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Action Needed: Restoring Tax Equity for Artists

posted by CAA — May 02, 2019

We urge our members to help support the Artist-Museum Partnership Act of 2019 (HR 1793), an important initiative to restore tax equity for artists. If passed the act would allow artists to deduct the fair market value of their work when donating to an institution or charity, rather than only the cost of supplies. While collectors donating artwork can currently deduct fair market value, artists are not permitted to.

First introduced in 2005, the measure has passed the Senate more than once in the past, but it still hasn’t become law.

Rep. John Lewis is now circulating a “Dear Colleague” letter in support of the act, which we urge all representatives to sign on to.

DEAR COLLEAGUE LETTER

Click here to find your representatives.

For more on CAA’s advocacy efforts, click here.

CWA Picks for May 2019

posted by CAA — May 02, 2019

CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts selects the best in feminist art and scholarship to share with CAA members on a monthly basis. See the picks for May below.

Wendy Red Star, Apsáalooke Feminist #3—Apsáalooke Feminist Series, 2016, on view at the Newark Museum through June 16th. Image: © Wendy Red Star

Legal Gender: The Irreverent Art of Anita Steckel

April 13 – May 12, 2019
Verge Center for the Arts, Sacramento

When artist Anita Steckel’s (American, 1930-2012) solo exhibition, The Sexual Politics of Feminist Art (1972, Rockland Community College) was threatened closure by a County Legislator due to the erotic imagery in her work, she founded the Fight Censorship Group. The women’s collective, including member artists Louise Bourgeois, Hannah Wilke, and Joan Semmel among others, denounced the double standard in the artistic community between sexualized men and women, and played a major role in reshaping thought around erotic subject matter within the context of sexual and creative freedom. This exhibit, curated by Kelly Lindner and Rachel Middleman, spans five decades of the feminist artist’s collage and appropriation artwork including the Mom Art photomontage series from the 1960s (the title playing on the recognized term “Pop Art”) incorporating found imagery of anonymous librarians and priests critiquing racism, war and sexual inequalities; the Giant Woman series of photomontage with graphite depictions of mammoth women taking over New York City landmarks; her last series reworking personal photographs of family and friends, and more. As the exhibit statement points out: “In her deft combinations of photomontage, collage, drawing, and painting, Steckel proposes a broader discussion of female sexuality, feminism, gender parity, racial injustice, and political reckoning.” The exhibit surely pushes art’s boundaries, even today, as in the artist’s own words: “Good taste is the enemy of art. It’s wonderful for curtains, but in art, it’s suffocating.”

Wendy Red Star: A Scratch on the Earth

February 23 – June 16, 2019
Newark Museum, New Jersey

A Scratch on the Earth is a mid-career survey held at the Newark Museum of Wendy Red Star, a multidisciplinary artist (b. 1981) from Montana and member of the Apsáalooke (Crow) Tribe, organized by Tricia Laughlin Bloom, Curator of American Art, and guest curator Nadiah Rivera Fellah. Red Star’s presentation, including installation, photography, photo-collage, textile, and mixed media, explores the visual, social, and racial history of indigenous Crow traditions and mythology, often intermixed with the tribe’s painful experiences during which it lost land ownership under colonial American policies. Red Star critically analyzes and researches the portrayal of Native American subjects in the nineteenth century, an imaginary representation of the American West and Indian Reservations manipulated and promulgated by the US government and Hollywood, and highlights the Crow’s manifold resistance to such geographical, political and gendered boundaries. Many of Red Star’s series, for example Map of the Allotted Lands of the Crow Reservation, Montana—A Tribute to Many Good Women (2016), foreground the Crow’s matriarchal and ceremonial legacies supplanted by government enforced patriarchal structures. Red Star playfully and powerfully utilizes photography in her Apsáalooke Feminist series as a contemporary vehicle to refashion “original” Crow Indian representations in Western art through the production of large scale self-portraiture and the exuberant display of her own young daughter, both dressed in elk-tooth attire. A well-illustrated catalogue with essays is published in conjunction with the exhibition.

