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In Memoriam: Cynthia Navaretta

posted by June 15, 2020

Cynthia Navaretta.

We were saddened to learn of the passing of critic, publisher, and longtime CAA member Cynthia Navaretta last month at the age of 97. An active member of the organization and a founding member of the Women’s Caucus for Art (WCA), Navaretta was founder of the feminist arts publisher Midmarch Arts Press and a tireless advocate for women artists.

A memorial in her honor will be hosted via on Sunday, September 13th, 2020, at 6pm (EST). Members interested in attending are invited to contact cyncelebration@gmail.com to receive information and a link closer to the event. Readers are also invited to post comments and pictures about her life on a newly created Facebook page, here.

Cynthia Navaretta, art critic, curator, publisher,  art collector,  architectural engineer died on May 18, 2020 at 97

In her mid-twenties Cynthia Navaretta was immersed in the New York art scene from the early days of the New York School and the influential 8th Street Club (one of only 6 female members!) before she married Emanuel Navaretta, artist, poet, criticprofessor and roommate of Franz Kline in 1950Cynthia’s friends and neighbors in New York and Long Island (Springs in the Hamptons) included Jackson Pollack, Harold Rosenberg, Lee Krasner, Milton Resnick, Milton Avery, Franz Kline, the De Kooning’s (Elaine and Willem) Ibram Lassaw, David Smith, Phillip Pavia, Judy Chicago, Agnes Martin, Pat Passlof, Hans Hofmann, June Wayne, Susan Schwalb and a long list of other art legends.   

In 1974, she was a founding steering committee member of Artists Talk On Art, the art world’s longest running panel discussion series. With her knowledge of the New York art scene, along with her professional qualifications in engineering and building, Cynthia served as a mayoral appointee to the Artists Certification Committee of the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs and later served as the public voting member of the powerful Loft Board in Manhattan for 20 years, deciding who was a bona fide artist and deserving of live-work studio space in converted factories. She was a founding member of the Women’s Caucus for Art, the Coalition of Women’s Arts Organizations, and also Women in the Arts.  

She represented the United States at the 1985 UN Conference on Women in Kenya and served in similar capacities on other boards and meetings around the world including the International Festival of Women Artists, Copenhagen in 1980. She befriended many well-known African-American women artists throughout the United States. In 1995, she published the first definitive compendium of American women artists of color  – Gumbo Ya Ya: Anthology of Contemporary African – American Women Artists with an introduction by Leslie King HammondMidmarch Arts Press.  

As the founder of Midmarch Arts Press, she published numerous memoirs, guideshistories and anthologies by and about American artists, male and female including: Guide to Women’s Arts Organizations, Women Artists of the World edited by Sylvia Moore, Cindy Lyle and Cynthia NavarettaMutiny in the Mainstream — Talk That Changed Art (with Judy Seigal), The Heart of the Question, The Writings and Paintings of Howardena Pindellintroduction by Lowery S. Sims, Voices of Women, by Lucy Lippard, Postmodern Heretics, by Eleanor HeartneyOut of the Picture: Milton Resnick and the New York School edited and with an Introduction by Goeffey Dorfman and The First Wife’s Tale: A Memoir by Louise Strauss – Ernst, to name only a few.   

Cynthia Navaretta at the National Women’s Conference in Houston 1977. Credit: Judy Seigel, via The New York Times

Her sharp mind, mixed with her organizational skills and ability to span many spheres of knowledge and personalities made her the ideal art panel planner, moderator or guest speaker. She was a beloved panel participant at College Art Association and mentored many young female artists. She was an active member of the International Art Critics Association and often traveled on their numerous trips around the world. She was also the publisher, along with photographer Judy Siegel, of the well-known Women Artist News (1978 – 1991), the first publication sent out on a regular basis covering the doings and activities of women artists; thus, publishing the first constant and continuing dialogue for women artists in the United States. A prodigious publisher, author and critic of feminist art in the United States Cynthia was one of the few who acknowledged and attracted regional and southern feminist artists whose work would otherwise most probably never have seen the light of day. Through the vehicles of Women Artist News and Midmarch Press, Cynthia was determined to document and champion many obscure female artists, offering them an exclusive avenue to introduce themselves and their work to a wider audience in the art world. 

