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Jesse Reed and Maggie Paxton

posted by January 13, 2020

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

On this week’s podcast, two young high-profile designers talk about how they use research and create meaning in Fashion and Graphic Design. They also describe concepts for experimental studio projects that could be used in a design curriculum.

Maggie Paxton is a multi-category designer with a focus in footwear, currently working for Marc Jacobs on his runway and contemporary shoe collections. Maggie is a resident of Brooklyn, but travels often to Venehtsia, Italy for shoemaking purposes. Aside from shoes of all kinds, Maggie’s other interests include antiques and oddities, folk art and Americana, mycology, counterculture art and fashion, and logos of all varieties.

Jesse Reed previously worked as an associate partner under Michael Bierut at the New York office of Pentagram. While at Pentagram, his clients included New York University, Hillary for America, Wildlife Conservation Society, Bobby Flay, Syracuse University, and Saks Fifth Avenue, among others. In 2017, Jesse co-founded Order, a design office in Brooklyn, along with fellow partner, Hamish Smyth. He and Hamish are also the co-founders of Standards Manual, an independent publishing imprint focusing on the preservation of graphic design history, such as the NYCTA Graphics Standards Manual, and the NASA Graphics Standards Manual reissues, among others. Jesse has taught at the University of Cincinnati and Parsons New School for Design. His courses covered icon/symbol systems and branding development.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Betsy Alwin and Kate Casanova

posted by January 06, 2020

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Betsy Alwin and Kate Casanova discuss teaching material in sculpture.

Betsy Alwin teaches in the Sculpture Department at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design teaching Foundations 3D, Installation and Sculpture. This summer she finished an outdoor public commission which was unveiled at the end of September at Franconia Sculpture Park in Shafer, Minnesota.

Kate Casanova is an assistant professor of Sculpture at the University of Denver. She uses a wide range of materials such as fungi, silicone and video to explore the subject of the Posthuman body.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Jan Wurm and Terri Cohn

posted by December 30, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Jan Wurm and Terri Cohn discuss making art through troubled times.

Jan Wurm is an artist, educator, and curator engaged in expanding the community forum for contemporary art dialogue.

Terri Cohn is a writer, curator, art historian, and fine art consultant. She has contributed to numerous publications including Art Practical, Performa, Public Art Review, and Art in America. Her curatorial work has included exhibitions for museums and galleries in the Bay Area.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Juan Carlos Rodriguez Rivera and Allison Yasukawa

posted by December 23, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Juan Carlos Rodriguez Rivera and Allison Yasukawa discuss international and multilingual students at art/design schools.

Juan Carlos Rodríguez Rivera is a queer boricua visual communicator and educator, passionate about food, lover of gradients, and anything with glitter. Juan was born and raised in Cataño, the smallest town of Puerto Rico, but relocated to San Francisco, California in 2017. Juan’s work focuses on challenging colonial perspectives in design from the point of view of a boricua diaspora. Juan Carlos is an Assistant Professor in the Design Department at California College of the Arts, and holds an MFA in Communications Design from Pratt Institute in NY.

Allison Yasukawa is a visual artist and educator. She holds an MFA in Studio Arts and an MA in TESOL and Applied Linguistics. In her studio practice, she explores asymmetries of power and imagined geographies in interactional spaces ranging from the personal to the global. Yasukawa’s pedagogy focuses on studio and academic classes in English for Art and Design. She is the Director of English Language Learning at the California Institute of the Arts and has presented nationally and internationally on art-language overlaps in critique instruction, student autonomy, and multilingualism as a creative resource.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Andrew Demirjian and Claudia Hart

posted by December 16, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Andrew Demirjian and Claudia Hart discuss emerging media, micro to macro.

Drawing from conceptual art, experimental music and computer science, Andrew Demirjian scrapes and remixes Internet culture to create dense rhythmic collages of sound and language. He teaches theory and production courses in emerging media in the Film and Media Department and the Integrated Media Arts MFA program at Hunter College, he is currently a Fellow at the MIT Open Documentary Lab.

Claudia Hart has been active as an artist, curator and critic since 1988. Her art consists of virtual simulations of all kinds: 3d imagery integrated into photography, multi-channel animation installations, performances, and sculptures using advanced production techniques such as Rapid Prototyping, CNC routing and augmented-reality custom apps. Her works deals with issues of representation, the role of the computer in shifting contemporary values about identity and the real, and ideas about what is usually called the “natural.” Her project is to feminize the masculinist culture of technology by interjecting emotional subjectivity into the overly-determined Cartesian world of digital design.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Kevin Tervala and Jennifer Kingsley

posted by December 09, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

On this week’s podcast, a medievalist stumbles into an Africanist and they decide to invite undergraduates to curate a feminist show.

Correction: Ashton Cooper’s article first appeared as part of a Barnard College exhibition, not Bryn Mawr. For more information: The Problem of the Overlooked Female Artist: An Argument for Enlivening a Stale Model of Discussion

Kevin Tervala is Associate Curator of African Art and Department Head for the Arts of Africa, the Americas, Asia, and the Pacific Islands at The Baltimore Museum of Art.

Jennifer Kingsley is the Director of the interdisciplinary undergraduate Programs in Museums and Society at the Johns Hopkins University.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Pete Schulte and Rubens Ghenov

posted by December 02, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Pete Schulte and Rubens Ghenov discuss the syncretism that exists between representation and non-objectivity in their current work, the fallacy of binary critiques of art in relation to form and content, as well as the manner in which these interests influence their approach to pedagogy.

Pete Schulte is an artist who lives and works in Birmingham, Alabama. He is Associate Professor of Art and chair of the drawing area at The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. Schulte is also co-founder, with artist Amy Pleasant, of The Fuel and Lumber Company curatorial initiative. He recently completed a summer long residency at The Chinati Foundation in Marfa, Texas and will present a solo exhibition of his work at McKenzie Fine Art in New York City later this fall.

Rubens Ghenov was born in São Paulo, Brazil and immigrated to the US in 1989. He lives and works in Knoxville, Tennessee where he is an Assistant Professor of Painting and Drawing at the University of Tennessee. He recently concluded an Affiliated Fellowship at the American Academy in Rome whose works will be in two upcoming group shows, Symbols and Archetypes at Vanderbilt Fine Arts Gallery in Nashville, Tennessee and a yet to be titled show at Mindy Solomon in Miami.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Kristen Lowe and Andrew Wykes

posted by November 25, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Kristen Lowe and Andrew Wykes discuss living and making in desperate times.

Kristen Lowe is a studio artist, filmmaker, and professor of art and art history at Gustavus Adolphus College. Her studio is located southwest of Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Professor Andrew Wykes teaches at Hamline University in Saint Paul, Minnesota. His teaching career spans 36 years. Andrew is a landscape painter who moved to the United States from the UK in 1995.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Member Spotlight: Barbara Hoffman

posted by November 21, 2019

Up next in our Member Spotlight series, we are highlighting the work of Barbara Hoffman, founder and principal of The Hoffman Law Firm and a pioneer in the field of art law who served as CAA’s pro bono legal counsel for ten years. Joelle Te Paske, CAA’s media and content manager, spoke with Barbara over the phone to learn about her rich history with CAA. Read the interview, edited for length and clarity, below.

Image courtesy Barbara Hoffman.

Hi Barbara. I’m delighted to have the chance to speak with you. You are one of our esteemed lifetime members who has been a part of the organization in various capacities for more than 40 years. That’s incredible.

The pleasure is mine. I loved working with CAA during my tenure there.

Just looking over your bio on your website, I’m just amazed at how many different roles you’ve taken on over your career as an art lawyer. How did you first get involved with CAA?

I’ve always been interested in art, and I studied in Paris at the Académie Julian during my junior year when I majored in French and Art History. But I wasn’t very aware of the College Art Association.

After my studies, I was one of the early art lawyers. I had founded the Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts in the state of Washington, and continued to develop and write on the subject of art law, at a time when there were only a handful of people who were doing it.

Before then, I practiced civil rights law in New York. I’m from New York—I went to Columbia Law School—and was helping artists on the side when I was in my senior year. I volunteered as a lawyer for the first Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts in New York. I was then recruited to be a law professor in Seattle and I’d had so much fun with Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts that I thought I would join the Washington branch when I moved. When it didn’t exist, I ended up founding the statewide Washington Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts, and hosting an art law clinic at the law school.

Oh, interesting. So it started in New York and then you brought it over to the West Coast, in Washington.

Art Journal, Censorship I, Fall 1991, guest edited by Barbara Hoffman and Robert Storr

Yes. Then eventually I moved back to New York and I joined the New York City Bar Art Law Committee. I was also Chair of the Public Art Subcommittee. We drafted a balanced, annotated model contract to be made available to artists and administrators. Percent for Art was just starting, and most artists and bureaucrats had little knowledge of copyright and other issues in public art.

The National Endowment for the Arts put together a task force of artists and administrators in which I was invited to participate, alongside Joyce Kozloff, who was on the CAA Board of Directors at the time. Susan Ball was executive director at the time. There was a feminist uprising, and my name was put forward to replace Gil Edelson.

I was CAA’s pro bono outside counsel and member of the executive committee for ten years. Among many activities, I wrote a column for CAA on legal issues. My fondest memories are those of working with the different CAA committees and their chairs. Particularly memorable was the work I did with Albert E. Elsen, a professor of art history and a great scholar on Rodin. We revised the guidelines for the code of ethics for art historians. And I worked with several well-known artists too, many of whom are no longer with us.

I also advised all the CAA publications. This was an interesting time for the issues of fair use and copyright in images. Through me, CAA got involved in what was called the Conference on Fair Use, taking place under the US Patent and Trademark Office and the US Copyright Office, which dealt with bringing copyright law into the digital world.

Art Journal, Censorship II, Winter 1991, guest edited by Barbara Hoffman and Robert Storr

Before I came in to represent CAA, most of the people there were representing either libraries on one side, who were of course for fair use, or publishers, both trade book and academic publishers, who were of course for a stricter interpretation and enhanced copyright protection. But nobody was really talking about issues like images until we brought up to the subject.

On that issue I worked very hard, and CAA worked very hard. It was extremely controversial for the organization, because as you know, everybody at CAA wears multiple hats and the copyright issues involved both publishers and scholars. So I worked with the Copyright Committee and Fair Use and Christine L. Sundt, president of the Visual Resources Association and a member of CAA. She was a passionate devotee of legal issues there.

I imagine those are the fundamental building blocks for CAA’s Code of Best Practices in Fair Use that was published in 2015.

There are earlier versions of it, too. There was one during my tenure and then it evolved over time. We were never successful in terms of getting the government, the Conference on Fair Use, to be able to come together to develop official guidelines. I spent hours and hours and hours developing scenarios. We tried to get people’s agreement on the analysis and whether it was or wasn’t fair use. But at the end there was never a resolution of that and I think it continued on until 2015. It was a long-going effort. We were the first people to really address the whole issue in the late eighties, early nineties.

That’s fascinating. And especially now, with the emergence of the internet.

Another thing that we were really involved with during my tenure was the issue of freedom of expression. I represented CAA and was active in what we now call the Culture Wars, when Jesse Helms tried to ban the publication of [Robert] Mapplethorpe’s images. This was in 1989, and continued through the 1990s.

They were extremely active times. I’m most proud of the two-volume issue I did on censorship with Robert Storr for Art Journal. It was voted at the hundredth anniversary conference the best Art Journal that was published in the journal’s history.


To accompany this interview, we’ve brought the historic two-volume issue out from behind the paywall for readers to explore through the end of December 2019: Censorship I and Censorship II


For the double issue, I dedicated my statement to Justice Brennan of the Supreme Court. In my view, his decisions on the Supreme Court regarding the First Amendment and freedom of expression basically did more to provide contours of protection for artistic expression than any other Supreme Court Justice.

Then Rob Storr made his editor’s statement a full reprint of Mapplethorpe’s X Portfolio. He got permission from the Mapplethorpe Foundation because of his connections to publish them, but when we sent it to our normal printer, they were afraid to publish it because they thought they (or CAA) would be sued for pornography. They asked us to find a different printer. So we sent it around to all these places that might publish pornography. But the pornography magazines that we sent them to didn’t have the quality that we would require for the CAA journals! So we went to The Burlington Magazine and asked them if they would print it. It was much more expensive, but our usual printer paid the difference. So it was actually printed, by my recollection, by The Burlington Magazine.

 

There were two fall outs from the issue. The first fall out was a number of CAA members dropped their membership. Pretty amazing. They said the issue should have come with a warning label. You know, they got it in the mail, they left it on the table, and then their children saw it, with no warning.

Another spin off was because the CAA journal goes to every single university that’s a member for the library and art departments, the images that people had been talking about—but never saw—were suddenly available. As part of this I ended up participating in a panel at the University of Nashville, defending a professor who had brought that issue to his class of drawing and photography.

It was all a very meaningful experience. As a result, I was involved in authoring two friends of the court briefs, in the district court and the appellate court, on behalf of the College Art Association. Those were then quoted by the court defending Karen Finley and what they called the NEA Four [Karen Finley, Tim Miller, John Fleck, and Holly Hughes], who had their NEA grants declined because of the Helms amendment. So we introduced a friend of the court brief on behalf of College Art Association, and another one was on behalf of College Art Association and PEN America.

Later on, the organization’s centennial publication featured an image from Faith Ringgold’s French series that I licensed as her lawyer at the time. Faith was an active CAA member on the board and committee on diversity.

CAA’s centennial publication,The Eye, The Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association, with Faith Ringgold’s The Sunflower Quilting Bee at Arles (1996) on the cover.

The complexity of being an art lawyerit brings you into so many different issues. 

It was great. As I said, I worked with all the CAA Committees over that time. I still go to conferences from time to time and participate. And I just, you know, I’m happy to see so many artists that I’ve worked with being rewarded over time by the CAA. I’ve shown up for their presentations, the last ones being Howardena Pindell and Ursula von Rydingsvard for lifetime achievements.

Yes! Our 2019 honorees.

So I’m still keeping up and seeing how the organization has grown and changed. My legacy is these cases, my friends, and the guidelines. A wonderful opportunity for me to combine my passions—law and art history. As a member of the Executive Committee I attended all the CAA annual conferences, and when I wasn’t doing official business, I’d go to art history sessions. I have very happy memories of the wonderful people that I met there. I’m still in contact with many of them. That’s a part of my life that’s ongoing.

That’s wonderful.

And I’m still doing the same thing—still fighting for artists. Still fighting for the first amendment. Still doing public art. So, I feel very fortunate to be a life member.

Barbara Hoffman Biography

The Hoffman Law Firm continues as a preeminent global art and copyright boutique with a focus on Europe, Asia, Africa, and the United States. Author and editor of A Visual Artist’s Guide to Estate Planning (1996 and 2008), Barbara Hoffman also advises artists, galleries, and their estates on legacy planning, and endowed foundations.

Barbara has been recognized by her peers and clients with leadership posts and honor, including as Chair of the New York City Bar Association Committee on Art Law, Chair of the International Bar Association Committee on Art and Cultural Institutions and Heritage Law, and being selected to New York Super Lawyers, Best Lawyers in America, and Best Law Firms in art law and copyright law (2012-2020).

In addition to her service on the CAA executive committee, Barbara serves or has served on many boards, including ArtTable, Performa and the boards of several artists’ foundations. She was voted one of Art and Auction 51’s Power Women in the Art World 2016. www.hoffmanlaw.org

Kerry Hustwit and Megan Griffiths

posted by November 18, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Kerry Hustwit and Megan Griffiths discuss “Educating the Future Filmmaker: Theory and Practice.”

Kerry Hustwit is a filmmaker and assistant professor of Communication and Digital Media at Neumann University.

Megan Griffiths is an award-winning writer/director working in film and television. She has directed shows for HBO, EPIX, TNT, and Netflix. Additionally, Megan has directed six feature films, among them Eden, which won the Emergent Narrative Director Award and the Audience Award for Narrative Feature at SXSW 2012.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast