CAA News Today

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by February 26, 2020

5Pointz in January 2013. Photo courtesy of Ezmosis via Wikimedia Commons/artnet News

A Stunning Legal Decision Just Upheld a $6.75 Million Victory for the Street Artists Whose Works Were Destroyed at the 5Pointz Graffiti Mecca

The trial was a key test of the Visual Artists Rights Act (VARA), which grants protections to artworks deemed to be of “recognized stature.” (artnet News)

‘It Confirms the Dread I Felt on Election Day’: Artists From Countries Targeted by Trump’s Latest Immigration Ban Speak Out

The addition of Nigeria, Myanmar, Eritrea, Kyrgyzstan, Sudan, and Tanzania to the restricted travel list nearly doubles the number of countries affected since Trump’s original executive order. (artnet News)

Concerns Over Britain Returning Elgin Marbles to Greece Arise as EU Drafts Brexit Negotiating Mandate

After a draft EU mandate leaked to the media last week, reporters were quick to speculate that the Parthenon Marbles could become a bargaining tool in Brexit trade talks. (ARTnews)

American Alliance of Museums: Advocacy Toolkit

Museums Advocacy Day is happening now in Washington DC. Use American Alliance of Museums’s free advocacy tools to join in. (AAM)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by February 05, 2020

Patricia Walters. Photo: Sarah L. Voisin, via The Washington Post

She Collected Art Worth Millions. Now, She’s Giving the Coveted Collection to Howard University.

Patricia Walters is donating 152 pieces to Howard University to honor her husband, the late political scientist Ronald W. Walters. (Washington Post)

The Aftermath of a Fire at the Museum of Chinese in America’s Archives

Staff are hopeful after the first recovery effort found 150 boxes in a salvageable state. (Atlas Obscura)

Helen Frankenthaler Foundation Awards $2.5 Million to Five Universities

The announcement marks an expansion of the foundation’s Frankenthaler Scholarships program, a multiyear initiative that has already dedicated more than $4 million to advance the academic careers of art and art history students. (Artforum)

Art School’s Merger With Christian University Stokes Uproar

The union of Watkins College of Art and Belmont University in Nashville has prompted concern for the future of non-Christian faculty members and LGBTQ students on campus. (New York Times)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 29, 2020

Much of the collection of the Museum of Chinese in America may have been ruined after a fire broke out at a building in Chinatown where its acquisitions were stored. Photo: Lloyd Mitchell, via New York Times

85,000 Pieces From Beloved Chinatown Museum Likely Destroyed in Fire

Our thoughts are with the staff and supporters of the Museum of Chinese in America after a devastating fire destroyed much of their collection last week. Donate to the recovery fund here. (New York Times)

German Museum Experiments With Novel Approach to Charging Its Visitors

The Weserburg Museum of Modern Art recently tried an experimental approach in museum admission pricing – €1 for every 10 minutes. (MuseumNext)

Images of 100,000 Artworks From Paris Museum Collections Now Freely Available to the Public

Paris Musées is offering digital downloads of artworks by Rembrandt, Gustave Courbet, Eugène Delacroix, and many others. (Hyperallergic)

Yale Art History Department to Scrap Survey Course

“Introduction to Art History: Renaissance to the Present” was once touted as one of Yale College’s quintessential classes. This spring, the final rendition of the course will question the idea of Western art itself. (Yale News)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 22, 2020

Museum Tour Toolkit: Developing an Inclusive Tour

A free resource from the Minneapolis Institute of Art, this toolkit for developing an inclusive museum tour was compiled through discussions with more than 150 docents and guides over a two-year period. (MIA)

History Shows What’s Wrong With the Idea That War Is ‘Normal’ in the Middle East

“This trope is frequently turned to by those who would have the world believe that war in the Middle East is somehow innate and inevitable.” (Time)

Germany Opens an Official ‘Help Desk’ for Those Seeking to Reclaim Nazi-Looted Art, Simplifying a Long-Opaque Process

The office in Berlin, led by art historian Susanne Meyer-Abich, aims to guide people around the bureaucratic hurdles for claiming back their cultural assets. (artnet News)

Philadelphia Mayor: Museum Should ‘Strengthen’ Sexual Harassment Policy

The mayor’s remarks come after former Philadelphia Museum of Art employee Joshua Helmer was forced to resign from his Erie Art Museum post. (New York Times)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 15, 2020

Mario Moore, Several Lifetimes, 2019. Courtesy of the artist.

