CAA News Today

Monica Zandi and Stephanie Cortazzo

posted by February 11, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Monica Zandi and Stephanie Cortazzo discuss “Body/Cut” and the Brooklyn Collage Collective.

Monica Zandi is a writer, educator, and graduate art student at Hunter College.

Stephanie Cortazzo is a multimedia artist who recently had a show entitled Cosmic Crisis and is in the Brooklyn Collage Collective (www.brooklyncollagecollective.com/).

Filed under: Artists, CAA Conversations, Podcast

Rosie Liljenquist and Anne Diekema

posted by February 04, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Rosie Liljenquist and Anne Diekema discuss Open Educational Resources (OER).

Rose Liljenquist is an Open Educational Resources librarian at Gerald Sherratt Library, Southern Utah University. Anne Diekema is also a librarian at Gerald Sherratt Library and an assistant professor at Southern Utah University.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Education, Podcast

Emil Robinson and Squeak Carnwath

posted by January 28, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are now on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Emil Robinson and Squeak Carnwath discuss trust and voice in the studio, and how they approach teaching painting.

Emil Robinson is Assistant Professor in the School of Design at the University of Cincinnati.

Squeak Carnwath is an artist who maintains a studio in Oakland, California, and is a Professor Emerita from UC Berkeley.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Rachel Clarke and Peter Williams

posted by January 21, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are now on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Rachel Clarke and Peter Williams discuss interdisciplinary and community-involved curriculum.

Rachel Clarke is professor of New Media Art at California State University, Sacramento. Her work intertwines themes of nature, culture, and technology; combining physical and virtual modes of making.

Peter Williams is a new media artist specializing in interactive installation, and an assistant professor at California State University, Sacramento.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Education, Podcast

Barbara Bergstrom and Darden Bradshaw

posted by January 14, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are now on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Barbara Bergstrom and Darden Bradshaw discuss what makes an art education program successful.

Dr. Barbara Bergstrom is an assistant professor of art education at Bowling Green State University. Dr. Darden Bradshaw is an assistant professor of art education at the University of Dayton.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Kirk Maynard and Alexandra Thomas

posted by January 07, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are now on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Kirk Maynard and Alexandra Thomas discuss addressing institutionalized discrimination through artistic practice.

Kirk Maynard is a mixed media artist born in Brooklyn, New York in 1993. He received his BS in Visual Arts Education from Andrews University in 2014 and is currently an MFA student at New Jersey City University. A second generation Guyanese-American, Maynard’s work focuses on the political undercurrents of culture and identity in America.

Alexandra M. Thomas is a PhD student at Yale for History of Art and African American Studies with a certificate in Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies. Her current research interests include global modern and contemporary art, Black atlantic visual culture, African art, queer theory, performance studies, and Black feminist thought.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Member Spotlight: Renata Holod

posted by December 18, 2018

Renata Holod is College of Women Class of 1963 Term Professor in the Humanities, at the History of Art Department, and Curator, Near East Section, Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, at the University of Pennsylvania. She has carried out archaeological and architectural fieldwork in Syria, Iran, Morocco, Turkey, Central Asia, Tunisia, and Ukraine, and is the author of numerous books and essays.

CAA media and content manager Joelle Te Paske corresponded recently with Professor Holod to learn more about what she’s working on.

Joelle Te Paske: Thank you for taking the time, Professor. So to begin, where are you from originally?

Renata Holod: I was born in Ukraine, and grew up in Edmonton, Alberta and then Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

I have a BA in Islamic Studies from the University of Toronto; a MA from University of Michigan in the History of Art, and my PhD from Harvard in Fine Arts.

JTP: What led you to the work you do now?

RH: My work on projects varies in date and methodology, from archaeology (I worked in Syria, and Tunisia), to architectural and regional history of different periods and locations (including fourteenth- to fifteenth-century architecture, settings and cities in greater Iran, and contemporary architecture from Morocco to Indonesia), to work on objects and collections (ceramics, the late Ottoman painter Osman Hamdi Bey). I get bored quickly.

