CAA News Today

Materiality and Mediation: Global Conversations
Tuesday, 4th October 2022.

A virtual symposium convened by the CAA, the Design History Society, and the International Association of Word and Image Studies

To what extent are materiality and mediation useful foci in the study of design, word and image? What happens when we bring them together? How do materiality and mediation work in tandem as productive subjects of enquiry? What are the local, regional and international variations in the ways these foci are understood and engaged by design historians and those working in word and image studies?

This global collaborative project brings together three intersecting constituencies—art and design, design history, word and image studies—to examine the ways in which materiality and mediation intersect.

For more information on the event, its requirements, and how to apply:
Proposals may address the following, but are not limited by this list:
  • mediating the ethics and sustainability of extraction and deployment of materials
  • sensoriality of materials and mediation
  • mediation as material activism
  • mediating intersections of materiality and form (natural/synthetic/digital matter; art/craft/design/film/photography; prose/poetry/drama)
  • localizing/globalizing materials through mediation
  • ‘raw and cooked’ materials
  • mediating materialities of scale
  • mediating immateriality
  • mediating materials as signifiers of identity politics
  • (Im)material media of mediation
  • agency of materials
  • dialogues and disputes between makers and mediators.
Format:
To promote transnational dialogue by the most equitable and sustainable means, speakers and participants are invited to make their contributions virtually. Four 15-minute presentations will be followed by a one-hour round table discussion and Q&A. Presenters will be asked to record a talk in advance, for screening at the event, followed by live discussion.
Proposals must include:
  • a proposal title;
  • an abstract of 250 words;
  • a statement of relevance to the symposium theme, Materiality and Mediation: Global Conversations;
  • and a one-page CV listing major publications.

Please send your proposal via email to the DHS Administrator, Jenna Allsopp, (designhistorysociety@gmail.com) by 12 midnight GMT on Tuesday June 14, 2022. Notifications of acceptance will be emailed on July 8, 2022.

The Design History Society and the International Association of Word and Image Studies are two of CAA’s affiliated societies. If you have an interest in joining CAA as an affiliated society, please visit this page.

Filmed at the National Museum of Mexican Art, this program features a discussion about mentoring between two Chicago-based artists, Rubén Aguirre and Dan Ramirez, mediated by Cesáreo Moreno, Director and Curator of the National Museum of Mexican Art. Their conversation takes place inside the Aguirre’s exhibition Tectonic Reflections, open at the National Museum of Mexican Art until July 24. This program was a part of the session, “Mentoring Beyond the Classroom: The Continuing Relationship Over Time,” at CAA’s 2022 Annual Conference in February, chaired by Richard Serrano, a member of CAA’s Services to Artists Committee.

Distinguished Scholar, Kirsten P. Buick

posted by April 14, 2022

On February 17, 2022, Kirsten P. Buick was featured as the Distinguished Scholar at CAA’s 110th Annual Conference. The Distinguished Scholar session highlighted her career and provided an opportunity for dialogue between and among colleagues. Moderated by Annual Conference Chair, Theresa Avila, the session also featured presentations by a few of Buick’s students, including Shana Klein, Abbey Hepner, Annette M. Rodriguez, and Emmanuel Ortega. Watch the session in full below!

Established in 2001, the Distinguished Scholar Session illuminates and celebrates the contributions of senior art historians. The Annual Conference Committee identifies the distinguished scholar each year and each session typically brings together the distinguished scholar and a group of colleagues. The honoree’s involvement is fundamental to the series as a way of demonstrating a living tradition that gives voice to the continuities and ruptures that have shaped art-historical scholarship from the twentieth century into the new millennium.

We are inviting nominations for next year’s Distinguished Scholar at CAA’s 2023 Annual Conference in New York. Nominate individuals here!


On her career, Buick explains:

I identify as a scholar of the visual and material culture of the first British Empire, and the British diaspora in the US, Caribbean, and India. My teaching encompasses topics such as surveys of British Colonial and U.S. Art, American Landscape representation, African American Art, Pro- and Anti-Abolitionist Images in the Atlantic World; and seminars such as Photographing Jim Crow, 1890-1965, Patronizing Women: Taste and Collecting in the 19th and 20th Centuries, and The Victorian Nude: Representing Women, Men, Intersex, and Children. My research and teaching interests encompass histories of science, medicine, religion, as well as monuments, and the use of public space. Increasingly, I am interested in the racialization of mobility—what I characterize as critical mobility studies. I publish primarily in the realm of the history of African American art and its roots in US cultural formations. My first book, “Child of the Fire: Mary Edmonia Lewis and the Problem of Art History’s Black and Indian Subject,” is a good example of how I wed my teaching and publication imperatives together with my challenge to art history and visual studies to be more and to do better. Ultimately, teaching is my passion; and I tell my students that job # 1 is surviving the damage, and job # 2 is to never concede the center. 

Kirsten Pai Buick is a professor of art history at the University of New Mexico. She received her Ph.D. in art history from the University of Michigan and was a SAAM Predoctoral Fellow and a Charles Gaius Bolin Fellow at Williams College. Buick is a recipient of the David C. Driskell Prize for African American Art and has published extensively on African American art, including her book Child of the Fire: Mary Edmonia Lewis and the Problem of Art History’s Black and Indian Subject (Duke Univ. Press, 2010). Her second book, In Authenticity: “Kara Walker” and the Eidetics of Racism, is in progress.  

Filed under: Annual Conference, Event

Affiliated Society News: April

posted by April 11, 2022

Affiliated Society News shares the new and exciting things CAA’s affiliated organizations are working on including activities, awards, publications, conferences, and exhibitions.

Interested in becoming an Affiliated Society? Learn more here.


American Society of Appraisers

Publications

Valuing a Business, 6th Edition

The seminal book on business valuation is back and better than ever. Shannon Pratt’s Valuing a Business has been the go-to valuation guide for 40 years and has been updated with need-to-know information about taxes, financial reporting, compliance, and more.  Valuing a Business is still the best resource on the market for both new and experienced business appraisers.  This book fully covers the concepts of business valuation and provides detailed answers to virtually every question on the topic, from executive compensation and lost profits analysis to ESOP issues and valuation discounts.

Events

11th Annual ASA Equipment Valuation Conference

Tuesday, May 24, from 11 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Now in its 11th year, this annual event has grown to become the definitive source for appraisers, equipment management and finance professionals on the latest insights into equipment valuation. Instantly leverage knowledge gained on market trends and spotlighted asset sectors, as well as new contacts made, by incorporating into your practice areas or introducing to your team.

2022 ASA Summer Appraisal Camp

August 2022

Develop the skills you’ll need to build a career in appraising personal property such as fine and decorative art, antiques, vintage cars, furniture, coins, stamps, and more.

The program includes four virtual courses held over four weeks, including:

  • PP201 – Introduction to Personal Property Valuation – August 3-6, 2022
  • PP202 – Development of a Personal Property Appraisal: Research and Analysis – August 10-13, 2022
  • PP203 – Communication of a Personal Property Appraisal: Report Writing – August 17-20, 2022
  • PP204 – Personal Property Valuation: The Legal and Commercial Environments – August 24-27, 2022


Taiwanese Art History Association

Announcements / Events

PHOTOGRAPHY AND TAIWAN: History and Practice

Thursday, April 7

The Taiwan Academy of the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Los Angeles (TECO-LA), the University of Arizona’s School of the Arts (SAUA), and the Center for Creative Photography (CCP) are collaborating for the first time on the “Spotlight Taiwan project” to hold the “Photography and Taiwan: History and Practice” online symposium from April 7 to April 9, 2022 (PST). Nineteen scholars and experts from Korea, the United States, Australia and Taiwan are invited to attend the symposium. They will help the audience understand more about the history, culture and democratization of Taiwan through a historical lens and scholarly debate as recorded in the photography.

Ukraine’s history, art, and culture are endangered by the ongoing war. At Dumbarton Oaks, this lecture and conversation series by experts in the fields of history, art history, archaeology, heritage, sociology, as well as museums and conservation, among others, presents the region’s rich historical and cultural complexity through its objects, sites, and monuments. A focus on the medieval and early modern periods featuring Greek, Latin, and Slavic contacts, brings to the fore critical evidence to counter modern misrepresentations of Ukraine’s history and cultural heritage.