Most Paintings on Princeton’s Campus Are of Dead White Men. But One Artist Is Adding Equally Grand Portraits of Its Cooks and Cleaners

Created during a year-long fellowship, artist Mario Moore’s portrait series honors service workers on the Princeton University campus. (artnet News)

Free Your Mind: A Speculative Review of #NewMoMA

“The museum has given over the ground floor to a new childcare facility, available to all its staff. The higher floors of the extension will provide affordable housing for low-income workers in the arts…” From Claire Bishop and Nikki Columbus, a speculative review of the “new MoMA.” (Paper Monument)

Museum Director Forced Out Amid Harassment Complaints

Joshua Helmer was removed at the Erie Art Museum after a recent New York Times article about complaints during his tenure at the museum and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. (New York Times)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by January 08, 2020

The archaelogical site and ruins of gates and columns of the Persian Achaemenid dynasty ancient capital city of Persepolis. Photo by Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto via Getty Images, via artnet News

President Trump’s Threat to Bomb Iranian Cultural Sites ‘Must Be Condemned,’ Say Outraged Museum Directors, Politicians, and Scholars

Cultural figures and scholars around the world have condemned Trump’s statements. (artnet News)

Update: The Pentagon Has Rejected Trump’s Threat to Bomb Iran’s Heritage Sites. Here’s What May Have Been Saved (artnet News)

Reimagining Museum Design, With Education at the Forefront

“Education departments have generally been the most imaginative, responsive, and inclusive arms of museums. So, why are they not given the highest consideration in new museum building planning?” (Hyperallergic)

Ten Rules for (Possibly) Succeeding in Academia through Upward Kindness

A satirical article on tips for “upward toxicity” in academia was Times Higher Education’s most-read article of 2019. In response—and in the spirit of the new year—here are ten rules for success through upward kindness. (THE)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by December 25, 2019

The overhead entrance to the previously uncharted chamber in Indonesia, which houses cave art that dates back at least 43,900 years. Credit: Ratno Sardi for The New York Times

Mythical Beings May Be Earliest Imaginative Cave Art by Humans

The paintings found in central Indonesia—which are at least 43,900 years old—may shift an understanding of when and where humans started depicting imaginary figures. (New York Times)

How to Make Museums More Accessible for Disabled People? Ask Them

“New experiences, exhibitions, and programs need to be done with and not for disabled people. It’s not rocket science, but it does require organizational commitment.” (The Art Newspaper)

Meet the Chief Diversity Officer Overhauling the Phillips Collection

In one of the first roles of its kind at an American museum, Makeba Clay is the inaugural Chief Diversity Officer at the Phillips Collection in Washington, DC. (Artsy)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by December 18, 2019

On August 20, 2018, police stand guard after the Confederate statue known as Silent Sam was toppled by protesters on campus at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Photo: Gerry Broome/AP, via The Atlantic

A University’s Betrayal of Historical Truth

To settle a lawsuit over toppled Confederate monument Silent Sam, the University of North Carolina agreed to pay the Sons of Confederate Veterans $2.5 million—a sum that rivals the endowment of its history department. (Vanity Fair)

Rebecca Salter Appointed First Female President of London’s Royal Academy of Arts

The painter and printmaker will be the Royal Academy of Arts’ first female president in its 251-year history. (Artforum)

Students in Indian Capital Protest ‘Anti-Muslim’ Citizenship Law

Last week, thousands of students gathered at Jamia Millia Islamia university in New Delhi to protest. (Al Jazeera)

How a Denial of Tenure at Harvard Became a National Controversy

The tenure denial of professor Lorgia García Peña at Harvard has sparked a national conversation on the lack of legitimacy given to ethnic studies. (Vox)

Related: My mentor was denied tenure. Why should I stay in academia? (Boston Globe)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by December 11, 2019

Credit: Torbakhopper/Wikimedia Commons, via Education Dive

At Women’s Colleges, Rules Vary Widely for Trans and Nonbinary Students

Admissions criteria can vary widely from institution to institution and is not always publicly posted, leaving students floundering for answers. (Education Dive)

How to Feel like You Have Enough: Overcoming a Scarcity Mindset 

“Time, money, status, security, respect. You name it, we’ve felt scarce around it. As artists, we are constantly having to advocate for our value—at work, in galleries, within academia, and in society at large.” (The Creative Independent)

Harvard’s Only Latina Professor on the Tenure Track Was Rejected & Students Are Protesting

Students held a sit-in to protest the tenure denial of professor Lorgia García Peña and called for the creation of an ethnic studies department. (Remezcla)

Black Scholars Are Not ‘Rare Creatures’

“When Purdue’s president said this, I had to respond because this myth is so pervasive.” (New York Times)

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News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by December 04, 2019

Archives of American Art Publishes Finding Aid for Linda Nochlin Papers

The Smithsonian has just released an online finding aid for over 30 linear feet of the late art historian’s archival material. (Archives of American Art)

A Viral List of Hundreds of Opportunities for Artists, Compiled by One Person to Encourage Community

Everest Pipkin has made public their “Big Artist Opportunities List”—a collection of over 400 opportunities for artists across the globe. (Hyperallergic)

George Soros’s Foundation Is Launching a $15 Million Initiative to Repatriate Cultural Objects to African Nations

The Open Society’s initiative will support African lawyers, scholars, archivists, and grassroots organizations campaigning for the return of artifacts taken during the colonial era. (artnet News)

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