CAA News Today

Filmed at the National Museum of Mexican Art, this program features a discussion about mentoring between two Chicago-based artists, Rubén Aguirre and Dan Ramirez, mediated by Cesáreo Moreno, Director and Curator of the National Museum of Mexican Art. Their conversation takes place inside the Aguirre’s exhibition Tectonic Reflections, open at the National Museum of Mexican Art until July 24. This program was a part of the session, “Mentoring Beyond the Classroom: The Continuing Relationship Over Time,” at CAA’s 2022 Annual Conference in February, chaired by Richard Serrano, a member of CAA’s Services to Artists Committee.

Distinguished Scholar, Kirsten P. Buick

posted by April 14, 2022

On February 17, 2022, Kirsten P. Buick was featured as the Distinguished Scholar at CAA’s 110th Annual Conference. The Distinguished Scholar session highlighted her career and provided an opportunity for dialogue between and among colleagues. Moderated by Annual Conference Chair, Theresa Avila, the session also featured presentations by a few of Buick’s students, including Shana Klein, Abbey Hepner, Annette M. Rodriguez, and Emmanuel Ortega. Watch the session in full below!

Established in 2001, the Distinguished Scholar Session illuminates and celebrates the contributions of senior art historians. The Annual Conference Committee identifies the distinguished scholar each year and each session typically brings together the distinguished scholar and a group of colleagues. The honoree’s involvement is fundamental to the series as a way of demonstrating a living tradition that gives voice to the continuities and ruptures that have shaped art-historical scholarship from the twentieth century into the new millennium.

We are inviting nominations for next year’s Distinguished Scholar at CAA’s 2023 Annual Conference in New York. Nominate individuals here!


On her career, Buick explains:

I identify as a scholar of the visual and material culture of the first British Empire, and the British diaspora in the US, Caribbean, and India. My teaching encompasses topics such as surveys of British Colonial and U.S. Art, American Landscape representation, African American Art, Pro- and Anti-Abolitionist Images in the Atlantic World; and seminars such as Photographing Jim Crow, 1890-1965, Patronizing Women: Taste and Collecting in the 19th and 20th Centuries, and The Victorian Nude: Representing Women, Men, Intersex, and Children. My research and teaching interests encompass histories of science, medicine, religion, as well as monuments, and the use of public space. Increasingly, I am interested in the racialization of mobility—what I characterize as critical mobility studies. I publish primarily in the realm of the history of African American art and its roots in US cultural formations. My first book, “Child of the Fire: Mary Edmonia Lewis and the Problem of Art History’s Black and Indian Subject,” is a good example of how I wed my teaching and publication imperatives together with my challenge to art history and visual studies to be more and to do better. Ultimately, teaching is my passion; and I tell my students that job # 1 is surviving the damage, and job # 2 is to never concede the center. 

Kirsten Pai Buick is a professor of art history at the University of New Mexico. She received her Ph.D. in art history from the University of Michigan and was a SAAM Predoctoral Fellow and a Charles Gaius Bolin Fellow at Williams College. Buick is a recipient of the David C. Driskell Prize for African American Art and has published extensively on African American art, including her book Child of the Fire: Mary Edmonia Lewis and the Problem of Art History’s Black and Indian Subject (Duke Univ. Press, 2010). Her second book, In Authenticity: “Kara Walker” and the Eidetics of Racism, is in progress.  

Filed under: Annual Conference, Event

Annual Artist Interview, Willie Cole

posted by April 05, 2022

On February 18, 2022, Willie Cole was featured in the Annual Artists’ Interviews at CAA’s 110th Annual Conference. Watch the interview in full below!

Beginning in 1997, the Annual Artists’ Interviews were established to provide the opportunity for esteemed artists to have one-on-one conversations with colleagues at the Annual Conference. Each year, the Services to Artists Committee (SAC) identifies two distinguished artists to participate.  The interviews are held annually as part of the Services to Artists Program at the conference.

 


 

Willie Cole is a contemporary American sculptor, printer, and perceptual engineer. His work uses contexts of postmodern eclecticism, and combines references and appropriation from African and African American imagery. Cole is best known for his Dada and Surrealist readymades, which assemble and transform ordinary domestic and used objects such as irons, ironing boards, high-heeled shoes, hair dryers, bicycle parts, wooden matches, lawn jockeys, and other discarded appliances and hardware. Cole grew up in Newark, NJ. He attended the Boston University School of Fine Arts, received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the School of Visual Arts in New York in 1976, and continued his studies at the Art Students League of New York from 1976 to 1979.  

Recent exhibitions of Cole’s work include To Reclaim, Kavi Gupta, Chicago, IL, USA; New Concepts in Printmaking 2: Willie Cole, MoMA, New York, NY, USA; Reconfiguring an African Icon: Odes to the Mask by Modern and Contemporary Artists from Three Continents, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY, USA; Chicago, Surrealism: The Conjured Life, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, IL, USA; and Afro: Black Identity in America and Brazil, Tamarind Institute, Albuquerque, NM, USA. Cole’s work is in the permanent collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN; MoMA, New York, NY; National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA; Studio Museum in Harlem, NY; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, IL; Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY; and many others. 

Filed under: Annual Conference, Artists

Annual Artist Interview, Jessica Stockholder

posted by March 28, 2022

Jessica Stockholder, Assist: Sidled, 2016 (Photograph © Jessica Stockholder)

On February 18, 2022, Jessica Stockholder was featured in the Annual Artists’ Interviews at CAA’s 110th Annual Conference, interviewed by Christine Mehring. See below to watch the interview in full!

Beginning in 1997, the Annual Artists’ Interviews were established to provide the opportunity for esteemed artists to have one-on-one conversations with colleagues at the Annual Conference. Each year, the Services to Artists Committee (SAC) identifies two distinguished artists to participate.  The interviews are held annually as part of the Services to Artists Program at the conference.

 


 

Jessica Stockholder is an internationally acclaimed visual artist and educator who lives and works in Chicago. In addition to earning her BFA from the University of Victoria in Canada and her MFA from Yale University, she was awarded two honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degrees: one from Emily Carr University of Art and Design in 2010, and one from Columbia College in 2013. Stockholder was Elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 2018.  

Stockholder’s works sit at the intersection of painting with sculpture, and often incorporate the architecture in which it has been conceivedEmploying a wide range of ordinary everyday materials Stockholder orchestrates an intersection of pictorial and physical space. She probes how meaning derives from physicality, and engages the sensuality and pleasure evoked by color and formal order in an effort to call attention to the edges of understanding.  

