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Thank You for CAA 2020! What Did You Think?

posted by February 17, 2020

See more highlights @caavisual.

Thank you to the thousands of participants who contributed to the 108th Annual Conference! You can see highlights on our Twitter and Instagram feeds and via the #CAA2020 hashtag.

If you attended CAA 2020, we want to hear from you. Let us know what worked, what didn’t, and what you’d like to see next year in our online survey. All survey respondents are eligible to be entered into a drawing for a free year-long membership.

Take the survey

We appreciate your feedback and hope to see you next year in New York, February 10-13, 2021! The submissions portal for CAA 2021 opens March 1.

Filed under: Annual Conference, Surveys

Welcome to the 2020 Annual Conference

posted by February 12, 2020

The 108th CAA Annual Conference begins tomorrow in Chicago! Welcome in advance to the thousands of CAA members, colleagues, and friends who will be there. If you’re attending, make sure you have downloaded the CAA 2020 app, which is your go-to resource for personalizing your schedule and connecting with others at the conference. There is also a desktop version and printable PDF of the schedule available here.

Want to attend but haven’t registered? Onsite registration is available, and thanks to generous support from the Carl & Marilynn Thoma Art Foundation, we’re happy to offer a Pay-as-you-Wish Day Pass on Friday, February 14th.

Not at the conference? See what’s happening on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and join in the discussion online using using #CAA2020.

CAA staff is on-the-ground at the Hilton Chicago, so website updates and email replies may be delayed. Thanks for your understanding!

Filed under: Annual Conference

Susanna Crum and Julia Lillie

posted by February 10, 2020

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Susanna Crum and Julia Lillie discuss “Mapping and Print: Perspectives from Contemporary Art and Art History.”

Susanna Crum is an artist and educator in Louisville, Kentucky, where she teaches printmaking as an Assistant Professor at Indiana University Southeast and at Calliope Arts, a shared print media workspace she cofounded in 2015. She is President of the Mid America Print Council, and just spent a month fishing and conducting a research-based mapping project in the small town of Alvik, Norway.

Julia Lillie is a PhD Candidate at the Bard Graduate Center in New York, where she studies early modern European print culture. She is currently based in Auburn, Alabama, and is at work on her dissertation, which investigates a network of exiled Protestant engravers active in the Catholic city of Cologne in the late sixteenth century. She was previously a Collections Manager in the Department of Drawings and Prints at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

New in caa.reviews

posted by February 07, 2020

      

Dániel Margócsy reviews Insect Artifice: Nature and Art in the Dutch Revolt by Marisa Anne Bass. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Sven Dupré writes about Art and Optics in the Hereford Map: An English Mappa Mundi, c. 1300 by Marcia Kupfer. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Beth Saunders discusses Anthony W. Lee’s book The Global Flows of Early Scottish Photography: Encounters in Scotland, Canada, and China. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Filed under: caa.reviews

CWA Picks for CAA 2020

posted by February 05, 2020

In lieu of the Committee on Women in the Arts’ monthly write ups on select exhibitions, programs and scholarship that explore gender issues, feminist practices and the work of women artists from around the world and the United States, this month’s picks will focus on local highlights during the 2020 Annual Conference in Chicago.

Among them we would like to highlight the performance program curated by Out of Site Chicago for CWA’s Reception at HAUS and the Hokin Gallery, Columbia College Chicago during CAA 2020 on Thursday February 13. For more information and to RSVP, click here.

The evening celebrates the centennial of US women’s suffrage and the 50%  women-centered content of this year’s conference, marking this monumental occasion while also acknowledging the discriminatory practices that limited voting rights for indigenous women and women of color, even after the passage of the 19th amendment. Seeking to extend conversations on gender, race, class and equality from a local and transnational perspective in light of the fraught history of inclusion in the US and this CWA-spearheaded initiative, Out of Site brings together two riveting, thought-provoking performances by Chicago-based artists Wannapa P-Eubanks and Alexandria Eregbu.

The 50/50 initiative’s spirit and the critical commemoration of US women’s suffrage underpin also several of the participatory projects and workshops of the 2020 ARTexchange program and exhibition that can be also explored during the CWA Reception. Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s 19th-century women’s suffrage address “Solitude of Self” is, for instance, the focus of Carol Flueckiger’s drawing workshop Solitude of Selfie, while the underside of the movement is addressed in UNDERBELLY, a participatory performance by Jennifer Natalya Fink and Julie Laffin. Click here to participate in this modern suffragette parade. For complete list of artists and workshops of 2020 ARTexchange click here.

