College Art Association

CAA News Today

People in the News

posted by October 15, 2016

People in the News lists new hires, positions, and promotions in three sections: Academe, Museums and Galleries, and Organizations and Publications.

The section is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2016

Academe

Celeste-Marie Bernier, formerly of the University of Nottingham in England, has taken up a position as professor of black studies at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

John Hatch has been appointed chair of the Department of Visual Arts at Western University in London, Ontario, Canada.

Mary Healy, formerly research fellow and guest lecturer in the history of art and visual culture at Trinity College Dublin in Ireland, has become lecturer at University College Cork, also in Ireland.

Sheila Pepe has become a faculty member in the MFA Fine Arts program at the School of Visual Arts in New York.

Museums and Galleries

Alan Chong, formerly director of the Asian Civilisations Museum and the Peranakan Museum in Singapore, has been named director and chief executive officer of the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester, New Hampshire.

Amanda Gilvin, formerly visiting assistant professor of African art at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York, has been appointed assistant curator of collections for the Davis Museum at Wellesley College in Wellesley, Massachusetts.

Michael Goodson, formerly director of exhibitions at the Beeler Gallery at Columbus College of Art and Design in Columbus, Ohio, has been appointed senior curator of exhibitions for Ohio State University’s Wexner Center for the Arts, also in Columbus.

Jens Hoffmann, deputy director of exhibitions and programs at the Jewish Museum in New York, has a new position at his institution: director of special exhibitions and public programs.

Kristin Holder, print room manager for the Blanton Museum of Art’s Julia Matthews Wilkinson Center for Prints and Drawings at the University of Texas at Austin, is now curator emerita at her institution.

Sarah Newman, previously consulting curator of modern art for the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, has been named James Dicke Curator of Contemporary Art at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, also in Washington, DC.

Stephanie E. Rozman has joined the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, California, as assistant curator for Asian art.

Khristaan D. Villela, formerly professor of art history and scholar in residence at Santa Fe University of Art and Design in New Mexico, has been named director of the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe.

Jonathan Frederick Walz, formerly curator of American art for the Sheldon Museum of Art at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, has been appointed director of curatorial affairs and curator of American art at the Columbus Museum in Columbus, Georgia.

 

Institutional News

posted by October 15, 2016

Read about the latest news from institutional members.

Institutional News is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2016

Harvard Art Museums in Cambridge, Massachusetts, have been awarded a $325,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support their fall 2018 exhibition, Animal-Shaped Vessels from the Ancient World: Feasting with Gods, Heroes, and Kings.

Harvard Art Museums in Cambridge, Massachusetts, have unveiled a new online resource dedicated to the Bauhaus, one of the most influential schools of art and design in the twentieth century.

Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore has been awarded a $142,604 grant from the Maryland Governor’s Office on Service and Volunteerism, in partnership with the Corporation for National and Community Service, to support the school’s Community Art Collaborative AmeriCorps service program.

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond has accepted a $1.5 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support the in-depth technical examination, conversation, and art-historical study of the museum’s African art collection.

 

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by October 15, 2016

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2016

Dustin Chad Alligood, curator for the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, was a participant in NextGen 2016, a program of the Getty Leadership Institute at Claremont Graduate University in Claremont, California.

Alex Arzt, an artist based in Adamstown, Maryland, has been awarded a 2016 residency at the Artists’ Cooperative Residency and Exhibitions (ACRE) program in Steuben, Wisconsin.

Renzo Baldasso, assistant professor of art history for the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University in Tempe, has been named a Paul Mellon Visiting Senior Fellow for fall 2016–winter 2017 by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. His research project is “A New Aesthetics for Print: The Emergence of the Visuality of the Printed Page from Gutenberg to Ratdolt.”

Caitlin Beach, a PhD candidate in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University in New York, has earned a 2016–18 Wyeth Fellowship from the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. As a nonresident predoctoral dissertation fellow, Beach will work on “Sculpture, Slavery, and Commodity in the Nineteenth-Century Atlantic World.”

John Richard Blakinger has accepted a two-year postdoctoral fellowship with the USC Society of Fellows in the Humanities at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.

