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Jim Hopfensperger at home.

As of this month, Jim Hopfensperger, professor of art at Western Michigan University’s Gwen Frostic School of Art, is CAA’s new president for the 2018-2022 term. As a professor and artist with a wealth of experience, we thought it would be a great opportunity to ask Jim his thoughts on CAA and the field at-large. CAA media and content manager Joelle Te Paske  spoke with him earlier this month.

JTP: Hi Jim! Thanks so much for speaking with me. How are you?

JH: Very well, Joelle. Thank you so much for taking the time to visit!

JTP: To get us oriented, where did you grow up?

JH: My spouse, Jane, and I were raised in the upper Midwest. While career choices took us to Pennsylvania and Massachusetts, we returned “home” to Michigan eighteen years ago to be nearer aging family members.

JTP: And what did you study?

JH: I was educated as a craftsperson, working primarily in non-ferrous metals such as silver, gold, and copper. During a sabbatical leave from my faculty position at Penn State University in the early 1990s, I was presented the opportunity to work in a furniture studio in Massachusetts. Within a few weeks I was totally hooked, gifting my metal working tools to a younger artist and moving forward as a furniture maker.

Jim Hopfensperger, Shaker Purple, 2012

JTP: What drew you to the work you do now?

JH: I am drawn to how creating art/design objects—one-at-a-time and by hand—reinforces and reaffirms what it means to be a human being. Thinking with my hands, my eyes, and my mind to conceive well-designed and useful articles makes me feel whole. Perhaps I am a kinesthetic thinker/learner? It also seems possible that, for better and for worse, my sense of self is simply anchored in making things. The non-existent term “neuroceutical therapy” comes to mind!

JTP: What is exciting to you as the incoming CAA president?

JH: The forces of change are in motion all around us. It is a truly exhilarating time to be in the business of living!

As for CAA, a raft of research suggests that healthy organizations prosper when focusing efforts along two key pathways: 1) identifying and strengthening essential core competencies and 2) systematically exploring future capacities. This means sustaining CAA’s outstanding programs and services while simultaneously identifying the organization’s next purposes. Full attention to both matters seems essential if we are to extend a highly distinguished history of advocacy for artists, art historians, scholars, curators, critics, designers, collectors, and educators. I am grateful for this opportunity and excited about the work ahead.

Jim Hopfensperger, Deliberation No. 7, 2005

JTP: What work has been done over the past few years that you would like to build on?  What would you like to see happening at CAA in the next year?  How about in the next ten?

JH: Clearly, CAA remains an eminent learned society. At the same time it is increasingly fulfilling its potential as a professional association that serves members across educational, curatorial, scholarly, and creative pursuits. In the short term I am confident CAA will remain a strong association and identify more ways to support members in their professional lives.

Over the next few years a pivot toward some key constituencies might make strategic sense. Those include 1) the burgeoning ranks of contingent employees upon whom educational and cultural institutions have become increasingly reliant; 2) the large number of design and new/emerging media practitioners graduating from art and design programs; and 3) the community of international scholars, artists, and designers steadily advancing global perspectives. I look forward to working with CAA members, staff, board, and other stakeholders to map a future wherein these colleagues will be well served.

JTP: What has been a memorable professional moment for you at a CAA Annual Conference?

JH: I am deeply invested in the fellowship aspects of CAA. My fondest memory involves mentoring in the Professional Development Workshops at the Annual Conference in 2000. One my mentees was, as I, trained as a metalsmith. We worked closely after that conference to identify strategies for achieving his professional goals, and he eventually accepted a splendid academic position. In return for my service, and for each of the past eighteen years uninterrupted, he has gifted to me a handcrafted metal ornament to hang on our family holiday tree. Simply precious! (And if you are reading this Professor James Thurman, a wholehearted “Thank You!” is long overdue.)    

Jim Hopfensperger, Deliberation No. 9, 2013

JTP: What would you say is the number one challenge facing higher education?

JH: Excellent question. My two cents: Adapting to the startling, inevitable pace of cultural and technological change is an operational necessity. Yet, communicating the value of an educated populace appears to be our most immediate and pressing challenge. Making the case for the causal relationship between educational opportunities and the ascendance of an increasingly ethical, moral, and empathetic society is job one. In the absence of such a mission statement, it is not difficult to imagine financial or economic ‘values’ easily filling the void.