CWA PICKS FOR CAA 2020 IN CHICAGO

Woman Made Gallery 

Woman Made Gallery is a tax-exempt, not-for-profit organization founded in 1992. Its goal is to cultivate, promote and support the work of female-identified artists by providing exhibition opportunities, professional development, and public programs that invite discussion about what feminism means today.
Link

Vaginal Davis as G.B. Jones in Beggars of Life segment of The White to be Angry, 1999
Photo by John AES Nihil of Aesthetic Nihilism Pictorial

Vaginal Davis: The White to be Angry at the Art Institute Chicago
at the Art Institute Chicago
February 1 – April 26, 2020
Link

Mika Rottenberg: Easypiecesat
at the Bergman Family Gallery
October 2, 2019 – March 8, 2020
Link

Female Trouble: Amanda Joy Calobrisi, Lilli Carré, Qinza Najm, Kathryn Refi, Frances Waite
at Western Exhibitions
January 10 – February 22, 2020
Link

Margie Criner: Mind Over Matter
at Bert Green Fine Art
January 11 – February 22, 2020
Link

Candida Alvarez: Estoy Bien
at Monique Meloche Gallery
February 1 – March 28, 2020
Link

American Medina: Stories of Muslim Chicago
at Chicago History Museum
Link

Why women should vote
at Jane Addams Hull House
Link

True Peace: the presence of justice
at Jane Addams Hull-House Museum
Link

Facing Freedom in America 
at Chicago History Museum
Link

Beth Foley
at Gallery Victor Armendariz
January 10 – February 28, 2020
Link

Weaving Beyond the Bauhaus
at the Art Institute Chicago
August 3, 2019 – February 17, 2020
Link

Robyn O’Neil: The Tapestries
at Western Exhibitions
January 10 – February 22, 2020
Link

VISIT THE CONFERENCE SITE

Filed under: Annual Conference, CWA Picks

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by February 05, 2020

Patricia Walters. Photo: Sarah L. Voisin, via The Washington Post

She Collected Art Worth Millions. Now, She’s Giving the Coveted Collection to Howard University.

Patricia Walters is donating 152 pieces to Howard University to honor her husband, the late political scientist Ronald W. Walters. (Washington Post)

The Aftermath of a Fire at the Museum of Chinese in America’s Archives

Staff are hopeful after the first recovery effort found 150 boxes in a salvageable state. (Atlas Obscura)

Helen Frankenthaler Foundation Awards $2.5 Million to Five Universities

The announcement marks an expansion of the foundation’s Frankenthaler Scholarships program, a multiyear initiative that has already dedicated more than $4 million to advance the academic careers of art and art history students. (Artforum)

Art School’s Merger With Christian University Stokes Uproar

The union of Watkins College of Art and Belmont University in Nashville has prompted concern for the future of non-Christian faculty members and LGBTQ students on campus. (New York Times)

Want articles like these in your inbox? Sign up: 

Filed under: CAA News

Image courtesy Bend Design Conference.

Please join us for a Memorial Celebration for Professor Victor Margolin during the 2020 Annual Conference on February 12, 2020.

Memorial Celebration for Professor Victor Margolin

Wednesday, February 12, 2020
5:30-7:30 pm
Resident’s Dining Room
Jane Addams Hull House
800 S. Halsted Street
Chicago, Illinois

If you’d like to attend, please RSVP to Rebecca Houze: rhouze@niu.edu

Victor Margolin (1941-2019) was Professor Emeritus of Design History at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He served on the CAA Board of Directors from 1993 to 1997 and was a frequent presenter and session chair at CAA’s Annual Conferences. He promoted the study of design and design history by encouraging the work of others and contributing to the activities of the Design Studies Forum. He was honored with Lifetime Achievement Awards for design research from LearnXDesign (2015) and the Design Research Society (2016). Victor was a founding editor of the academic design journal Design Issues. Books that he has written, edited, or co-edited include The Struggle for Utopia: Rodchencko, Lissitzky, Moholy-Nagy, 1917-1936Design DiscourseThe Designed World: Images, Objects, Environments; and The Politics of the Artificial: Essays on Design and Design Studies. He also edited and co-edited important volumes of essays on design titled Design Discourse (1989), The Idea of Design (1995) Discovering Design (1995) and The Designed World: Images, Objects, Environments (2002). The first two volumes of his World History of Design were published in April 2015.