Andrianna Campbell, a doctoral student in art history at the Graduate Center, City University of New York, has received a Twelve-Month Chester Dale Fellow for 2016–17 from the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. She will research “Norman Lewis: Linearity, Pedagogy, and Activism in His Abstract Expressionism, 1946–1964” during her time as a nonresident predoctoral dissertation fellow.

Natalie Campbell, an independent curator based in Washington, DC, has received a 2017 Curatorial Fellowship from the Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design in Asheville, North Carolina. With Carissa Carman, she will work on an exhibition called Tie Up, Draw Down, scheduled for summer 2017.

Carissa Carman, lecturer and area head of textiles in the Department of Studio Art at Indiana University in Bloomington, has received a 2017 Curatorial Fellowship from the Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design in Asheville, North Carolina. She will work on an exhibition called Tie Up, Draw Down, scheduled for summer 2017, with Natalie Campbell.

Peter Christensen, assistant professor of art history in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Rochester in Rochester, New York, has won a 2016 SAH/Mellon Author Award from the Society of Architectural Historians. His book Germany and the Ottoman Railways: Art, Empire, and Infrastructure will be published by Yale University Press.

Grace Chuang, a doctoral candidate in art history at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts, has been appointed a 2016–18 Samuel H. Kress Fellow by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. As a nonresident predoctoral dissertation fellow, Chuang will work on “The Furniture of Bernard II Vanrisamburgh, Master Cabinetmaker in Eighteenth-Century Paris.”

Lee Ann Custer, a PhD student in the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of History of Art in Philadelphia, has accepted an Ailsa Mellon Bruce Predoctoral Fellowship for Historians of American Art to Travel Abroad. The award was presented by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC.

Catherine Damman, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University in New York, has earned a Twenty-Four-Month Chester Dale Fellow for 2016–18 from the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. During her time as a nonresident predoctoral dissertation fellow, she will research “Unreliable Narrators: Laurie Anderson, Julia Heyward, and Jill Kroesen Perform the 1970s.”

Maggie Dethloff, a PhD student in the Department of Art History at the University of California, Irvine, has completed a 2016 summer internship at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. For her project, Dethloff assisted with research and organization for an upcoming exhibition on the photographs of Sally Mann.

Jill Johnson Deupi, director and chief curator of the University of Miami’s Lowe Art Museum in Coral Gables, Florida, was a 2016 participant in the Getty Leadership Institute at Claremont Graduate University in Claremont, California.

Rachel Epp Buller, associate professor of visual arts and design at Bethel College in Mishawaka, Indiana, has been awarded one of the two Mary McMullan Grants given in the United States by the National Art Education Foundation. The grant will fund the development of a new course on activism, art, and design.

Jennifer Foley, director of education and community engagement for the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York, was a participant in NextGen 2016, a program of the Getty Leadership Institute at Claremont Graduate University in Claremont, California.

Sarah E. Fraser, professor of Chinese art history and deputy head of the Institute of East Asian Art History at Heidelberg University in Heidelberg, Germany, has been appointed Ailsa Mellon Bruce Senior Fellow at the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. Fraser’s research concerns “Chinese as Subject: Genres in Nineteenth-Century Photography and the Migration of European Chinoiseries.”

Faye Raquel Gleisser, assistant professor of contemporary art in the Department of Art History of the Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts at Indiana University in Bloomington, has received a 2017 Academic Fellowship from the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Research Center in Santa Fe, New Mexico. In fall 2017 Gleisser will work on “Guerilla Tactics:  Performance Art and the Aesthetics of Resistance in American Visual Culture, 1967–83.”

Aaron M. Hyman, a doctoral candidate in the History of Art Department at the University of California, Berkeley, has earned a 2015–17 Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship from the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. During his time as a resident predoctoral dissertation fellow, Hyman will research “Rubens in a New World: Prints, Authorship, and Transatlantic Intertextuality.”

Frances Jacobus-Parker, a doctoral student in the Department of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, has earned a 2017 Academic Fellowship from the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Research Center in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Her dissertation is titled “Redescription: Vija Celmins and the Replica in Postwar American Art.”

Hagi Kenaan, associate professor in the Department of Philosophy at Tel Aviv University in Israel, has been named William C. Seitz Senior Fellow by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. He will work on “The Origins of Photography and the Future of the Image.”

Bahareh Khoshooee, an MFA candidate in studio art at the University of South Florida in Tampa, has earned a 2016 residency in the Artists’ Cooperative Residency and Exhibitions (ACRE) program in Steuben, Wisconsin.

David Young Kim, assistant professor in the Department of History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, has been appointed Paul Mellon Senior Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts by the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. His project will examine “The Groundwork of Painting: Background, Materiality, and Composition in Italian Renaissance Art.”

Dale Kinney, Eugenia Chase Guild Professor Emeritus in the Humanities and Research Professor at Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, has been named 2016–17 Samuel H. Kress Professor at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts by the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.

Estelle Lingo, associate professor of art history and Donald E. Petersen Endowed Fellow at the University of Washington in Seattle, has been appointed Andrew W. Mellon Professor for 2016–17 at the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC.

Melissa Ming-Hwei Lo, assistant curator for the Huntington Library, Art Collection, and Botanical Gardens in San Marino, California, was a participant in NextGen 2016, a program of the Getty Leadership Institute at Claremont Graduate University in Claremont, California.

Fernando Loffredo has been selected as an A. W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow for 2015–17 by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. He is working on “A Sea of Marble: Traveling Fountains in the Early Modern Mediterranean.”

Joseph Madrigal, assistant professor of art at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa, has earned a 2016 residency at the Artists’ Cooperative Residency and Exhibitions (ACRE) program in Steuben, Wisconsin.

Michelle McCoy, a PhD student in the History of Art Department at the University of California, Berkeley, has been named Ittleson Fellow for 2015–17 by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. During her residency as a predoctoral dissertation fellows, McCoy will explore “Astrology and Astronomy in the Art of Liao-Yuan China and Inner Asia.”

Patricia Miranda, an artist, curator, and educator based in New York, has become the fall 2016 artist in residence at the I-Park Foundation in East Haddam, Connecticut.

Mary G. Morton, curator and head of the National Gallery of Art’s Department of French Paintings in Washington, DC, has been appointed 2016–17 Ailsa Mellon Bruce National Gallery of Art Sabbatical Curatorial Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts. Her exhibition will be titled Considering Caillebotte.

Itohan I. Osayimwese, assistant professor of the history of art and architecture at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, has won a 2016 SAH/Mellon Author Award from the Society of Architectural Historians. Her book Colonialism and the Archive of Modern Architecture in Germany will be published by the University of Pittsburgh Press.

Hannah Patterson, an artist based in Maryville, Tennessee, has accepted a 2016 residency from the Artists’ Cooperative Residency and Exhibitions (ACRE) program in Steuben, Wisconsin.

Giancarla Periti, associate professor of Italian Renaissance art at the University of Toronto in Ontario, Canada, has been honored with a Samuel H. Kress Senior Fellowship. During her time at the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC, she will work on “Correggio: Borders, Frames, and the Center of Painting.”

Lisa Pon, professor of art history in the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, has received a Paul Mellon Visiting Senior Fellowship for fall 2016–winter 2017. Her research project at the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC, is called “Raphael and the Renaissance Arts of Collaboration.”

Aviva Rahmani, an artist based in New York, has won a 2016 award in architecture/environmental structures/design category through the Artists’ Fellowship Program of the New York Foundation for the Arts.

Jennifer Reynolds-Kaye, Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman-Payson Postdoctoral Fellow at the Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut, was a participant in NextGen 2016, a program of the Getty Leadership Institute at Claremont Graduate University in Claremont, California.

Jeff Robinson, instructor of art and director of the Visual Arts Gallery at the University of Illinois in Springfield, has accepted a 2016 residency at the Artists’ Cooperative Residency and Exhibitions (ACRE) program in Steuben, Wisconsin.

Kristine Ronan, who recently earned her PhD in art history from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, has been awarded a 2017 Academic Fellowship from the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Research Center in Santa Fe, New Mexico. As a postdoctoral fellow, Ronan will continue work on “Indian – Pop – Politics: The Rise and Fall of a Native/American Art Movement.”

Margaret Samu, a freelance art historian based in New York, has become writer in residence at New York University’s Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia. She will work on her manuscript “Russian Venus” during the 2016–17 academic year.

Elke Seibert, a postdoctoral researcher, has been awarded a two-year fellowship at the German Center for the History of Art in Paris, France, sponsored by the German Research Foundation. She will continue researching “Prehistoric Rock Paintings and the Genesis of Contemporary Art in New York and Paris (1930–60).”

Zeynep Simavi, program specialist in public and scholarly engagement for the Smithsonian Institution’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington, DC, was a participant in NextGen 2016, a program of the Getty Leadership Institute at Claremont Graduate University in Claremont, California.

Anna P. Sokolina has become the first Milka Bliznakov Scholar in recognition and support of her research proposal, “Life to Architecture: Milka Bliznakov Academic Papers and Records of Russian Women Architects at the IAWA.” The Milka Bliznakov Research Prize Jury 2016 at the International Archive of Women in Architecture, facilitated at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, created a new designation that includes a stipend to cover a two-year period (2016–18).

Phil Taylor, a doctoral student in the Department of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, has been appointed David E. Finley Fellow for 2014–17 by the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. His research, to be undertaken as a resident predoctoral dissertation fellow, examines “Raoul Ubac’s Photographic Surrealism.”

Jill Vaum, a PhD candidate in the Department of History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, has received an Ailsa Mellon Bruce Predoctoral Fellowship for Historians of American Art to Travel Abroad, awarded by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC.

Leslie Wilson, a graduate student in the Department of Art History at the University of Chicago in Illinois, has received a Twenty-Four-Month Chester Dale Fellow for 2015–17 from the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. While a resident predoctoral dissertation fellow, Wilson will consider “Past Black and White: The Color of Post-Apartheid Photography in South Africa, 1994‒2004.”

Oliver M. Wunsch, a PhD candidate in the Department of History of Art and Architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been appointed Robert H. and Clarice Smith Fellow for 2016–17 by the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. As a nonresident predoctoral dissertation fellow, he will research “Painting against Time: The Decaying Image in the French Enlightenment.”

Irini Zervas, who recently earned an MA in art history from Hunter College, City University of New York, has completed work as a 2016 National Gallery of Art Summer Intern. For her project in Washington, DC, Zervas assisted with research and organization for an upcoming exhibition on women photographers working from the 1920s through the 1940s.

 

Exhibitions Curated by CAA Members

posted by October 15, 2016

Check out details on recent shows organized by CAA members who are also curators.

Exhibitions Curated by CAA Members is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2016

 

Books Published by CAA Members

posted by October 15, 2016

Publishing a book is a major milestone for artists and scholars—browse a list of recent titles below.

Books Published by CAA Members appears every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2016

Anastasia AukemanWelcome to Painterland: Bruce Conner and the Rat Bastard Protective Association (Oakland: University of California Press, 2016).

Michael Corris. Leaving Skull City: Selected Writings on Art (Dijon, France: Les Presses du réel, 2016).

Wayne Franits, ed. The Ashgate Research Companion to Dutch Art of the Seventeenth Century (New York: Routledge, 2016).

Peter J. Holliday. American Arcadia: California and the Classical Tradition (New York: Oxford University Press, 2016).

Sharon Louden. The Artist as Cultural Producer: Living and Sustaining a Creative Life (Bristol, UK: Intellect Books, 2017).

Adair Margo and Melissa Renn. Tom Lea, Life Magazine, and World War II (El Paso, TX: Tom Lea Institute, 2016).

Craig McDaniel and Jean Robertson. Spellbound: Rethinking the Alphabet (Bristol, UK: Intellect Books, 2016).

Christina Bryan Rosenberger. Drawing the Line: The Early Work of Agnes Martin (Oakland: University of California Press, 2016).

Laura E. Smith. Horace Poolaw, Photographer of American Indian Modernity (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2016).

Nicholas Stanley-Price, Mary K. McGuigan, and John F. McGuigan Jr. At the Foot of the Pyramid: 300 Years of the Cemetery for Foreigners in Rome (Bonn: Arbeitskreis selbständiger Kultur-Institute, 2016).

Linda Stein, ed. Holocaust Heroes: Fierce Females; Tapestries and Sculpture by Linda Stein (Philadelphia: Old City Publishing, 2016).

Meiqin WangUrbanization and Contemporary Chinese Art (New York: Routledge, 2016).

 

What is myCAA?

posted by October 14, 2016

artnews

With the opening of conference registration for the 2017 Annual Conference in New York, February 15-18, you might have seen us mention our new campaign, myCAA.

myCAA is a way for us to tell our members, and even those outside our membership in the arts and culture field, that we are listening. And that we want to hear from you! myCAA is about opening up the channels of communication member to member and between the CAA staff, board, committees, and affiliates. We are all in this together, each and every person involved in CAA. From the administrative and staff side of CAA, we know the organization exists because of the support of our members and those working in the visual arts field. Your support helps us in turn support you in your professional teaching, scholarship, and art making. We see this circle as vital to the impact that art historians, artists, and scholars have on the field of visual arts and on society as a whole.

We want to hear from you on CAA Connect, our new digital discussion and resource library platform. The myCAA community is where members should post any and all thoughts they have about how to make CAA an organization that serves the profession at the highest level. How to log in to CAA Connect.

At the conference, we want to hear from you. Stop a CAA staff member, board member, or committee member in the hallway, in sessions, or in the Hilton lobby! Say hello and tell us how we can make CAA the best organization it can be to support your efforts and your work.

Call us. Email us. Write to us. Send us a carrier pigeon.

We know that our members and those working in the visual arts contribute to and improve society every single day. myCAA is the call for our members to use their voices and to tell us how we can help so you can push forward and change the world.

New in caa.reviews

posted by October 14, 2016

Laura Weigert discusses Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker: Work/Travail/Arbeid, an exhibition and site-specific work at the Centre Pompidou. Each of the nine hour-long segments features “a different combination of dancers and musicians.” According to Weigert, “the concept of work” is central to the project, along with the question of “what might dance achieve in a museum.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Yumi Park Huntington reviews the exhibition catalogue Chavín: Peru’s Enigmatic Temple in the Andes. Edited by Peter Fux, the essays “present new archeological excavations and new interpretations of material objects.” Using “rich and abundant data,” the contributors illustrate “the importance of analyzing a culture within its network of interactions and exchanges with contemporaneous societies.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Heather Diack visits This Place, a traveling exhibition initiated by Frédéric Brenner and curated Charlotte Cotton. Featuring twelve internationally acclaimed photographers, the show “claims to grapple with ‘the complexity of Israel and the Westbank, as place and metaphor,’” but ultimately “does not bring the viewer any closer to understanding the realities of this highly charged terrain.”  Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Brian Madigan reads Art and Rhetoric in Roman Culture, edited by Jaś Elsner and Michel Meyer. The volume “makes a case for a prescriptive approach to the understanding of Roman visual culture” based on “Aristotle’s tripartite division of rhetoric.” While the “nature of workings” of this visual rhetoric “are still vitally debated,” the book will surely benefit “advanced scholars of Roman art.” Read the full review at caa.reviews

Caa.reviews publishes over 150 reviews each year. Founded in 1998, the site publishes timely scholarly and critical reviews of studies and projects in all areas and periods of art history, visual studies, and the fine arts, providing peer review for the disciplines served by the College Art Association. Publications and projects reviewed include books, articles, exhibitions, conferences, digital scholarship, and other works as appropriate. Read more reviews at caa.reviews.

Filed under: caa.reviews, Uncategorized

craftactioncallforsubmissionsCAA Media Lounge
105th Annual Conference NYC 2017
Submission Deadline
Nov 30, 2016

Craft Action: Genre Bending 

Craft Action: Genre Bending is a juried video screening exploring the role of process, skill, and action as it relates to craft mediums. The growing interdisciplinarity of craft practices is the impetus for this call for submissions of video work by practitioners engaged craft media, such as ceramics, textiles, metals, wood, and glass. The use of video with craft enables the artist to engage in using materials and tools in combination with their representation to express new ideas, addressing making by investigating not only what is shown, but how it is shown.

Media Lounge is CAA’s main stage of new media explorations where students, academics, and artists come together to build camaraderie. These methods of working with conceptual and technical content provides fodder for a dynamic dialogue of how artists’ place themselves in the larger distinction of media, both analog and digital.

Each year Media Lounge coordinates a central theme to explore the interrelationship of media across a topic. This year in NYC, Media Lounge presents screenings, panels and discussions that explore the genres of craft and video, politics and strategy, and inter-related material explorations of new media and footage that entangles what is expected of cross-disciplinary explosions of content, surrounding the theme of Genre Bending.

Genre is a way to group practices into categories that are familiar-or frame an expected experience from the audience. Media Lounge NYC 2017 uses genre and the elasticity of bending to explore new media genre relationships and their impulse of hybrid crossovers.

Anne Sophie-Lehman has theorized that the combination of craft and film produces its own unique genre, which she calls “showing making”. Part archival, part instructional, part visual pleasure, and part showmanship, this idea of genre bending and genre production is the starting point for this year’s Media Lab theme.

Craft Action: Genre Bending seeks to explore how artists bend, break, subvert, or invent new genres for craft and film. Artists will be asked to note in their application what genre/s they see themselves as bending or creating. This may be a traditional genre, like comedy, tragedy, animation, or a craft-based genre like the instructional demonstration – or a genre yet-to-be defined that can provoke new understanding and considerations.

Artwork Requirements

All video submission must be original works of art completed within the last 3 years.

Submission Guidelines

  • Entries will be accepted from the link HERE
  • Artists are required to submit video as Vimeo files, opening up the access of the files to shared
  • The video(s) should be an excerpt totaling no longer than 5 minutes.
  • Artists may submit up to three videos to be selected

Screening Dates and Panel Discussion

CAA Conference Media Lounge
February 16, 2017
Thursday 1:30-3

Guest Curators and Conference Panelists

Marilyn Zapf is the Assistant Director at The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design (CCCD) and Curator of CCCD’s Benchspace Gallery & Workshop in Asheville, NC where she has curated a number of nationally-traveling exhibitions including Made in WNC (2015) and Gee’s Bend: From Quilts to Prints (2014). Zapf teaches courses on the History of Craft at Warren Wilson College and publishes articles and reviews in international publications, including Art Jewelry Form and Crafts Magazine (UK). She is a founding member of the international experimental history of design collective, Fig. 9, holds a MA in the History of Design from the Royal College of Art and Victoria and Albert Museum in London, England, and a BA (English Literature) and BFA (Jewelry and Metalworking) from The University of Georgia. Her areas of research include craft, postmodernism and de/industrialization.

Namita Gupta Wiggers is a curator, writer, educator and artist based in Portland, Oregon. She is the Director of Critical Craft Forum, and Exhibitions Review Editor, Journal of Modern Craft. From 2004-12 Wiggers served as the Curator, and later Director and Chief Curator (2012 -14) of Museum of Contemporary Craft. She curated over 65 exhibitions, including: New Embroidery: Not Your Grandma’s Doily, Touching Warms the Art, The Academy is Full of Craft, Object Focus: The Bowl, and Manufractured: The Conspicuous Transformation of Everyday Objects (curated by Steven Skov Holt and Mara Holt Skov), and Gestures of Resistance (curated by Judith Leemann and Shannon Stratton.). She curated the first museum exhibitions on Betty Feves, Laurie Herrick, Nikki McClure, Emily Pilloton, and Ken Shores. Recent exhibitions include Across the Table, Across the Land with Michael Strand for NCECA’s 50th Anniversary, and Everything has been Material for Scissors to Shape, on view at the Wing Luke Museum of Asian American Experience. Wiggers is editing a Companion on Contemporary Craft (Wiley Blackwell), and collaborating on a project focused on gender and jewelry with Benjamin Lignel.

Entry Fee

Free

Venue

Hilton New York Midtown, College Art Association Conference, Media lounge

ArtSpace + Media Lounge

CAA’s Services to Artists Committee hosts offerings in ArtSpace and Media Lounge, a “conference within a conference” of innovative programs that are of special interest to artists, emerging professionals, and artist / educators. ArtSpace and Media Lounge programming offers an informal, dynamic setting with sessions, panels, screenings, curated media, distinguished artists interviews, exhibition opportunities and other social events. These programs are free and open to the public, and do not require CAA membership or registration fees for the conference to participate or attend.

Thank you in advance for your participation and please feel free to contact carissacarman at gmail.com if you have questions regarding the submission.

Each week CAA News summarizes eight articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

Cruelty and Kindness in Academia

Academics don’t have a reputation for being kind. To put it gently, higher education values intellect over affect. Kindness tends to be viewed as the opposite of criticism. Scholars, after all, are trained in critique, and not necessarily the constructive kind. (Read more from Vitae.)

Why New-Media Art Still Hasn’t Fully Gone Mainstream

Artists working in “new” media have never been so widely admired—a generation of artists in their twenties and thirties, including Amalia Ulman, Neil Beloufa, Ian Cheng, Jon Rafman, and Cécile B. Evans, are now shown internationally. Yet a quarter of a century after the emergence of digital art, it continues to raise challenges for museums, galleries, and collectors. (Read more from the Art Newspaper.)

The Questions We Should Be Asking Our Students

How much do you know about how your students study? I’ve been asking the question a lot lately, and most of the answers I’ve heard aren’t all that impressive. They’re more about how the faculty member thinks students study, how they should study, or how they aren’t studying. (Read more from Faculty Focus.)

What It Takes to Recover a Stolen Work of Art

A recent highly publicized announcement that two stolen van Gogh paintings had been recovered after fourteen years was a welcome surprise. How do thieves make off with a painting? What should a victim do after realizing they’ve been robbed? Why are only a tiny percentage of works recovered? (Read more from Artsy.)

Alizarin Crimson: Now You See It…

If a single color embodies the dividing line between pigments considered suitable for permanent works of art and those that are suspect and poor in lightfastness, Alizarin Crimson (PR 83) would be it. And yet the color is still used by many artists who are drawn to it in spite of its many problems. (Read more from Just Paint.)

Old Media, New Media, Data Media: Evolving Publishing Paradigms

Not so long ago we routinely talked of old vs. new media. The old was characterized by investment in and creation of content, which gave rise to a common set of properties—definitive and authoritative journalism and scientific reports, the fixed text, and the pursuit of the finest authors and top creative talent. New media, on the other hand, was digital and had its own set of properties. (Read more from the Scholarly Kitchen.)

The Rise of Living-Room Galleries in London

Young artists and curators throughout London are organizing public exhibitions in their own homes. Many are recent graduates who cannot afford the hefty cost of renting a temporary space. “There’s a pressing need for young artists to find inexpensive places to show art,” said Elena Colman. (Read more from the Art Newspaper.)

What’s behind Art’s Uneasy Celebrity Courtship?

The art world collectively raised its eyebrows when Sotheby’s Hong Kong announced a collaborative curated auction with Choi Seung-hyun, the 28-year-old Korean boy-band star known as T.O.P. Yet the art world’s newly discovered courtship of celebrity is deeper than it seems, which is why it’s making so many people uneasy. (Read more from Artnet News.)

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New in caa.reviews

posted by October 07, 2016

Gina McDaniel Tarver reviews the exhibition and catalogue Moderno: Design for Living in Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela, 1940–1978. The “rich multivocal production” occasionally fails “to tackle some of the complex issues it raises,” but “provides valuable insights into modern impulses and contradictions that manifested in compelling ways in Brazilian, Mexican, and Venezuelan design.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Anne Collins Goodyear examines the Getty Foundation’s Online Scholarly Catalogue Initiative (OSCI), which led to the creation of several digital catalogues by eight museums. Discussing “the implications of the project as a whole,” Goodyear finds the “undertaking represents but a first step,” yet “lays a significant foundation for the future of scholarship in the museum, and beyond.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Patricia Emerson discusses Drawing in Silver and Gold: Leonardo to Jasper Johns, an exhibition catalogue examining the history of metalpoint in Europe and the United States over the course of six centuries. By “studying a medium across stylistic boundaries,” the book “helps us to recognize the versatility of a medium that might have been thought, repeatedly, to be obsolete.” Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Caa.reviews publishes over 150 reviews each year. Founded in 1998, the site publishes timely scholarly and critical reviews of studies and projects in all areas and periods of art history, visual studies, and the fine arts, providing peer review for the disciplines served by the College Art Association. Publications and projects reviewed include books, articles, exhibitions, conferences, digital scholarship, and other works as appropriate. Read more reviews at caa.reviews.

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