Stockholder’s work has been exhibited in many of the world’s most influential art venues, including Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Dia Center for the Arts, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Venice Biennale. It is included in such museum collections as the Art Institute of Chicago, Whitney Museum of American Art, LACMA, and Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam.  

Stockholder is currently the Raymond W. & Martha Hilpert Gruner Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Visual Arts at the University of Chicago, a position she accepted in 2011, after 12 years as Director of the Sculpture Department at the Yale School of Art.  

Filed under: Annual Conference, Artists

CAA’s 109th Annual Business Meeting Minutes

posted by February 11, 2022

COLLEGE ART ASSOCIATION
109TH ANNUAL BUSINESS MEETING
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2021 2:00 P.M. EST

MINUTES

  1. Call to Order/Opening Remarks
    1. President Elizabeth Schlatter called the meeting to order at 2:02 p.m. EST. She thanked the staff for their enormous efforts. She then acknowledged the diverse people linked to the land on which she works and lives, particularly those who have been displaced from that land.
  2. Executive Director’s Report
    1. Meme Omogbai offered a reflection on the importance of this conference. It is amazing we were able to offer the extensive content we did during a pandemic, specifically:
      1. 365 sessions, over 1100 individual presentations in addition to a book and trade fair.  Intersectionality between the visual arts, climate change, eco-feminism, and many other topics.
      2. The virtual format of the conference has offered a new level of access. Content is available across the world and for a month after the conference.
    2. The conference will serve as an important turning point in the history of CAA toward achieving the four pillars of its Strategic Repositioning:
      1. Long term sustainability of the organization through attention to meeting the needs of all segments of our constituency and maximizing the value of membership
      2. Social Entrepreneurship and e-commerce
      3. Technological infrastructure towards a digital transformation to ensure effective and efficient operations and delivery of content
      4. Robust development activities
  3. Approval of the minutes from the February 2020 annual meeting.    
  4. Approval of Minutes of 108th Annual Business Meeting, held in two parts, February 12, and February 14, 2020  
    1. Jaqueline Francis moved; Laura Anderson Barbata seconded. The minutes were approved unanimously.
  5. Financial report
    1. CFO Bob Tofolo reported on the following items:
      1. The association posted a breakeven operating budget for FY20.
      2. The association continues to operate under a break-even budget for FY21. This includes $3.3M in current expenses against equivalent revenue.
      3. A PPP loan of $372,000 was awarded to CAA. That loan was subsequently forgiven last December.
      4. The endowment market value on June 30, 2020 was $9.825M vs prior year of $9.6M
      5. Member count for this year vs. last: As of June 30, 2020, there were 6,699 (7,773, -14%) individual members. There were 443 (464) organizational members and an additional 586 (617, -5%) subscribers to The Art Bulletin and/or Art Journal through our co-publisher Taylor and Francis. These numbers are not exactly comparative as prior year memberships reflect exaggerated increases due to discounts that are absent this year.
      6. 3938 registered attendees at the conference as of this morning. It is expected to be over 4000 by tomorrow.
      7. Question (posed by a member in attendance): how did numbers compare to the last NYC conference? 2019 attendance was over 5000, but the numbers from this year’s count include registrations for Free and Open sessions which we would not have tracked in prior years so some additional work needs to be done so that we can compare apples to apples.
  6. New Business
    1. The following question was posed by a member in attendance: Considering technical issues that have emerged this year, will CAA be evaluating Confex and considering whether they are the best vendor to use moving forward? Elizabeth indicated that the organization would be evaluating all aspects of the conference, including the platform. Meme added that in the midst of this digital transformation, there will be a consolidation of different systems that will address some of the issues that emerged. She encouraged people to fill out the conference surveys that are being administered.
  7. Results of Election of New Directors 
    1. Elizabeth announced the newly elected CAA Board Members:
      1. Roland Betancourt
      2. Lara Evans
      3. Wanda Raimundi-Ortiz
      4. Kelly Walters
      5. Kelvin Parnell Jr. (Emerging Professional)
  8. Adjournment
    1. The meeting was adjourned at 2:25 p.m. EST.

Respectfully submitted by Colin Blakely, Secretary.

CAA’s 110th Annual Business Meeting Agenda

posted by February 11, 2022

CAA Annual Business Meeting Agenda
Friday, February 18, 2022
1 p.m. CT 

The 110th Annual Business Meeting of the members of the College Art Association will be called to order at 1 p.m. CT on Friday, February 18 at the 2022 Annual Conference. Access to this meeting is included in paid registration and can also be accessed by registering for ”No-cost registration”. Once you have registered, please log into the online conference schedule to attend the meeting.

CAA President, N. Elizabeth Schlatter will preside.

  1. Welcome + Call to Order – N. Elizabeth Schlatter, CAA President
  2. Executive Director’s Report Meme Omogbai, CAA Executive Director + CEO 
  3. Approval of Minutes of 109th Annual Business Meeting [ACTION ITEM]
  4. Financial Report – Georgia Harrell, CAA Treasurer + Robert Tofolo, CAA Head of Operations
  5. Old/New Business
  6. Board Member Election Results – N. Elizabeth Schlatter, CAA President
  7. Adjourn

Proxies

If you are unable to attend the Annual Business Meeting, kindly complete a proxy online to appoint the individuals named thereon to (i) vote, as directed by you, for directors, and, at their discretion, on such other matters as may properly come before the Annual Business Meeting; and (ii) vote on any and all adjournments thereof. A proxy, with your vote for directors, must be received no later than 5 p.m. CT Thursday, February 17th, 2022.

Next Meeting – 2023 

The 111th Annual Business Meeting of the College Art Association will be held in New York in 2023, precise date to be announced.

 

 

Digital Humanities at the 110th Annual Conference

posted by February 03, 2022

The upcoming Annual Conference this winter and spring will feature a number of sessions that discuss issues related to the digital humanities and art. See below for links to explore sessions that relate to these topics in the conference schedule.

See the rest of this year’s conference schedule online! Register for CAA’s upcoming conference and learn more at our registration page. After you register, sign into the app and create your own custom schedule using the tools and filtering options on the side (switch time zones in the upper left of the app: CST for in-person and your own time zone for virtual).