In the words of his colleague and co-editor Bruce Brown, “Victor was a man of immense intellectual generosity and he mentored scholars young and old around the world. He was always a reasoned advocate of design as a tool to create societies that were more just, equitable and compassionate. These values were accompanied by a keen mind and twinkling eye that drew Victor to people all over the world. His deep humanity, ideas and insights will live on through books and essays to inspire future generations of designers.”

The Jane Addams Hull-House Museum is located on the campus of the University of Illinois at Chicago, 800 S. Halsted Street, Chicago. It is easily reached by public transportation using the UIC Halsted stop on the Blue Line or the Halsted Bus (#8), or via the Eisenhower Expressway (I-290) and the Dan Ryan Expressway (I-90). Parking is available at the Halsted and Taylor Street garage.

Filed under: Annual Conference, Design, Obituaries

Honorees this year include Eleanor Antin, Joseph Leo Koerner, Maud K. Lavin, Annet Couwenberg, Harriet Senie, Kyle Staver, and many other scholars, artists, and teachers

CAA Annual Conference, Chicago, February 12-15, 2020

Eleanor Antin

We are pleased to announce the recipients and finalists of the 2020 CAA Awards for Distinction. Among the winners this year is Eleanor Antin, recipient of the 2020 Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement. Born in the Bronx in 1935 to immigrant parents, Antin is an innovator and pioneer as a feminist artist, a performance and installation artist, a conceptual artist, filmmaker, and writer. She is an emeritus Professor of Visual Arts at the University of California, San Diego and author of several books including An Artist’s Life by Eleonora Antinova and Conversations with Stalin. Antin’s solo museum exhibitions have appeared at the MoMA, the Whitney Museum, and, in 2019, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art with her retrospective, Eleanor Antin: Time’s Arrow. Her awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship and a 2006 Women’s Caucus for Art Lifetime Achievement Award.

Joseph Leo Koerner

Joseph Leo Koerner is the recipient of the 2020 Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award for Writing on Art. His achievements include four landmark books on sixteenth-century paintings: The Moment of Self-Portraiture in German Renaissance Art (University of Chicago Press, 1993), The Moment of Self-Portraiture in German Renaissance Art (University of Chicago Press, 2003), The Reformation of the Image (Reaktion Books, 2004), and Bosch and Bruegel: From Enemy Painting to Everyday Life (Princeton University Press, 2016). Koerner has also written widely on more recent artists, from Caspar David Friedrich to Paul Klee, and explored early-twentieth century Vienna through a documentary project and a semi-autobiographical film.

Maud K. Lavin

Dr. Maud K. Lavin is the recipient of the 2020 Distinguished Feminist Award for scholarship. Over the course of three decades, Lavin has worked tirelessly as a key pioneer in the field of feminist art history and visual studies. She is the author of numerous books including the first English-language book on Berlin Dada artist Hannah Hoch, Cut with the Kitchen Knife: The Weimar Photomontages of Hannah Hoch (Yale University Press, 1993), and most recently,  Boys’ Love, Cosplay, and Androgynous Idols: Queer Fan Cultures in Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, co-edited with Ling Yang and Jamie Zhao (Hong Kong University Press, 2017). She is a professor of Visual and Critical Studies and Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

The Awards for Distinction will be presented during Convocation at the CAA Annual Conference on Wednesday, February 12 at 6:00 PM at the Hilton Chicago. This event is free and open to the public.