In her later years, she organized and curated her archives which were accepted by the Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Art. This written legacy from one of the leading feminist voices on art- is sure to be preserved, shared, and seen as a unique transcript of the American art experience. 

In her ‘other’ life, Cynthia earned a master’s degree in mechanical engineering the 1940s. Returning to NYC, she was hired by the construction company Alvord & Swift. Established in 1911, Alvord became a significant contractor in the emerging specialty of HVAC design and construction. She designed and built many of the HVAC systems with Alvord & Swift for well-known skyscrapers in New York, including the famous Solow building. She also designed many of the HVAC systems at the 1964 World’s Fair in New York. During her several year’s tenure there, she had the thankless job of training and preparing no fewer than three less talented male colleagues to assume the position and prestige of Vice President. This glass ceiling was the deciding factor in her eventual resignation. At that time, she was one of approximately 400 female mechanical engineers in the United States.   

Throughout her engineering career, she held a variety of ambitious, supervisory positions. These included a managerial position for the ABC Television Network when the new Lincoln Center broadcast facility was being built. She also did a stint as an AMTRAK vice president, responsible for ‘new construction’ and ‘rights of way.’ She eventually retired to devote all her time to her publishing house and friends and family. But well into her nineties she could still be seen at art openings dressed to the ninths with her walker having arrived fashionably late by bus. 

Remembrance by Susan Schwalb.

Filed under: Art History, Artists, Obituaries

Fridays For Future protest in Toronto, Canada. Photo: Jasmin Sessler

As part of the 2021 Annual Conference, CAA seeks to offer a selection of sessions, papers, speakers, and related programming on the topic of Climate Crisis. Including but going beyond eco-art and eco-criticism, and with climate justice and intersectional thinking as priorities, panels and presentations can address ecology as a matter of the content of artworks, but also, and pressingly, how we—artists, designers, and art historians, institutional stakeholders and independent practitioners, and members of allied fields—can and should change our professional practices in light of the crisis.

We invite discussions of creative interventions into the status quo, up to and including a serious discussion of ways of reducing the carbon footprint of the annual conference itself, while preserving and enhancing access. Practices and themes may include remediation and amelioration, thematic representation and critique, the ramifications of change for institutions and collections, issues of preservation, and the nature of research. We invite radical and practical proposals. The conference content will stress a broad and inclusive conversation on climate crisis impact through the lens of age; gender; nationality; race; religion; and socioeconomic status among others.

SUBMIT A PROPOSAL

ARTexchange2020

Workshops • Performances • Exhibition

at Columbia College Chicago, Hokin Gallery, 623 South Wabash
February 12–February 24, 2020
Gallery Hours: Monday–Friday 9:00am–10:00pm; Saturday, 9:00am–5:00pm

Take part in workshops and performances facilitated by artists: Noah Breuer, Wendy DesChene + Jeff Schmuki, Jennifer Natalya Fink & Julie Laffin, Carol Flueckiger, Visda Goudarzi & Artemi-Maria Gioti, MiHyun Kim, Jill Odegaard, Lydia See, Christine Stiver.

View dynamic installations co-created with the public. Visitors can interact with many of the installations even when facilitating artists are not present. Come by every day to see how the space changes. Workshops and events are “drop-in” friendly. You can come and go for any time during facilitated workshops.

CAA’s Services to Artists Committee (SAC), in collaboration with the “Hokin Project,” a gallery management practicum course at Columbia College Chicago, presents ARTexchange 2020 as an opportunity for artists to share their work and build affinities with other artists, historians, curators, cultural producers, and the public.

The exhibition will remain on view through February 24, 2020.

For a full listing of all SAC programming at the 108th CAA conference, see here.

And don’t forget the ARTexchange Reception, Friday, February 14, 7:00pm–8:30pm.

Black Lunch Table — Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

Join us for a Wikipedia edit-a-thon hosted by the Black Lunch Table. Their initiative creates and improves articles about Black visual artists. Celebrating artists of color, women artists, and artists with disabilities, this program supports inclusion and recognition of intersectionality. No prior experience necessary. Bring a computer and a friend!