Aleksandra Karpowicz: Body as Home

May 6 – September 15, 2019
Venice, inauguration of GAD – Giudecca Art District, Italy

Aleksandra Karpowicz’s Body as Home (2018), a three channel 15-minute film, will mark the official launch of Giudecca Art District (GAD), coinciding with the opening of the 58th Biennale Arte 2019 in Venice, Italy. It portrays a journey of three protagonists who discover their selves through their bodily interactions with space. They are captured in four urban locations: Cape Town, London, New York, and Warsaw, navigating complex relationships between their social identity, migration, and the understanding of the concept of “home.” Karpowicz, a migrant herself (born in Poland, living in London), complicates the latter beyond its literal meaning and associations with a dwelling or a place of habitation. She questions when one becomes a visitor or a local inhabitant; how this is conditioned by movement, going away, towards or from and to. The artist is interested in the feeling of “being at home” in relation to geographical locations, to other people but also the self.

Still I Rise: Feminisms, Gender, Resistance, Act 2

February 9 – May 27, 2019
The De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill-on-Sea, UK

Still I rise, with Act 1 presented at Nottingham Contemporary in Nottingham UK at the end of 2018 and beginning of 2019, and Act 2 now on display in The De La Warr Pavilion, UK, is a powerful exhibition featuring works of over 40 practitioners, including for example Carolina Caycedo, Barby Asante, Tai Shani, Osias Yanov or Glenn Belverio (Glennda Orgasm), among many others. They are grounded in intersectional and queer feminist perspectives in a global context. The exhibition explores ways in which resistance has been approached and enabled through associated with feminism and feminist protest principles of collaboration, mutual support, community building, empathy, nurture, and solidarity. The title references Maya Angelou poem Still I rise (1978), concerning oppression and the struggle to overcome prejudice and injustice, which begins:

‘You may write me down in history
With your bitter, twisted lies,
You may trod me in the very dirt
But still, like dust, I’ll rise.’

Diverse creative practices on display navigate and suggest alternative ways of living and being together that are respectful of human rights and equality.

Jeschkelanger: #siostrzane_odbicie (#sister’s_reflection)

May 15 – June 23, 2019
SiC! Biuro Wystaw Artystycznych (Glass and Ceramics Gallery), Wrocław, Poland

The exhibition features glass work of two artists from Germany, who in December 2016 founded the artist duo Jeschkelanger. They work across multiple media, however they connect through glass, which acts as a space of exploration, collaboration, and exchange of ideas. Jeschkelanger question its limits and possibilities as a material, a medium, a method, and what they call “a melting point,” “a danger zone” and “a contact zone.” The works featured in this exhibition address the concept of hospitality and suggest ways in which the other may be welcome, while acknowledging difference and enabling mutual exchange, and where the dynamics between the host and the guest are questioned. Jeschkelanger create space for a future of shared mutual respect and connectivity, embodying feminist principles of solidarity and friendship. Their vision is hopeful and inviting the politics of togetherness.

THE UNEXPECTED SUBJECT: 1978 ART AND FEMINISM IN ITALY

April 4 – May 26, 2019
FM Center for Contemporary Art, Milan

Curators Marco Scotini and Raffaella Perna selected the year 1978 as “the catalyst year of all energies in play (not only in Italy)” to develop this broad investigation and “reconstruction of the relationship between visual arts and feminist movement in Italy” and the exchanges of feminist artists in Italy at this time with artistic panorama of Europe and beyond. The exhibit will include work from artists included in the 1978 Venice Biennale—which counted 80 women at a time when entrance was difficult—including the visual poetry of Mirella Bentivoglio (1922-2017) among others. The exhibit description names several notable exhibitions that took place in 1978 including an exhibition dedicated to Ketty La Rocca (1938-1976), a leading figure of Italian neo-avant-garde; the first feminist exhibit in Wroclaw, Poland, First International Women’s Art Exhibition; Coazione a Mostrare and Magma, which presented many significant European artists including Marina Abramovic, Hanna Darboven, Gina Pane, VALIE EXPORT, Rebecca Horn, Natalia LL among others. The year also included the international feminist seminar Comrade Woman: Women’s Question—A New Approach? in Belgrade; and the Cooperative Beato Angelico in Rome, the first artistic space entirely run by women. Though most of these notations include the word woman, the description notes the exhibition “criticizes the mainstream historical-critical view that relegates women artists to a marginal position” and privileges “artworks that demystify gender stereotypes and reflect on the role of women in society” including loaned artwork and printed materials related to feminist movements—posters, fanzines, LPs, photographs, and books.

LIKE SUGAR

February 9 – June 23, 2019
Tang Museum, Saratoga Springs, New York

Sugar is all around us, from harvest to consumer product, playing a role in several social justice issues from slavery to ecology and health epidemics and food injustice. Like Sugar explores these both positive and negative aspects of the sweet-tasting, soluble carbohydrates through contemporary artwork, historical materials and material culture. Viewing Emily Eveleth’s both delicious and engorged Big Pink (2016), enlarged pink frosted donuts in oil on canvas, in the same space as 19th-century stereoscopic images depicting slaves in sugar cane fields, such as Preparing Cane Blocks for Replanting, St. Kitts, immediately provokes thought and discussion around sugar in our lives in the present and past. Other artists in the exhibition include Julia Jacquette, Zine Sedira, and Laurie Simmons.

Mickalene Thomas: Do I Look Like a Lady?

March 9 – August 31, 2019
Portland Art Museum

Artist Mickalene Thomas is well-known for her photography, installation, and more recently film production reconsidering black womanhood through a queer lens. The Portland Art Museum just acquired the video installation, Do I Look Like a Lady (Comedians and Singers) (2016), the first by the artist in their collection. The video displays in checkerboard format, moving image footage and individual voices of African-American actors and singers from the 20th century such as Eartha Kitt, Jack “Moms” Mabley, Whoopi Goldberg, and Whitney Houston among others. They express heartbreaking roles, pointed lyrics, sharp jokes, and strong statements of resistance to the dominant culture offering a strong, rebellious, and poignant consideration of the roles of black women in the United States. The museum notes that Thomas spent time in Portland as a young adult and while there admired an exhibition of Carrie Mae Weem’s work in 1994, which was a formative experience that led her to becoming an artist.

Filed under: CWA Picks — Tags:

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by CAA — May 01, 2019

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A master conservator demonstrating a technique for removing contaminants from a Botticelli fresco in the Sistine Chapel. Photo by Robert Polidori for WSJ Magazine, via artnet News

Proposed Cut of Stanford University Press’s Subsidy Sparks Outrage

The proposal has prompted discussion on the value of a university press to its parent institution as well as an open letter from the larger academic community. (Chronicle of Higher Ed)

Preserving the Sistine Chapel Is a Never-Ending Task. See Behind-the-Scenes Photos of What It Takes

The name of the game? Constant vigilance. (artnet News)

Rediscovering the Confederate Flag of Truce

Sonya Clark, a professor of art and art history at Amherst College, is presenting the flag as a counterweight to the familiar battle flag of the Confederacy. (New York Times)

This Open Source Software Could Make Museum Websites More Accessible

The Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago has created a tool that seamlessly integrates image descriptions into its online platform. (Artsy)

Mónica Ramírez Talks The Bandana Project, Her Latinidad, And Her Career In Farmworkers Advocacy

Explore an art-activism project from the organizer who helped create the #TimesUp movement. (Forbes)

A Widely Cited Statistic That Supposedly Proved Student Debt Was a Rich Person Problem Was the Result of a Coding Error

The statistic popped up frequently in conversation about Elizabeth Warren’s education plan. (Slate)

Filed under: CAA News

Join a CAA Professional Committee

posted by CAA — Apr 29, 2019

ARTexchange at CAA 2018 in Los Angeles. Image by Rafael Cardenas.

Call for applicants to CAA’s Professional Committees (for term 2020-2023)

The Professional Committees address critical concerns of CAA’s members set out in the goals of CAA’s Strategic Plan. CAA invites members to apply for service on one of these working groups.

Committee members serve three-year terms (2020-2023), with at least one new member rotating onto a committee each year. Candidates must be current CAA members and possess expertise appropriate to the committee’s work. All committee members volunteer their services without compensation. It is expected that once appointed to a committee, a member will involve himself or herself in an active and serious way.

The following vacancies are open for terms beginning in February 2020:

CAA’s President, Vice President for Committees, and Executive Director review all candidates in the fall, and announce the appointments in late October, prior to the Annual Conference. New members are introduced to their committees during their respective business meetings at the Annual Conference.

Nominations and self-nominations should include a brief statement (no more than 150 words) describing your qualifications and experience and an abbreviated CV (no more than 2–3 pages). Please send all materials to Vanessa Jalet, CAA executive liaison at vjalet@collegeart.org.

Deadline: Friday, September 18, 2019

Kindly enter subject line in email: 2020 Professional Committee Applicant

 


Scroll down to learn about the charge of each of the Professional Committees, along with their current objectives and projects.

COMMITTEE ON DESIGN

The Committee on Design promotes and advances issues in design practice, design history/theory/criticism, and design education through advocacy, engagement, and a commitment to the diversity of practices and practitioners.

The Committee on Design invites you to join its current members in proposing programming for annual conference sessions, drafting best-practices guidelines, developing teaching resources for design and design history, and, in general, building infrastructures within CAA that serve the professional needs of designers and design historians.

COMMITTEE ON DIVERSITY PRACTICES

The Committee on Diversity Practices supports the development of global perspectives on art and visual culture. The committee promotes artistic, curatorial, scholarly and institutional practices that deepen appreciation of political and cultural heterogeneity, as educational and professional values. To that end, the committee assesses and evaluates the development and implementation of curricular innovation, new research methods, curatorial and pedagogical strategies, and hiring practices that contribute to the realization of these goals.

The Committee on Diversity Practices continues to address how CAA as an association can positively address diversity awareness, training and implementation and maintain a site for resources on diversity practices: http://www.collegeart.org/diversity/

COMMITTEE ON INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

The Committee on Intellectual Property monitors and interprets copyright legislation for the benefit of CAA’s various constituencies. In so doing, it seeks to offer educational programs and opportunities for discussion and debate in response to copyright legislation that affects educators, scholars, museum professionals, and artists.

The Committee on Intellectual Property organizes conference sessions on the Fair Use Code and maintains a resource cite on intellectual property: http://www.collegeart.org/ip/

COMMITTEE ON WOMEN IN THE ARTS

The Committee on Women in the Arts (CWA) promotes the scholarly study and recognition of women’s contributions to the visual arts and to critical and art-historical studies; advocates for feminist scholarship and activism in art; develops partnerships with organizations with compatible missions; monitors the status of women in the visual-arts professions; provides historical and current resources on feminist issues; and supports emerging artists and scholars in their careers.

Inclusive and international, comprising members from all professional backgrounds, the Committee on Women in the Arts is dedicated to the study, visibility and support of women in the arts, as well as feminist art and scholarship, with an expansive combination of initiatives that include: organizing panels and interviews of feminist artists and the recipients of the Distinguished Feminist Award during the annual conference; collaborations and events that take place beyond the conference venue; the monthly selection of international highlights of exhibitions known as the CWA Picks: http://www.collegeart.org/committees/picks; and its support of two nominees for the Distinguished Feminist Award.

EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The Education Committee promotes the visual arts as essential human activity; as a creative endeavor and subject of cultural and historical inquiry and critical appreciative activity, and encourages excellence in teaching at all levels.  Its focus is on pedagogy at the higher education level in art history, visual culture, studio, aesthetics, and art criticism, and on the interface between arts teaching and learning research and practice.

The Education Committee supports initiatives that acknowledge the importance of teaching and learning to advance visual arts, design, and art history in higher education, and more broadly to the public. In addition to a podcast series, CAA Conversations, the EC works on projects that support educational development, effective pedagogy, scholarship of teaching and learning, and improved career pathways for students.

INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE

The International Committee seeks to foster an international community of artists, scholars and critics within CAA; to provide forums in which to exchange ideas and make connections; to encourage engagement with the international student community; to develop relationships between CAA and organizations outside the United States with comparable goals and activities; and to assist the CAA Board of Directors by identifying and recommending advocacy issues that involve CAA and cross national borders.

The International Committee continues to promote international connections and discourse through organized conference sessions, solicited news and articles, collaborative events, and other vital programs such as the CAA-Getty International Program that brings global scholars to the annual conference.

MUSEUM COMMITTEE

The Museum Committee provides a bridge between scholars and arts professionals in the academic and museum fields.  It offers a forum for the discussion of issues of mutual interest and promotes museum advocacy issues within CAA.  The committee lends support and mentorship for both seasoned and emerging professionals to protect and interpret the arts within museums.

The Museum Committee strives to make the museum field more equitable and inclusive by critically examining the current and inadequate pipelines to the profession and questioning the practices and procedures by which museums operate. The committee is engaged in collaborative efforts to strengthen the relationship between art historians and museums, as well as in working creatively and constructively with other CAA committees and projects, including the Committee on Women in the Arts and RAAMP (Resources for Academic Art Museum Professionals).

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES COMMITTEE

The Professional Practices Committee (PPC) responds to specific concerns of the membership in relation to areas such as job placement and recruitment, tenure and promotion procedures, scholarly standards and ethics, studio health and safety, and guidelines for degree programs in the visual arts. The committee oversees CAA’s Standards and Guidelines drawing on the expertise of committee members and by forming task-forces to draft, review and revise these statements on a regular basis.

Recently, the Professional Practices Committee has been working on updating guidelines for degree programs (Associate, Baccalaureate, and MFA), as well as the new Guidelines for Addressing Proposed Substantive Changes to an Art, Art History of Design Unit or Program at Colleges and Universities. The committee is currently working on statements addressing the work of curators, visual resource professionals and artists working in the public realm.

SERVICES TO ARTISTS COMMITTEE

The Services to Artists Committee (SAC) was formed by the CAA Board of Directors to seek broader participation by artists and designers in the organization and the Annual Conference. SAC identifies and addresses concerns facing artists and designers; creates and implements programs and events at the conference and beyond; explores ways to encourage greater participation and leadership in CAA; and identifies ways to establish closer ties with other arts professionals and institutions.  To this end, committee members are responsible for the programming of ARTspace and its related events.

The Services to Artists Committee continues to organize ARTspace conference programming (free and open to the public) and is investigating initiatives to identify and address concerns for artists and designers beyond the conference.

STUDENT AND EMERGING PROFESSIONALS COMMITTEE

Established in February 1998, the Student and Emerging Professionals Committee is comprised of CAA members who are students, recent graduates, and experienced arts professionals with the intention of better representing students and emerging professionals within the larger CAA and academic framework.

The Student and Emerging Professionals Committee provides CAA with a crucial voice for those in school, recently graduated, changing tracks, or getting back into the field. SEPC helps connect its constituents to CAA’s resources and advocates for students and emerging professionals within the organization. In 2019-2020, SEPC has begun writing guidelines for professional development training in graduate programs; SEPC is also working to make CAA more accessible to a future generation of artists, scholars, and beyond. At the Annual Conference, SEPC hosts an SEPC lounge space out of which is run a full programming track that includes workshops, roundtables, mock interviews, and more. SEPC is looking for members who can help run its programs, and, more importantly, bring new approaches and underrepresented perspectives to SEPC’s advocacy.

Filed under: Committees, Professional Development, Service — Tags:

Dawn Holder and Stephanie Lanter

posted by CAA — Apr 29, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, Dawn Holder and Stephanie Lanter discuss evading boundaries in making meaning and teaching.

Dawn Holder is Associate Professor of Art at the University of the Ozarks, where he teaches Ceramics, Sculpture, and Art History. She has received numerous accolades for her work, and has exhibited in galleries and museums across the country, including the National Museum for Women in the Arts, where she was invited to participate in the Organic Matters: Women to Watch exhibition. She received an MFA in Ceramics from RISD and a BFA in Ceramics from the University of Georgia.

Stephanie Lanter is currently the Assistant Professor of Ceramics at Emporia State University in Kansas, where she teaches all levels of Ceramics, 3-Dimensional Design, and Fibers. She makes clay and mixed media sculpture, drawings, and texts and has been teaching for 15 years.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

New in caa.reviews

posted by CAA — Apr 26, 2019

Rebekah Compton writes about Eros Visible: Art, Sexuality and Antiquity in Renaissance Italy by James Grantham Turner. Read the full review at caa.reviews

 

Filed under: caa.reviews

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by CAA — Apr 24, 2019

Want articles like these in your inbox? Sign up: collegeart.org/newsletter

Credit: Andrew Tallon/Vassar College

Art Historian’s Laser Mapping Project Could Help Save Notre Dame

A professor at Vassar College painstakingly scanned the cathedral in 2015. His work may now help architects and engineers rebuild it. (CNN)

Elizabeth Warren’s Higher Education Plan: Cancel Student Debt and Eliminate Tuition

Announced Monday, Warren’s $1.25 trillion policy proposal aims to reshape higher education. (New York Times)

TED-Style Art History Platform Aims to Promote Arts Education Online

Explore short films about art history from artists, curators, and academics, available for free online at HENI Talks. (The Art Newspaper)

The Death of an Adjunct

“Thea Hunter was a promising, brilliant scholar.” (The Atlantic)

This App Can Tell You the Indigenous History of the Land You Live On

A free online tool that seeks to map Indigenous languages, treaties, and territories. (Native Land)

An Illustrated Database for Women Artists Spans the 15th to 19th Centuries

A Space of Their Own aims to compile the most comprehensive resource to date. (Hyperallergic)

Filed under: CAA News

CAA invites nominations and self-nominations for individuals to serve on our Professional Development Fellowship juries for three years (2019–22). Terms begin July 2019.

JURY VACANCIES FOR SPRING 2019

  • Professional Development Fellowship in Visual Art: two members
  • Professional Development Fellowship in Art History: one member

Duties and Qualifications

The fellowship juries award $10,000 each to one visual artist completing an MFA and one art historian completing a PhD in the coming year. Candidates for the art history jury must be actively publishing scholars with demonstrated seniority and achievement; candidates for the visual arts jury must be actively producing artists with a track record of exhibitions. Institutional affiliation is not required. Jury members review applications once per year and confer by conference call.

Candidates must possess expertise appropriate to the jury’s work and be current CAA members. They should not hold a position on a CAA committee or editorial board beyond May 31, 2019. CAA’s president and vice president for committees appoint jury members for service.

HOW TO APPLY

Nominations and self-nominations should include a brief statement (no more than 150 words) outlining the individual’s qualifications and experience and a CV (an abbreviated CV no more than two pages may be submitted). Please send all materials by email to Cali Buckley, CAA grants and special programs manager; submissions must be sent as Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF attachments.

For questions about jury service and responsibilities, contact Tiffany Dugan, CAA director of programs and publications.

Deadline: May 13, 2019

David Rifkind and Carmenita Higginbotham

posted by CAA — Apr 22, 2019

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

CAA podcasts are on iTunes. Click here to subscribe.

This week, David Rifkind and Carmenita Higginbotham discuss ethical approaches to managing contingent faculty.

Dr. David Rifkind is Associate Professor of Architecture and Interim Chair of Landscape Architecture + Environmental and Urban Design at Florida International University.

Dr. Carmenita Higginbotham is Associate Professor and Chair of the McIntire Department of Art at the University of Virginia.

Filed under: CAA Conversations, Podcast

Serve on the Millard Meiss Publication Fund Jury

posted by CAA — Apr 19, 2019

CAA invites nominations and self-nominations for individuals to serve on our Millard Meiss Publication Fund jury for four years (2019–23). Terms begin July 2019.

JURY VACANCIES FOR SPRING 2019

  • Millard Meiss Publication Fund: two members

Duties and Qualifications

The Millard Meiss Publication Fund jury awards subsidies to support the publication of book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of art and related subjects. Members review manuscripts and grant applications twice a year and meet in New York in the spring and fall to select the awardees. CAA reimburses jury members for travel and lodging expenses in accordance with its travel policy. Members volunteer their services to CAA without compensation. Candidates must be actively publishing scholars with demonstrated seniority and achievement; institutional affiliation is not required.

Candidates must possess expertise appropriate to the jury’s work and be current CAA members. They should not hold a position on a CAA committee or editorial board beyond May 31, 2019. CAA’s president and vice president for committees appoint jury members for service.

HOW TO APPLY

Nominations and self-nominations should include a brief statement (no more than 150 words) outlining the individual’s qualifications and experience and a CV (an abbreviated CV no more than two pages may be submitted). Please send all materials by email to Cali Buckley, CAA grants and special programs manager; submissions must be sent as Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF attachments. For questions about jury service and responsibilities, contact Tiffany Dugan, CAA director of programs and publications.

Deadline: May 13, 2019

Filed under: Awards, Publications, Service