 

Sessions on Digital Humanities

 

Critical Cataloging Conversations in Teaching, Research, and Practice
VISUAL RESOURCES ASSOCIATION (VRA)
Friday, February 18, 2022
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. EST)
Bridget Madden, University of Chicago

Dismantling the Patriarchal Canon: Foregrounding Women Artists and Patrons through Digital Art History
DIGITAL ART HISTORY SOCIETY
Friday, March 4, 2022
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. EST)
Tracy Chapman Hamilton
Dana Hogan, Duke University
Mariah Proctor-Tiffany, California State University, Long Beach

Archival Imaginaries and Futurities in Contemporary Art from SWANA
Saturday, February 19, 2022
4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. EST)
Lara Fresko Madra, Cornell University
Kareem Estefan, Brown University

New frontiers: creating, collecting, preserving and displaying digital based art of Russia and Eastern Europe
Saturday, February 19, 2022
4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. EST)
Natalia Kolodzei, Kolodzei Art Foundation

The Living Catalogue Raisonné
CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ SCHOLARS ASSOCIATION
Saturday, February 19, 2022
9:00 a.m.– 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EST)
Joan Pachner
Marin R Sullivan, Sculptural Things


 

Sessions on Digital Media

 

Digital Realms in Practice
Thursday, February 17, 2022
4:30 p.m.- 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. EST)

Diverse Resources for New Media
Thursday, February 17, 2022
4:30 p.m.- 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. EST)
Nadav Assor, Connecticut College

New frontiers: creating, collecting, preserving and displaying digital based art of Russia and Eastern Europe
Saturday, February 19, 2022
4:30 p.m.- 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. EST)
Natalia Kolodzei
Kolodzei Art Foundation

Making Media Social: An Examination of Video and Television in the History of Political Activism of the 1970s
Thursday, February 17, 2022
9:00 a.m.– 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. EST)
Corinna Kirsch, Stony Brook University
Brock Lownes, Stony Brook University

The Problem of Mapping Social Justice On The Social (Creative) Body In an Era Of NFT’s
Saturday, March 5, 2022
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. EST)
Gale Elston, CUNY

(inappropriate) digital intimacies
Saturday, March 5, 2022
2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 p.m. – 5 p.m. EST)
Francesca Balboni, University of Texas at Austin

Filed under: Annual Conference

CAA offers Annual Conference support grants to graduate students in art history and to international artists and scholars. Meet this year’s recipients of our named support grants and find information about their presentations at the conference and their corresponding session below. Dozens of other support grants were given to CAA members through the Presidents Council of CAA and the “Pay it Forward” initiative.


CAA TRAVEL GRANT IN MEMORY OF ARCHIBALD CASON EDWARDS, SENIOR, AND SARAH STANLEY GORDON EDWARDS

The CAA Support Grant in Memory of Archibald Cason Edwards, Senior, and Sarah Stanley Gordon Edwards was made possible by Mary D. Edwards. The grant supports women who are emerging scholars at either an advanced stage of pursuing a doctoral degree or who have received their PhD within the two years prior to the submission of the application.

 

Kristan Hanson, Dumbarton Oaks
Presentation at the Annual Conference: “Nurturing Growth: Eva Gonzalès’s La Plante favorite and Berthe Morisot’s Fillette aux jacinthes”
Session: Enchanted by Nature: Picturing Gendered Plants and Female Agency in Europe and China (17th – 19th Century)

Kristan M. Hanson is an art historian and plant humanist. Her research examines the historical significance of individual plants and botanical forms in art to deepen understandings of human/plant interactions and anthropogenic environmental change. She currently holds a consultancy as Managing Digital Editor for the Plant Humanities Initiative at Dumbarton Oaks, prior to which she was a 2020–2021 academic year fellow. Hanson has also received fellowships and awards to support her research from the Oak Spring Garden Foundation, HASTAC Scholars program, Hall Center for the Humanities, and Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities.

 

Cynthia Kok, Yale University
Presentation at the Annual Conference: “’Een bloempoth van parlemoer’: Painting Life in Dirck van Rijswijck’s Mother-of-Pearl Floral Panels”
Session: Analogous Matter: Skeuomorphism as Method

Cynthia Kok is a Ph.D. candidate at Yale University. Her dissertation focuses on sensorial engagement in making and craft experiments with mother-of-pearl in the early modern Dutch world. Cynthia received her MA from Bard Graduate Center and her BA from the University of California, Berkeley. She has held curatorial internships at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute, the Frick Collection, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum and she is the 2021-2023 Kress History of Art Institutional Fellow at the Leiden University Centre for the Arts in Society (LUCAS).

 

Honorable Mention:

Shoghig Halajian, University of California San Diego
Presentation at the Annual Conference: “Destroying the Form: On the Spatial Politics of Rafa Esparza’s bust: A Mediation on Freedom”
Session: Monumentality in Art: Memory, History, and Impermanence in Diaspora

Shoghig Halajian is a curator and art historian, who serves on the Board of Directors at Human Resources LA and was previously Assistant Director at LACE (Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions). She is co-editor of the online journal Georgia, in collaboration with Anthony Carfello and Suzy Halajian, which is supported by a Creative Capital | Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant. She has presented projects at the Hammer Museum and the ONE Archives at USC Libraries in Los Angeles; Le Magasin–National Center for Contemporary Art in Grenoble; Al Ma’mal Foundation for Art in Jerusalem, UKS in Oslo, among others. She was a 2021 Research Fellow at Ocean Space–TBA 21 in Venice. She is a Ph.D. candidate in Art History, Theory and Criticism with a Critical Gender Studies emphasis at University of California, San Diego, where her research explores contemporary queer aesthetics and performance through a critical race lens, focusing on artistic experiments with collaboration.


SAMUEL H. KRESS FOUNDATION CAA CONFERENCE SUPPORT FELLOWSHIP FOR INTERNATIONAL SCHOLARS

Recognizing the value of the international exchange of ideas and experience among art historians, the Kress Foundation is offering support for international scholars participating as speakers at the 2022 CAA Annual Conference. The scholarly focus of the papers must be European art before 1830.

 

Lorenzo Vigotti, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz
Presentation at the Annual Conference: “Diplomatic Exchanges and Architectural Inventions along the Silk Road: The Case of Soltaniyeh and Santa Maria del Fiore”
Session:  Beyond the Silk Road

Lorenzo is a trained architect with a M. Arch. from the University of Florence, Italy, and a Ph.D. in architectural history from Columbia University with a dissertation on the origin of the Renaissance palace. He is currently a post-doc at the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florence, where he studies the shift in spatial organization in domestic residences between the 14th and the 15th century, with an emphasis on early collecting practices and the birth of the studiolo as a manifestation of power by the urban oligarchy. Together with Shahid Beheshti University in Tehran, Iran, Lorenzo is exploring the circulation of architectural knowledge between medieval Persia and Italy, specifically the materiality and the problems of preservation of brick dome structures. Finally, he oversees the virtual reconstruction of the now lost Florentine ghetto at the Medici Archive Project.