JTP: You’ve been a CAA member for over 40 years. How has the field changed?

RH: There are many more practitioners in my particular field. In fact, it is no longer one field, but could be divided into regional and temporal sub-fields. There is much more theorization, and also expanded archival work (e.g. Ottoman archives), and now digital humanities, etc.

JTP: What is the most exciting part of your work currently?

RH: Studying unpublished objects, and redoing the galleries and publishing the Middle East collection for the later periods (Parthian through the nineteenth century) at the Penn Museum.

JTP: A favorite exhibition or study you’ve worked on over the years?

RH: Whichever one is currently being submitted.

JTP: What is your top recommendation for our readers?

RH: Network Theory and its application; see the work of my former student, Yael Rice on Mughal workshops, as well as the work of Johannes Preiser-Kappeler (Vienna).

JTP: What is a favorite memory from a CAA conference?

RH: Seeing my former students give papers; and meeting my former classmates.

JTP: Thank you, Professor Holod.

Renata Holod is College of Women Class of 1963 Term Professor in the Humanities, at the History of Art Department, and Curator, Near East Section, Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, at the University of Pennsylvania. She has carried out archaeological and architectural fieldwork in Syria, Iran, Morocco, Turkey, Central Asia, Tunisia, and Ukraine. She is co-author of City in the Desert: Qasr al- Hayr East (1978); Architecture and Community: Building in the Islamic World Today (1983); The Mosque and the Modern World (1997); The City in the Islamic World (2008) and An Island Through Time: Jerba Studies (2009). She was recently part of the team redoing the Middle East galleries at the Penn Museum, with a special issue of Expedition magazine and a new handbook as well. Her most recent articles are: “Approaching the Mosque: Birth and Evolution” in The World of the Mosque: Magnificent Designs (New York: Rizzoli, 2017) 14-21, and “Jerba in the 3rd/9th century CE: Under Aghlabi Control?” in The Aghlabids & their Neighbors: Art & Material Culture in Ninth-Century North Africa, Glaire D. Anderson, Corisande Fenwick, and Mariam Rosser-Owen, eds. (Leiden: Brill, HdO series, 2017), 451- 469. On several international advisory and editorial boards, she has also served as President, Board of Trustees at The Ukrainian Museum in NYC, 2013-2017.

Chelsea Farrar and Heidi Herboldsheimer

posted by December 17, 2018

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are now on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Chelsea Farrar and Heidi Herboldsheimer discuss Red for Ed, a grassroots movement started by parents and teachers as a way to stand up for public education.

Chelsea Farrar is Curator of Community Engagement at the University of Arizona Museum of Art.

Heidi Herboldsheimer has been teaching middle school in Arizona for seven years.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Denise Burge, Lisa Siders, and Jenny Ustick

posted by December 10, 2018

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are now on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Denise Burge, Lisa Siders, and Jenny Ustick discuss interdisciplinary collaboration.

Denise Burge is an instructor of Drawing and Animation at the University of Cincinnati.

Lisa Siders is a fiber and installation artist living on Whidbey Island, Washington.

Jenny Ustick is the Interim Director of the Masters of Fine Arts Program, Foundations Coordinator, and Instructor of Drawing at the University of Cincinnati.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Sherry Muyuan He and Jonathan Aller

posted by December 03, 2018

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are now on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Sherry Muyuan He and Jonathan Aller discuss working with students of diverse level skillsets in the classroom.

Sherry Muyuan He is an assistant professor of Graphic Design at the University of South Dakota. She is also an interdisciplinary designer engaging in the community with food-themed activities.

Jonathan Aller is an adjunct faculty member at Minneapolis College of Art and Design, and contemporary portraiture artist exploring community and identity in the physical and digital realm.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast