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Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by February 15, 2012

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

February 2012

Blane De St. Croix, an artist and associate professor of sculpture at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, has accepted a 2011 Massachusetts College of Art Alumni Award for Outstanding Accomplishment.

Alexander Dumbadze, assistant professor of art history at George Washington University in Washington, DC, has received an award from the Arts Writers Grant Program, administered by Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, in support of his article, “Jack Goldstein and the Origins of Postmodernism.”

Daniel Eisenberg, professor in the Department of Film, Video, New Media, and Animation at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in Illinois, has been awarded a film/video grant from Creative Capital to help fund The Unstable Object, a film that will address the relationship between factory workers and the objects they produce.

Malik Gaines, a member of the artist collective My Barbarian, has received a grant in visual arts from Creative Capital in support of a series of workshops and public performances, titled Post-Living Ante-Action Theater. His group will collaborate with artists working in Israel and Egypt to stage visual, musical, and theatrical demonstrations.

Ken Gonzales-Day had been awarded a visual-arts grant from Creative Capital in support of Profiled, an ongoing project that uncovers racial stereotypes from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Gonzales-Day will use the grant to produce a series of workshops with middle school students in central Los Angeles that will explore themes of racial and ethnographic categorization in art viewing and making.

Julie Green, an artist and associate professor of art at Oregon State University in Corvallis, has received a 2011 Joan Mitchell Foundation Award for Painters and Sculptors. Green is one of twenty-five artists nationwide to receive the award.

Michele Greet, associate professor of art history at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, has been awarded a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities for her project, “Transatlantic Encounters: Latin American Artists in Paris between the Wars.”

Natilee Harren, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History at the University of California, Los Angeles, is cowinner of the first Art & Education Paper Prize. Harren’s text, “Objects without Objects: The Artwork in Flux,” has been published in Art & Education Papers.

Jane McFadden, associate professor of art and design at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, had received a grant through the Arts Writers Grant Program, a collaboration between Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, in support of her forthcoming book, There and Not There: Walter De Maria.

Christine Mehring, associate professor of art history at the University of Chicago in Illinois, has accepted an award from the Arts Writers Grant Program, administered by Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, that will support her forthcoming book, Munich ‘72: Olympian Art and Architecture. Written in collaboration with Sean Keller, Munich ’72 will examine the lost history of the art and architecture of the 1972 Olympics and its lasting effects on the global art world and the construction on German postwar identity.

Melissa Potter, assistant professor of interdisciplinary arts at Columbia College Chicago in Illinois, has received a faculty development grant to help produce a collaboration with a fellow artist and faculty member, Paul Catanese. Their project, Handmade Media, explores the intersection of electronic media and hand papermaking.

Emily Eliza Scott, an independent artist and scholar, has earned a grant from the Arts Writers Grant Program, administered by Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. The award will support her forthcoming article, “Toxic Gardens: Patricia Johanson’s House and Garden Proposal (1969),” which addresses Patricia Johanson’s radical proposals for New York City parks in the late 1960s and their relationship to Land art, Minimalism, and an emergent ecologically conscious culture.

Roger Shimomura, a painter and professor of art at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, has received a $50,000 United States Artists Fellowship. Shimomura is known for work that investigates Asian American identity and, more recently, Muslim American identity in a post–September 11 world.

Deborah Stratman, a Chicago-based artist and filmmaker, has received a film/video grant from Creative Capital that will help fund her forthcoming film, The Illinois Parables, which explores a series of regional narratives while addressing themes of the rational, the supernatural, the political, and the mystical.

Jesse Sugarmann, an interdisciplinary artist and assistant professor of new genres at California State University, Bakersfield, has received a film/video grant from Creative Capital in support of We Build Excitement, a film about the American automobile industry and the manufacturing of American identity.

Christopher Sullivan, an artist and faculty member in film, video, and new media
at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in Illinois, has been awarded a Creative Capital grant in film/video to help produce The Orbit of Minor Satellites, his forthcoming animated feature.

Meredith Tromble, an artist, writer, and associate professor at the San Francisco Art Institute in California, has earned a grant through the Arts Writers Grant Program, a collaborative venture between Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, in support of her blog Art and Shadows, a platform to address contemporary art and its relationship to theories of mind and consciousness.

Murtaza Vali, a writer, art historian, and curator based in Brooklyn, New York, has accepted a grant for short-form writing through Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts’ Arts collaborative initiative, the Arts Writers Grant Program. Throughout the year Vali will produce critical writing that addresses figures of absence and presence in contemporary political art.

William Wilson has been recognized with a grant from the Arts Writers Grant Program, administered by Creative Capital and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. The funds will help support Ray Johnson: An Illustrated Life in Art, a book that will examine Johnson’s life and work in the context of an extensive personal archive housed in Wilson’s home.

Exhibitions Curated by CAA Members

posted by February 15, 2012

Check out details on recent shows organized by CAA members who are also curators.

Exhibitions Curated by CAA Members is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

February 2012

Colin B. Baily. Renoir, Impressionism, and Full Length Painting. Frick Collection, New York, February 7–May 13, 2012.

Patricia G. Berman. Luminous Modernism. Scandinavia House, New York, October 25, 2011–February 11, 2012.

Jeanne Brasile. Jones and Roa: Pulvis et Umbra. Cuchifritos Art Gallery/Project Space, New York, November 12–December 18, 2011.

Reni Gower. Papercuts. Norman Shannon and Emmy Lou P. Illges Gallery, Columbus State University, Columbus, Georgia, March 22–April 24, 2012.

John Silvis. Walls and Light: Recent Photographs by Father Paul Anel. First Things Gallery, New York, November 10, 2011–January 9, 2012.

Cortney Lane Stell. Jorrit Tornquist: The Intersection of Color and Thought. J. Phillip J Steele Gallery, Denver, Colorado, February 6–March 4, 2012.

Thalia Vrachopoulos. Carol Jacobsen: Mistrial. Sixth Floor President’s Gallery, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, New York, October 17–December 16, 2011.

Michael J. Waters and Cammy Brothers. Variety, Archeology, and Ornament: Renaissance Architectural Prints from Column to Cornice. University of Virginia Art Museum, Charlottesville, Virginia, August 26–December 18, 2011.

Lili White. The Missing Third Festival Show. Another Experiment by Women Film Festival, Anthology Film Archives, New York. March 7, 2012.

Books Published by CAA Members

posted by February 15, 2012

Publishing a book is a major milestone for artists and scholars—browse a list of recent titles below.

Books Published by CAA Members appears every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

February 2012

Jeffrey Abt. American Egyptologist: The Life of James Henry Breasted and the Creation of His Oriental Institute (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011).

Annette Blaugrund. Dispensing Beauty in New York and Beyond: The Triumph and Tragedies of Harriet Hubbard Ayer (Charleston, SC: History Press, 2011).

Faya Causey. Amber and the Ancient World (Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Museum, 2012).

Cora Cohen. Cora Cohen: Works on Paper (Houston: D. M. Allison Editions, 2011).

Jake Harvey, Joel Fisher, Jessica Harrison, and Noé Mendelle. Stone: A Legacy and Inspiration for Art (London: Black Dog Press, 2011).

Bernard L. Herman, ed. Thornton Dial: Thoughts on Paper (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, in association with the Ackland Art Museum, 2012).

Zoya Kocur, ed. Global Visual Cultures: An Anthology (Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell, 2011).

Aden Kumler. Translating Truth: Ambitious Images and Religious Knowledge in Late Medieval France and England (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2011).

Mary Patten. Revolution as an Eternal Dream: The Exemplary Failure of the Madame Binh Graphics Collective (Chicago: Half Letter Press, 2011).

Nicolas Pearce and Jason Steuber, eds. Original Intentions: Essays on Production, Reproduction, and Interpretation in the Arts of China (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2012).

Michael J. Waters and Cammy Brothers. Variety, Archeology, and Ornament: Renaissance Architectural Prints from Column to Cornice (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Art Museum, 2011).

Please visit the website for the 100th Annual Conference in Los Angeles for complete details about obtaining access to wireless-internet connections at the Los Angeles Convention Center and the four conference hotels.