The full list of 2020 CAA Awards for Distinction Recipients

Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement

Eleanor Antin

Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award for Writing on Art

Joseph Leo Koerner

Distinguished Feminist Award—Scholar

Maud K. Lavin

Distinguished Teaching of Art Award

Annet Couwenberg

Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award

Harriet Senie

Artist Award for Distinguished Body of Work

Kyle Staver

CAA/AIC Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation

Jeanne Marie Teutonico

Award for Excellence in Diversity

3Arts

Outstanding Leadership in Philanthropy Award

Terra Foundation for American Art

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award

J. P. Park
A New Middle Kingdom: Painting and Cultural Politics in Late Chosŏn Korea (1700–1850)
University of Washington Press, 2018

Finalists

Chanchal B. Dadlani
From Stone to Paper: Architecture as History in the Late Mughul Empire
Yale University Press, 2019

Barbara Furlotti
Antiquities in Motion: From Excavation Sites to Renaissance Collections
Getty Publications, 2019

Matthew Looper
The Beast Between: Deer in Maya Art and Culture
University of Texas Press, 2019

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award

Karl Kusserow and Alan C. Braddock
Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment
Princeton University Art Museum, 2019
with contributions by Miranda Belarde-Lewis, Teddy Cruz, Rachael Z. DeLue, Mark Dion, Fonna Forman, Laura Turner Igoe, Robin Kelsey, Anne McClintock, Timothy Morton, Rob Nixon, Jeffrey Richmond-Moll, Kimia Shahi, and Jaune Quick-to-See-Smith

Honorable Mention

Esther Gabara
Pop América, 1965–1975
Duke University Press, 2018

Finalists

Cathleen Chaffee
Introducing Tony Conrad: A Retrospective
Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY, in association with Koenig Books, London, 2019

Jessica Morgan and Alexis Lowry
Charlotte Posenenske: Work in Progress
Dia Art Foundation and Walther König, 2019

Elizabeth Morrison
Book of Beasts: The Bestiary in the Medieval World
Getty Publications, 2019

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums, Libraries, Collections, and Exhibitions

Denise Murrell
Posing Modernity: The Black Model from Manet and Matisse to Today
Yale University Press in association with The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery, Columbia
University in the City of New York, 2018

Honorable Mention

Phillip Earenfight
Shan Goshorn: Resisting the Mission
Trout Gallery, Dickinson College, 2019

Finalists

Tracy L. Adler
Jeffery Gibson: This is The Day
Prestel Publishing, 2018

Faith Brower, Heather Ahtone, and Seth Hopkins
Warhol and the West
University of California Press, 2019

Frank Jewett Mather Award for Art Criticism

Darby English
To Describe a Life: Notes from the Intersection of Art and Race Terror
Yale University Press, 2019

Art Journal Award

Philip Glahn and Cary Levine
“The Future Is Present: Electronic Café and the Politics of Technological Fantasy”
Art Journal, vol. 78, no. 3 (Fall 2019): 100–121

Arthur Kingsley Porter Prize

Claudia Brittenham
“Architecture, Vision, and Ritual: Seeing Maya Lintels at Yaxchilan Structure 23″
The Art Bulletin, vol. 101, no. 3 (September 2019): 8–36

Learn about the juries that select the recipients of the CAA Awards for Distinction.

VISIT THE CONFERENCE SITE

Dear Fellow CAA Members,

Last week CAA forwarded to its members an article from a student newspaper, the Yale Daily News, on the subject of introductory courses in the History of Art at Yale, without opportunity for comment from the Department. In the statement below my colleagues and I explain what is actually happening, as we move to offer Yale undergraduates a range of introductory courses that do justice to the diversity of our faculty’s research, of Yale’s collections and of the student body itself.

I work with a group of brilliant art historians who are constantly rethinking what we teach and how to teach it – our vision is expansive rather than reductive, in terms both of coverage and of art-historical methodology. It’s an interesting reflection on the current media ecology that the modest, incremental and generous changes being introduced to Yale’s curriculum could lead to an astonishing outburst of reactionary moral outrage online. Hyperbolic comparisons are rife: the ‘New York Post’ sees us as Visigoths poised to destroy Rome. We read of ‘Stalin at Yale.’ But Stalin murdered nine million people, while our Department is offering four, rather than two, 100-level courses. The parallel is imprecise, to say the least.

As all of us, across the profession, are exploring how to move forward, inspiring students to study the history of art and architecture. This is a matter of urgency in a world where critical visual skills have never been more important. We assert for our discipline a central role in a liberal arts education. Accordingly, plans are already afoot for a discussion around introductory art history teaching at the New York meeting of the Association in 2021. Visigoths will be welcome. I hope to see you there!

