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Photo by Sarah Deragon, Portraits to the People

Jordana Moore Saggese is an Associate Professor of American Art at the University of Maryland, College Park and the current Editor-in-Chief of Art Journal, CAA’s publication focused on twentieth- and twenty-first-century art history. Trained as an art historian, Saggese’s work focuses on modern and contemporary art with an emphasis on the expressions and theorizations of blackness. She was previously Associate Professor of Contemporary Art & Theory at California College of the Arts.

Joelle Te Paske, CAA Media and Content Manager, corresponded with her this month to learn about how she came to do the work she does, and her aspirations for the journal and the field beyond.

Joelle Te Paske: Thanks for taking the time for our interview, Jordana. So to begin, where are you from originally? What pathways led you to the work you’re doing now?

Jordana Moore Saggese: I am originally from Nashville, Tennessee. I attended Vanderbilt University, as a first-generation college student, for my undergraduate degree, and fell into an art history major at the very last moment. In fact, the summer before my senior year I suddenly realized that every opportunity I had to take an elective unit during my time at Vanderbilt I had chosen an art history class. The art history classes I took with my mentor Leonard Folgarait were truly inspiring. He encouraged his students (even those like me, who had very little knowledge of art history) to consider the work of artists as a response to the values and ideas of society, which in turn are determined by historical conditions. I can still remember his lecture on Dada, which was really the turning point for me. It was at that moment that I realized art was not something meant only for the elite; art could also be a form of rebellion. Although I had never been inside an art museum before my time as an undergraduate, Dr. Folgarait, and other faculty there, encouraged me and asked me to think deeply about the stakes of representation and introduced me to a range of objects across multiple continents and chronologies. With their encouragement, I decided to declare a major in art history and apply for graduate school my senior year.

This meant that I had to take the two-semester survey course as a senior, which fundamentally shifted the way I think about teaching those courses.

Whose art history are we teaching?

I can still remember my shock, sitting in a huge lecture hall, listening to someone drone on about a mostly white, male, heterosexist art history. I was wholly unprepared to memorize a seemingly endless stream of images. I finished the courses but this was not the art history that I was used to. That experience, of coming in almost backwards to the discipline, highlighted two main issues that still impact my teaching and research today.

First, how can we give students the very best introduction to the discipline—one that reflects the deep inquiry and the collaboration that was so intrinsic to my experience in the upper-division courses?

And second, whose art history are we teaching? That is, to what extent has a colonialist logic pervaded much of modern art history and what can I do—in my teaching and research—to undo that logic? I have been acutely aware of the ways in which art history has tended to exclude diverse perspectives and histories and much of my own work involves complicating those dominant narratives.

Saggese’s first book, Reading Basquiat: Exploring Ambivalence in American Art, was published by UC Press in 2014.

JTP: I love these questions as a fundamental starting point—not supplement—to the question of teaching art history. You were previously on the faculty at the California College of the Arts, and are now at University of Maryland, College Park. How has the transition been?

JMS: Teaching at an art school for the first ten years of my career was a wonderful experience in that it gave me direct and constant access to working artists. Thanks to my colleagues I was able to stay current in the field—a challenge for any historian of contemporary art—and my students constantly challenged me to make the history of art come into real time and space. CCA was also a site of experimentation, where students and faculty were willing to challenge one another, to wrestle openly with difficulty, and to fail. I have tried to bring those values to my teaching at Maryland as well. I have found the students and faculty at College Park to be deeply invested in their individual fields of interest but also in the discipline as a whole. There has also been tremendous support for my research practice, which has been a great benefit to making this transition.

JTP: As a Basquiat scholar, what is something you wish more people know about the artist? 

JMS: I wish that more people considered the extent to which Basquiat’s celebrity status has threatened to eclipse his critical significance. My main project has been, and continues to be, writing this artist into the history of American art. I would also add that working on Basquiat presents extreme challenges for a researcher. There is no public archive of his work and approximately 85-90% of the paintings and drawings are in private collections (and I might mention, constantly being sold). This means that in order to see the works, one must shake a lot of hands, charm a lot of people, and knock on lots of doors. Working on Basquiat requires a thick skin, as I am often embroiled in territorial battles or even ignored. I also spend a lot of money traveling to see exhibitions so that I might glimpse the works in person. So, it’s not your typical research project!

JTP: I can only imagine the challenges that presents in pushing research forward—it’s far from a straightforward dive into the archives. What are you working on currently?

JMS: My second book, The Basquiat Reader: A Critical Anthology will be published by the University of California Press in 2020. The Basquiat Reader is a comprehensive sourcebook on Basquiat for both general audiences and advanced readers. Through a combination of interviews with the artist, criticism from the artist’s lifetime and immediately after, previously unpublished research by me, and a selection of the most important critical essays on the artist’s work, The Basquiat Reader provides a full picture of the artist’s views on art and culture, his working process, as well as the critical significance of his work both then and now. It is my hope that by giving more people access to the primary sources, we will see more scholarship on this artist.

My new book project considers representations of black male athletes as a point of entry to thinking about how black men have historically been presented to (and positioned by) the white mainstream public as a fear/fantasy. More specifically, I examine the ways in which black masculinity is constructed in the visual realm, and how the black athletic body can shape the moral, physical, and social position of African American men more broadly. Over five chapters I analyze key moments in the history of the sport, prominent black athletes and their representation in the American popular press and visual art.

Art Journal, Spring 2019

JTP: That is such important work, especially as those constructions persist and accelerate in contemporary visual culture. What are your hopes for Art Journal during your tenure?

JMS: During my tenure I would like to continue to build on the global reach of the publication—in terms of both content and readership. I mean global here as something more than a keyword to signal “diversity.” I use global to signal an interconnected conversation between Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, South America, the Pacific—rather than a series of isolated references to an “other.” I want to think of how the perspective of modern and contemporary art from Mumbai or even Beijing connects to as well as lives separate from the touch-points of America and Europe. This is something that I began to explore in my edited forum, “Diversity and Difference,” published in Art Journal in 2016—that is, how can we think beyond the paradigm of margins and center?

I am also hoping to increase a direct engagement of artist members via the introduction of new features, such as “Object Lessons,” which will first appear in Fall 2019. This is an opportunity for artists to consider a specific object of visual culture that has directly impacted or influenced their own practice. I am also increasing the diversity of artists that we publish in Art Journal. For example, every artist project for issues published in 2019 was developed by a woman of color.

Finally, I want to highlight the role of the journal as a forum for professional conversations. Readers can expect to see short essays on fair use, censorship, and the white supremacist logic of art history—topics that typically are buried in whispers. I see Art Journal as a place where these difficult conversations and issues come to light. Many readers of Art Journal are also teachers, and I hope to bring more focus to issues of pedagogy over the coming years of my tenure as Editor-in-Chief.

How can we think beyond the paradigm of margins and center?

JTP: It’s exciting to see the direction you are bringing to it. What are some of your other arts-related recommendations at the moment?

JMS: I have really enjoyed seeing the conversation around #POCarthistory (started by Ananda Cohen-Aponte [who recently took over CAA’s Instagram]) develop on Twitter over the last months. As someone interested in our current moment I am constantly reading Hyperallergic and I have found the resources on the website of the Association for Critical Race Art History very important to my own pedagogical development. I am currently reading The Painter’s Touch by Ewa Lajer-Burcharth.

JTP: Do you have a favorite exhibition you’ve seen recently?

JMS: This year I really enjoyed the shows by Jack Whitten (Met Breuer) and Nari Ward (New Museum), but I am still reeling from the show of new paintings by Lynette Yiadom-Boakye (Under-Song for a Cipher), which I saw at the New Museum two years ago. That show left me speechless.


The Spring 2019 issue of Art Journal is now online.

Not a CAA member? Join today and begin exploring immediately.