Filed under: Annual Conference — Tags:

Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts produces a curated list, called CWA Picks, of recommended exhibitions and events related to feminist art and scholarship in North America and around the world.

The CWA Picks for February 2012 include four solo shows of women artists at museums and galleries across the United States. The Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, California, presents Alina Szapocznikow: Sculpture Undone, 1955–1972, and the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, will exhibit the work of Maya Lin. Kathryn Spence: Dirty and Clean is on view at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, Connecticut, and the Delaware Art Museum in Wilmington has organized a survey of work by the celebrated children’s book author and illustrator, Katharine Pyle (1863–1938).

Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

Image: Alina Szapocznikow with her work Naga (Naked), 1961. Alina Szapocznikow Archive/Piotr Stanislawski/National Museum in Kraków (photograph by Marek Holzman and provided by the Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw)

Filed under: Committees, Exhibitions

Rosanne Gibel, a professor of graphic design at the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale in Florida and chair of CAA’s Education Committee, has catalogued all design-related sessions and events taking place at next week’s 100th Annual Conference in Los Angeles. Below is a chronological list by day.

Wednesday, February 22

Deconstructing Costume Histories: Rereading Identities in Fashion Collections and Exhibitions
Wednesday, February 22, 9:30 AM–12:00 NOON
Concourse Meeting Room 409AB, Level 2, Los Angeles Convention Center
Chairs: Ian McDermott, ARTstor; Consuelo Gutierrez, independent scholar

ARTspace
Citizen Designer: Authoring a Definition
Wednesday, February 22, 9:30 AM–12:00 NOON
West Hall Meeting Room 515A, Level 2, Los Angeles Convention Center
Chairs: Gary Rozanc, Columbia College Chicago; Alyson Beaton, Columbia College Chicago

Design Studies Forum Business Meeting
Wednesday, February 22, 12:30–2:00 PM
West Hall Meeting Room 515B, Level 2, Los Angeles Convention Center

CAA Education Committee
Who Do We Teach? Challenges and Strategies in Recognizing Our Students, and Developing and Supporting Curriculum for Multiple Constituencies
Wednesday, February 22, 12:30–2:00 PM
Concourse Meeting Room 403A, Level 2, Los Angeles Convention Center
Chairs: Joan Giroux, Columbia College Chicago; Cindy Maguire, Adelphi University

Design, from “California Dreamin’” to “Designed in California,” ca. 1965–2012
Wednesday, February 22, 2:30–5:00 PM
Concourse Meeting Room 406AB, Level 2, Los Angeles Convention Center
Chairs: James Housefield, University of California, Davis; Stuart Kendall, California College of the Arts

Art History Open Session: Renaissance Art
Form and Function: Art and Design?
Wednesday, February 22, 2:30–5:00 PM
Concourse Meeting Room 405, Level 2, Los Angeles Convention Center
Chair: Antonia Madeleine Boström, J. Paul Getty Museum

Thursday, February 23

SPEAKOUT! CAA’s Strategic Plan for the Annual Conference and You
Thursday, February 23, 8:00–9:00 AM
Concourse Meeting Room 402AB, Level 2, Los Angeles Convention Center

Foundations in Art: Theory and Education
Foundations in Literature: Developing a Culture of Reading within the Art and Design Foundations Program
Thursday, February 23, 12:30–2:00 PM
Concourse Meeting Room 404A, Level 2, Los Angeles Convention Center
Chair: Sara Dismukes, Troy University

Critical Craft Forum
What Is Contemporary about Craft?

Thursday, February 23, 5:30–7:00 PM
Concourse Meeting Room 408A, Level 2, Los Angeles Convention Center
Chairs: Namita Gupta Wiggers, Museum of Contemporary Craft; Elizabeth Agro, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Friday, February 24

Design Education 2.0: Teaching in a Techno-Cultural Reality
Friday, February 24, 9:30 AM–12:00 NOON
Concourse Meeting Room 404A, Level 2, Los Angeles Convention Center
Chair: Ashley John Pigford, University of Delaware