  • Tim Barringer, Chair, Department of the History of Art, Yale University

The following statement has been approved by all members of the History of Art Department at Yale University:

For more than half a century, Yale’s History of Art Department has been dedicated to “the study of all forms of art, architecture, and visual culture in their social and historical contexts.”  A particular strength of the Department’s teaching is close engagement with the great works from major world traditions held in the Yale University Art Gallery, where spectacular examples of European and American paintings and sculpture, prints, drawings and photographs sit alongside world class collections of Asian, African and the Indo-Pacific art. The Beinecke Library, Yale Center for British Art and Peabody Museum hold manuscripts, paintings, drawings and artefacts central to our field of study and teaching mission.

Art history is a global discipline. Yale faculty have made field-changing contributions to the study the arts of the Americas (notably Pre-Columbian art and the full range of North American art from colonial to contemporary), African art and arts of the African Diaspora, Asian and Islamic Arts, and European art from ancient times to today.  The diversity of the Department’s faculty and our intellectual interests finds an analogue in the diversity of today’s student body.

Discussions in the Department have focused on how to ensure that this diversity of research and resources can inform and energize our teaching. Offerings at the undergraduate level include upper-level lecture courses that address a full range of subjects (such as ‘Greek Art and Architecture’, ‘African Arts and Expressive Cultures’, ‘American Photojournalism’ and ‘Introduction to Contemporary Art’). Small intensive seminars are more focused still (such as ‘Surrealism,’ ‘Japanese Screens’, and ‘The Global Museum’). We aim for the widest possible selection of courses, balanced across time and region, while we maintain and cherish intensive coverage of western art, from classical Greece to medieval, Renaissance and Baroque, nineteenth-century, modern and contemporary.

But what about survey courses, which aim to introduce a large body of students from across Yale to the History of Art? We have traditionally offered two survey courses. The first discusses the ancient Middle East, Egypt, and pre-Renaissance European art (HSAR 112). The second covers European and American art from the Renaissance to the present (HSAR 115). New introductory courses have been added to these two offerings, such as ‘Global Decorative Arts,’ ‘Arts of the Silk Road,’ ‘Global Sacred Art’ and ‘The Politics of Representation.’ Faculty members have designed these introductory courses to engage the wealth of objects in Yale’s collections but also to move across traditions and periods.

Beginning this past Fall 2019, the Department committed to offering four different introductory courses each year. All of these courses, current or future, are designed to introduce the undergraduate with no prior experience of the History of Art to art historical looking and thinking. They also range broadly in terms of geography and chronology. Essential to this decision is the Department’s belief that no one survey course taught in the space of a semester could ever be comprehensive, and that no one survey course can be taken as the definitive survey of our discipline.

As we continue to renew our curriculum while preserving our commitment to introductory teaching of the broadest scope, new courses will replace HSAR112 and 115. Some will engage with the monuments and masterpieces of European and American art, some will introduce other world traditions, and some will be organized thematically offering comparative perspectives. As always, our introductory classes will bring Yale students face to face with works of art and material objects of great beauty and cultural value from across time and place.

We remain as committed as ever to “the study of all forms of art, architecture, and visual culture” and to sharing insights into works of art, from the Parthenon sculptures to Benin bronzes, from Renaissance Florence to Aztec sculpture, from the Taj Mahal to performance and digital art. As life becomes increasingly dominated by the visual, through screens and lenses, Art History’s focus on critical visual analysis has never been more relevant. Recent excitement on social media about Yale’s curriculum demonstrates just how significant and lively – even controversial – the study of Art History can, and should, be. We are delighted to welcome large numbers of students to Art History classes at Yale now and in the future.

Filed under: Art History, Higher Education

Sarah Sharp and Meredith Starr

posted by February 03, 2020

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Sarah Sharp and Meredith Starr discuss teaching technological fluidity.

Sarah G. Sharp is an artist and curator whose interests include alternative social histories, language, place, technology, and craft. She is an Assistant Professor and Foundations Area Coordinator in the Visual Arts Department at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and teaches in the MFA in Art Practice program at SVA in New York. She lives and works in Brooklyn and Baltimore.

Meredith Starr’s artwork is based on data she observes in her personal life and an investigation of social issues. She fuses science with artifacts of our humanity, exploring themes such as desire, memory, identity politics, and ecology. She is an Assistant Professor of Visual Arts at SUNY Suffolk County Community College and is a regional coordinator for the FATE organization. She lives and works in New York.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast