CAA News Today

Attendees of the 99th Annual Conference and Centennial Kickoff will have three opportunities to meet Susan Ball, CAA executive director emerita, as well as many of the fifteen contributors to The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association, the newly published book that surveys the impressive history of the organization from 1911 to the present.

After Convocation, Ball and others will sign copies of the book at a table in the foyer outside the East Ballroom, 3rd Floor, Hilton New York. This year’s Convocation, which takes place on Wednesday, February 9, 5:30–7:00 PM, features a keynote address by the pioneering eco-artists Newton and Helen Mayer Harrison that you will not want to miss.

In the Book and Trade Fair, Rutgers University Press will host two author signings on Thursday and Friday afternoons, at a time to be announced. CAA encourages you to stop by the press’s booth (#604) near the front entrance of the Americas I Ballroom and say hello to Ball and the other authors.

The impressive 330-page book, published by CAA and Rutgers University Press, celebrates the beginning of CAA’s Centennial year. In honor of this milestone, Rutgers will offer a 50 percent discount on any other press title that is purchased during the conference when you buy a copy of The Eye, The Hand, The Mind at the booth.

Come one, come all! Renowned for its glamorous parties, the Metropolitan Museum of Art will be hosting the CAA Centennial Reception during the 2011 Annual Conference in New York. Join your friends and colleagues, fellow conference attendees, and special guests for an unforgettable evening that will celebrate the beginning of CAA’s Centennial year.

The reception will take place on Thursday evening, February 10, 7:30–9:00 PM, in the magnificent spaces of the Great Hall and the Temple of Dendur, and the passage of Egyptian art between them. It immediately follows the presentation of CAA’s 2011 Awards for Distinction in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium. Wine, beer, soft drinks, and hors d’oeuvre will be served. The Met Store will be open too, making available its excellent inventory of gift items in addition to its superb collection of art monographs, catalogues, and books. CAA is grateful to Thomas Campbell, director of the Metropolitan, for generously opening the museum for this special occasion.

A $35 ticket is required for admission. Although online sales have ended, you may pick up a ticket at the Events Tickets booth in the Registration Area at the Hilton New York, 2nd Floor Promenade. CAA will not be selling tickets at the museum. The awards presentation, however, is free and open to the public.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is located at 1000 Fifth Avenue at 82nd Street on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. To attend the reception, climb the stairs and walk through the main museum entrance. To attend the awards ceremony, taking place 6:00–7:30 PM, enter the auditorium through the 83rd Street entrance.

Conference attendees may also visit the museum free of charge during the week just by showing their registrant badges.

Filed under: Annual Conference, Centennial

Edited by Susan Ball, executive director emerita, The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association surveys the impressive history of the organization from 1911 to the present. The 330-page hardcover book, published jointly by CAA and Rutgers University Press, can be ordered now ($29.95); it will also be available at the upcoming Annual Conference in New York—just in time for CAA’s Centennial Kickoff.

CAA was founded with a single stated purpose: “to promote art interests in all divisions of American colleges and universities.” From this humble yet ambitious origin, Ball has organized her book thematically instead of chronologically, with sixteen “purposes” from the CAA By-laws that are covered in twelve chapters. Written by artists and scholars who have worked closely with the organization over the last few decades, The Eye, the Hand, the Mind offers not a comprehensive history but rather a presentation of memorable highlights that tells the complex, contentious story of a venerable organization.

The Eye, the Hand, the Mind reviews familiar aspects of CAA. Craig Houser negotiates the long history of CAA’s dynamic publications program, which began in 1913 with the first issue of The Art Bulletin, and Julia A. Sienkewicz chronicles the evolution of the celebrated Annual Conference. Less known is CAA’s traveling-exhibition program in the 1930s, uncovered by Cristin Tierney. More recently, Ellen K. Levy explores how CAA has similarly supported presentations of artwork by its members, both students and professionals. Other authors investigate myriad other topics: developments in pedagogy and curriculum; political involvements and advocacy work; visual resources, libraries, and issues of copyright; professional support and career development; partnerships with museums and their associations; relationships to other learned societies in the humanities; governance structure and diversity matters; and much more. In the conclusion, Paul B. Jaskot anticipates the future of the organization as it enters its next one hundred years.

Ball, who served as CAA executive director from 1986 to 2006, is now director of programs at the New York Foundation for the Arts. In addition to organizing the book project, she wrote the introduction and contributed a chapter on the founding of CAA, administrative and financial matters, and the organization’s larger role in the visual arts.

The renowned artist Faith Ringgold has generously allowed the use of her lithograph, The Sunflower Quilting Bee at Arles (1996), for the book’s cover. She created the work, published by the Rutgers Center for Innovative Print and Paper (now the Brodsky Center for Innovative Editions), as a benefit print to support CAA’s Professional Development Fellowship Program. Ringgold will be honored this year with CAA’s Distinguished Feminist Award.

Events at the Annual Conference

At the Annual Conference, CAA and Rutgers University Press are planning several events to promote The Eye, the Hand, the Mind. Judith K. Brodsky will operate a table outside Convocation, to be held at the Hilton New York on Wednesday evening, February 9, 2011, in the East Ballroom, Third Floor. Book signings with many of the contributors will take place in CAA’s Book and Trade Fair, also at the Hilton, on Thursday and Friday afternoons, February 10–11. Please check back later this month for more details on these events and more.

Table of Contents

Below is a list of the fifteen authors and their chapter titles:

  • Susan Ball, “Introduction”
  • Steven C. Wheatley, “The Learned Society Enterprise”
  • Susan Ball, “The Beginnings: “Art for higher education, and higher education for Artists”
  • Cristin Tierney, “A Stimulating Prospect: CAA’s Traveling Exhibition Program, 1929–1937”
  • Barry Pritzker, “Cooperative Relationships with Museums”
  • Craig Houser, “The Changing Face of Scholarly Publishing: CAA’s Publications Program”
  • Julia A. Sienkewicz, “United the Arts and the Academy: A History of the CAA Annual Conference”
  • Ofelia Garcia, “Mentoring the Profession: Career Development and Support”
  • Ellen K. Levy, “Art in an Academic Setting: Contemporary CAA Exhibitions”
  • Matthew Israel, “CAA, Pedagogy, and Curriculum: A Historical Effect, An Unparalleled Wealth of Ideas”
  • Christine L. Sundt, “Visual Resources for the Arts”
  • Judith K. Brodsky, Mary D. Garrard, and Ferris Olin, “Governance and Diversity”
  • Karen J. Leader, “CAA Advocacy: The Nexus of Art and Politics”
  • Paul B. Jaskot, “Conclusion: The Next 100 Years”

The book also includes four appendices that list CAA’s sixteen purposes, past presidents of the Board of Directors, volunteer and staff administrators, and the editors from the publications program.

CAA encourages schools, departments, museums, libraries, and art institutions to place a salutatory announcement in the Centennial Booklet, which will be distributed at Convocation, taking place on Wednesday, February 9, 5:30–7:00 PM, during the 2011 Annual Conference. Held in the East Ballroom at the Hilton New York, Convocation is free and open to the public.

The Centennial Booklet will contain the list of speakers for Convocation, which include Jim Leach, chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and Kate Levin, commissioner of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs. The publication will also include a short profile of the Convocation speakers, the visionary ecoartists Newton and Helen Mayer Harrison, and citations for the recipients of the special Centennial Awards, which recognize a handful of distinguished leaders who have vigorously and tirelessly supported the visual arts for many years (names to be announced soon). CAA will also present a Centennial Statement and acknowledge the many donors who have supported the organization this year.

Contributors have three options for their announcements: quarter, half, and full pages; the affordable prices are $250, $400, and $750 respectively. Please download the Centennial Booklet advertising form for full details. For more information on helping celebrate CAA’s past, present, and future, please contact Sara Hines, CAA development and marketing manager, at 212-691-1051, ext. 216. Deadline: January 3, 2011.

Filed under: Annual Conference, Centennial

CAA has published full session information for the 99th Annual Conference and Centennial Kickoff in New York, taking place February 10–13, 2011. Along with the names of the sessions and their chairs, the conference website now offers the names and affiliations of all speakers, the titles of their papers or presentations, and the days, times, and locations of each panel.

The listings, which include regular program sessions (2½ hours) and shorter lunchtime and dinner sessions (1½ hours), are presented chronologically, from Wednesday morning to Saturday afternoon. This year’s conference will be plentiful and diverse and cover nearly every area of the practice, history, and teaching of art. Here are but five highlights among the two-hundred-plus sessions that conference registrants will have access to: “(Re)Contextualizing Precolumbian Art in the Twenty-First Century”; “Participation and Engagement: Curating Contemporary Art after New Media”; “Making a Living as an Artist: With or Without a Gallery”; “Emergent Practices: Arts-Based Research and Teaching”; and the two-part “Claiming Authorship: Artists, Patrons, and Strategies of Self-promotion in Medieval and Early Modern Italy.”

In celebration of its one-hundredth anniversary, CAA will present special Centennial sessions that address broad themes in the visual arts and gather top artists, scholars, and thinkers for invigorating debate. These sessions include “Feminism,” led by Norma Broude and Griselda Pollock; “Art/Technology Global Sample,” with Mark Tribe and Chris Csikszentmihalyi as chairs; and “Globalization,” guided by James Elkins and Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann. Just added this week was “Against Acknowledgment: Sexuality and the Instrumentalization of Knowledge,” chaired by Jonathan Katz, cocurator of Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture, the controversial exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery.

Poster sessions—which are live, informal presentations by individuals, aided by displays on poster boards and with an interactive audience element—take place on Thursday and Friday afternoons. Among the thirteen topics are: “Walt Disney: Undergraduate Research and Critical Thinking,” “How the Sausage Is Made: A Model of Graphic Design Practice and Teaching,” and “Analysis of University Press Production in Art and Art History, 1991–2007.”

CAA launched the website for the New York conference, headquartered at the Hilton New York in midtown Manhattan, in early October. It expands on the 2011 Conference Information and Registration booklet that was mailed to all members; new material and information will continue to be added between now and February. Online registration is open. You can also buy tickets for special events, such as the Centennial Reception at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and several postconference tours, and sign up for a professional-development workshop. Alternatively, you may download conference forms to fill out and send. If you are taking part in Career Services, please review what CAA offers for candidates and employers.

Advance registration can be made through January 21, 2011, before rates increase onsite. The deadline for early registration, December 10, 2010, has passed.

Filed under: Annual Conference, Centennial

This offer from Rutgers University Press expired in late 2010.

Members receive a special 30 percent discount when preordering the forthcoming book on the history of CAA, The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association. Edited by Susan Ball, this 328-page hardcover book will be published in January 2011 by Rutgers University Press. It will also be available at the 99th Annual Conference and Centennial Kickoff in New York, where a special signing party will take place.

CAA members may preorder the book online for $20.97 (listed at $29.95). The special offer will end soon. Use code 02CAA10 on the Rutgers University Press website, after you “Add to Cart” and before you “Checkout.”

CAA was founded in 1911 with a single stated purpose: “to promote art interests in all divisions of American colleges and universities.” From this humble yet ambitious origin, Ball has organized her book thematically instead of chronologically, with sixteen “purposes” covered in twelve chapters, some written collaboratively. As such, it offers not a comprehensive history but rather a presentation of memorable highlights that tells the complex, contentious story of a venerated organization.

The Eye, the Hand, the Mind reviews familiar aspects of CAA. Craig Houser negotiates the history of CAA’s dynamic publications program, which began in 1913 with the first issue of The Art Bulletin, and Julia Sienkewicz chronicles the evolution of the Annual Conference. Less known is CAA’s traveling-exhibition program in the 1930s, uncovered by Cristin Tierney. More recently, Ellen Levy explores how CAA has similarly supported presentations of artwork by its members, both students and professionals. Other authors investigate myriad other topics: developments in pedagogy and curriculum; political involvements and advocacy work; visual resources, libraries, and issues of copyright; professional support and career development; partnerships with museums and their associations; relationships to other learned societies in the humanities; governance structure and diversity matters; and much more.

Ball, who served as CAA executive director from 1986 to 2006, is now director of programs at the New York Foundation for the Arts. In addition to organizing the book project, she contributed a chapter on the founding of CAA, administrative and financial matters, and the organization’s larger role in the visual arts.

Filed under: Books, Centennial

CAA Begins Its Centennial Campaign

posted by November 16, 2010

The year 2011 marks the College Art Association’s one-hundredth anniversary, a celebratory landmark for any organization but particularly so given CAA’s dynamic influence in shaping the study and practice of the visual arts. Without dedicated members like you, CAA would not be where it is today. You can continue demonstrating your loyal support with a contribution to the new Centennial Campaign, which begins this week.

Since 1911, CAA has led many progressive developments in the art and academic worlds. In the 1920s, the organization helped establish art history as a legitimate subject in the humanities, and during the Great Depression it was instrumental in the Federal Arts Project of the Works Progress Administration. A 1960s statement declaring the MFA as the terminal degree for artists led to a robust Standards and Guidelines program in the next decade, and the Culture Wars of the 1980s and 1990s spurred CAA to take a firm stance supporting the First Amendment. The past ten years have been the busiest, with a small, dedicated staff administering a wide range of programs—from book grants and graduate-student fellowships to intellectual-property assistance and advocacy for contingent faculty—while continuing to publish distinguished journals and produce the largest international conference in the visual arts.

The Centennial is a time to think about CAA’s future. Earlier this year, the Board of Directors unveiled a new strategic plan, based on feedback from members, that identifies core goals and objectives for the next five years. Priorities include increasing support to artists, bringing designers into our circle, enhancing international outreach, and stepping up advocacy efforts—all of which allows the organization to strengthen its vital presence throughout the field.

CAA will kick off its Centennial celebration in New York at the 99th Annual Conference, to be held February 9–12, 2011. A variety of programs and events will complement the usual conference format, including a special awards ceremony and reception at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, a public-art project in Times Square, sessions that bring together well-known figures for passionate cross-disciplinary exchange, and a toast to CAA’s anniversary at the Annual Members’ Business Meeting.

CAA remains dedicated to serving professionals and students in the visual arts, but it needs your assistance. Contributions to the Centennial Campaign at every level make a difference; they are also fully tax deductible. Your gift will not only sustain the organization now, but it will also help guarantee CAA’s leadership for the next one hundred years.

Filed under: Centennial

2011 Annual Conference Website Goes Live

posted by October 05, 2010

The website for the 99th Annual Conference and Centennial Kickoff goes live today. The upcoming conference, taking place February 9–12, 2011, at the Hilton New York in midtown Manhattan, begins the celebration of CAA’s one-hundredth anniversary.

Online registration is now open, and hotel reservations can be made. Register before the early deadline, December 10, to get the lowest rate and to ensure your place in the Directory of Attendees. You may also purchase tickets for special events, such as the reception at the Metropolitan Museum of Art following the presentation of the annual Awards for Distinction, as well as for professional-development workshops on a variety of topics for artists and scholars.

CAA will regularly update the conference website over the next few months, with additional details on the program, awards, tours, and more. Session titles and chairs’ names are available now, and all presenters’ names and papers will follow in the coming weeks.

The CAA Annual Conference is the world’s largest international forum for professionals in the visual arts, offering more than two hundred stimulating sessions, panel discussions, roundtables, and meetings. CAA anticipates more than five thousand artists, art historians, students, curators, critics, educators, art administrators, and museum professionals to attend the Centennial event.

Filed under: Annual Conference, Centennial

The Exhibitor and Advertiser Prospectus for the 2011 Annual Conference is now available for download. Featuring essential details for participation in the Book and Trade Fair, the booklet also contains options for sponsorship opportunities and advertisements in conference publications.

The Exhibitor and Advertiser Prospectus will help you reach a core audience of artists, art historians, educators, students, and administrators, who will converge in New York for CAA’s 99th Annual Conference and Centennial Kickoff, taking place February 9–12, 2011. The Book and Trade Fair offers three days of exhibit time and will be centrally located at the Hilton New York, the conference headquarters hotel.

In addition, vital sponsorship packages will allow you to maintain a high profile throughout the conference. Companies and organizations may sponsor specific areas and events, such as Convocation and the Student Lounge, or work with CAA staff to design a custom visibility package. Advertising possibilities include the Conference Program, distributed to over five thousand registrants, and the conference website, seen by thousands more.

The priority deadline for Book and Trade Fair applicants is October 29; the final deadline for applications and payments, and for sponsorships and advertisements, is December 3.

Questions about the Book and Trade Fair? Contact Paul Skiff, CAA assistant director for Annual Conference, at 212-691-1051, ext. 213. For sponsorship and advertising queries, speak to Sara Hines, CAA development and marketing manager, at ext. 216.

Celebrate CAA’s one-hundredth anniversary at the 99th Annual Conference and Centennial Kickoff in New York, taking place Wednesday, February 9–Saturday, February 12, 2011. The Hilton New York in midtown Manhattan is the conference headquarters hotel, holding most sessions and panels, Career Services and the Book and Trade Fair, receptions and special events, and more. The hotel is also a half block away from the Museum of Modern Art. Other events will take place throughout the city.

Registration Costs

Early registration is $155 for members, $90 for student and retired members, and $280 for nonmembers. These low registration prices are good through December 10, 2010. Advance registration takes place after this date, until January 21, 2011. Costs are $225 for members, $130 for student and retired members, and $350 for nonmembers. Onsite registration is also available for $270, $155, and $400 respectively.

CAA members can register by completing the online registration form (with your credit-card information) at the conference website in October 2010. Or you may complete the form in the 2011 Conference Registration and Information booklet, which will be sent to you later in the fall; mail or fax the form to CAA with your check or credit-card information.

Institutional Members

Institutional members at the Academic/Corporate or Library/Department/Museum level can register up to ten faculty and staff members at the reduced individual-member rate (early or advance, depending on the deadline). Ask your school or department chair to find out if your institution holds a CAA membership at these levels. Please contact CAA’s Member Services at 212-691-1051, ext. 12, to find out more.