 

Ana Cristina Howie, University of Cambridge
Presentation at the Annual Conference: “’Favoured Black Attendants’ in ‘Splendid State Portraits’? Genoese merchants, Flemish painters, and the Spanish Atlantic Slave Trade”
Session:  Archive, Object, Image: Reading Against the Grain in the Dutch and Spanish “Golden Ages”

Ana is originally from New Zealand and completed her bachelor’s degree in the History of Art and French at the University of Auckland. She continued her studies at the Université Paris-Sorbonne, then earned her MA in the History of Art at the Courtauld Institute in London, specializing in early modern Netherlandish artistic production. She began her PhD under the supervision of Professor Ulinka Rublack at the University of Cambridge in 2019, funded by the Prince of Wales International Scholarship. Her doctoral research investigates the relationships between women, dress, and portraiture in seventeenth-century Genoa, with a focus on the oeuvres of Flemish painters Peter Paul Rubens and Antony van Dyck. She is the recipient of the inaugural Society for Renaissance Studies/British School in Rome Residential Doctoral Research Scholarship for 2021/22. Her work and projects have been supported by the Royal Historical Society, Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, Magdalene College, Cambridge, and the Cambridge Trust.

 

Iro Katsaridou, Museum of Byzantine Culture, Thessaloniki, Greece
Presentation at the Annual Conference: “Through Foreign Eyes: Curating the 1821 Greek War of Independence”
Session: Instrumentalizing Memory and the Politics of Commemoration

Iro Katsaridou was recently (2021) appointed Director of the Thessaloniki Museum of Photography, Greece. Previously, she has worked as curator of modern and contemporary art at the Museum of Byzantine Culture in Thessaloniki. She studied art history at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and the Université Paris I-Sorbonne, and also pursued museum studies at the City University of New York. Her doctoral dissertation (Aristotle University, 2010) focused on contemporary Greek photography. Iro has researched photography and art in wartime (World War I and II), curated exhibitions and edited related catalogues in this particular field. More recently (2021) she has curated an exhibition at the Museum of Byzantine Culture on the aspects of Philhellenic movements in art and the Greek War of Independence. She has taught as adjunct faculty at several Greek universities. She has co-edited two books on photography during the Nazi Occupation of Greece (1941-1944), one on the art of World War I in Greece, and written articles and book chapters on photography, museum policies, as well as the relationship between contemporary Greek art and politics. She has presented her research in international conferences, while in 2019 and 2020 she participated in the CAA-Getty International Program.

 

Jana Kantoříková, Sorbonne University/CNRS
Presentation at the Annual Conference: “Crucified Women: The Way of the Cross in the Symbolist Movement”
Session: Women in Art in the second part of the 19th century-early part of the 20th

Jana Kantoříková is an associated researcher at the Center of Interdisciplinary Research on Central, Eastern and Balkanic Europe at Sorbonne University/CNRS. She received her PhD in Slavic Philology, History of Czech Literature and Literary Theory at the Charles University in Prague and the University of Regensburg (2018). She taught at the University of Passau (Germany) and the Sorbonne University. Her research focuses on European modernisms and cultural transfers between France, Germany and the Czech lands, for example “Horror Fragmenti in Czech Symbolism” in Angst, Anxiety, Anguish in Fin de Siècle Art and Literature (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2020) or “Le Cycle de la volupté et de la mort : ‘livre empoisonné’ et ornementation du péché” in L’art (décoratif) du livre fin-de-siècle: éloge du parergon (Éditions Otrante, 2021). She is currently working on projects related to the reception of Friedrich Nietzsche in Central Europe and the blackness imagery in the Czech lands in the 19th century.

 

Judith Noorman, University of Amsterdam
Presentation: “The Invisibility Myth. Women, Art and Household Consumption in the Dutch Republic”
Session at the Annual Conference: Archive, Object, Image: Reading Against the Grain in the Dutch and Spanish “Golden Ages”

Judith Noorman is Assistant Professor of Art History in the Early Modern Period and Director of the Amsterdam Centre for Studies in Early Modernity (both at the University of Amsterdam). As of September 2021, she is leading a governmentally funded NWO VIDI project: The Female Impact. Women, Art and Household Consumption in the Dutch Republic, 1580-1720. She earned her PhD at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University and has conducted postdoctoral research at the Drawing Institute, Morgan Library & Museum. At the 110th CAA Annual Conference, she is presenting a paper on The Invisibility Myth. Women, Art and Household Consumption in the Dutch Republic, as part of the HNA-sponsored session Archive, Object, Image: Reading Against the Grain in the Dutch and Spanish “Golden Ages”, which is chaired by Carrie J. Anderson and Marsely Kehoe.


CAA-GETTY INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM

Every year since 2012, the CAA-Getty International Program has enabled art historians, museum curators, and artists who teach art history to attend CAA’s Annual Conference. This program is funded on an annual basis by the Getty Foundation. Meet the CAA-Getty International Program participants here.

Each week this Black History Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that celebrate, recognize, and interrogate Black art, history, and experience. This week, we look forward to the research and scholarship that will be presented virtually at the upcoming Annual Conference. Many sessions feature talks that look at or investigate Blackness, racism, colonialism, neo-colonialism, and slavery, Black identity, theory of race, Afrofuturism, queerness, the African diaspora, and  intersections between these topics.

 

In chronological order:

 

February 17-19:

Reimagining the Past alongside Black Women Artists, Thursday, February 17, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Latinx Bodies: Presence/absence and representation (Part 1) , Thursday, February 17, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

To See, to Keep, to Know: Photography and Intergenerational Knowledge Production, Thursday, February 17, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 – 1:30 p.m. EST)

Archive, Object, Image: Reading Against the Grain in the Dutch and Spanish “Golden Ages,” , Thursday, February 17, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 – 1:30 p.m. EST)

U.S. Latinx Art, Pre-1950 ,Thursday, February 17, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 – 1:30 p.m. EST)

Latinx Bodies: Presence/Absence and Representation (Part 2) , Thursday, February 17, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Haunting and Memory in Arts of Africa and the African Diaspora , Friday, February 18, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

The air we breathe: aesthetics and politics of the breath in transpacific and transatlantic visual cultures ,Friday, February 18, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Flipping the Script , Friday, February 18, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

(re)activation of Exhibitions as sites of contestation, Friday, February 18, 2022, 4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

Decolonial Teaching Methodologies in Digital Arts & Design, Saturday, February 19, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

What’s the “matter” with American Sculpture?, Saturday, February 19, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Signs o’ the Times: Music and Politics in Contemporary Art ,Saturday, February 19, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

The Price of Blackness: African American art and visual culture in the first two decades of the Twenty-First Century, Saturday, February 19, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (11:00 – 12:30 p.m. EST)

Knowing People: Black Practices in Queer Collaborations, Saturday, February 19, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

‘Heresies’ and Other Mythologies, Saturday, February 19, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Signs o’ the Times: Music and Politics in Contemporary Art, Part II ,Saturday, February 19, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Toward an Inclusive Methodology: Experiments in Art Writing,Saturday, February 19, 2022, 4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

 

March 3-5

Women in Architecture: The African Exchange,Thursday, March 3, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

The Promise of Modern Art and Design: Cold War-Era Art and Diplomacy,Thursday, March 3, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

DESIGN INCUBATION COLLOQUIUM 8.2: RECENT RESEARCH IN COMMUNICATION DESIGN , Thursday, March 3, 2022,9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Blackness and the Ashcan School, Thursday, March 3, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Carnival in Africa, Friday, March 4, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Curatorial Care: Feminist and Queer Practices ,Friday, March 4, 2022,9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST

Reading Kerry James Marshall’s ‘Rythm Mastr’, Friday, March 4, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 – 1:30 p.m. EST)

Transnational, Transcultural, Transversal: On the Decolonial Discourse of Art,Friday, March 4, 2022, 11:00 – 12:30 p.m. CST (12:00 – 1:30 p.m. EST)

Black Collage, Friday, March 4, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Abolitionist Aesthetics, Friday, March 4, 2022, 4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

Art History and Social Justice in Practice ,Friday, March 4, 2022,4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

Activist Exhibitions, Friday, March 4, 2022, 4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

On Afro-pessimism and Its Alternatives ,Saturday, March 5, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)

Reconsidering Art History Through Access ,Saturday, March 5, 2022, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. CST (10:00 – 11:30 a.m. EST)
New Perspectives in Art, Design, and Art History: Supporting and Showcasing Emerging Voices from Marginalized Communities ,Saturday, March 5, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

New Ways of Seeing ,Saturday, March 5, 2022, 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. CST (3:30 – 5:00 p.m. EST)

Botanical Intimacies: Colonialism, Decolonial Practice, and Queered Ecologies , Saturday, March 5, 2022,4:30 – 6:00 p.m. CST (5:30 – 7:00 p.m. EST)

 

 

Filed under: Advocacy, Annual Conference — Tags:

CAA 2022 Awards for Distinction

posted by January 24, 2022

CAA announces the 2022 recipients of Awards for Distinction. By honoring outstanding member achievements, CAA reaffirms its mission to encourage the highest standards of scholarship, practice, connoisseurship, and teaching in the arts. With these annual awards, CAA seeks to honor individual artists, art historians, authors, museum professionals, and critics whose accomplishments transcend their individual disciplines and contribute to the profession as a whole and to the world at large.

Among the awards, the Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement is presented to Betye Saar who has not only forged a singular practice for six decades but has also influenced generations of artists, makers, and thinkers. Calling upon the legacies of artists like Joseph Cornell, her symbolic and potent assemblages, of which she’s best known, reflect on the lives, experiences, and identities of African Americans, spirituality, and cultural connectivity.

The Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award for Writing on Art is presented to Wu Hung. Perpetually interested in the shape of time, in relation to the time of the world, he has authored many books, essays, and exhibition catalogues that bring Chinese visual culture into different orders of focus, taking into account the changing conditions of tombs, screens, performances, and protests. The scope of his work has an epic quality, allowing arguments to unfold across centuries without losing sight of the very human presence of artists and audiences.


Art Journal Award 

David J. Getsy and Che Gossett, “A Syllabus on Transgender and Nonbinary Methods for Art and Art History,” Art Journal, vol. 80, no. 4 (Winter 2021): 101-115.

 

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award  

Robert Cozzolino, ed. Supernatural America: The Paranormal in American Art, University of Chicago Press, 2021.

 

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums, Libraries, Collections, and Exhibitions  

Sarah M. Miller, Documentary in Dispute: The Original Manuscript of Changing New York by Berenice Abbott and Elizabeth McCauslandRyerson Image Centre/MIT Press, 2020. 

 

Frank Jewett Mather Award  

Kaira M. Cabañas, Immanent Vitalities: Meaning and Materiality in Modern and Contemporary Art. University of California Press, 2021. 

 

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award 

Elina Gertsman, The Absent Image: Lacunae in Medieval Books, Penn State University Press, 2021.

 

Arthur Kingsley Porter Prize 

Marius B. Hauknes, “Painting against Time: Spectatorship and Visual Entanglement in the Anagni Crypt,” The Art Bulletin, vol. 103, no.1 (February 2021): 7-36.

Artist Award for a Distinguished Body of Work  

Kent Monkman   

 

CAA/AIC Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation 

Zahira Véliz 

 

Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement 

Betye Saar 

 

Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award for Writing on Art 

Wu Hung 

 

Distinguished Feminist Award – Artist  

In lieu of the Distinguished Feminist awards, we will recognize leaders in the field of feminist art and art history in our 2022 programming highlighting the 50th Year Anniversary of feminism at CAA. 

 

Distinguished Feminist Award – Scholar 

In lieu of the Distinguished Feminist awards, we will recognize leaders in the field of feminist art and art history in our 2022 programming highlighting the 50th Year Anniversary of feminism at CAA. 

 

Distinguished Teaching of Art Award 

Fred Hagstrom 

 

Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award 

Terry Smith 

 

Excellence in Diversity Award  

Valerie Cassel Oliver

 


Citations:  

Art Journal Award 

David J. Getsy and Che Gossett, “A Syllabus on Transgender and Nonbinary Methods for Art and Art History,” Art Journal, vol. 80, no. 4 (Winter 2021): 101-115.

In organizing a course of study predicated on the ontological challenge to discourses of art offered by trans and nonbinary positions, David J. Getsy and Che Gossett have generously identified a major lacuna in the field and provided a toolkit for its amelioration. The jury unanimously selected their “A Syllabus on Transgender and Nonbinary Methods for Art and Art History” as the most distinguished contribution to the Art Journal in 2021. The syllabus not only identifies, positions, and summarizes critical scholarship in the field of transgender and nonbinary studies, it also demonstrates the fruitful integration of pedagogy and emerging research methodologies. Noting the relative dearth of art historical scholarship that has taken up trans methods and histories, the authors suggest the ways in which key themes and terms from art might be critically reevaluated in light of transgender studies. An introduction to each section’s bibliography synthesizes complex debates and individual arguments with remarkable clarity. Sensitive to the necessary intersections of trans analytics with critical approaches to race, ability, and class, the authors highlight readings from Black feminist thought and abolition optics, among other transversal concerns, that elucidate points of fracture within and strategies of resistance to the regulatory gender binary. At once rigorous and accessible, Getsy and Gossett’s contribution offers an adaptable blueprint for researchers and educators. 

Committee: 
Omar Kholeif, Sharjah Art Foundation 
Tilo Riefenstein, School of the Arts, York St John University 
Phil Taylor, George Eastman Museum (Chair) 

 

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award 

Robert Cozzolino, ed. Supernatural America: The Paranormal in American Art, University of Chicago Press, 2021.

America is haunted. Genocidal policies unleashed on Native Americans; the horror of the transatlantic slave trade; war, racism, and social injustice; dark passages in community and individual histories – these traumas and more have left behind a trail of spirits. Taking as its topic the paranormal in American art, Supernatural America reveals the myriad ways in which citizens and artists have sought to see, understand, or come to terms with the ghosts of the past. Lavishly illustrated, with many images never seen before, Supernatural America breaks new ground in presenting the paranormal as a historical subject of wide-ranging importance. Incisive essays by scholars and artists cover painting and sculpture from the late 18th century to the present, spirit photography, art channeled through mediums, spiritualist paraphernalia, folk and outsider art, UFO-inspired materials, video and installation from a range of perspectives. This revealing, thought-provoking investigation into an emerging scholarly field gives proof to William Faulkner’s well-known line: ‘The past is never dead. It’s not even past’. 

Committee: 
Susan Aberth, Bard College 
Benjamin Anderson, Cornell 
Karen Lang, University of Arizona 
Andrew Saluti, Syracuse University (Chair) 
Joyce Tsai, Clyfford Still Museum 

 

Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award for Smaller Museums, Libraries, Collections, and Exhibitions 

Sarah M. Miller, Documentary in Dispute: The Original Manuscript of Changing New York by Berenice Abbott and Elizabeth McCauslandRyerson Image Centre/MIT Press, 2020. 

In 2015 the Ryerson Image Centre acquired the archives of Berenice Abbott, including more than 6000 photographs and 7000 negatives, her papers, correspondences, and manuscripts. One of the key figures in the history of documentary photography, Abbott is now known as an archivist as well as an artist. It was Abbott who preserved Eugene Atget’s archives at the end of the twenties and published his work.  Her own photographs, taken while working for the WPA, consolidated her reputation as a documentary photographer.  What exactly is that reputation? In order to answer that question, Documentary in Dispute meticulously reconstructs the manuscript of the book Changing New York, first published in 1939 by Dutton & Co, with photographs by Berenice Abbott and text by renowned art critic Elizabeth McCausland. In a tour de force of archival research and scholarly presentation, Sarah M. Miller reveals how the project was altered to obscure the aesthetic, political and ethical values of photographer and author. Miller’s beautifully written, highly focused essay on Abbott and McCausland situates them in an international avant-garde which recognized the potential of image and text to transform, even to break, our habits of seeing and being.  Miller’s overall approach recalls Walter Benjamin’s own in the 1930s.  Not coincidentally, Benjamin was inspired by Abbott’s archival and photographic achievements.  

Committee: 
Susan Aberth, Bard College 
Benjamin Anderson, Cornell 
Karen Lang, University of Arizona 
Andrew Saluti, Syracuse University (Chair) 
Joyce Tsai, Clyfford Still Museum 

 

Frank Jewett Mather Award 

Kaira M. Cabañas, Immanent Vitalities: Meaning and Materiality in Modern and Contemporary Art. University of California Press, 2021. 

The jury has unanimously selected Kaira M. Cabañas’ Immanent Vitalities: Meaning and Materiality in Modern and Contemporary Art. Cabañas has written a highly readable volume addressing the material relations between objects and subjects as well as addressing the limiting institutional conventions of academic art history. Her work draws upon theories of new materialism, an animating force that, when attended to, requires rethinking binary categories such as living and inert or life and matter. Cabañas’ volume traverses histories and hemispheres: from the perceptual doubts engendered by the force of color in Alejandro Otero’s paintings to the enmeshed material contingencies of Gego’s metal sculptures, from the sensorial therapeutic propositions of Lygia Clark’s relational objects to the curatorial entanglements of Alessandro Balteo-Yazbeck’s challenges to the grid, and from the affective agencies Mario Pedrosa located in the paintings of Djanira da Motta e Silva to the documented rituals of care obfuscating boundaries between the organic and the inorganic in Matheus Rocha Pitta’s Polaroids. Cabañas proposes an alternative to the kind of nation-bounded analyses that often burden studies of modern and contemporary art of Latin America. She addresses academic art history’s tendency to isolate along geographic lines, marginalizing practices and scholarship. Cabañas’ text thus models a critical strategy for assessing not just artworks but the field itself. 

Committee: 
Julia Bryan-Wilson, University of California, Berkeley 
Kim Theriault, Dominican University 
Andrew Wasserman, Dominican University (Chair) 

 

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award

Elina Gertsman, The Absent Image: Lacunae in Medieval Books, Penn State University Press, 2021.

Countering the customary interpretation of late medieval art as relentlessly profuse and exuberant, Elina Gertsman’s The Absent Image: Lacunae in Medieval Books, explores different constructions of emptiness ranging from the presentation of voids in illustrations to represent the unrepresentable to the deliberate inclusion of physical holes in manuscript pages designed to reveal portions of other pages. Gertsman’s investigation of the “fecundity of emptiness” is a generative and compelling topic for scholars of art history/visual studies across areas, both within and outside Medieval Studies. She argues and demonstrates that, between 1200s and 1500s, the broad circulation of scientific thought and its engagement with theology and formal and literary discourses on emptiness, absence, and negation account for visual, cognitive, and material expressions on the pages of medieval books. Cross-disciplinary in its approach, Gertsman’s book simultaneously draws attention to the visual and material aspects of the manuscripts, phenomenological experience, and philosophical, religious, and scientific theories of the period. In doing so she uncovers an unexpected kinship between the medieval artists and the modernist avant-garde, where the void is regarded as the locus of the sublime and of boundless possibility. Her erudite writing and compelling approach to the subject poses questions throughout that magnify the relevance of her study and stimulate personal inquiry—as a reader reflects on other areas of consideration across time called out in the text. The book is lavishly illustrated and artfully designed with a shape and size complementary to the subject of study.  

Committee: 
John Cunnally, Iowa State University 
Christina Hellmich, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco 
Laura Anne Kalba, University of Minnesota
Lisa D. Schrenk, University of Arizona 
Dorothy Wong, University of Virginia (Chair) 

 

Arthur Kingsley Porter Prize 

Marius B. Hauknes, “Painting against Time: Spectatorship and Visual Entanglement in the Anagni Crypt,” The Art Bulletin, vol. 103, no.1 (February 2021): 7-36.

Marius Hauknes offers a riveting and multi-layered interpretation of the role of spectatorship in the production of meaning in the 13th-century crypt of the Anagni Cathedral. Rather than consider a viewer as a passive onlooker, he devotes attention to multiple aspects of embodied spectatorship: movement, (shifting) angles/perspectives, (in)visibility, temporality, and knowledge. These offer a powerful vantage point from which to consider the intersection of the painting program with the body itself. Drawing attention to contemporary concerns and interests in the body’s health, its cognitive capacities (and limits), and its place in the universe, Hauknes places the paintings into conversation with medicine and astrology. The images emerge as intellectual acts in a religious and political setting that grappled with problems of temporality and being. Hauknes evinces deep and extensive scholarly research, and is able to draw precise and appropriate insights from contemporary cultural and historical contexts, without losing focus on the artwork itself. While offering compelling readings of specific scenes — showing how they could connect, overlap, or echo with one another — Hauknes posits that comprehensive spectatorship was not possible. Instead, human comprehension and temporality contrasts with the divine, creating a space for reflection on the need for medicine and astrology. 

Committee: 
Nathan T. Arrington, Princeton University (Chair) 
Susanna Berger, University of Southern California 
Rachel Miller, California State University, Sacramento 

 

Artist Award for a Distinguished Body of Work  

Kent Monkman   

There is a long-standing history in the visual arts of artists bearing witness to atrocities: Goya’s painting “The Third of May,” Picasso’s “Guernica,” to name but two. Toronto-based Cree artist Kent Monkman’s exhibition “Shame and Prejudice: A Story of Resilience” follows this tradition, with a few notable updates. On the occasion of Canada’s 150th anniversary in 2017, Monkman’s paintings featured in a cross-country touring exhibit that culminated at the University of British Columbia’s Museum of Anthropology, August 6, 2020 – January 3, 2021, provides a searing critique of Canada’s colonial policies past and present, including, in the artist’s accounting: “the signing of the numbered treaties, the reserve system, genocidal policies of the residential schools, mass incarceration and urban squalor.” This is a body of work that, though tackling a grim subject matter, is often a blend of subversive humor, fantasy, and homoeroticism. And, although appropriating the form of Western history painting, Monkman’s artwork breaks from tradition by subverting and de-centering the Western gaze and re-presenting a perspective of history from the vantage point of the Indigenous peoples. Albeit, a history filtered through the particular lens of an artist who identifies as both queer and two-spirit, and through his trickster alter-ego, Miss Chief Share Eagle Testickle, the protagonist within much of Monkman’s paintings and performances. Through his use of history painting, Monkman’s project is one that reminds us of the potency of images, and the potential of the artist to provoke and challenge history and its representations.   

Committee: 
Stephen Fakiyesi, Independent Artist, Toronto 
Jessica Hong, Hood Museum, Toledo Art Museum 
Beauvais Lyons, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, (Chair) 

 

CAA/AIC Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation

Zahira Véliz 

Zahria (Soni) Véliz has enhanced our understanding of art through her numerous, scholarly publications to the fields of art history and paintings conservation. Dr. Véliz has strengthened the methodological approaches of scholars who work on Spanish artists and Franz Kline through her publication record as well as her generosity as a colleague. 

Through the translation and dissemination of Spanish texts, Dr. Véliz’s has made contemporaneous information about early modern painting accessible to researchers who do not read Spanish. Artists Techniques in Golden Age Spain (1987) is often cited in technical studies of Spanish paintings. More recently, Dr. Véliz edited a translation of Jusepe Martínez’s 1673-75 Practical Discourses on the Most Noble Art of Painting (2017). These publications, along with others by Dr. Véliz on subjects including blue pigments, wooden panels, and drawing practice, have been foundational to the study of Spanish art in the United States. 

Dr. Véliz’s PhD dissertation on Alonso Cano served as a foundation for many publications on the artist. In addition, Dr. Véliz’s knowledge and skills of connoisseurship regarding Spanish drawing enriched her drawings catalogues for the Courtauld Institute of Art in London and the Museo de Bellas Artes in Asturias. As Senior Paintings Conservator for the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Dr. Véliz published her research into a newly attributed painting to Diego Velázquez as well as technical and art historical research on Franz Kline’s paintings that are models of collaborative research.  

Committee Members: 
Jim Coddington, American Institute of Conservation  
Tiarna Doherty, University of Delaware, (Chair)  
Fernanda Valverde, Amon Carter Museum 

 

Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement  

Betye Saar  

Betye Saar (b. 1926, Los Angeles, CA) has not only forged a singular practice for six decades but has also influenced generations of artists, makers, and thinkers. Calling upon the legacies of artists like Joseph Cornell, her symbolic and potent assemblages, of which she’s best known, reflect on the lives, experiences, and identities of African Americans, spirituality, and cultural connectivity. Part of the broader Black Arts Movement in the 1970s, Saar also confronted issues of racism and sexism in groundbreaking and radical works like The Liberation of Aunt Jemima (1972). Saar contends the continual thread in her work is her “curiosity about the mystical.” As she wrote in 1998, “I am intrigued with combining the remnant of memories, fragments of relics and ordinary objects, with the components of technology. It’s a way of delving into the past and reaching into the future simultaneously. The art itself becomes the bridge. Curiosity about the unknown has no boundaries. Symbols, images, place and cultures merge. Time slips away. The stars, the cards, the mystic vigil may hold the answers. By shifting the point of view an inner spirit is released. Free to create.” By foregrounding the mystical, Saar sees people, cultures, contexts, temporalities as part of a larger, interconnected spiritual fabric, an understanding that is needed in a time of extreme ideological polarization, inequities, and geopolitical strife. Saar and her practice continue to resonate and inspire current generations and those to come.  

Committee: 
Stephen Fakiyesi, Independent Artist, Toronto 
Jessica Hong, Hood Museum, Toledo Art Museum 
Beauvais Lyons, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, (Chair) 

 

Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award for Writing on Art 

Wu Hung  

Trained in both China and the United States, Wu Hung’s writing brings perspectives native to both cultures to bear on aesthetics, art history, and archaeology.  His arguments ground the cultures of China, from the earliest ancient survivals to the interventions of our own time in structures of mind that defy the progress narratives of the West.  He has received countless awards for work that has transformed the study of East Asian art and drawn attention to the relationship between images and the spaces within which they are observed, from the Dunhuang caves to the double screens to Zhu Jinshi’s Fangzhen: A Cubic Meter of Canvas in Berlin.  

Overall, his writings explore the many, restless transitions across time and space.  Perpetually interested in the shape of time, in relation to the time of the world, he has authored many books, essays, and exhibition catalogues that bring Chinese visual culture into different orders of focus, taking into account the changing conditions of tombs, screens, performances, and protests.  The scope of his work has an epic quality, allowing arguments to unfold across centuries without losing sight of the very human presence of artists and audiences.  He works in the discipline of art history as a poet-scholar who knows the brushstroke from the inside out, crafting prose of great clarity and nuance that opens the field to specialists and new readers alike. 

 

Distinguished Feminist Award – Artist 

In lieu of the Distinguished Feminist awards, we will recognize leaders in the field of feminist art and art history in our 2022 programming highlighting the 50th Year Anniversary of feminism at CAA. 

Committee: 
Robin Cass, Rochester Institute of Technology (Chair) 
Delinda J. Collier, School of the Art Institute of Chicago 
Midori Yoshimoto, New Jersey City University 

 

Distinguished Feminist Award – Scholar 

In lieu of the Distinguished Feminist awards, we will recognize leaders in the field of feminist art and art history in our 2022 programming highlighting the 50th Year Anniversary of feminism at CAA. 

Committee: 
Robin Cass, Rochester Institute of Technology (Chair) 
Delinda J. Collier, School of the Art Institute of Chicago 
Midori Yoshimoto, New Jersey City University 

 

Distinguished Teaching of Art Award  

Fred Hagstrom 

Fred Hagstrom, a member of the Carleton College faculty since 1984, is the 2022 recipient of the CAA Distinguished Teaching of Art Award. Hagstrom’s nomination included endorsements from former students and colleagues, including a listing of 341 former students who have taken his printmaking, book arts, and drawing classes. Hagstrom also directed a bi-annual study abroad 10-week trip for students to Australia, New Zealand, and the Cook Islands twelve times over twenty years, where students learned about South Pacific and Maori art and culture. Based on this experience, Dylan Yvonne Welch (BA, ‘08) recalls “Each trip, he candidly and humbly facilitates conversations about colonial history, racism and art. As a student, this was a breath of fresh air as I had found that many other professors seemed uncomfortable or simply avoided discussing those topics.” Eleanor Jensen (BA, ’01) credit him with teaching her to both see and draw, while also observing that “Fred is deeply sensitive to his students and is always ready to stand up for somebody who has been harmed or overlooked.” Students observed that Hagstrom’s classes were interdisciplinary, challenging them to connect their studies in other disciplines as well as their life stories to their studio work. Jade Hoyer credits Professor Hagstrom with being a mentor long after she graduated in 2007. Fred Hagstrom has profoundly impacted his students, many of whom have pursued careers as artists and educators.  We are pleased to recognize Fred Hagstrom’s more than three decades of teaching with this award.  

Committee: 
Stephen Fakiyesi, Independent Artist, Toronto 
Jessica Hong, Hood Museum, Toledo Art Museum 
Beauvais Lyons, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, (Chair) 

 

Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award 

Terry Smith 

Terry Smith has long written, curated and taught across borders, in the beginning coming from Australia to study and work in New York as both a scholar and an active member of Art & Language. He has been expanding his sights ever since. He has long advocated for the study of indigenous art. For the past twenty years, starting with projects such as Global Conceptualism: Points of Origin, 1950s -1980s at the Queens Museum, he was the trusted collaborator of Okwui Enwezor. He has always insisted that the past and the present be given their due consideration and global perspectives. 

All of this came to his teaching. Students have understood the breadth of his expertise and curiosity; they have used them as inspiration for their own paths; they have appreciated his warmth, his encouragement and the gift of his time. The example he has set as an art historian and a curator has had visible effects in the ranks of university professors and museum curators in the United States and abroad. They do not conform to a single, theoretical way. His students repeatedly speak of his belief in the independent existence of the art object and at the same time his insistence that it be grounded and imbricated in its own real time social relations. Art is allowed its scale, its interior place in our minds, and its exterior place in our world. 

Committee: 
Shirin Fozi, University of Pittsburgh (Chair) 
Joseph Masheck, Hofstra University 
Molly Nesbit, Vassar College 

 

Excellence in Diversity Award 

Valerie Cassel Oliver, curator of modern and contemporary art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
Valerie Cassel Oliver is the Sydney and Frances Lewis Family Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA). With her life-long commitment to increasing diversity in modern and contemporary art, her work has always focused on representation, inclusivity and highlighting artists of different social and cultural backgrounds. Cassel Oliver began her career working with the Black Arts Alliance in Austin, Texas, where she administered grants for the National Endowment for the Arts. Then, she became director of the Visiting Artist Program at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and served as Senior Curator at Contemporary Arts Museum Houston from 2000 to 2017. Cassel Oliver was the organizer of the acclaimed exhibits including Double Consciousness: Black Conceptual Art Since 1970 (2005); Cinema Remixed and Reloaded: Black Women Artists and the Moving Image with Dr. Andrea Barnwell Brownlee (2009); Benjamin Patterson: Born in the State of Flux/us, and Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art (2012).  In 2018 at the VMFA, she co-organized the 50-year survey, Howardena Pindell: What Remains to be Seen, with Naomi Beckwith then with the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. The exhibit was named one of the most influential of the decade. Most recently, she organized the acclaimed survey, The Dirty South: Contemporary Art, Material Culture and the Sonic Impulse. Cassel Oliver’s many achievements have been widely recognized. In 2000 she was one of six curators selected to organize the Biennial including the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. She also has earned fellowships with the Getty Research Institute and the Center for Curatorial Leadership (New York). 

Committee: 
Carmelita Higgenbotham, Virginia Commonwealth University 
Kelly Murdoch-Kitt, University of Michigan 
Sohl Lee, Stony Brook University

 

 

Filed under: Annual Conference, Awards