Centennial Session
Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow: CAA Town Hall Meeting
Friday, February 24, 9:30 AM–12:00 NOON
West Hall Meeting Room 515B, Level 2, Los Angeles Convention Center
Chair: Margaret Lazzari, University of Southern California

AIGA Business Meeting
Friday, February 24, 12:30–2:00 PM
West Hall Meeting Room 502A, Los Angeles Convention Center

Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design
Windgate Fellowship Program: A Case for Funding Professional Development Opportunities for Graduating Seniors
Friday, February 24, 12:30–2:00 PM
Concourse Meeting Room 408A, Level 2, Los Angeles Convention Center
Chair: Stephanie Moore, Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design, University of North Carolina, Asheville

Is It Time to Question the “Privileging” of Visual Art?
Friday, February 24, 2:30–5:00 PM
Concourse Meeting Room 409AB, Level 2, Los Angeles Convention Center
Chairs: Greta Berman, Juilliard School; Ellen K. Levy, independent artist, New York

Centennial Session
Connections: Architecture and Design in Los Angeles at Midcentury
Friday, February 24, 2:30–5:00 PM
Bing Theater, Plaza Level, Bing Center, Los Angeles Times Central Court entrance, Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Chair: Ruth Weisberg, University of Southern California

CAA Annual Members’ Business Meeting and Reception
Friday, February 24, 5:30–7:00 PM
West Hall Meeting Room 503, Level 2, Los Angeles Convention Center
Keynote address: April Greiman

New Media Caucus
Code as Craft: Programming in the Art and Design Curriculum
Friday, February 24, 5:30–7:00 PM
Concourse Meeting Room 402AB, Level 2, Los Angeles Convention Center
Chair: Michael Salmond, Florida Gulf Coast University

Saturday, February 25

Design Studies Forum
Design, Thing Theory, and the Lives of Objects
Saturday, February 25, 12:30–2:00 PM
West Hall Meeting Room 503, Level 2, Los Angeles Convention Center
Chair: Leslie Atzmon, Eastern Michigan University

CAA Committee on Intellectual Property
Give and Take: Copyright’s Balancing Act
Saturday, February 25, 12:30–2:00 PM
West Hall Meeting Room 515B, Level 2, Los Angeles Convention Center
Chairs: Christine L. Sundt, Visual Resources; Doralynn Pines, Metropolitan Museum of Art, emerita

Filed under: Annual Conference, Design

caa.reviews invites nominations and self-nominations for six individuals to join its Council of Field Editors, which commissions reviews within an area of expertise or geographic region, for a three-year term: July 1, 2012–June 30, 2015. An online journal, caa.reviews is devoted to the peer review of new books, museum exhibitions, and projects relevant to art history, visual studies, and the arts.

The journal seeks three field editors for books in contemporary art, Iberian and colonial Latin American art, and Precolumbian art. Two field editors are needed to commission reviews of exhibitions in the Midwest and Southeast, covering the art of all periods, and one field editor for exhibitions on the West Coast covering art before 1800. Candidates may be artists, art historians, critics, curators, or other professionals in the visual arts; institutional affiliation is not required.

Working with the caa.reviews editor-in-chief, the caa.reviews Editorial Board, and CAA’s staff editor, each field editor selects content to be reviewed, commissions reviewers, and reviews manuscripts for publication. Field editors for books are expected to keep abreast of newly published and important books and related media in his or her field of expertise, and those for exhibitions should be aware of current and upcoming exhibitions (and other related projects) in their geographic regions. The Council of Field Editors meets annually at the CAA Annual Conference. Field editors must pay travel and lodging expenses to attend the conference.

Candidates must be current CAA members and should not be serving on the editorial board of a competitive journal or on another CAA editorial board or committee. Nominators should ascertain their nominee’s willingness to serve before submitting a name; self-nominations are also welcome. Please send a statement describing your interest in and qualifications for appointment, a CV, and your contact information to: caa.reviews Editorial Board, College Art Association, 50 Broadway, 21st Floor, New York, NY 10004; or email the documents to Alyssa Pavley, CAA editorial assistant. Deadline: April 25, 2012.

Updated on March 26, 2012.