This programming is partially funded by the Office of Academic Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Columbia College Chicago.

Workshop times: Thursday, 10:30am–1:30pm; Friday, 10:30am–1:30pm in the Media Lounge

Noah Breuer – CB&S Rubbings and Print Project

Noah Breuer leads a printmaking workshop, utilizing engraved designs inspired by CB&S, his great-great-grandfather’s textile factory that was seized along with all Jewish-owned property in German-occupied areas during WWII. Participants leave with their own book and contribute one copy for visual materials to be built upon by the next participants.

Workshop times: Wednesday, 4:00pm–6:00pm; Thursday, 4:00pm–6:00pm; Friday, 12:00pm–2:00pm

Wendy DesChene + Jeff Schmuki – Ostraka

Join DesChene and Schmuki in celebration of our fundamental right to vote through Ostraka, a collaborative installation that mirrors a 5th-century BC Athenian tradition, where citizens would inscribe the name of a person they wanted to politically neutralize on a shard of broken pottery called an ostrakon.

Workshop times: Wednesday, 2:00pm–4:00pm; Friday, 12:00pm–2:00pm

Jennifer Natalya Fink & Julie Laffin – UNDERBELLY

Join artists Fink and Laffin in a performance and “modern suffragette” march, retracing the steps of historical suffrage parades. Airing some dirty laundry to expose the underbelly of the movement, participants will wear two-sided sashes imprinted with both positive and negative statements related to the suffragette movement and voting rights.

Performance time: Thursday, 4:00pm–6:00pm

If you want to be a modern suffragette and participate in the march, sign up here to be contacted by the artists. Meet at the Hokin Gallery at 3:40 pm. Don’t forget to dress weather appropriate.

Carol Flueckiger – Solitude of Selfie

Flueckiger’s project explores Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s 19th century women’s suffrage address “Solitude of Self”. Participants will be prompted to engage with Stanton’s speech and make response drawings. Works will be pinned to the wall and later scanned and integrated into a book honoring the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment.

Workshop times: Wednesday, 9:00am–11:00am; Friday, 9:00am–11:00am

Visda Goudarzi & Artemi-Maria Gioti – Soundsourcing

Soundsourcing is a participatory performance orchestrated by artists Goudarzi and Gioti. In this collaborative sound performance, audience members contribute vocal sounds (words, phonemes and noises) which are picked up by two condenser microphones and processed by laptop performers in real-time. The artists invite participation in this unique sound creation process.

Performance time: Friday, 7:00pm–8:00pm

MiHyun Kim – Stories Become Data

Stories Become Data is an interactive digital environment that invites participants to add their own stories to a collective narrative. MiHyun Kim will lead a workshop utilizing iPads and projection to create a space for participants to share and to visualize their stories collectively and simultaneously through real time.

Workshop time: Friday, 2:00pm–4:00pm

Jill Odegaard – Woven Welcome

Woven Welcome is a community-based art project that utilizes the form of a woven rug as a statement of the interconnectedness of individuals. Join artist Jill Odegaard in creating this artistic metaphor, and engage in a dialogue with other conference attendees and community members.

Workshop times: Wednesday, 6:00pm–10:00pm; Friday, 9:00am–12:00pm

Lydia See – BMC Playbook

Lydia See’s BMC Playbook encourages the examination and manipulation of materials, space, and the collective spirit. This collaborative project, resulting in an installation in the Hokin Gallery, includes a series of chance operations based on a generative BMC card game, inspired by material study workshops at Black Mountain College.

Workshop time: Thursday, 4:00pm–6:00pm

Materials and instructions are available outside facilitated workshop times for the entire exhibition.

Christine Stiver – Banquet Art

Stiver’s participatory performance Banquet Art is modeled after one of Caroline Shawk Brooks’ own sculpting demonstrations in which she sculpted one face after another on the same bust of butter. Participants will sculpt a series of portraits, starting with Napoleon and George Washington, a litany of “great leaders” will follow.

Workshop time: Friday, 4:00pm–8:00pm

Ongoing

Graduate Student Screenings

A curated selection of current MA/MFA videos/digital artworks, premieres at the Media Lounge Wednesday. Participating artists: ANDiLAND, Jorge Bañales, Andrea Bagdon, Jacklyn Brickman/Heather Taylor, Christian Casas, Danielle Damico, Jesse Egner, Caleb Engstrom, Mary Gring, Selena Ingram, Bibiana Medkova, Carolina Montejo, Strange Lens, Maria V, F. C. Zuke

VISIT THE CONFERENCE SITE

Call for Submissions: CAA 2020 MFA Screening

posted by November 20, 2019

CAA’s Services to Artists Committee (SAC) invites MFA students to submit video work for consideration for the upcoming CAA 108th Annual Conference in Chicago in February 2020.

Selected works will be premiered during the conference in the Media Lounge on Wednesday, February 12, 12:15–1:45 PM, and screened during the conference at the ARTexchange exhibition, which will be presented at the Hokin Gallery at Columbia College (623 South Wabash), a half block north of the conference hotel.

Through this screening and exhibition initiative, SAC aims to welcome the next generation of artists and practitioners into our midst. Our annual MFA Screening celebrates the hard work of MFA students across the nation and world, while exposing their artworks to a broad audience. We look forward to reviewing your submissions.

Please use the form here or the button below to submit your entry (a maximum of three per participant).

SUBMIT HERE

Deadline: December 10, 2019

Submission for consideration is free, and membership with CAA is not required (we are collecting that information for statistical purposes).

Jurors: Joan Giroux, Richard Serrano, and Vagner Mendonça-Whitehead

Submissions should include the following:

  • A short bio (50 words or less)
  • A short artist statement (100 words or less)
  • A link to 1–3 videos
  • Personal website (optional)

Specifics for your submissions:

  • 5 minutes in maximum length (excerpts accepted)
  • mpeg 4
  • 720p
  • Slate/Title cards: 5 seconds, with your name, title of work, date of completion, name of school/program
  • uploaded onto Vimeo.com (upload your link, allow it to be download-able)

Deadline: December 10, 2019

Acknowledgment: January 15, 2020

In collaboration with the Committee on Women in the Arts, CAA offers 50 percent of the 2020 conference’s content in celebration of the Centennial of Women’s Suffrage in the United States, while also acknowledging the discriminatory practices that limited voting rights for Indigenous women and women of color, even after the passage of the 19th amendment in 1920. The Services to Artists Committee encourages applicants to embrace the spirit of the 2020 conference by engaging issues of inclusivity and intersectional discourses in the arts.

About us: The Services to Artists Committee (SAC) was formed by the CAA Board of Directors to seek broader participation by artists and designers in the organization and the Annual Conference. SAC identifies and addresses concerns facing artists and designers; creates and implements programs and events at the conference and beyond; explores ways to encourage greater participation and leadership in CAA; and identifies ways to establish closer ties with other arts professionals and institutions. To this end, committee members are responsible for the programming of ARTspace and its related events.

Filed under: Annual Conference, Artists, ARTspace

ARTexchange at the 2019 Annual Conference in New York. Photo: Ben Fractenberg

Originally formatted as a pop-up exhibition and meet-up event for artists and curators, ARTexchange provides an opportunity for artists to share their work and build affinities with other artists, historians, curators, and cultural producers at the Annual Conference.

This year, instead of a one-time event, ARTexchange invites artists to lead participatory projects and/or workshops over the duration of the conference with a culminating public reception on Friday, February 14, from 7-8:30 pm.

CAA’s Services to Artists Committee, in collaboration with the Hokin Project, a gallery management practicum course at Columbia College Chicago, seeks proposals from artists to lead participatory projects and/or workshops for ARTexchange.

ARTexchange projects and/or workshops will take place at the Columbia College Hokin Gallery, from February 12-15, 2020. The gallery is located a half block north of the Hilton Chicago conference hotel at 623 South Wabash. The work created will remain on exhibit through February 24, 2020. Proposals that include community engagement and meaningful interaction with CAA, Columbia College, and Chicago communities will be prioritized.