Dawn Holder and Stephanie Lanter

posted by April 29, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Dawn Holder and Stephanie Lanter discuss evading boundaries in making meaning and teaching.

Dawn Holder is Associate Professor of Art at the University of the Ozarks, where he teaches Ceramics, Sculpture, and Art History. She has received numerous accolades for her work, and has exhibited in galleries and museums across the country, including the National Museum for Women in the Arts, where she was invited to participate in the Organic Matters: Women to Watch exhibition. She received an MFA in Ceramics from RISD and a BFA in Ceramics from the University of Georgia.

Stephanie Lanter is currently the Assistant Professor of Ceramics at Emporia State University in Kansas, where she teaches all levels of Ceramics, 3-Dimensional Design, and Fibers. She makes clay and mixed media sculpture, drawings, and texts and has been teaching for 15 years.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

David Rifkind and Carmenita Higginbotham

posted by April 22, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, David Rifkind and Carmenita Higginbotham discuss ethical approaches to managing contingent faculty.

Dr. David Rifkind is Associate Professor of Architecture and Interim Chair of Landscape Architecture + Environmental and Urban Design at Florida International University.

Dr. Carmenita Higginbotham is Associate Professor and Chair of the McIntire Department of Art at the University of Virginia.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

David Modler and Sam Peck

posted by April 15, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, David Modler and Sam Peck discuss art education and collaboration.

David R. Modler is an associate professor of Art Education in the Department of Contemporary Art at Shepherd University in Shepherdstown, West Virginia.

Sam Peck currently works and studies at the University of Minnesota as a PhD student, resident artist, art educator, and researcher.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Maggie Guggenheimer and Ellen Oh

posted by April 08, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Maggie Guggenheimer and Ellen Oh discuss how arts professionals contribute as contingent faculty.

Maggie Guggenheimer is Director of External Relations for Virginia Humanities (University of Virginia).

Ellen Oh is Director of Programs in the Office of the Vice President for the Arts at Stanford University.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Member Spotlight: Nazar Kozak

posted by April 04, 2019

Nazar Kozak at the 2019 CAA Annual Conference. Photo: Ben Fractenberg

Up next in our Member Spotlight series, we are highlighting the work of Nazar Kozak, senior research scholar in the Department of Art History in the Ethnology Institute at the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, and an alumnus of the CAA-Getty International Program. Joelle Te Paske, CAA’s media and content manager, corresponded recently with Professor Kozak to learn more about his experiences at the Annual Conference, his current research, and his tips for scholars looking to extend their work internationally.

Joelle Te Paske: Hi Professor. Thanks for taking the time for our interview. So to begin, where are  you from originally? What is the focus of your research?

Nazar Kozak: I am from Lviv, Ukraine, and I work in two fields simultaneously: medieval and contemporary art. The first one emerged from my interest in the cultural heritage of the region in which I live. My ongoing research in this field is focused on the sixteenth-century iconographic migrations of the Akathistos cycle across the post-Byzantine world from Venetian Cyprus in the South to the Tsardom of Muscovy in the North. Through this, I aim to discover artistic connections within this politically segmented realm that are not readily visible through archival data and thus to problematize nationalist narratives that have dominated Eastern European scholarship in the past. My second specialization emerged in recent years when issues of social justice and war came into the forefront in my country. I was driven to document and re-think artistic responses to the turmoil of events and through this to make my art history relevant to the times I am living through socially and politically. Currently, I am working on an article that explores how border art resists a global biopolitical divide.

Akathistos cycle on the south facade of the Dormition Church in Humor, 1535. Photo: Nazar Kozak

JTP: What is your favorite thing about being a CAA member? Do you have a favorite memory?

NK: My favorite part of being a member is attending the Annual Conference. I remember the reaction of the audience to my talk at the Global Conversation session in 2017 when I shared my personal crisis in finding a motivation to continue writing art historical research when war broke out in my country and how I eventually found that motivation. The room was crowded and I remember the anxiety that I had before the session and the confidence I felt when I spoke and also during several moving conversations I had with attendees afterwards. That talk was published on the CAA website.

JTP: What is the most exciting part of your work currently?

NK: Currently and always the most exciting moment is when I realize that my work on a scholarly project is done; that is, when I can confirm my intellectual hypothesis and substantiate it with evidence that I genuinely believe to be true for now. This feeling, of course, does not last forever.

JTP: What would you say are some of the challenges?

NK: The major challenge is to find a sustainable answer for the Why question: Why am I writing a particular paper or monograph? And not just a random answer to tell others, but an answer I can tell myself and stick with, at least until I finish writing. The access to material and writing itself is a challenge, of course, but I think when you know your stake in it you can handle all the rest.

A view of Independence Square in Kyiv after violent clashes with the police during the Maidan Revolution, January 21, 2014. Photo: Borys Harasymiv

JTP: What is a favorite study you’ve worked on over the years? Any recommendations for our readers?

NK: Right now it is my article on art interventions during the Ukrainian Maidan revolution published in Art Journal in 2017.

I would recommend Decolonizing Nature: Contemporary Art and the Politics of Ecology by T.J. Demos, because it is a great piece of engaging scholarship and because art and ecology is a crucial issue that is relevant to us all.

For those who are interested in online resources on Byzantine art I would recommend The Digital Research Archive for Byzantium (DIFAB) and North of Byzantium.

JTP: What is your experience with Humanities Commons and the CAA-Getty program?

NK: I have used Humanities Commons several times as a platform for online discussions which have worked well as a supplement for in-person exchanges. Among other online platforms that I use is Academia.edu though I see its commercialization as controversial. The CAA-Getty International Program is the major vehicle that facilitates scholars from countries where art history has fewer resources than in West Europe or North America to bring their voice and to build their professional networks on the global scale. I participated in that program three times: first as a scholar and twice as an alumnus. This year I was selected to collaborate with the program’s director Janet Landay and the current CAA International Committee chair Pearlie Rose Baluyut to design and moderate the preconference colloquium on international topics in art history and I was honored to have that opportunity not only for my benefit but to contribute to the program as well. I might add that because of my work with the CAA-Getty program I have recently joined CAA’s International Committee, where I look forward to continuing to work on recruiting and interacting with international scholars.

Map of home institutions of 2019 CAA-Getty International Program participants. Learn more.

Nazar Kozak is a senior research scholar in the Department of Art History in the Ethnology Institute at the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. Previously he also taught at the Medieval and Byzantine Studies Department at the Ivan Franko National University of Lviv. After receiving his PhD from the Lviv Academy of Arts in 2000, he spent a year in Greece under the auspices of the State Scholarships Foundation (IKY). Kozak is a recipient of research and publication grants from the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and an alumnus of the CAA-Getty International Program. In 2016-2017, he was a visiting Fulbright Scholar in The Ukrainian Museum in New York. Kozak is the author of a monograph on image and authority in Kyivan Rus’ and articles dealing with Byzantine and post-Byzantine wall-paintings preserved in Ukraine. His ongoing research is focused on the sixteenth-century iconographic migrations of the Akathistos cycle across the post-Byzantine world. More recently, Kozak has also begun to work on topics in contemporary art. His article on the art interventions during the Ukrainian Maidan published in the Spring 2017 issue of the Art Journal received an honorable mention as a finalist for that year’s Art Journal Award.

Nazar Kozak (third from top left) and fellow 2019 CAA-Getty International Program participants.

Alan Crockett and Alan Crockett, Jr.

posted by April 01, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Alan Crockett and Alan Crockett, Jr. discuss different approaches relative to community.

Alan Crockett is professor emeritus at Ohio State University.

Alan Crockett, Jr., is director at Klamath/Siskiyou Art Center, and an instructor at College of the Siskiyous.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Anja Foerschner and Marta Jovanovic

posted by March 25, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Anja Foerschner and Marta Jovanovic discuss feminist art.

Dr. Anja Foerschner is a curator, scholar, and professor at the Node Center for Curatorial Studies in Berlin.

Marta Jovanovic is an artist and founder of PerformanceHUB in Belgrade.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Ashley Gardini and Cheyanne Cortez

posted by March 18, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Ashley Gardini and Cheyanne Cortez discuss the realities of adjuncting.

They are both adjunct instructors at several community colleges in northern California.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Cali Buckley takes part in the Rijksmuseum’s Museum Objects as Evidence: Approaches to the Material World Summer School, 2018. Photo: Thijs Gerbrandy

We’re delighted to introduce Cali Buckley, CAA’s new Grants and Special Programs Manager and RAAMP Coordinator, who began her full-time role in January after working part-time as the CAA Programs Assistant in 2017. She received her PhD from Penn State University on interactive anatomical models and their creation by craftsmen in the early modern era. Joelle Te Paske, CAA Media and Content Manager, spoke with her in late January to learn more about her research and her hopes for the Resources for Academic Art Museum Professionals (RAAMP) program, which provides publicly accessible resources to academic museum professionals.

Joelle Te Paske: Thanks for taking the time to chat, Cali. So to begin, where are you from?

Cali Buckley: I’m from Pottsville, Pennsylvania. It’s only about three hours from here. It’s north of Philly, best known for Yuengling beer which is the oldest brewery in America. That’s our claim to fame.

JTP: Good to know. And you worked with CAA a few years ago, correct?

CB: Yes, I moved to New York after my Fulbright and worked for CAA for six months as a programs assistant part-time while I was finishing my dissertation. Once I defended and graduated, I moved back to Germany.

I actually have long ties with CAA. Right out of college, I worked for Penn State University Press on art history books. I was able to actually attend CAA and talk to authors, and I worked at the Book and Trade Fair for about three years. It was fun. You can hear people talking about their wonderful book ideas. If I had more time, I would just sit around and see how people pitch these things because it’s fascinating.

I went to Penn State for journalism and then went into publishing right after graduating—I worked on history books and then got really into art history and thought about all the possibilities. Because I guess I had this much narrower idea of traditional art history. And then working on some of these new books really expanded my sense of what that could be.

JTP: That’s great.

CB: I knew some folks in our art history department at Penn State through the editorial board, and I started talking to them about the possibility of my doing my masters there. And I met one of my professors through an editor there. So I planned on going for my masters and then back into publishing, but I completely fell in love with it. I found some great topics, and I just kind of wanted to keep moving forward.

I started going to CAA as a graduate student, so no longer in the Book and Trade Fair. I was part of this group called The Graduate Student Association for Visual Culture. And we would apply for money from Penn State to get groups of us to go to CAA every year. So we would have this group caravan to CAA, all the art historians.

JTP: Sounds ideal.

CB: It’s wonderful. We created this Valentine’s Day tradition because CAA usually falls over Valentine’s Day. And we still get together on the 14th and watch our favorite movie and eat pizza.

JTP: Are you going to do it this year?

CB: Yes, yes, absolutely.

So I started with doing the Book and Trade Fair at CAA. Then I went as a graduate student, gave a talk at CAA in Chicago a few years back. And the same day participated in a roundtable in publishing. CAA’s been huge in my life.

JTP: I’d love to speak a bit about your research, too—early anatomical models and the control of women in medicine.

CB: Originally, when I went into publishing, I was doing weird research projects on interactive books and books as objects. And I used to give talks at Columbia to journalism students in the summer about how to create physical books and how it’s different from books online. How to work with the movement of books and do all these funny things that literary magazines were experimenting with. And then I found this sixteenth-century version of what I was talking about, in the form of an anatomical model.

These have become much more popular in the last ten years but some of these [models] had layers. So they were just images of the body with layers showing the different organs and systems. And that idea of movement and interactivity was fascinating—and a lot of them are inaccurate, even for their time, which makes them even more interesting.

There are all these different layers to audiences, whether you’re trying to highlight the accuracy, which a lot of these are not, or the visuality and the interactivity. And that seems to be more important.

Then I got into ivory models, which is a huge project of mine, creating a whole catalogue of them. That’s a big part of my dissertation.

JTP: Interesting.

CB: I found 180 in the world and I have new people emailing me every year. They’re a much bigger phenomenon than we thought and I’ve done quite a bit of research in Germany to pull these threads together and find out more about their history. I’ve been trying to bring these to light and hopefully I’ll have an article out soon.

JTP: That’s terrific. I’m curious—what is one of your favorite CAA conference memories?

CB: I think one of the great memories was actually an event connected to CAA where I was giving a talk with someone from The Art Institute of Chicago and they let us do a private showing of prints and different objects [at the museum]. Some of the prints were the actual interactive prints that I had worked on.

JTP: That’s always exciting, to be in the same room with objects you’ve studied.

Do you have a favorite exhibition you’ve seen recently?

CB: I just went to the Brueghel exhibition in Vienna and it was amazing. I mean, it was really well done and it went through both his history and paintings and a lot of his earlier drawings and sketches. But it also included a lot of the process to make the materials—some of the wooden planks and those sorts of thing that he used, and the process of painting and printing. That process stuff was really interesting. I think that should be in a lot more exhibitions.

JTP: I agree. My first job was as a registrar at a gallery and I can never quite divorce myself from “How much did the crate cost?”! Because you have a different sense of the process.

CB: Absolutely. I work a lot on materiality. I’m interested in the process of how a work was made, what it’s made of, and how the material affects it. I actually started taking a lot more art classes in different areas to get a feel for it.

I took a class in wax modeling with someone who does wax moulages and restoration. Moulages are generally medical things. So I essentially made a moulage using wax of some skin condition! That was a fun workshop. I was at the Narrenturm which is an old insane asylum in Vienna that now houses a pathological museum. And then you spend a couple of hours making these wax moulages. It was just such a bizarre and wonderful day.

JTP: That does sound bizarre and wonderful!

So, thinking forward to your work with RAAMP, what do you find the most exciting part of that resource?

CB: I’m excited to be [at CAA] and working on a diversity of projects so that I get that bigger, that broader umbrella of what’s new and exciting outside of my little area of the research world. Part of that is the RAAMP program, which really allows people in various facets of the academic and museum worlds to share experiences and have discussions about issues facing those institutions—and those who they serve—today. I love the idea of having meetings and sharing discussions online, because that way they are more accessible. Our Coffee Gatherings are like afternoon meetings at a café with a small audience that can discuss matters in a casual way, but they are also recorded now so students can always watch these later to gain insight into particular matters. The video practica are similar, but more streamlined with one person discussing a specific topic. I can’t wait to get more Coffee Gatherings together because those small group discussions can be really valuable.

JTP: How do you see of the role of academic art museums moving forward?

CB: Academic art museums are as integral as ever to education, but they are facing different issues as time goes on while also dealing with age-old dilemmas. They need to learn how to use the latest technology and how to deal with the latest controversies over artwork, but they also need to engage students. The whole idea of RAAMP is to provide resources for academic art museums to tackle these problems. Part of that is providing a network of professionals who share their expertise.

I do think that museums have to be aware of the social environment and how to contend with criticism. Our session at the 2019 conference allows us to open up this topic to see how artists and professionals deal with some very serious issues of artwork being interpreted as offensive. Artwork is inherently open to interpretation, so I think it’s important to discuss how museums act as mediators to a degree—and how their role is balanced with their place in an academic institution.

I should add that one of my favorite teaching experiences was being able to introduce first-year students to the Palmer Museum of Art at Penn State and asking them to describe the giant [Helen] Frankenthaler painting we had hanging there. There’s nothing quite like it when a student realizes that they have history right in front of them.

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Filed under: CAA Conversations, Staff