Filed under: caa.reviews, Publications

Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts selects the best in feminist art and scholarship. The following exhibitions and events should not be missed. Check the archive of CWA Picks at the bottom of the page, as several museum and gallery shows listed in previous months may still be on view or touring.

February 2012

Alina Szapocznikow, Petit Dessert I (Small Dessert I), 1970–71, colored polyester resin and glass, 3 3/16 x 4 5/16 x 5⅛ in. Kravis Collection (artwork © Estate of Alina Szapocznikow/Piotr Stanislawski/ADAGP, Paris; photograph by Thomas Mueller and provided by Broadway 1602, New York, and Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne)

Alina Szapocznikow: Sculpture Undone, 1955–1972
Hammer Museum
University of California, Los Angeles, 10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90024
February 5–April 29, 2012
Alina Szapocznikow: Sculpture Undone, 1955–1972 is the inaugural United States museum survey for this underrepresented Polish artist. A Holocaust survivor who died in 1973 at the age of forty-seven, Szapocznikow is widely acknowledged by her artist peers as one of the most significant sculptors of the twentieth century. She pioneered the use of unconventional sculptural materials, such as polyester and polyurethane, and constructed a visual language that addressed the body’s pain and regeneration. The exhibition includes approximately sixty sculptures, fifty works on paper, and numerous photographic works, demonstrating the tremendous range of Szapocznikow’s vision and continuing influence on twentieth- and twenty-first-century artists.

Maya Lin
Heinz Architectural Center
Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213
February 11–May 13, 2012
An exhibition of work by Maya Lin explores her diverse career as architect, artist, and dedicated environmentalist. The twenty-one sculptures and drawings on view range from room-sized installations evocative of geological topography to intricately designed wall installations. Lin has made one new work inspired by Pittsburgh’s three rivers, Pin River – Ohio (Allegheny & Monongahela), specifically for the Carnegie Museum, and her new memorial video project, What is Missing?, will be screened in the museum’s Scaife Lobby.

Shares and Stakeholders: The Feminist Art Project Day of Panels
Abramson Auditorium
Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 250 South Grand Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90012
February 25, 2012
This year’s Feminist Art Project Day of Panels, organized by the artists Audrey Chan and Elana Mann and held in conjunction with the CAA Annual Conference, asks the question: What are the stakes—and who are the stakeholders—of the feminist future? The conversations will address the greater inclusivity of a contemporary feminist art that embraces a multiplicity of identities and philosophies. Topics of discussion will include: feminist art educational models, the roles of men in feminist art, interventionist art strategies, radical queer art making, and feminism as a daily humanist practice. This event is free and open to the public.

Katharine Pyle, “He knocked against a tin pan that clattered down with a tremendous din,” from Three Little Kittens by Katharine Pyle (New York: Dodd, Mead and Company, 1920), 1920, graphite, ink, and gouache on illustration board, 7⅞ x 6⅜ in. Lent by David and Sarah Wyeth (photograph provided by the Delaware Art Museum)

Tales of Folk and Fairies: The Life and Work of Katharine Pyle
Delaware Art Museum
2301 Kentmare Parkway, Wilmington, DE 19806
February 18–September 9, 2012
This exhibition presents seventy-one works by the celebrated children’s book author and illustrator Katharine Pyle (1863–1938). A native of Wilmington, Katherine Pyle was encouraged from a young age to pursue poetry and illustration by her older brother, the famed illustrator Howard Pyle. She studied at the Philadelphia School of Design for Women and at the Drexel Institute of Art and Science, also in Philadelphia. Her work was stylistically aligned with her brother, and also with Beatrix Potter, Walter Crane, and Aubrey Beardsley. Pyle’s subjects were taken from Norse and Greek mythology, fairy tales, and animal stories, and her 1923 illustrations for Anna Sewell’s novel Black Beauty are among her best-known work.

A Complex Weave: Women and Identity in Contemporary Art
Perlman Teaching Museum
Weitz Center for Creativity, Carleton College, 320 Third Street East, Northfield, MN 55057
January 13–March 11, 2012
This exhibition, curated by Martin Rosenberg and J. Susan Isaacs, looks at the current state of feminist art practices and the range of materials and theories used by contemporary artists. Personal and political identity is explored in painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, and needlework. The roster of artists include: Blanka Amezkua, Sarah Amos, Helene Aylon, Siona Benjamin, Zoe Charlton, Sonya Clark, Annet Couwenberg, Lalla A. Essaydi, Judy Gelles, Sharon Harper, Julie Harris, Fujiko Isomura, Tatiana Parcero, Philemona Williamson, April Wood, and Flo Oy Wong.

Kathryn Spence, Short sharp notes, a long whistled trill on one pitch, clear phrases (detail), 2010–11 (artwork © Kathryn Spence; photograph by Rick Schwab and provided by Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco)

Kathryn Spence: Dirty and Clean
Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum
258 Main Street, Ridgefield, CT 06877
January 29, 2011–June 10, 2012
The German-born, San Francisco-based artist Kathryn Spence uses found, dirty, and discarded materials to explore the complexities of humanity’s relationship to garbage and its place in our ecosystem. Spence, an avid bird-watcher and nature enthusiast, creates life-sized animal models from scraps of paper, fabric, string, and wire. Her work plays with the idea of dirt and dirtiness as both a purifying source and as a by-product of human waste and greed.

Filed under: CWA Picks, Uncategorized — Tags:

In honor of CAA’s Centennial, the artist Sheryl Oring will ask 2012 Annual Conference attendees a single question: What is the role of the artist? Over the course of a two-day performance in Los Angeles, Oring will pose the question to her visitors and transcribe their answers verbatim onto note cards using a manual typewriter, with a goal of collecting one hundred answers. Hence the title of her work, 100 Possibilities. Collectively, these answers will paint a portrait of academic views about the role of the artist as CAA enters its second century as a professional organization. After the performance, Oring will collect and organize the cards into an archive that may be used to create an artist’s book and an exhibition. In addition, digital scans of the cards may eventually be published on the CAA website.

Oring’s performance will take place 1:00–5:00 PM on Wednesday, February 22, and Thursday, February 23, 2012—or until she receives her one hundred answers. CAA will set up a table for the artist in the registration area, located in Concourse Foyer, Level 1, Los Angeles Convention Center.

Oring is an interdisciplinary artist whose work explores technology and its role in society through projects that incorporate both old and new media to tell stories, examine public opinion, and foster open exchange. She received a CAA Professional-Development Fellowship in the Visual Arts in 2010–11 as she completed her MFA at the University of California, San Diego.

Filed under: Annual Conference

The National Committee for the History of Art (NCHA) has awarded travel grants to fourteen PhD students at American universities to attend the thirty-third congress of the International Committee of the History of Art (Comité International d’Histoire de l’Art, or CIHA), taking place July 15–20, 2012, in Nuremberg, Germany. Each student’s department will match the NCHA funds. Nominated by their departments, the students were selected from among a much larger group of highly competitive nominees.

The NCHA grant recipients are:

  • Krysta Black, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Brianne Cohen, University of Pittsburgh*
  • Jennifer Cohen, University of Chicago*
  • Dana Cowen, Case Western Reserve University*
  • Jill Holaday, University of Iowa*
  • Elizabeth Kassler-Taub, Harvard University
  • Anna Kim, University of Virginia
  • Laine Little, State University of New York, Binghamton
  • Jennifer A. Morris, Princeton University*
  • Turkan Pilavci, Columbia University
  • Stephanie E. Rozman, University of Minnesota*
  • Erin Sullivan, University of Southern California*
  • John A. Tyson, Emory University
  • Maureen Warren, Northwestern University

The asterisk (*) indicates a current CAA member.

NCHA is the American affiliate of the international community of art historians. Two representatives from CAA, usually the past presidents from the Board of Directors, are NCHA individual members. Both NCHA and CIHA aim to foster intellectual exchange among scholars, teachers, students, and others interested in art history broadly conceived as encompassing art, architecture, and visual culture across geographical boundaries and throughout history. Through the organization of scholarly conferences of varying size and scope, NCHA and CIHA promote the communication, dissemination, and exchange of knowledge and information about art history and related fields, ultimately seeking to promote a global community of art historians.