The logical outcome might then resemble Oscar Wilde’s timeless quip about a cynic being ‘a man who knows the price of everything and the value of nothing.’

JTP: Do you have a favorite artwork? 

JH: I have a keen interest in all forms of applied design—dynamic and surprising buildings, objects, communications, products, and processes. However, and for reasons I am not fully able to explain, my favorite artwork is Monet’s Four Trees in the Met’s collection. This quiet little companion and I visit perhaps once every 12 to 24 months. Invariably, I leave our encounters refreshed and restored.

Claude Monet, The Four Trees, 1891, oil on canvas, 32 1/4 x 32 1/8 in. (81.9 x 81.6 cm) Collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Image: Wikimedia Commons

JTP: What about a favorite book?   

JH: Much of my reading over the past decade can be described as a search for serviceable maps of the human mind, followed by rubbernecking at accidents caused by irrational behaviors. Daniel Kahneman’s Thinking Fast and Slow is a fine example of the former, the type of mind mapping I find highly addictive. Kahneman’s lenses for understanding our extraordinary capabilities, while simultaneously identifying those pesky faults and deep biases that accompany human thought and action, help structure my own thinking. In a related way writings on decision-making in everyday life are equally intriguing and useful. Charles Duhiggs’s The Power of Habit, Dan Ariely’s Predictably Irrational, Keith Payne’s The Broken Ladder successfully illustrate complexities and contradictions when/where supposedly rational thoughts and human actions intersect, often to hilarious and/or tragic effect—endlessly fascinating stuff!

Jim Hopfensperger is a professor of art at Western Michigan University’s Gwen Frostic School of Art where he teaches foundation art. Jim’s art works have been shown nationally and internationally in over 100 exhibitions at venues including the Detroit Institute of Arts, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Auckland Memorial Museum, Lever House, University of Iowa Museum of Art, University of Oregon Museum of Art, State Museum of Pennsylvania, North Carolina Museum of History, and National Ornamental Metals Museum.

Jim’s past appointments include serving as Senior Associate Dean in the College of Fine Arts at Western Michigan University, Chair of the Department of Art & Art History at Michigan State University, and Head of the Studio Art Program at The Pennsylvania State University. He has also taught at the Massachusetts College of Art, University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth, Skidmore College, University of Michigan, and North Carolina State University.

Jim is Past President of the National Council of Arts Administrators, and is an accreditation visitor for the National Association of Schools of Art and Design. He earned a MFA from University of Michigan, a MA from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a BA from Michigan State University.

As you know, CAA is a non-profit organization.  Last fall, our beloved Treasurer Jack Hyland passed away after more than twenty years of service to the Association. Board Member Peter Lukehart has agreed to serve as Interim Treasurer until a permanent new treasurer is found.

If you know someone, perhaps a spouse or friend of an existing CAA member, who knows their away around numbers (i.e., budgets, annual financial statements, etc.) who would be willing to serve the Association as its Treasurer, please contact Executive Director Hunter O’Hanian (HOHanian@collegeart.org). Elected by the Board of Directors, the Treasurer is a non-paid position and sits on the Board of Directors.  He or she works closely with the Association’s CFO to review financial statements.  It is estimated that this role takes approximately 5 hours of volunteer time per quarter, in addition to attendance at the Board of Directors meetings which are usually in February, May and October.

CAA Welcomes New Board Members

posted by March 02, 2018

  

The results of the 2018 CAA Board of Directors Election were presented at the CAA Annual Business Meeting, Part II on Thursday, February 23 at 2:00 PM at the 106th CAA Annual Conference in Los Angeles. We are grateful to all the candidates who put forward their names for consideration this year.

Six candidates were selected for election by the 2017-18 Nominating Committee for a four-year term running from 2018–22.

We congratulate Laura Anderson Barbata, Audrey G. Bennett, Dahlia Elsayed, and Alice Ming Wai Jim on their election to the CAA Board of Directors.

Read more about the new board members:

Laura Anderson Barbata statement and resume

Audrey G. Bennett statement and resume

Dahlia Elsayed statement and resume

Alice Ming Wai Jim statement and resume

About the Board of Directors

The Board of Directors is charged with CAA’s long-term financial stability and strategic direction; it is also the Association’s governing body. The board sets policy regarding all aspects of CAA’s activities, including publishing, the Annual Conference, awards and fellowships, advocacy, and committee procedures.

Filed under: Board of Directors, Governance

As you know, CAA is a non-profit organization.  Last fall, our beloved Treasurer Jack Hyland passed away after more than twenty years of service to the Association. Board Member Peter Lukehart has agreed to serve as Interim Treasurer until a permanent new treasurer is found.

If you know someone, perhaps a spouse or friend of an existing CAA member, who knows their away around numbers (i.e., budgets, annual financial statements, etc.) who would be willing to serve the Association as its Treasurer, please contact Executive Director Hunter O’Hanian (HOHanian@collegeart.org). Elected by the Board of Directors, the Treasurer is a non-paid position and sits on the Board of Directors.  He or she works closely with the Association’s CFO to review financial statements.  It is estimated that this role takes approximately 5 hours of volunteer time per quarter, in addition to attendance at the Board of Directors meetings which are usually in February, May and October.

Notice of CAA 106th Annual Business Meeting

posted by December 15, 2017

College Art Association
Notice of 106th Annual Business Meeting
Los Angeles, California
Wednesday, February 21 and Friday, February 23, 2018

The 106th Annual Business Meeting of the members of the College Art Association will be called to order at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 21st, during Convocation at the 2018 Annual Conference, in Room 502A and B at the Los Angeles Convention Center, 1201 S. Figueroa Street, Los Angeles, California.

CAA President, Suzanne Preston Blier, will preside. The Annual Business Meeting will be held in two parts.

AGENDA

The Agenda for the first part of the Annual Business Meeting is as follows:
I. Welcome – Hunter O’Hanian, CAA Executive Director and CEO
II. Presentation by Suzanne Preston Blier, CAA President
III. Executive Director’s Report – Hunter O’Hanian
IV. Presentation of CAA Awards for Distinction – Suzanne Preston Blier
V. 2018 Professional Development Fellowships in Visual Arts and Art History
VI. Keynote Address – Charles Gaines, CalArt, School of Art.

After the Keynote Address, the Meeting will be recessed and will re-convene on Friday, February 23, 2018 from 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. in Room 403B, at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The Agenda for the second part of the Annual Business Meeting is as follows:

VII. Approval of Minutes of 105th Annual Business Meeting, February 15 and 17, 2017 – see: http://www.collegeart.org/news/2017/12/15/caa-105th-annual-business-meeting-minutes 

VIII. Financial Report: Teresa Lopez, CAA Chief Financial Officer
IX. Old Business
X. New Business
XI. Results of Election of New Directors: Suzanne Preston Blier
XII. Open discussion with members, Board and staff

Proxies
If you are unable to attend the Annual Business Meeting, please complete a proxy online to appoint the individuals named thereon to (i) vote, as directed by you, for directors, and, at their discretion, on such other matters as may properly come before the Annual Business Meeting; and (ii) to vote in any and all adjournments thereof. CAA Members will be notified when the proxy for casting votes becomes available online in early January 2018. A proxy, with your vote for directors, must be received no later than 6:00 p.m. PST Thursday, February 22, 2018.

Next Meeting – 2019
The 107th Annual Business Meeting of the College Art Association will be held in New York in 2019, and again take place in two parts — with a call to order on February 13, and a second meeting and open discussion on February 15.

Roberto Tejada, Secretary
College Art Association

December 15, 2017

Filed under: Board of Directors, Governance

CAA 105th Annual Business Meeting Minutes

posted by December 15, 2017

The College Art Association 105th Annual Business Meeting Minutes
New York Hilton Midtown Hotel
1335 Avenue of the Americas
NY NY 10019

February 15, 2017: Convocation, 5:30 p.m.
West/East Ballroom, 3rd Floor

February 17, 2017:  MY_CAA, 12:15 p.m.
East Ballroom, 3rd Floor
 

Part One

CAA’s President, Suzanne Preston Blier, welcomed attendees to CAA’s Convocation and to the Association’s 105th Annual Meeting of its members. While the Annual Meeting was scheduled to be held in two parts, Blier advised attendees that official items of the meeting would be covered on Friday, February 17th, from 12:15 – 1:15 p.m. at the “My-CAA meeting, hosted by Hunter O’Hanian, CAA’s new Executive Director and CEO.

Convocation proceeded with the President’s opening comments followed by the Awards ceremony, the Keynote Address with Mary Miller, and cocktails next to the East Ballroom.

CAA’s President, Suzanne Preston Blier addressed Convocation with the subject “Art Matters.” Here follows the link to President Blier’s comments:  http://www.collegeart.org/news/2017/02/24/caa-2017-convocation-presidents-address-art-matters/

Part Two

I. Call to Order – President’s Report – Suzanne Preston Blier
On Friday, February 17, 2017 at 12:15 p.m., President Blier called to order Part Two of the Annual Meeting in the East Ballroom.

II. Blier introduced Judith Rodenbeck the Annual Conference Chair who spoke of the success of the changes to the Annual Conference instituted by the Annual Conference Committee and other parties. Rodenbeck had received much positive feedback on the new, shorter session times (90 minutes) and the multitude of session options available to Conference attendees.

III. Report by Hunter O’Hanian, CAA’s Executive Director and CEO

IV. President Blier asked for the approval of the minutes of the February3, 2016 Annual Business Meeting held in Washington, D. C. A motion was made to approve the 2016 minutes. The motion was seconded and the minutes were approved.

V. Blier/Hunter called on Teresa Lopez, CAA’s Chief Financial Officer, to give her financial report for Fiscal Year 2016.

Due to reduced membership enrollment, as well as lower attendance in at 2016 Washington DC annual conference, the Association ended fiscal year 2016 with a deficit of $326,000 including one-time expenses of $125,000.

As of the end of the last fiscal year, there were 9,027 individual members and 1,311 institutional members, including 735 library subscribers handled through Taylor & Francis. Last year’s deficit was funded from the Association’s reserves. The fair market value of CAA’s investment portfolio decreased from $9,644,074 on July 1, 2016 to $9,399,572 on June 30, 2016. CAA drew down $925,000 in that period.

In July 2016, the CAA Board of Directors hired a new executive director, Hunter O’Hanian. In the current year, we have seen an increase in total membership numbers and revenue. Registrations for this year’s annual conference have not only exceeded last year, but have also exceeded paid registrations from the 2015 annual conference in New York. The number of attendees for this Annual Conference stands at 3,236 as of this afternoon.

Over the next few months CAA staff and board will be working on budgets on for future years which will better match projected expenses to projected revenues.

Copies of the audited financial statements for FY2016 compared with FY2015 are available here and as a pdf on our website.

VI. President Blier called for Old Business. There was none.

VII. President Blier called for New Business. There was none.

VIII. Results of Board Election
President Blier stated that official business was completed and announced the results of the election of new directors. The following members have been elected to CAA’s Board of Directors:

Colin Blakely
Peter Lukehart
Melissa Hilliard Potter
Julia Sienkewicz

President Blier thanked all the candidates for their willingness to serve CAA.

Respectfully submitted,

Roberto J. Tejada, Secretary
College Art Association

March 22, 2017

 

Next CAA Annual Business Meeting  – 2018

The 106th Annual Meeting of the College Art Association will take place during Convocation on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. and on Friday, February 23, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. at the Los Angeles Convention Center.

Filed under: Board of Directors, Governance

The CAA Board of Directors comprises professionals in the visual arts who are elected annually by the membership to serve four-year terms. Please read the CAA By-laws on Nominations, Elections, and Appointments for more information on the process.

As of January 3, 2018, voting is open! Scroll down to meet the candidates and cast your vote.

The deadline for voting is 6:00 p.m. (Pacific Time) on Thursday, February 22, 2018.

Meet the Candidates

The 2017–18 Nominating Committee has selected a slate of six candidates for election to the CAA Board of Directors for the 2018–22 term. Click the names of the candidates below to read their statements and resumes before casting your vote. The candidates are:

About the Board

The Board of Directors is charged with CAA’s long-term financial stability and strategic direction; it is also the Association’s governing body. The board sets policy regarding all aspects of CAA’s activities, including publishing, the Annual Conference, awards and fellowships, advocacy, and committee procedures.

HOW TO VOTE

CAA members may vote for up to four (4) candidates, including one write-in candidate (who must be a CAA member). The four candidates receiving the most votes will be elected to the board. CAA members may cast their votes and submit their proxies online beginning in early January 2018; no paper ballots will be mailed. Please have your CAA user/member ID# and password handy when you are ready to vote.

Please fill out the form below to cast your vote. (Use the scroll bar on the right side of the form to scroll down, make your choices, and submit.)

Create your own user feedback survey

The results of the 2018 Board of Directors election will be announced at CAA’s Annual Business Meeting from 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. on Friday, February 23, at the 2018 Annual Conference in Los Angeles.

Questions? Contact Vanessa Jalet, executive liaison, at (212) 392-4434 or vjalet@collegeart.org

Filed under: Board of Directors, Governance

2018-2019 Nominating Committee Seeks Members

posted by November 27, 2017

CAA invites you to help shape the future of the organization by serving on the 2018-2019 Nominating Committee. Each year, this committee nominates and interviews potential candidates for the CAA Board of Directors and selects the final slate for the membership’s vote. The candidates for the 2018 Board of Directors’ election were announced on Thursday, November 9, 2017.

The Board of Directors and the Nominating Committee strive to find the best candidates that represent the broad sub-disciplines and practitioners represented in CAA’s membership. The 2017-2018 Nominating Committee will select new members of the 2018-2019 committee at its business meeting, to be held at the 2018 Annual Conference in Los Angeles in February. Once selected to serve on the 2018-2019 Nominating Committee, each member, in the spring of 2018, proposes 5 or more people to run for the board. Service on the Nominating Committee involves conducting telephone interviews with candidates during the summer and meeting with the Committee in the fall to determine a final slate for the 2019 Board of Directors’ election.  Nominating Committee members attend their own business meeting at the 2019 Annual Conference in New York to select the new members who will replace them on the next year’s Nominating Committee.

Nominations and self-nominations should include a brief statement of interest and a 3–4 page condensed CV. Please email a statement and your CV as Word attachments, with the subject line “2018-2019 Nominating Committee,” care of Vanessa Jalet, CAA executive liaison. Deadline: Friday, December 1, 2017  

Filed under: Board of Directors

The CAA Board in Action

posted by November 22, 2017

CAA board members at the 105th Annual Conference in New York, 2017. Photo: Ben Fractenberg

This has been a busy time for the CAA Board of Directors. In the end of October, they attended a two-day meeting and retreat, addressing a variety of issues facing the organization and the field.

Under the leadership of President Suzanne Preston Blier, the Board looked at potential changes to the governance structure, updates on finances and membership enrollment, the impact of the Annual Conference, the recent staff reorganization and progress on our 2015-2020 strategic plan.

In addition to hearing detailed reports from the various committees, the Board spent time on the process to rebrand and rename the Association. We have narrowed down the choices and members will be asked for their input in the coming weeks. Many thanks to the 800 members who responded to the survey this summer. That survey feedback was valuable in directing our thinking. We are hopeful that a new name and identity will be launched at the 106th Annual Conference in Los Angeles in February 2018.

The board also elected new officers: Jim Hopfensberger was elected to succeed Suzanne Blier. She finishes her term as president in Spring 2018. Melissa Potter was elected secretary and Peter Lukehart was elected treasurer.

Roberto Tejada was elected to serve in the newly created office of vice president of Diversity and Inclusion.

Filed under: Board of Directors

CAA’s Nominating Committee met in early October 2017 to review the candidates who have applied to run in CAA’s Board of Directors election for the term 2018-2022. The Nominating Committee selected the following six candidates, four of whom will be elected to Board service. In the coming weeks, CAA will post their full biographies for consideration by the CAA membership.