In collaboration with the Committee on Women in the Arts, CAA offers 50 percent of the 2020 conference’s content in celebration of the Centennial of Women’s Suffrage in the United States, while also acknowledging the discriminatory practices that limited voting rights for Indigenous women and women of color, even after the passage of the 19th amendment in 1920. The Services to Artists Committee encourages applicants to embrace the spirit of the 2020 conference by engaging issues of inclusivity and intersectional discourses in the arts.

Artists will have access to found objects or recycled materials donated and sourced that might include such things as office supplies, paper, fabric, paint, or drawing materials. A risograph with at least eight ink drums is at hand as a possible resource as well. Please consider that activities will take place in a public, open, non-studio environment and should not include toxic materials or processes.

Artists whose proposals are accepted must become CAA members. Complete information on CAA membership is available here.

The Hokin Project is a Gallery Management Practicum course of the Business and Entrepreneurship Department. Graduate and undergraduate students manage all aspects of the gallery to present multi-disciplinary work of the broader Columbia College Chicago community and beyond through programs, events, and exhibitions.

Please email any questions to hokingallery@gmail.com and artexchange2020@gmail.com. Include “CAA ARTexchange” in the subject line.

Deadline to submit (extended): November 8, 2019

View a PDF version of these guidelines and gallery images

You will be asked to provide:
  • Contact information
  • A short narrative bio (150 words or less)
  • A short artist statement (150 words or less)
  • Website URL (optional)
  • A PDF (one file maximum 10 MB) of your proposal detailing your project, including materials requests, technical needs, and how you will engage the community (Chicago, CAA, and Columbia College Chicago) and/or consider inclusivity through the proposal. Please refer to the gallery plan, and if a particular space is preferable for the activity, make a note (please note that space will be shared amongst the accepted projects). If your project might take place over consecutive days, please note below in the Availability section. (up to 500 words)
  • Work samples (5–10 images and/or links to 1–2 video/audio files)
  • An image description list detailing the title, year completed, medium, and dimensions of each work. You may also include a short description describing how the work relates to the proposed project.
  • Availability: your availability during different time slots during the conference and any other information related to scheduling.
Filed under: Annual Conference, Artists, ARTspace

We’re delighted to announce the following guests will be presenting at the 108th CAA Annual Conference, taking place February 12-15, 2020, at the Hilton Chicago.

Keynote Speaker

Amanda Williams. Photo: David Kasnic Photography

The Keynote Speaker for the 108th CAA Annual Conference will be Amanda Williams. A visual artist who trained as an architect, Williams’s creative practice navigates the space between art and architecture, through works that employ color as a way to highlight the political complexities of race, place and value in cities. Williams has received critical acclaim including being named a USA Ford Fellow and a Joan Mitchell Foundation grantee. Her works have been exhibited widely and are included in the permanent collections of the Art Institute of Chicago and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. She lives and works on the South Side of Chicago.

CAA Convocation featuring Amanda Williams’s keynote will take place Wednesday, February 12, 2020, from 6-7:30 PM at the Hilton Chicago, Grand Ballroom. Free and open to the public. 

Distinguished Scholar

The Distinguished Scholar for the 108th CAA Annual Conference will be Dr. Kellie Jones, professor in Art History and Archaeology and African American and African Diaspora Studies at Columbia University. Her research interests include African American and African Diaspora artists, Latinx and Latin American Artists, and issues in contemporary art and museum theory.

Dr. Kellie Jones. Photo: Rod McGaha

Dr. Jones, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, has also received awards for her work from the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, Harvard University and Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation. In 2016 she was named a MacArthur Foundation Fellow.

Dr. Jones’s writings have appeared in a multitude of exhibition catalogues and journals.  She is the author of two books published by Duke University Press, EyeMinded: Living and Writing Contemporary Art (2011), and South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s (2017), which received the Walter & Lillian Lowenfels Criticism Award from the American Book Award in 2018 and was named a Best Art Book of 2017 in The New York Times and a Best Book of 2017 in Artforum.

Dr. Jones has also worked as a curator for over three decades and has numerous major national and international exhibitions to her credit.  Her exhibition “Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles, 1960-1980,” at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, was named one of the best exhibitions of 2011 and 2012 by Artforum, and best thematic show nationally by the International Association of Art Critics (AICA). She was co-curator of “Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the 1960s” (Brooklyn Museum), named one the best exhibitions of 2014 by ArtforumRead our interview with Kellie Jones.

The Distinguished Scholar Session will take place Thursday, February 13, 2020, from 4-5:30 PM at the Hilton Chicago, Grand Ballroom.

Distinguished Artist Interviews

The Distinguished Artist Interviews will feature artist Sheila Pepe interviewed by John Corso Esquivel, and artist Arnold J. Kemp interviewed by Huey Copeland.

Sheila Pepe. Photo: Rachel Stern

Sheila Pepe  is a cross-disciplinary artist employing conceptualism, surrealism, and craft to address feminist and class issues. Hot Mess Formalism, Pepe’s most recent solo exhibition organized by the Phoenix Art Museum, traveled to the Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, New York; Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, Nebraska; and the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln, Massachusetts between 2017 and 2019. A catalogue for the exhibition featured essays by by Julia Bryan-Wilson, Elizabeth Dunbar, Lia Gangitano, and curator Gilbert Vicario.

Other texts, all published in 2019, feature Pepe’s work: Vitamin T: Threads, and Textiles in Contemporary Art, the revised Art and Queer Culture by Catherine Lord and Richard Meyer, both published by Phaidon, and Feminist Subjectivities in Fiber Art and Craft: Shadows of Affect by John Corso Esquivel.

Venues for Pepe’s many other solo exhibitions include the Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, Massachusetts, and the Weatherspoon Art Museum, Greensboro, North Carolina. Her work has been included in important group exhibitions, most recently Fiber: Sculpture 1960- Present, curated by Janelle Porter, organized by the ICA Boston; Queer Abstraction, curated by Jared Ladesema, organized by the Des Moines Art Center in Iowa and Even Thread Has Speech, curated by Shannon Stratton for the John Michael Kohler Art Center, Wisconsin.

John Corso Esquivel is the Doris and Paul Travis Associate Professor of Art History at Oakland University.

Arnold J. Kemp. Photo: Todd Rosenberg for the School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Arnold J. Kemp is an interdisciplinary artist living in Chicago. The recurrent theme in his drawings, photographs, sculptures and writing is the permeability of the border between self and the materials of one’s reality. Kemp’s works are in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Studio Museum in Harlem, The Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, The Portland Art Museum, The Schneider Museum of Art, and the Tacoma Art Museum. He has received awards from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the  Joan Mitchell Foundation, The Pollock-Krasner Foundation, and Portland Institute for Contemporary Art. His work has been exhibited recently in Chicago, Mexico City, New York, San Francisco and Portland. His work was also shown in TagProposals On Queer Play and the Ways Forward at the ICA Philadelphia. Kemp was a founding curator at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts from 1993-2003 and is currently the Dean of Graduate Studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Read our interview with Arnold J. Kemp.

Huey Copeland is Arthur Andersen Teaching and Research Professor, Interim Director of the Black Arts Initiative (2019-2020), Associate Professor of Art History, and affiliated faculty in the Critical Theory Cluster, the Department of African American Studies, the Department of Art Theory & Practice, the Department of Performance Studies, and the Gender and Sexuality Studies Program at Northwestern University.

The Distinguished Artist Interviews will take place Friday, February 14, 2019, from 4-6:30 PM at the Hilton Chicago, Grand Ballroom. Free and open to the public. 

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CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

HOTELS AND TRAVEL

Monica Zandi and Stephanie Cortazzo

posted by February 11, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Monica Zandi and Stephanie Cortazzo discuss “Body/Cut” and the Brooklyn Collage Collective.

Monica Zandi is a writer, educator, and graduate art student at Hunter College.

Stephanie Cortazzo is a multimedia artist who recently had a show entitled Cosmic Crisis and is in the Brooklyn Collage Collective (www.brooklyncollagecollective.com/).

Filed under: Artists, CAA Conversations, Podcast

Submit Your Work to ARTexchange at CAA 2019

posted by January 23, 2019

Artist Joanne Tarlin presents her work at ARTexchange at the 2018 CAA Annual Conference in Los Angeles. Photo: Rafael Cardenas

The Services to Artists Committee invites artist members to submit work to ARTexchange, CAA’s pop-up exhibition and annual social event for artists and curators. This event provides an opportunity for artists to share their work and build affinities with other artists, historians, curators, and cultural producers. ARTexchange will take place Friday evening, February 15, 2019, from 5:30–7:30 PM, and is free and open to the public.

Participating CAA members will be given space to share their work on, above and beneath a six-foot table. Artwork cannot be hung on walls, and it is not possible to run power cords devices. Participants are responsible for their own work. Sales of work are not permitted. Performance, process-based, interactive, and participatory works are especially encouraged.

Please be sure to provide all of the following information in order to complete your submission:

  1. A short biography or artist statement. (150 words max)
  2. A description of what you will exhibit and how you will use the space. Please include any details regarding performance, sound, spoken word, or technology-based work, laptop/tablet digital or media presentations. (250 words max)
  3. Your CAA member number (memberships must be valid).
  4. A link to a website of your work or 5-10 images of your recent work, including: title, year, medium and dimensions. (Maximum image size 5 mb of 1500pixels largest size and sent as JPG)

Submissions to ARTexchange can be and sent by email to Julie Hughes (artexchangeCAA@gmail.com) with “ARTexchange” and your last name in the subject line.

Deadline to submit: February 1, 2019

Filed under: Annual Conference, Artists, ARTspace

Artist Joyce J. Scott leads as Keynote; Distinguished Scholar Elizabeth Hill Boone; Artist Interviews with Julie Mehretu and Julia Bryan-Wilson and Guadalupe Maravilla and Sheila Maldonado; Designer Stephen Burks, and Douglas Dreishpoon and Randy Kennedy with Mary Helimann, Bob Stewart, and John Giorno, among many other notable speakers and presenters

The Getty Foundation to receive the Outstanding Leadership in Philanthropy Award

We’re delighted to announce the following special guests will be presenting at the 107th CAA Annual Conferencetaking place February 13-16, 2019, at the New York Hilton Midtown.

Keynote Speaker

Joyce J. Scott. Photo: John Dean

The Keynote Speaker for the 107th CAA Annual Conference will be Joyce J. Scott, sculptor and craftsperson and 2016 MacArthur Fellow. Scott is best known for her figurative sculpture and jewelry using free-form off-loom bead weaving techniques similar to a peyote stitch, as well as blown glass, and found objects. Over the past 50 years, Scott has established herself as an innovative fiber artist, print maker, installation, and performing artist. She explores challenging subjects, powerfully revealing the equality between materials and practices often associated with “craft” and “fine art.”

Scott is the recipient of myriad commissions, grants, awards, residencies, and prestigious honors from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation, Anonymous Was a Woman, American Craft Council, National Living Treasure Award, and has received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Women’s Caucus for the Arts, a Mary Sawyers Imboden Baker Award, among others.

CAA Convocation featuring Joyce J. Scott’s Keynote will take place Wednesday, February 13, 2019, from 6-7:30 PM. Free and open to the public. 

Elizabeth Hill Boone. Photo: Paula Burch

Distinguished Scholar

The Distinguished Scholar for the 107th CAA Annual Conference will be Elizabeth Hill Boone, Professor of History of Art and Martha and Donald Robertson Chair in Latin American Art at Tulane University. An expert in the Pre-Columbian and early colonial art of Latin America with an emphasis on Mexico, Professor Boone is the former Director of Pre-Columbian Studies at Dumbarton Oaks and recipient of numerous honors and fellowships, including the Order of the Aztec Eagle, awarded by the Mexican government in 1990. Read our interview with Elizabeth Hill Boone.

The Distinguished Scholar Session will take place Thursday, February 14, 2019, from 4-5:30 PM. 

Distinguished Artist Interviews

The Annual Artist Interviews will feature two artist interviews: Julie Mehretu interviewed by Julia Bryan-Wilson and Guadalupe Maravilla interviewed by Sheila Maldonado.

