CAA News Today

CAA is pleased to announce the recipient of the 2020 Professional Development Fellowships. The recipient of the $10,000 fellowship in visual art is Ana Maria Farina, SUNY New Paltz. A fellowship in art history was not awarded this year.

The honorable mention in visual art is awarded to Sabrina Pastard, Columbia College Chicago. All fellows and honorable mentions receive a complimentary one-year CAA membership and registration for the 2022 Annual Conference in Chicago.

2020 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FELLOWSHIP IN VISUAL ARTS

Ana Maria Farina, SUNY New Paltz

Ana Maria Farina paints using a gun––a tufting gun––along with needles, hooks, and knots. Repurposing a phallic signifier of violence, she conjures vibrant objects of comfort that inhabit a mystical pictorial space between abstraction and representation.

Ana Maria was born and raised in Brazil and is now based in the Hudson Valley, New York. She received her masters degree in Art and Art Education from Columbia University in 2016, and in 2018 she was awarded a fellowship to the New York Foundation for the Arts Immigrant Artist Mentoring Program. In 2019, she received a scholarship to attend the MFA program at SUNY New Paltz, where she also served as the Visiting Artist Director and Instructor of Record. Ana’s work has been featured in many spaces throughout New York and she has upcoming exhibitions at the Wassaic Project, the Garrison Art Center, the Dorsky Museum, among others.

HONORABLE MENTION IN VISUAL ART

Sabrina Pastard, Columbia College Chicago

Sabrina Pastard is a visual artist who works with the poetics in the meta of the mundane. Often balancing her visuals on the borderline of familiarity and the abject, safety and crisis. Her multidisciplinary practice ranges in medium from ready-made sculptures and abstract prints to conceptual writings and poetry. Each new work invites an intellectual intimacy from the viewer as it inquires to the status of our assumed lives and societal taboos. Pastard was raised in St. Louis, MO and received her B.A. in studio art from George Fox University. She currently resides in Chicago and will complete her MFA at Columbia College Chicago in May 2021.

ABOUT THE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FELLOWSHIP

CAA’s Professional Development Fellowship program supports promising artists and art historians who are enrolled in MFA and PhD programs nationwide. Awards are intended to help them with various aspects of their work, whether for job-search expenses or purchasing materials for the studio. CAA believes a grant of this kind, without contingencies, can best facilitate the transition between graduate studies and professional careers. The program is open to all eligible graduate students in the visual arts and art history. Applications for the 2021 fellowship cycle will be due December 15, 2021. Learn more. 

CAA at 2021 Advocacy Days

posted by April 16, 2021

Screenshot of CAA in virtual conversation with NY Senator Chuck Schumer, 2021

CAA representatives advocated for the arts and humanities with partners at the American Association of Museums (AAM) and the National Humanities Alliance (NHA) this spring for Museums Advocacy Day on February 23 and Humanities Advocacy Day on March 11, 2021. Alongside other academic societies, scholars, and museum professionals, CAA urged congressional representatives and senators to back full funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and particularly the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS), which provides grants for museums and arts organizations throughout the country, for the fiscal year 2022. Increased allocations for these programs would bring funding levels back to what they were over a decade ago in 1998. We met with the offices of New York representatives Tom Reed, Jerry Nadler, Carolyn Maloney, John Katko, and Yvette Clarke and senators Kirsten Gillibrand and Chuck SchumerSen. Schumer joined Museums Advocacy Day in person to share his enthusiasm about moving forward with emergency relief funds for arts organizations and supporting more space for them in the next year’s congressional budget.  

 CAA has been participating in these meetings for the past three years. We noted that 1/3 of all museums in the US are at risk of closing without assistance. We also stressed the importance of museums as institutions that have served our community greatly during COVID and have come up with creative solutions for childhood education, community building, virtual exhibitions, and out-of-the-box engagement strategies. The arts and humanities have helped our communities cope and their spaces—schools, libraries, and museums—remain some of the only spaces in communities that can be accessed freely by the public.   

Filed under: Advocacy, Humanities

Join us for a conversation with Sean Nash, a visual artist and food fermentation experimentalist, and Stephanie Maroney, a feminist science and food studies scholar, as they discuss “Microbial Teachers and Fermentive Pedagogies.”

Sean Nash is a visual artist and food fermentation experimentalist. His multidisciplinary work integrates fermented foods with sculptures as edible, time-based, and socially engaged components of programs and exhibitions. Sean’s work has been shown nationally, with solo shows at the Kniznick Gallery at Brandeis (Krautsourcing, 2019), Plug Projects in Kansas City, MO (Lactobacillus Amongus, 2017), and Black Ball Projects in Brooklyn, NY (They/Them/Their, 2016). His work can be found at senash.com

Stephanie Maroney is a feminist science and food studies scholar creating collaborative projects on fermentation and mycology. She has published on the topics of queer fermentation praxis, the colonial afterlife of microbiome science, and probiotic dietary culture. Stephanie has a Ph.D in Cultural Studies and administers a community-engaged arts and humanities research program at UC Davis.

 

 

Filed under: Podcast

In this conversation, the pair discuss Schwartz’s new book Walker Evans: No Politics. The first book to take seriously Evans’s refusal to act or work politically, Walker Evans offers a sweeping reassessment of American documentary and its histories. Opening with a discussion of Evans’s place in the canon as well as Schwartz’s efforts to problematise canonical histories of documentary, the podcast covers a range of topics, from the publication of Evans’s short, but punchy, review of photographic books, his 1931 essay “The Reappearance of Photography,” to the 1971 retrospective exhibition of his work at the Museum of Modern Art. At the centre of this conversation is a debate about Evans’s legacy, about how and why it needs to be reimagined today.

Stephanie Schwartz is an Associate Professor of the History of Art at University College, London.

Jorge Ribalta is an independent curator and photographer living and working in Barcelona.

Filed under: Podcast — Tags:

CAA joins 36 member societies in solidarity with Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in signing a statement by the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) condemning the appalling acts of racism, violence, and discrimination committed against these communities.

That statement asserts, “We find ourselves in a moment where, for good reason, we and many other Americans have been and continue to be focused intently on anti-Black racism. But we are reminded by the horrific events in Georgia this week and increased acts of violence over this past year linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, of the deep prejudices affecting Asians in this country. These and other attacks against the Asian-American community represent the latest chapter in our history of xenophobia, which tends to flare during times of crisis.” (ACLS American Council of Learned Societies)

See the original statement.

Filed under: Advocacy

Warren Cariou and Siobhan Angus

posted by November 09, 2020

The CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, our guests continue the conversation on art, pedagogy, and environmental justice.

Warren Cariou is a photographer, filmmaker, writer, and interdisciplinary scholar whose work often explores links between environment, culture, and storytelling, with a particular focus on Indigenous communities in western Canada. He directs the Centre for Creative Writing and Oral Culture at the University of Manitoba, where he teaches in the Department of English, Theatre, Film and Media. His petrographs can be viewed at: www.warrencariou.com

Siobhan Angus is a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History of Art at Yale University and a visiting scholar at the Yale Center for British Art. Her research, informed by a commitment to social and environmental justice, explores the visual culture of resource extraction in Canada, with a focus on photography and visual archives.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Alicia Grullón and Chloë Bass

posted by November 02, 2020

The CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, our guests discuss art, pedagogy, and environmental justice.

Alicia Grullón is an artist, author, curator, and activist based in New York City. She is an organizer of the People’s Cultural Plan and the legislative art project Percent for Green. She is an adjunct professor at the School of Visual Arts and Queens College, City University of New York.

Chloë Bass is an artist and public practitioner based in New York City. She is an assistant professor of art at Queens College, where she co-runs Social Practice Queens, an experimental pedagogical platform that seeks to integrate studio art with research, community collaboration, and environmental justice. Her project “Wayfinding” closed in September 2020, and the audioguide is available to listen at: https://www.chloebass.com/wayfinding

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Roland Betancourt and Bryan C. Keene

posted by October 26, 2020

The CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, our guests discuss their work with the theme “In Raking Light.”

Roland Betancourt is a Professor of Art History at the University of California, Irvine, whose forthcoming book with Princeton University Press is entitled, Byzantine Intersectionality: Sexuality, Gender, and Race in the Middle Ages.

Bryan C. Keene is assistant professor of art history at Riverside City College and formerly associate curator of manuscripts at the Getty Museum; his 2019 edited volume is Toward a Global Middle Ages: Encountering the World through Illuminated Manuscripts.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Naomi J. Falk and Susan Altman

posted by October 19, 2020

The CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, CAA Conversations returns with “What Do We Do Now?”, a conversation with Naomi J. Falk about shifting studio pedagogy to teaching online.

Naomi J. Falk’s work considers our relationships with manufactured and natural landscapes, exploring the current climate, socially, environmentally, and politically. Facing swiftly changing classroom environments, this spring, she and Stacy Isenbarger began a new project share platform for art educators called, www.WhatDoWeDoNow.art. Falk is an Assistant Professor of Studio Art in 3D Studies at the University of South Carolina. She lives and works in Columbia, SC.

Susan Altman is a Professor and Assistant Chair of the Visual, Performing and Media Arts Department at Middlesex County College in Edison, NJ. In addition to teaching studio courses, she is also the Director of the Center for the Enrichment of Learning and Teaching. Her studio practice is in drawing and printmaking, and she lives and works in New York City.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

New in caa.reviews

posted by October 16, 2020

Holly Shaffer discusses Aquatint Worlds: Travel, Print, and Empire, 1770–1820 by Douglas Fordham. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Filed under: caa.reviews