Laura Anderson Barbata is a practicing, trans-disciplinary artist living and working in Brooklyn and Mexico City. Her work is intended to connect various cultures through the platform of contemporary art. Her art engages creative practices that promote dignity, shared values, diversity, and collaboration through reciprocal exchange of knowledge.  Among many unique projects, she has worked with the Yanomami of the Venezuela Amazon to document their oral history, overseen collaborative work with stilt dancing groups from Trinidad and Tobago, Brooklyn and Oaxaca and directed a 10-year effort to repatriate the remains of a Mexican Opera Singer. Ms. Barbata has extensive business expertise, as director of image and concept designer for a chain of 50 restaurants throughout Mexico. She was Vice President of the company and worked to protect the interests of the shareholders until the business was sold. Ms. Barbata feels she offers a unique perspective – having international business experience as well as maintaining a career as an artist.

Audrey G. Bennett is a full professor in the Department of Communication and Media, and director of the interdisciplinary graduate program in Communication and Rhetoric at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.  She was a 1996 recipient of a CAA Professional Development Fellowship and is currently a member of CAA’s Inaugural Committee on Design. From 2002-2010 she was a member of the Board of the Upstate New York chapter of the AIGA, the professional association for design where she served in a number of leadership roles. She is a former 2015 Andrew W. Mellon Distinguished Scholar, University of Pretoria, South Africa. Prof. Bennett secured funding for and founded the Global Interaction in Design Education (GLIDE), a biennial, virtual design conference. She would like to assist CAA in diversifying its membership culturally and intellectually.

Dahlia Elsayed is an Associate Professor of Fine Arts in the Humanities Dept. at CUNY-LaGuardia Community College. She is a practicing artist who combines text and imagery to create visually narrative paintings that document internal and external geographies. Her work is influenced by conceptual art, comics and landscape painting and cartography.  She is particularly interested in attracting and welcoming the vital constituency of community college faculty and students to CAA.  Furthermore she sees opportunities to facilitate interactions between community colleges, senior colleges and graduate programs to strengthen best practices and continuity.

Alice Ming Wai Jim is Associate Professor in Contemporary Art and Concordia University Research Chair in Ethnocultural Art Histories at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. She is the founding co-editor of the international scholarly journal, “Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas.” Alice is an art historian, curator and cultural organizer in the fields of diasporic and global art histories, media arts and curatorial studies. Focusing on Asian Canadian and African Canadian artists, she has curated exhibitions of over fifty artists of color and Indigenous artists and organized major scholarly events within academic settings and for the broader arts community in Canada and internationally. She is also involved in a leadership capacity in several formal partnerships involving international networking and community building initiatives, with a strong commitment to research and social justice. Alice would like to work toward increasing the visibility of members from diverse cultural communities, strengthening international exchanges, and expanding critical capacities for art historical scholarship and critical visual culture studies on and by ethnic minority and Indigenous peoples across the Americas and internationally.

Richard Lubben is Dean of the Arts Division at Lane Community College in Eugene, Oregon.  He is a painter, whose recent work consists of a series of large format abstract oil paintings examining visual transitions of landscapes through seasonal changes, memories of nature and delicate ecosystems. He was awarded a Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Human Rights and Social Justice at the University of Ottawa in 2013. He has served on CAA’s Task Force on Advocacy, been on panels at CAA’s Annual Conference and is currently the Chair of CAA’s Education Committee.  Lubben urges the inclusion of representatives from community colleges on CAA’s board but even more importantly attracting to CAA the thousands of 2-year institutional members, and potential individual members, associated with the nearly 1500 community colleges across the United States.

Walter Meyer, Professor of Art History at Santa Monica College, a 2-year community college  in California.  His degree is early 20th century art, specializing in Eastern Europe and Russia.  He has taken on a number of leadership positions at SMC including co-chairing the Technology Planning Committee . He is President of the Art Historians of Southern California, and former board member of the Craft & Folk Art Museum in Los Angeles. Currently, he serves on CAA’s Professional Practices Committee. Meyer believes in the mission of the community college system and its ability to help art and art history programs close the equity gap with under-represented populations on college campuses.

Filed under: Board of Directors