Julie Mehretu. Photo: Anastasia Muna

Julie Mehretu is a world-renowned painter, born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in 1970, who lives and works in New York City and Berlin. She received a Master’s of Fine Art with honors from The Rhode Island School of Design in 1997. Mehretu is a recipient of many awards, including the The MacArthur Fellowship (2005) and the US Department of State Medal of Arts Award (2015). She is best known for her large-scale paintings that take the abstract energy, topography, and sensibility of global urban landscapes and political unrest as a source of inspiration. She has shown her work extensively in international and national solo and group exhibitions and is represented in public and private collections around the world. Julia Bryan-Wilson is Doris and Clarence Malo Chair and Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art at University of California, Berkeley.

Guadalupe Maravilla. Photo: Raul Rodarte Torres

Guadalupe Maravilla (formally Irvin Morazan) was part of the first wave of undocumented children to arrive at the United States border in the 1980s from Central America. In 2016, as a gesture of solidarity with his undocumented father (who uses Maravilla as his last name in his fake identity) Irvin Morazan changed his name to Guadalupe Maravilla. Maravilla has performed and presented his work extensively in venues such as the Whitney Museum of American Art, New Museum, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Bronx Museum, El Museo Del Barrio, Jersey City Museum, Caribbean Museum (Colombia), and MARTE Museum (El Salvador). His work has been recognized by numerous awards and fellowships including, Franklin Furnace, Creative Capital Grant, Joan Mitchell Emerging Artist  Grant, Art Matters Grant & Fellowship, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Fellowship, Dedalus Foundation Fellowship and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. Sheila Maldonado is a New York-based writer and poet, whose family hails from Honduras.

The Distinguished Artist Interviews will take place Friday, February 15, 2019, 3:30-5:30 PM. Free and open to the public. 

CAA Committee on Design Featured Speaker

Stephen Burks. Photo: Photography Emin

CAA is also pleased to announce that designer Stephen Burks will speak at the Annual Conference in a special event of the CAA Committee on Design. Burks will lead a talk titled, “Objects of African Descent: Tracing the lineage and influence of everyday African objects and culture throughout the diaspora and beyond.” Burks believes in a pluralistic vision of design inclusive of all cultural perspectives. For his efforts with artisan groups around the world, he has been called a design activist. His ongoing Man Made project bridges the gap between authentic developing world production, industrial manufacturing, and contemporary design. Independently and through association with the nonprofits Aid To Artisans, Artesanias de Colombia, the Clinton Global Initiative, Design Network Africa, and the Nature Conservancy, Burks has consulted on product development with artisan communities throughout the world. In addition, leading, manufacturers have commissioned his studio, Stephen Burks Man Made, to develop lifestyle collections that engage hand production as a strategy for innovation. In 2015, Burks was awarded the National Design Award in product design and in 2018, the Harvard Loeb Fellowship.

UPDATE, January 28, 2019: Unfortunately due to scheduling conflicts this event is canceled. Explore other presentations on design here. 

Outstanding Leadership in Philanthropy Award

For the second year, CAA will present the Outstanding Leadership in Philanthropy Award to a foundation or philanthropic organization that has established a record of exceptional generosity and civic and charitable responsibility. This year’s award will be given to the Getty Foundation.

View the full Annual Conference schedule

Natasha Hovey and Steve Hilton

posted by November 05, 2018

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are now on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Natasha Hovey and Steve Hilton discuss a yearlong artist residency model at Midwestern State University.

Natasha Hovey is currently an assistant professor at Texas A&M International University in Laredo, Texas, where she teaches: Ceramics 1, Intermediate and Advanced Ceramics, Sculpture 1, Intermediate and Advanced Sculpture, and Practicum Course for Seniors. She never thought she would miss it, but she longs for the Midwest’s subzero temps and feet of snow.

Steve Hilton is a professor of art at the Lamar D. Fain College of Fine Arts at Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, Texas, teaching both Ceramics and Art Education. He just found out that the current MSU ceramics resident has been offered a full-time position, which means the MSU residency program is 6 for 6 in placing residents.

Filed under: Artists, CAA Conversations, Podcast