completed this spring. Videos will be limited to three minutes in duration and will tell the story of the award recipient. For this pilot project, two awardees have been selected:

The selected video profiles will be featured on  CAA’s YouTube Channel and on the CAA website. The selected student will receive a complementary one-year membership to CAA and access to CAA’s 2023 Annual Conference.

 

Timeline

March 22, 2022 – Application for videographer deadline

April 5, 2022- Notification of selected videographer(s)

June 8, 2022- Completed videos due

 

Application instructions:

Please fill out this form and send a resume as a PDF to info@collegeart.org with “Distinguished Awards Videographer” in the subject line.

 

Filed under: Awards

CAA 2022 Awards for Distinction

posted by January 24, 2022

CAA announces the 2022 recipients of Awards for Distinction. By honoring outstanding member achievements, CAA reaffirms its mission to encourage the highest standards of scholarship, practice, connoisseurship, and teaching in the arts. With these annual awards, CAA seeks to honor individual artists, art historians, authors, museum professionals, and critics whose accomplishments transcend their individual disciplines and contribute to the profession as a whole and to the world at large.

Among the awards, the Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement is presented to Betye Saar who has not only forged a singular practice for six decades but has also influenced generations of artists, makers, and thinkers. Calling upon the legacies of artists like Joseph Cornell, her symbolic and potent assemblages, of which she’s best known, reflect on the lives, experiences, and identities of African Americans, spirituality, and cultural connectivity.

The Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award for Writing on Art is presented to Wu Hung. Perpetually interested in the shape of time, in relation to the time of the world, he has authored many books, essays, and exhibition catalogues that bring Chinese visual culture into different orders of focus, taking into account the changing conditions of tombs, screens, performances, and protests. The scope of his work has an epic quality, allowing arguments to unfold across centuries without losing sight of the very human presence of artists and audiences.


Art Journal Award 

David J. Getsy and Che Gossett, “A Syllabus on Transgender and Nonbinary Methods for Art and Art History,” Art Journal, vol. 80, no. 4 (Winter 2021): 101-115.

 

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award  

Robert Cozzolino, ed. Supernatural America: The Paranormal in American Art, University of Chicago Press, 2021.

 

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums, Libraries, Collections, and Exhibitions  

Sarah M. Miller, Documentary in Dispute: The Original Manuscript of Changing New York by Berenice Abbott and Elizabeth McCauslandRyerson Image Centre/MIT Press, 2020. 

 

Frank Jewett Mather Award  

Kaira M. Cabañas, Immanent Vitalities: Meaning and Materiality in Modern and Contemporary Art. University of California Press, 2021. 

 

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award 

Elina Gertsman, The Absent Image: Lacunae in Medieval Books, Penn State University Press, 2021.

 

Arthur Kingsley Porter Prize 

Marius B. Hauknes, “Painting against Time: Spectatorship and Visual Entanglement in the Anagni Crypt,” The Art Bulletin, vol. 103, no.1 (February 2021): 7-36.

Artist Award for a Distinguished Body of Work  

Kent Monkman   

 

CAA/AIC Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation 

Zahira Véliz 

 

Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement 

Betye Saar 

 

Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award for Writing on Art 

Wu Hung 

 

Distinguished Feminist Award – Artist  

In lieu of the Distinguished Feminist awards, we will recognize leaders in the field of feminist art and art history in our 2022 programming highlighting the 50th Year Anniversary of feminism at CAA. 

 

Distinguished Feminist Award – Scholar 

In lieu of the Distinguished Feminist awards, we will recognize leaders in the field of feminist art and art history in our 2022 programming highlighting the 50th Year Anniversary of feminism at CAA. 

 

Distinguished Teaching of Art Award 

Fred Hagstrom 

 

Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award 

Terry Smith 

 

Excellence in Diversity Award  

Valerie Cassel Oliver

 


Citations:  

Art Journal Award 

David J. Getsy and Che Gossett, “A Syllabus on Transgender and Nonbinary Methods for Art and Art History,” Art Journal, vol. 80, no. 4 (Winter 2021): 101-115.

In organizing a course of study predicated on the ontological challenge to discourses of art offered by trans and nonbinary positions, David J. Getsy and Che Gossett have generously identified a major lacuna in the field and provided a toolkit for its amelioration. The jury unanimously selected their “A Syllabus on Transgender and Nonbinary Methods for Art and Art History” as the most distinguished contribution to the Art Journal in 2021. The syllabus not only identifies, positions, and summarizes critical scholarship in the field of transgender and nonbinary studies, it also demonstrates the fruitful integration of pedagogy and emerging research methodologies. Noting the relative dearth of art historical scholarship that has taken up trans methods and histories, the authors suggest the ways in which key themes and terms from art might be critically reevaluated in light of transgender studies. An introduction to each section’s bibliography synthesizes complex debates and individual arguments with remarkable clarity. Sensitive to the necessary intersections of trans analytics with critical approaches to race, ability, and class, the authors highlight readings from Black feminist thought and abolition optics, among other transversal concerns, that elucidate points of fracture within and strategies of resistance to the regulatory gender binary. At once rigorous and accessible, Getsy and Gossett’s contribution offers an adaptable blueprint for researchers and educators. 

Committee: 
Omar Kholeif, Sharjah Art Foundation 
Tilo Riefenstein, School of the Arts, York St John University 
Phil Taylor, George Eastman Museum (Chair) 

 

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award 

Robert Cozzolino, ed. Supernatural America: The Paranormal in American Art, University of Chicago Press, 2021.

America is haunted. Genocidal policies unleashed on Native Americans; the horror of the transatlantic slave trade; war, racism, and social injustice; dark passages in community and individual histories – these traumas and more have left behind a trail of spirits. Taking as its topic the paranormal in American art, Supernatural America reveals the myriad ways in which citizens and artists have sought to see, understand, or come to terms with the ghosts of the past. Lavishly illustrated, with many images never seen before, Supernatural America breaks new ground in presenting the paranormal as a historical subject of wide-ranging importance. Incisive essays by scholars and artists cover painting and sculpture from the late 18th century to the present, spirit photography, art channeled through mediums, spiritualist paraphernalia, folk and outsider art, UFO-inspired materials, video and installation from a range of perspectives. This revealing, thought-provoking investigation into an emerging scholarly field gives proof to William Faulkner’s well-known line: ‘The past is never dead. It’s not even past’. 

Committee: 
Susan Aberth, Bard College 
Benjamin Anderson, Cornell 
Karen Lang, University of Arizona 
Andrew Saluti, Syracuse University (Chair) 
Joyce Tsai, Clyfford Still Museum 

 

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums, Libraries, Collections, and Exhibitions 

Sarah M. Miller, Documentary in Dispute: The Original Manuscript of Changing New York by Berenice Abbott and Elizabeth McCauslandRyerson Image Centre/MIT Press, 2020. 

In 2015 the Ryerson Image Centre acquired the archives of Berenice Abbott, including more than 6000 photographs and 7000 negatives, her papers, correspondences, and manuscripts. One of the key figures in the history of documentary photography, Abbott is now known as an archivist as well as an artist. It was Abbott who preserved Eugene Atget’s archives at the end of the twenties and published his work.  Her own photographs, taken while working for the WPA, consolidated her reputation as a documentary photographer.  What exactly is that reputation? In order to answer that question, Documentary in Dispute meticulously reconstructs the manuscript of the book Changing New York, first published in 1939 by Dutton & Co, with photographs by Berenice Abbott and text by renowned art critic Elizabeth McCausland. In a tour de force of archival research and scholarly presentation, Sarah M. Miller reveals how the project was altered to obscure the aesthetic, political and ethical values of photographer and author. Miller’s beautifully written, highly focused essay on Abbott and McCausland situates them in an international avant-garde which recognized the potential of image and text to transform, even to break, our habits of seeing and being.  Miller’s overall approach recalls Walter Benjamin’s own in the 1930s.  Not coincidentally, Benjamin was inspired by Abbott’s archival and photographic achievements.  

Committee: 
Susan Aberth, Bard College 
Benjamin Anderson, Cornell 
Karen Lang, University of Arizona 
Andrew Saluti, Syracuse University (Chair) 
Joyce Tsai, Clyfford Still Museum 

 

Frank Jewett Mather Award 

Kaira M. Cabañas, Immanent Vitalities: Meaning and Materiality in Modern and Contemporary Art. University of California Press, 2021. 

The jury has unanimously selected Kaira M. Cabañas’ Immanent Vitalities: Meaning and Materiality in Modern and Contemporary Art. Cabañas has written a highly readable volume addressing the material relations between objects and subjects as well as addressing the limiting institutional conventions of academic art history. Her work draws upon theories of new materialism, an animating force that, when attended to, requires rethinking binary categories such as living and inert or life and matter. Cabañas’ volume traverses histories and hemispheres: from the perceptual doubts engendered by the force of color in Alejandro Otero’s paintings to the enmeshed material contingencies of Gego’s metal sculptures, from the sensorial therapeutic propositions of Lygia Clark’s relational objects to the curatorial entanglements of Alessandro Balteo-Yazbeck’s challenges to the grid, and from the affective agencies Mario Pedrosa located in the paintings of Djanira da Motta e Silva to the documented rituals of care obfuscating boundaries between the organic and the inorganic in Matheus Rocha Pitta’s Polaroids. Cabañas proposes an alternative to the kind of nation-bounded analyses that often burden studies of modern and contemporary art of Latin America. She addresses academic art history’s tendency to isolate along geographic lines, marginalizing practices and scholarship. Cabañas’ text thus models a critical strategy for assessing not just artworks but the field itself. 

Committee: 
Julia Bryan-Wilson, University of California, Berkeley 
Kim Theriault, Dominican University 
Andrew Wasserman, Dominican University (Chair) 

 

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award

Elina Gertsman, The Absent Image: Lacunae in Medieval Books, Penn State University Press, 2021.

Countering the customary interpretation of late medieval art as relentlessly profuse and exuberant, Elina Gertsman’s The Absent Image: Lacunae in Medieval Books, explores different constructions of emptiness ranging from the presentation of voids in illustrations to represent the unrepresentable to the deliberate inclusion of physical holes in manuscript pages designed to reveal portions of other pages. Gertsman’s investigation of the “fecundity of emptiness” is a generative and compelling topic for scholars of art history/visual studies across areas, both within and outside Medieval Studies. She argues and demonstrates that, between 1200s and 1500s, the broad circulation of scientific thought and its engagement with theology and formal and literary discourses on emptiness, absence, and negation account for visual, cognitive, and material expressions on the pages of medieval books. Cross-disciplinary in its approach, Gertsman’s book simultaneously draws attention to the visual and material aspects of the manuscripts, phenomenological experience, and philosophical, religious, and scientific theories of the period. In doing so she uncovers an unexpected kinship between the medieval artists and the modernist avant-garde, where the void is regarded as the locus of the sublime and of boundless possibility. Her erudite writing and compelling approach to the subject poses questions throughout that magnify the relevance of her study and stimulate personal inquiry—as a reader reflects on other areas of consideration across time called out in the text. The book is lavishly illustrated and artfully designed with a shape and size complementary to the subject of study.  

Committee: 
John Cunnally, Iowa State University 
Christina Hellmich, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco 
Laura Anne Kalba, University of Minnesota
Lisa D. Schrenk, University of Arizona 
Dorothy Wong, University of Virginia (Chair) 

 

Arthur Kingsley Porter Prize 

Marius B. Hauknes, “Painting against Time: Spectatorship and Visual Entanglement in the Anagni Crypt,” The Art Bulletin, vol. 103, no.1 (February 2021): 7-36.

Marius Hauknes offers a riveting and multi-layered interpretation of the role of spectatorship in the production of meaning in the 13th-century crypt of the Anagni Cathedral. Rather than consider a viewer as a passive onlooker, he devotes attention to multiple aspects of embodied spectatorship: movement, (shifting) angles/perspectives, (in)visibility, temporality, and knowledge. These offer a powerful vantage point from which to consider the intersection of the painting program with the body itself. Drawing attention to contemporary concerns and interests in the body’s health, its cognitive capacities (and limits), and its place in the universe, Hauknes places the paintings into conversation with medicine and astrology. The images emerge as intellectual acts in a religious and political setting that grappled with problems of temporality and being. Hauknes evinces deep and extensive scholarly research, and is able to draw precise and appropriate insights from contemporary cultural and historical contexts, without losing focus on the artwork itself. While offering compelling readings of specific scenes — showing how they could connect, overlap, or echo with one another — Hauknes posits that comprehensive spectatorship was not possible. Instead, human comprehension and temporality contrasts with the divine, creating a space for reflection on the need for medicine and astrology. 

Committee: 
Nathan T. Arrington, Princeton University (Chair) 
Susanna Berger, University of Southern California 
Rachel Miller, California State University, Sacramento 

 

Artist Award for a Distinguished Body of Work  

Kent Monkman   

There is a long-standing history in the visual arts of artists bearing witness to atrocities: Goya’s painting “The Third of May,” Picasso’s “Guernica,” to name but two. Toronto-based Cree artist Kent Monkman’s exhibition “Shame and Prejudice: A Story of Resilience” follows this tradition, with a few notable updates. On the occasion of Canada’s 150th anniversary in 2017, Monkman’s paintings featured in a cross-country touring exhibit that culminated at the University of British Columbia’s Museum of Anthropology, August 6, 2020 – January 3, 2021, provides a searing critique of Canada’s colonial policies past and present, including, in the artist’s accounting: “the signing of the numbered treaties, the reserve system, genocidal policies of the residential schools, mass incarceration and urban squalor.” This is a body of work that, though tackling a grim subject matter, is often a blend of subversive humor, fantasy, and homoeroticism. And, although appropriating the form of Western history painting, Monkman’s artwork breaks from tradition by subverting and de-centering the Western gaze and re-presenting a perspective of history from the vantage point of the Indigenous peoples. Albeit, a history filtered through the particular lens of an artist who identifies as both queer and two-spirit, and through his trickster alter-ego, Miss Chief Share Eagle Testickle, the protagonist within much of Monkman’s paintings and performances. Through his use of history painting, Monkman’s project is one that reminds us of the potency of images, and the potential of the artist to provoke and challenge history and its representations.   

Committee: 
Stephen Fakiyesi, Independent Artist, Toronto 
Jessica Hong, Hood Museum, Toledo Art Museum 
Beauvais Lyons, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, (Chair) 

 

CAA/AIC Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation

Zahira Véliz 

Zahria (Soni) Véliz has enhanced our understanding of art through her numerous, scholarly publications to the fields of art history and paintings conservation. Dr. Véliz has strengthened the methodological approaches of scholars who work on Spanish artists and Franz Kline through her publication record as well as her generosity as a colleague. 

Through the translation and dissemination of Spanish texts, Dr. Véliz’s has made contemporaneous information about early modern painting accessible to researchers who do not read Spanish. Artists Techniques in Golden Age Spain (1987) is often cited in technical studies of Spanish paintings. More recently, Dr. Véliz edited a translation of Jusepe Martínez’s 1673-75 Practical Discourses on the Most Noble Art of Painting (2017). These publications, along with others by Dr. Véliz on subjects including blue pigments, wooden panels, and drawing practice, have been foundational to the study of Spanish art in the United States. 

Dr. Véliz’s PhD dissertation on Alonso Cano served as a foundation for many publications on the artist. In addition, Dr. Véliz’s knowledge and skills of connoisseurship regarding Spanish drawing enriched her drawings catalogues for the Courtauld Institute of Art in London and the Museo de Bellas Artes in Asturias. As Senior Paintings Conservator for the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Dr. Véliz published her research into a newly attributed painting to Diego Velázquez as well as technical and art historical research on Franz Kline’s paintings that are models of collaborative research.  

Committee Members: 
Jim Coddington, American Institute of Conservation  
Tiarna Doherty, University of Delaware, (Chair)  
Fernanda Valverde, Amon Carter Museum 

 

Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement  

Betye Saar  

Betye Saar (b. 1926, Los Angeles, CA) has not only forged a singular practice for six decades but has also influenced generations of artists, makers, and thinkers. Calling upon the legacies of artists like Joseph Cornell, her symbolic and potent assemblages, of which she’s best known, reflect on the lives, experiences, and identities of African Americans, spirituality, and cultural connectivity. Part of the broader Black Arts Movement in the 1970s, Saar also confronted issues of racism and sexism in groundbreaking and radical works like The Liberation of Aunt Jemima (1972). Saar contends the continual thread in her work is her “curiosity about the mystical.” As she wrote in 1998, “I am intrigued with combining the remnant of memories, fragments of relics and ordinary objects, with the components of technology. It’s a way of delving into the past and reaching into the future simultaneously. The art itself becomes the bridge. Curiosity about the unknown has no boundaries. Symbols, images, place and cultures merge. Time slips away. The stars, the cards, the mystic vigil may hold the answers. By shifting the point of view an inner spirit is released. Free to create.” By foregrounding the mystical, Saar sees people, cultures, contexts, temporalities as part of a larger, interconnected spiritual fabric, an understanding that is needed in a time of extreme ideological polarization, inequities, and geopolitical strife. Saar and her practice continue to resonate and inspire current generations and those to come.  

Committee: 
Stephen Fakiyesi, Independent Artist, Toronto 
Jessica Hong, Hood Museum, Toledo Art Museum 
Beauvais Lyons, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, (Chair) 

 

Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award for Writing on Art 

Wu Hung  

Trained in both China and the United States, Wu Hung’s writing brings perspectives native to both cultures to bear on aesthetics, art history, and archaeology.  His arguments ground the cultures of China, from the earliest ancient survivals to the interventions of our own time in structures of mind that defy the progress narratives of the West.  He has received countless awards for work that has transformed the study of East Asian art and drawn attention to the relationship between images and the spaces within which they are observed, from the Dunhuang caves to the double screens to Zhu Jinshi’s Fangzhen: A Cubic Meter of Canvas in Berlin.  

Overall, his writings explore the many, restless transitions across time and space.  Perpetually interested in the shape of time, in relation to the time of the world, he has authored many books, essays, and exhibition catalogues that bring Chinese visual culture into different orders of focus, taking into account the changing conditions of tombs, screens, performances, and protests.  The scope of his work has an epic quality, allowing arguments to unfold across centuries without losing sight of the very human presence of artists and audiences.  He works in the discipline of art history as a poet-scholar who knows the brushstroke from the inside out, crafting prose of great clarity and nuance that opens the field to specialists and new readers alike. 

 

Distinguished Feminist Award – Artist 

In lieu of the Distinguished Feminist awards, we will recognize leaders in the field of feminist art and art history in our 2022 programming highlighting the 50th Year Anniversary of feminism at CAA. 

Committee: 
Robin Cass, Rochester Institute of Technology (Chair) 
Delinda J. Collier, School of the Art Institute of Chicago 
Midori Yoshimoto, New Jersey City University 

 

Distinguished Feminist Award – Scholar 

In lieu of the Distinguished Feminist awards, we will recognize leaders in the field of feminist art and art history in our 2022 programming highlighting the 50th Year Anniversary of feminism at CAA. 

Committee: 
Robin Cass, Rochester Institute of Technology (Chair) 
Delinda J. Collier, School of the Art Institute of Chicago 
Midori Yoshimoto, New Jersey City University 

 

Distinguished Teaching of Art Award  

Fred Hagstrom 

Fred Hagstrom, a member of the Carleton College faculty since 1984, is the 2022 recipient of the CAA Distinguished Teaching of Art Award. Hagstrom’s nomination included endorsements from former students and colleagues, including a listing of 341 former students who have taken his printmaking, book arts, and drawing classes. Hagstrom also directed a bi-annual study abroad 10-week trip for students to Australia, New Zealand, and the Cook Islands twelve times over twenty years, where students learned about South Pacific and Maori art and culture. Based on this experience, Dylan Yvonne Welch (BA, ‘08) recalls “Each trip, he candidly and humbly facilitates conversations about colonial history, racism and art. As a student, this was a breath of fresh air as I had found that many other professors seemed uncomfortable or simply avoided discussing those topics.” Eleanor Jensen (BA, ’01) credit him with teaching her to both see and draw, while also observing that “Fred is deeply sensitive to his students and is always ready to stand up for somebody who has been harmed or overlooked.” Students observed that Hagstrom’s classes were interdisciplinary, challenging them to connect their studies in other disciplines as well as their life stories to their studio work. Jade Hoyer credits Professor Hagstrom with being a mentor long after she graduated in 2007. Fred Hagstrom has profoundly impacted his students, many of whom have pursued careers as artists and educators.  We are pleased to recognize Fred Hagstrom’s more than three decades of teaching with this award.  

Committee: 
Stephen Fakiyesi, Independent Artist, Toronto 
Jessica Hong, Hood Museum, Toledo Art Museum 
Beauvais Lyons, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, (Chair) 

 

Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award 

Terry Smith 

Terry Smith has long written, curated and taught across borders, in the beginning coming from Australia to study and work in New York as both a scholar and an active member of Art & Language. He has been expanding his sights ever since. He has long advocated for the study of indigenous art. For the past twenty years, starting with projects such as Global Conceptualism: Points of Origin, 1950s -1980s at the Queens Museum, he was the trusted collaborator of Okwui Enwezor. He has always insisted that the past and the present be given their due consideration and global perspectives. 

All of this came to his teaching. Students have understood the breadth of his expertise and curiosity; they have used them as inspiration for their own paths; they have appreciated his warmth, his encouragement and the gift of his time. The example he has set as an art historian and a curator has had visible effects in the ranks of university professors and museum curators in the United States and abroad. They do not conform to a single, theoretical way. His students repeatedly speak of his belief in the independent existence of the art object and at the same time his insistence that it be grounded and imbricated in its own real time social relations. Art is allowed its scale, its interior place in our minds, and its exterior place in our world. 

Committee: 
Shirin Fozi, University of Pittsburgh (Chair) 
Joseph Masheck, Hofstra University 
Molly Nesbit, Vassar College 

 

Excellence in Diversity Award 

Valerie Cassel Oliver, curator of modern and contemporary art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
Valerie Cassel Oliver is the Sydney and Frances Lewis Family Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA). With her life-long commitment to increasing diversity in modern and contemporary art, her work has always focused on representation, inclusivity and highlighting artists of different social and cultural backgrounds. Cassel Oliver began her career working with the Black Arts Alliance in Austin, Texas, where she administered grants for the National Endowment for the Arts. Then, she became director of the Visiting Artist Program at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and served as Senior Curator at Contemporary Arts Museum Houston from 2000 to 2017. Cassel Oliver was the organizer of the acclaimed exhibits including Double Consciousness: Black Conceptual Art Since 1970 (2005); Cinema Remixed and Reloaded: Black Women Artists and the Moving Image with Dr. Andrea Barnwell Brownlee (2009); Benjamin Patterson: Born in the State of Flux/us, and Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art (2012).  In 2018 at the VMFA, she co-organized the 50-year survey, Howardena Pindell: What Remains to be Seen, with Naomi Beckwith then with the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. The exhibit was named one of the most influential of the decade. Most recently, she organized the acclaimed survey, The Dirty South: Contemporary Art, Material Culture and the Sonic Impulse. Cassel Oliver’s many achievements have been widely recognized. In 2000 she was one of six curators selected to organize the Biennial including the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. She also has earned fellowships with the Getty Research Institute and the Center for Curatorial Leadership (New York). 

Committee: 
Carmelita Higgenbotham, Virginia Commonwealth University 
Kelly Murdoch-Kitt, University of Michigan 
Sohl Lee, Stony Brook University

 

 

Filed under: Annual Conference, Awards

Finalists for the 2022 Morey and Barr Awards

posted by January 03, 2022

CAA is pleased to announce the 2022 finalists for the Charles Rufus Morey Book Award and the two Alfred H. Barr Jr. Awards. The winners of the three prizes, along with the recipients of other Awards for Distinction, will be announced in January 2022 and presented during Convocation in conjunction with CAA’s 110th Annual Conference, February 16–19, 2022. 

 

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award Shortlist, 2022 

Monica Bravo, Greater American Camera: Making Modernism in Mexico, Yale University Press, 2021 

Elina Gertsman, The Absent Image: Lacunae in Medieval Books, Penn State University Press, 2021

Dipti Khera, The Place of Many Moods: Udaipur’s Painted Lands and India’s Eighteenth Century, Princeton University Press, 2020

Susanna P. Newbury, The Speculative City: Art, Real Estate, and the Making of Global Los Angeles, University of Minnesota Press, 2021

 

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award Shortlist, 2022 

Carmen Ramos, ¡Printing the Revolution!: The Rise and Impact of Chicano Graphics, 1965 to Now, Princeton University Press, 2020

Sarah Fee, Cloth that Changed the World: The Art and Fashion of Indian Chintz, Yale University Press, 2020

Dorothy Moss, Hung Liu: Portraits of Promised Lands, Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, 2021

Sarah Roberts and Katy Siegel, Joan Mitchell, Yale University Press, 2021

Andrea Nelson with Elizabeth Cronin, Mia Fineman, Mila Ganeva, Kristen Gresh, Elizabeth Otto, Kim Sichel, The New Woman Behind the Camera, DelMonico Books, 2020

Julia Griffin and Andrzej Szczerski, editors, Young Poland: The Polish Arts and Crafts Movement, 1890–1918, Lund Humphries, 2020

 

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums, Libraries, Collections, and Exhibitions Shortlist, 2022 

Nadezhda Kavrus-Hoffmann with the collaboration of Pablo Alvarez, A Catalogue of Greek Manuscripts at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Press, 2021

Julie L. McGee, David Driskell: Icons of Nature and History, Rizzoli, 2021

Sarah M. Miller, Documentary in Dispute. The Original Manuscript of Changing New York by Berenice Abbott and Elizabeth McCausland, Ryerson Image Centre/MIT Press, 2020

Elizabeth Finch; Marshall N. Price; Graham Bader; Scott Manning Stevens; Ruth Fine,  Roy Lichtenstein: History in the Making, 1948-1960, Rizzoli, 2020

David S. Areford, Strict Beauty: Sol LeWitt Prints, Yale University Press, 2020

Tameka Ellington & Joseph Underwood, TEXTURES: The History and Art of Black Hair, Hirmer Publishers / University of Chicago Press, 2022

Filed under: Awards

Nicole Fleetwood, recipient of CAA’s Frank Jewett Mather and Charles Rufus Morey book awards, discusses the inspiration behind her book, Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration.

Supporting excellence in the arts for over 100 years, CAA and its members are highly integrated into the fabric of art and its history, particularly in New York City. On September 1, 2021, CAA had the privilege to highlight its impact in an event featuring its distinguished awardees and partnerships. The event, an Inaugural Evening with CAA Distinguished Awardees and Artists, recognized the talent of CAA’s membership and reaffirmed CAA’s commitment and advocacy for scholars, artists, designers, teachers, young professionals, and many others.  

Surrounded by recent artworks created by The League’s faculty members, CAA Executive Director and CEO Meme Omogbai introduced celebrated critic and curator Nicole R. Fleetwood. Fleetwood delivered a private presentation discussing her book and exhibition Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration, including detailed insights into the backstory and personal inspiration behind the important project. The book, published by Harvard University Press, unprecedently won both CAA’s Frank Jewett Mather and Charles Rufus Morey book awards in 2021. It was also reviewed across CAA’s publications, including The Art BulletinArt Journal, and caa.reviews. Fleetwood’s book accompanies a groundbreaking exhibition that began at MoMA PS1 in 2020 and continues to travel; it will open on September 17 at the Abroms-Engel Institute for the Visual Arts at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and be on view through December 11, 2021.  

CAA Executive Director and CEO, Meme Omogbai, presents Nicole Fleetwood with the CAA Frank Jewett Mather and Charles Rufus Morey book awards.

The reception also commended CAA’s Outstanding Leadership in Philanthropy Award recipient, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation. The Samuel H. Kress Foundation has supported CAA in its mission for over 60 years, through programs in art history and, more recently, digital transformation. With support from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, CAA’s new strategic focus on digital initiatives will bridge history, scholarship, and accessibility to better serve all segments of its constituency, especially underprivileged audiences. 

The Art Students League of New York graciously hosted CAA for this event. Like CAA, The League is an organization with a long history of promoting the arts and education. Indeed, CAA and The League have been highly integrated into the fabric of art and its history in New York City and have been closely intertwined, collaborating on several events and initiatives dating back to at least the 1950s. 

CAA Executive Director and CEO, Meme Omogbai, presents Max Marmor, President of the Kress Foundation, with the CAA Philanthropy Award.

Located west of The League, the site-specific exhibition Re:Growth, A Celebration of Art, Riverside Park, and the New York Spirit, curated by Karin Bravin, included several artists from the CAA community: current CAA Board Member Dahlia Elsayed, former Board President DeWitt Godfrey, and CAA member Jean Shin. While the weather prevented a group walk-through of the exhibition, Elsayed spoke to attendees about the unique exhibition, her sculpture in the show, and its significance.  

Altogether, the evening underscored CAA’s wide reach and impact in the arts and the talent of its members. As the largest international organization of arts professionals, CAA has a vital mission to promote the visual arts and their understanding through intellectual engagement, commitment to diversity, and advocacy. This upcoming year will provide opportunities to celebrate several milestones in this mission. CAA’s next virtual event in November 2021, will celebrate the 10-year anniversary of the publication of CAA’s seminal history, The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association. In February 2022, CAA will host its first hybrid Annual Conference in Chicago and online; registration will open in October.  

Jennifer Rissler, Vice President for External Relations and acting CAA Board President, and Dahlia Elsayed, current CAA Board Member and artist, both spoke at the event.

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