INAUGURAL LECTURE | FRIDAY 22 APRIL 2022 | 12:00 EDT [ 17:00 London | 18:00 Paris | 19:00 Kyiv ]

OLENKA Z. PEVNY (University of Cambridge)

Lacunae of Art History and Kyiv’s Visual Culture

Free and open to the public. Register for the inaugural lecture here. If you cannot attend but would like to receive future updates about this series of events, please join the mailing list here.

Future events include:

  • May 2022 – Lecture: Mariana Levytska, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (The “Holy Rus’ concept” and Religious Art with Political Connotations (Pochaiv Monastery in 19th century)
  • May 2022 – Discussion workshop on The Cathedral of St. Sophia, Kyiv
  • June 2022 – Lecture: Christian Raffensperger, Wittenberg University (“Medieval Origins and Modern Constructs, Rus – Ukraine – Russia”)
  • July 2022 – Lecture: Liudmyla Sharipova, University of Nottingham (Mazepa’s women before and after Poltava: to save and to keep)
  • July 2022 – Discussion workshop on Endangered Monuments
  • September 2022 –  Lecture: Maria Grazia Bartolini, Università degli Studi di Milano (Reading the image of prince Volodymyr Sviatoslavych in seventeenth-century Kyiv)
  • September 2022 – Discussion workshop on Displaced Cultural Heritage.
  • October 2022 – Lecture: Nazar Kozak, Senior Research Scholar, Department of Art History, The Ethnology Institute, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine Lviv (Images of Power and Their Discursive Site-Specificity in Kyivan Rus’)
  • November 2022 – Lecture: Talia Zajac, University of Toronto (will speak about the marriages between the ruling clan of Rus’ and Latin Christian Europe or the translation and commentary on the eleventh-century prayerbook of Gertruda of Poland)
  • November 2022 – Discussion workshop on historical memory.
  • December 2022 – Lecture: Halyna Kohut, Associate Professor, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv (Taste, Social Class, and Oriental Carpet Design in the Eighteenth-Century Cossack Hetmanate)

 

SPONSORSHIP AND ENDORSEMENT:

  • Dumbarton Oaks
  • Princeton University
  • Boise State University
  • Tufts University
  • Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, University of Kent
  • College Art Association (CAA)
  • Byzantine Studies Association of North America (BSANA)
  • British Association for Slavonic and East European Studies (BASEES)
  • Historians of German, Scandinavian, and Central European Art (HGSCEA)
  • Society of Historians of Eastern European, Eurasian and Russian Art and Architecture (SHERA)

 

Filed under: Advocacy, Event

Affiliated Society News: February

posted by February 15, 2022

Many of CAA’s affiliated societies will be presenting virtual sessions at our 110th Annual Conference from February 17-19 and from March 3-5. Check out a list of their sessions to preview!

To attend these sessions and more, make sure to register for the conference and learn more at its registration page.


AHNCA (Association of Historians of Nineteenth-Century Art)

Events

AHNCA’s Emerging Scholars Working Group Presents: See/Sip/Share: AHAA Crossover 

Wednesday, February 23 at 6 p.m. EST

The Emerging Scholars Working Group of the Association of Historians of Nineteenth-Century Art will join with the Association of Historians of American Art (AHAA) to host a See/Sip/Share, a bring-your-own beverage casual discussion of two images. Register here.

Filed under: Affiliated Societies, Event

Brazil CIHA Conference Website: CIHA São Paulo 2021 – Motion Migrations – The CIHA conference aims to describe, to reflect upon and to analyze the different forms of migrations in a concrete, historiographical and theoretical way. (usp.br)

The National Committee of the History of Art (NCHA) is pleased to announce that the 35th World Congress of the International Committee of the History of Art (CIHA) will take place January 17-21, 2022.  Originally planned as an in-person gathering in São Paulo, Brazil, the format has shifted to a hybrid model due to the pandemic and most of the speakers will participate virtually.  Registration for virtual attendance will be free of charge.

Organized around the theme of “Motion: Migrations,” the conference will virtually bring together an international roster of art historians for five days of scholarly exchange. Presentations will reflect on the different forms, theories and historiographies of migration in the history of art and in its contemporary conditions (see the conference page URL). The conference theme is especially relevant to our current period of lockdowns, restricted borders, and global supply chain disruptions.

The São Paulo conference is the second of two paired congresses on the question of “Motion” (the first half took place in Florence, Italy, in 2019). The session themes and the full program are available on the program tab of the CIHA conference website. 39 US-based art historians are scheduled to speak on the program, including 12 graduate students.

The NCHA supports the participation of US art historians at all stages of their career in this important global conversation and is committed to the success of the São Paulo CIHA.  To this end, the NCHA has awarded travel fellowships to students in US doctoral programs so that they can participate in the conference in person.   The Committee encourages US art historians to virtually attend the conference and to share information about it with any interested groups.  Finally, please consider organizing events that enable graduate students or other members of your academic community to watch CIHA sessions together.   Should you have questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to any of the NCHA members.

CIHA is the oldest continuously held art history conference in the world. Quadrennial CIHA Congresses promote innovative art historical research and foster dialogue among scholars from around the globe. NCHA is the US affiliate of CIHA and works to connect scholars in the United States with their counterparts in other countries, in part by encouraging participation in and attendance at CIHA congresses and colloquia. We hope to “see” many art historians at the upcoming conference.

Filed under: Event

As part of CAA’s 10-year anniversary celebration of its publication, The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association, chapter authors reflect on their contributions and how their impressions of the field have changed. Our final video in the series features Judith Brodsky, Mary Garrard, and Ferris Olin, who co-authored chapter 11, “Governance and Diversity.”

Involved not just in CAA, its Annual Conference, and its Committee on Women in the Arts (CWA), but also with CAA’s affiliate society the Women’s Caucus for Art, these three women represent pillars in the field of feminist art history.

In this video, they discuss the first 100 years of CAA’s history representing women and underrepresented groups, and point to the future: 2022 marks fifty years of the first committee to represent women at CAA. CAA is excited to honor this milestone at the 2022 Annual Conference and beyond.

Brodsky and Olin are each presenting at the upcoming 110th Annual Conference. See links underneath their bios below for more information on their sessions, panels, and talks.

 

SPEAKERS BIOGRAPHIES

Judith K. Brodsky is currently distinguished professor emerita at Rutgers University. She founded the Rutgers Center for Innovative Print and Paper, now renamed the Brodsky Center in her honor and located at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. The Center has been instrumental in promoting the recognition of women artists and artists of color. She is also co-founder of the Rutgers Center for Women in the Arts and Humanities and The Feminist Art Project, a national and international program to promote women artists in the cultural milieu. With her colleague, Dr. Ferris Olin, she established the Miriam Schapiro Archives on Women Artists at Rutgers and was curator of the Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series at Rutgers from 2006-2013. Brodsky was the co-founder of the Women Artists Archive National Directory (WAAND), funded initially by the Getty Foundation, a digital directory of archives where the papers of women artists active in the US since 1945 are located. A printmaker and book artist, Judith’s work is in over 100 permanent collections. She has also organized and curated many exhibitions and has published extensively, including contributions to The Power of Feminist Art and SIGNS, A Journal of Women in Culture and Society; Junctures in Women’s Leadership: The Arts. Most recently she published the first book on the impact of feminist theory on digital technology in the arts titled Dismantling the Patriarchy, Bit by Bit: Feminism, Art, and Technology, Bloomsbury, 2021. She served as CAA’s President and received the Annual Recognition Award from CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts, as well as past national president for ArtTable and Women’s Caucus for Art.

Details for Judith Brodsky’s participation in the 2022 Annual Conference: link.

Mary D. Garrard, professor emerita of art history at American University, Washington, D. C., is a scholar whose work has combined Italian Renaissance art with feminist studies. Her book, Artemisia Gentileschi: The Image of the Female Hero in Italian Baroque Art (Princeton, 1989), was a groundbreaking contribution to the field, that launched modern studies of the now-famous artist. In Artemisia Gentileschi Circa 1622: The Shaping and Reshaping of an Artistic Identity (University of California, 2001), Garrard addressed new critical issues in Gentileschi studies. Her third book, Artemisia Gentileschi and Early Modern Feminism, positions the artist among the feminist treatises and debates of her time (Reaktion Books, London, 2020). Beyond Artemisia, Garrard has written and spoken extensively on Italian Renaissance, Early Modern art, and feminist art history. With her colleague Norma Broude, Garrard created and edited three books that have become basic texts in art history and women’s studies courses, including Feminism and Art History: Questioning the Litany (1982); The Expanding Discourse: Feminism and Art History (1992); and Reclaiming Female Agency: Feminist Art History After Postmodernism (2005).  Broude and Garrard also created and contributed to The Power of Feminist Art: The American Movement of the 1970s (1994).

Ferris Olin is distinguished professor emerita at Rutgers University, where she was the co-founder and co-director (with Judith K. Brodsky) of Rutgers Center for Women in the Arts and Humanities, and The Feminist Art Project, an international collaboration to make visible the impact of women on the cultural landscape. She also established the Miriam Schapiro Archives on Women Artists at Rutgers as well as the Margery Somers Foster Center, a research center focused on documenting women’s leadership in the public arena, and served as Associate Director of the Institute for Research on Women and earlier, Director of the Art Library. She was curator of the Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series at Rutgers from 1995-2006 and later (with Judith K. Brodsky) from 2006-2013. With Brodsky, Olin also created the Women Artists Archive National Directory (WAAND). Olin has also published broadly. Her most recent book, co-authored with Judith K. Brodsky, is called Junctures in Women’s Leadership: The Arts (Rutgers University Press, fall 2018). Olin has served on the boards of numerous non-profit organizations and was Vice-President of the College Art Association. She is the recipient of numerous awards, among them the Women’s Caucus for Art Lifetime Achievement Award and the College Art Association Committee on Women’s Annual Recognition Award (now known as Distinguished Feminist Award).

Details for Ferris Olin’s participation in the 2022 Annual Conference: link.

Filed under: Advocacy, Event, Publications

Affiliated Society News: December

posted by December 17, 2021

Many of CAA’s affiliated societies will be presenting sessions at our 110th Annual Conference from February 17-19 and from March 3-5. Check out a list of their sessions to preview!

To attend these sessions and more, make sure to register for the conference and learn more at its registration page.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA

Announcements

Bibliography Week 2022 Schedule & Registration

From January 25–28, 2022 the Bibliographical Society of America will celebrate Bibliography Week with a series of events designed to demonstrate bibliographical practice and its relevance to interdisciplinary scholarship in the humanities.

Tuesday, January 25, 4-5pm Eastern – Materialities of Tibetan Buddhist Texts
Within the diverse traditions of Tibetan Buddhism, the power of books—both printed and hand-written—lies not only in their contents, but also in their materiality as objects. The three scholars on this panel will share bibliographical studies of Tibetan texts that highlight how text production, circulation, and replication within architectural spaces has been utilized by Tibetan religious and political leaders to assert and solidify their power.

Wednesday, January 26, 4-5pm Eastern – Meet the Editors of Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America
Please join Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America (PBSA) co-editors Dr. Sarah Werner and Dr. Jesse Erickson for an online Q&A session on January 26. Drs. Werner and Erickson will discuss their vision for the journal and how it can be part of an expanded field of bibliographical scholarship. They will also answer questions that you might have about publishing in PBSA, such as the submission and review process, image permissions, special issues, and open access.

Thursday, January 27, 11-12pm Eastern – In-Person, Center for Book Arts Tour
Guests are invited to a tour of the Center for Books Arts in New York (28 W 27th St., 3rd Floor). For nearly 50 years, CBA has supported artists and uplifted the book arts by presenting exhibitions, lectures, readings, and performances; providing opportunities for artists, writers, curators and scholars through residencies, fellowships, publishing, and collecting; and empowering the creation of new book art by providing courses on book art related technique and history.

Thursday, January 27, 2-3pm Eastern – Bound Images: Maps and Books
This panel offers three case studies to explore what changes theoretically and in practice when we dethrone the ‘sovereign map’ and engage with the production, circulation and reading of maps as bound images, a hybrid graphic and textual part of the stories told by authors and publishers which is experienced by readers through materiality, context, and significance: Giuseppe Rosaccio’s Il mondo e sue parti (Florence, 1595), Johann Jakob Scheuchzer’s Physica Sacra (Augsburg and Ulm, 1731), and Jorge Juan and Antonio Ulloa’s Relación Histórica del viage a la América meridional (Madrid, 1748).

Friday, January 28, 12:00 pm Eastern – 2022 BSA Annual Meeting & New Scholars Program

  • Christopher Adams, Malkin New Scholar – ‘Could you make it rather more of a He and She picture?’: The Queer Dust-Jacket and Postwar British Fiction
  • Eve Houghton, Pantzer New Scholar – ‘I am always sorry to antagonize collectors’: Henrietta Bartlett and the 1916 Census of Shakespeare Quartos
  • Liza Mardoyan, BSA New Scholar – Decorative Bird Initials in the Medieval Armenian Manuscript Culture
  • Learn more about the 2022 New Scholars and read their talk abstracts here.

Friday, January 28, 1:30 pm Eastern – Keynote Lecture by Dr. Elizaveta Strakhov: What Makes Bibliography Critical? A Medievalist’s Response
What makes bibliography critical for a Western manuscripts scholar? Medievalists have, after all, enshrined bibliography to the point of developing the specialized subdisciplines of paleography and codicology. How does a Western medievalist breathe new life into bibliography, that bread-and-butter of their scholarly pursuits? This talk offers a case study of two manuscripts of bilingual Anglo-French poet Charles d’Orléans’s work: not the two collections notoriously supervised by him, but two later fifteenth-century, largely neglected manuscripts of his work, one made for European humanist circles and the other circulating with English Tudor royal audiences.

 


AHNCA (Association of Historians of Nineteenth-Century Art)

Events

Virtual Salon Series: Rethinking the Visual and Material Culture of Enslavement
January 19, 2022 at 7 pm EST

The Association of Historians of Nineteenth-Century Art and the Dahesh Museum of Art present a Virtual Salon, “Rethinking the Visual and Material Culture of Enslavement,” featuring Jennifer Van Horn (University of Delaware), Adrienne L. Childs (The Phillips Collection), and Phillip Troutman (George Washington University). Register at this link.

Virtual Salon: Decorative Arts and Materiality
February 9, 2022 at 7 pm EST

Please join us on Wednesday, February 9, at 7 pm EST for our Virtual Salon on the Decorative Arts and Materiality. This series of online events is co-sponsored by the Association of Historians of Nineteenth-Century Art (AHNCA) and the Dahesh Museum of Art. The panel will feature Amy F. Ogata (University of Southern California), Lee Talbot (The Textile Museum, George Washington University), and Christine Garnier (Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts/Harvard University). Registration information forthcoming!

 


SOCIETY FOR THE HISTORY OF COLLECTING

Event

As part of its continuing series of Zoom lectures focusing on the collections of university museums, the next Society for the History of Collecting–West Coast chapter event will take place on January 28, 2022:

Collectors’ Clothing Caches: Selections from the Texas Fashion Collection
Annette Becker
28 January 2022, 10:00 AM, PST; 6 PM BST

This talk traces the history of the Texas Fashion Collection through three collections and collectors who have shaped its holdings. The Collection was originally conceived by Stanley and Edward Marcus, of the Neiman Marcus luxury department stores, who in 1938 created the Neiman Marcus award to recognize national and international talent in all areas of fashion and design. The talk then focuses on Claudia Heard de Osborne, whose passion for Balenciaga resulted in a gift of hundreds of garments by the designer. The final spotlight will be on brothers Scott and Stuart Gentling, visual artists who collected historic garments as part of their artistic practice.

Annette Becker is a material culture historian and arts educator committed to bridging popular and academic understandings of fashion history. She currently serves as the director and curator of the Texas Fashion Collection, an archive of nearly 20,000 garments and accessories housed at the University of North Texas.

To register for this event please email: events@societyhistorycollecting.org

Filed under: Affiliated Societies, Event

As part of CAA’s 10-year anniversary celebration of its publication The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association, chapter authors reflect on their contributions and how their impressions of the field have changed. Our second video in the series features Craig Houser, who wrote Chapter 5, “The Changing Face of Scholarly Publishing: CAA’s Publication Program.”

Craig Houser is the director of the MA in Art History and its concentration in Art Museum Studies at the City College of New York. His scholarship has addressed institutional politics related to studio art and art history, as well as issues in gender and sexuality in modern and contemporary art.