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Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

In fall 2018, we announced CAA had received an anonymous gift of $1 million to fund travel for art history faculty and their students to special exhibitions related to their classwork. The generous gift established the Art History Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions.

The jury for the Art History Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions has now selected the second group of recipients as part of the gift. This year’s awardees are:

Holly Flora, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA
Course: Art, Cosmopolitanism, and Intellectual Culture in the Middle Ages
Exhibition: Medieval Bologna: Art for a University City at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, TN

Caroline Fowler, Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, MA
Course: Slavery and the Dutch Golden Age
Exhibition: Slavery at the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

Maile Hutterer, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR
Course: Time in Medieval Art and Architecture
Exhibition: Transcending Time: The Medieval Book of Hours at The Getty Center, Los Angeles, CA

Erin McCutcheon, Lycoming College, Williamsport, PA
Course: Art & Politics in Latin America
Exhibition: Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Unstable Presence at SFMOMA, San Francisco, CA

Shalon Parker, Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA
Course: Women Artists
Exhibition: New Time: Art and Feminisms in the 21st Century at the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley, CA

Rebecca Pelchar, SUNY Adirondack, Queensbury, NY
Course: Introduction to Museum Studies
Exhibition: Marcel Duchamp: The Barbara and Aaron Levine Collection at the Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, DC

As museums and schools have moved online in light of the coronavirus pandemic, we are being as flexible as necessary with the dates of travel to accommodate all award winners and classes.

The Art History Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions supports travel, lodging, and research efforts by art history students and faculty in conjunction with special museum exhibitions in the United States and throughout the world. Awards are made exclusively to support travel to exhibitions that directly correspond to the class content, and exhibitions on all artists, periods, and areas of art history are eligible.

Applications for the third round of grants will be accepted by CAA beginning in fall 2020. Deadlines and details can be found on the Travel Grants page.

The University of Washington announced last week that it would cancel in-person classes and have students take courses and finals remotely. Image: The UW campus in 2017, photo by Priyaranjan Pattnayak.

To help stop the spread of COVID-19 throughout the United States, several universities, including the University of Washington, Stanford, Columbia and Princeton, have chosen to temporarily forgo in-person classes in favor of remote learning. The decision to transition classes is part of an attempt at “social distancing,” the practice of limiting large gatherings and in-person contact to slow the transmission of the virus.

In most of these cases, it has been left up to faculty to make decisions about how to move their classes online. In an effort to crowdsource resources, we’ve gathered tweets and links that instructors are sharing to help, and will continue to update this list as we receive new ones.

For the most up-to-the-moment updates, please visit our Twitter feed. You can also explore resources others are sharing here.

Is your institution canceling in-person classes? Log it here:

Resources for getting started:

On including your students in an online learning plan:

Explore more resources using #CovidCampus:

HELPFUL LINKS

As Art Schools Cancel Student Shows, One Instagram Account Pledges to Give Them Life (ARTnews)

The Ultimate Guide to Virtual Museum Resources, E-Learning, and Online Collections (MCN)

Online Art & Design Studio Instruction in the Age of “Social Distancing” (Facebook group)

COVID-19 Freelance Artist Resources (link)

A New Medical Emergency Grant for Artists (Hyperallergic)

15 Tips for Working Remotely (American Alliance of Museums)

Online Teaching – In the context of COVID19 (Simon D. Halliday)

Art History Resources via Smarthistory (link)

RELATED READING

Opinion: Please Do a Bad Job of Putting Your Courses Online (Rebecca Barrett-Fox)

The Coronavirus and the Ruptured Narrative of Campus Life (The New Yorker)

How to Close Colleges Without Hurting Vulnerable Students (The Washington Post)

Have a resource to contribute? Email Joelle Te Paske, CAA media and content manager, at jtepaske@collegeart.org

A visit to LACMA at the 2018 Annual Conference in Los Angeles. Photo: Rafael Cardenas

In August 2018, we announced that CAA had received a major anonymous gift to fund travel for art history faculty and their students to special exhibitions related to their classwork. After a successful inaugural year, we’re pleased to now be accepting applications for the second grant cycle of the Art History Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions.

The fund is designed to award up to $10,000 to qualifying undergraduate and graduate art history classes to cover students’ and instructors’ costs (travel, accommodations, and admissions fees) associated with attending museum special exhibitions throughout the United States and worldwide.  The purpose of the grants is to enhance students’ first-hand knowledge of original works of art.

Applications are due by January 15, 2020.

APPLY NOW

GUIDELINES

  • These awards support student and instructor travel costs incurred while visiting museum special exhibitions in the United States and worldwide.
  • Graduate and undergraduate art history classes are eligible to apply for funds to attend temporary museum exhibitions in the United States and other countries. Travel to see permanent collections is not eligible, nor would be performances and related ephemeral events. Exhibitions on any artist, period, or area of art history are eligible for funding.
  • Awards are made directly to institutions whose institutional membership in CAA is in good standing.
  • Applicant instructors must have individual membership in CAA and be in good standing.
  • Funds may only be used to travel to exhibitions that correspond directly to the content of the class.
  • The size of the class for which a grant may be awarded shall not be larger than fifteen (15) students.
  • Awards may only be used for admission fees, travel and lodging expenses for the instructor and class members. Every attempt to attain group rates must be made.

Completed applications must include the following:

  • Instructor’s curriculum vitae
  • A course description and syllabus that identifies and explains the exhibition as part of the pedagogical aim of the course – Be sure to detail how the visit is integrated into the course (up to 500 words)
  • An explanation of the instructor’s expertise in the subject matter of the exhibition (up to 250 words)
  • A tentative itinerary of travel and lodging (up to 250 words)
  • A budget detailing transportation and lodging expenses associated with traveling to and from the exhibition and lodging and admission costs, including an explanation of how any travel and accommodation funds in excess of the award will be raised
  • A letter of support from the instructor’s department chair or dean

CRITERIA

  • How well the exhibition fits within the pedagogical aim of the course.
  • The scholarly merit of the exhibition.
  • Financial need. Would the class not be able to visit the exhibition, otherwise?

 AWARDS

Awards will not exceed $10,000 per class, per exhibition.

All travel must be completed between June 2020 – May 2021.

REPORTING

Awardees must submit a report of up to 1,000 words which explains in detail the benefits received and problems encountered in the course of travel to the exhibition for which support was received.

*Reports must be submitted to CAA no later than two months after the completion of travel.

ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Recipients of the award will be guaranteed a session at the subsequent CAA Annual Conference after their travel has ended. CAA will make the session available, but costs associated with attending the conference, including registration, membership, travel, and accommodation, will be the participants’ responsibility.

TIMELINE

The deadline for application materials is January 15.

APPLY NOW

Member Spotlight: Arnold J. Kemp

posted by September 18, 2019

We are delighted to welcome Arnold J. Kemp, in conversation with Huey Copeland, as one of our Distinguished Artist Interviews at the 2020 CAA Annual Conference. Learn more.


Up next in our Member Spotlight series, we are highlighting the work of Arnold J. Kemp, professor of Painting and Drawing and Dean of Graduate Studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC). Joelle Te Paske, CAA’s media and content manager, corresponded recently with Professor Kemp to learn more about his work. Read the interview below:

Arnold J. Kemp. Photo: Todd Rosenberg for the School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Where are you from originally?

I am from the 6 square miles of a Boston neighborhood called Dorchester. The back of my high school, which was located in the Fenway, faced the Isabella Stewart Gardener Museum and was just a few blocks away from the Museum of Fine Arts. I took classes at the MFA through an after school program supported by the Boston Public School system, and I was lucky to be asked to take classes at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston during the summers of my sophomore and junior years of high school.

During my senior year in high school I went to New York City to visit my older sister, and while she was at work I spent the day at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. I was entranced with the African and Oceanic collections there and I learned all that could. This was a transformative experience that has much to do with the way I have surrounded myself in an immersive life in the arts, culture, and literature.

What pathways led you to the work you do now?

After graduating high school I took part an internship working for the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum. I learned a lot there about how museums functioned. Then, in college at Tufts University, I worked for the Boston Center for the Arts while my roommates and I ran a small organization that showed our peers—other young artists and writers—and invited guests such as Tim Rollins, Emett Gowin, and Marie Howe. I was aware that not far away, the Dark Room Collective—which included Ellen Gallagher, Kevin Young, Tisa Bryant, Thomas Sayers Ellis, and Sharan Strange—was doing similar things. In fact, Ellen Gallagher and I worked together on the night shift at the Museum School’s library.

In 1991, when the art world was still struggling to distill the pain and loss of the AIDS epidemic, I moved to San Francisco and marched with ACT UP. Around that time I also started working at the not-for-profit experimental space called New Langton Arts, and I participated in the later days of conferences organized by the National Association of Artist’s Organizations (NAAO).

At Langton I met role models such as Renny Pritikin, Judy Moran, Jon Winet, Holly Block, Ann Philbin, and James Elaine who believed in spaces started by artists to support artists. I also met many great artists and writers who were central to the literary movement called New Narrative and places such as Small Press TrafficThe Lab and The Luggage Store gallery. Kevin Killian, Dodie Bellamy, Kathy Acker, Bob Glück, Barret Watten, Leslie Scalpino, Quincy Troupe, Harryette Mullen had a big influence on me. These people are important to me because they encouraged me to be an artist, a poet, and a curator. They showed me how to curate and showed me values of good organizations that supported communities struggling for relevance.

Courtesy Yerba Buena Center for the Arts.

At that time I had no idea that I would end up teaching. I was supporting myself by working for arts non-profits. I kept doing more and more in this arena and eventually became an assistant curator and then associate curator at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA). I worked there for ten years and curated solo and group exhibitions and worked with artists such as David Hammons, Patty Chang, Carrie Mae Weems, Fred Wilson, Ellen Gallagher, Laylah Ali, Bruce Conner, John Baldessari, Michael Joo, and so many others. I even met Bill T. Jones, Meredith Monk, Philip Glass, and Conlon Nancarrow while working at YBCA. I worked there from its start in 1993 until 2003 when I left to attend graduate school at Stanford.

Teaching came somewhat naturally while I was pursuing an MFA at Stanford. After grad school and after struggling for a few years as a New York artist, an opportunity arose for me to direct the MFA in Visual Studies Department and to teach at the Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland, Oregon. Prior to teaching in Portland I had an exhibition there and curated and organized a public program around my exhibition as part of Portland Institute for Contemporary Art’s TBA Festival. So much seemed possible in Portland, and I developed a true art family there.

The desire to experience working with larger schools and more diverse populations led me to positions as Chair of the Department of Painting and Printmaking at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) and also to my current position as Dean of Graduate Studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC).

What are you working on currently?

Arnold J. Kemp, Untitled, 2018, archival pigment print, 61 x 41 inches. Courtesy the artist.

I am always busy in the studio. I just completed delivering 23 works to the set of a remake of a Hollywood film that is currently being shot in Chicago. It turns out the producer of Jordan Peele’s films has been looking at my work for a long time, and I am glad that this opportunity has come my way.

I am also preparing for a solo show opening at the Los Angeles-based nonprofit JOAN in September 2020, followed by a solo show at Fourteen30 Contemporary, my gallery in Portland. For both these shows I will exhibit paintings and sculptures. Perhaps there will be a performance of one of my plays that have been staged in art galleries and artists’ spaces such as Biquini Wax EPS in Mexico City.

I also just joined the board of Threewalls, a Chicago-based nonprofit with an itinerant exhibition program that supports and encourages art practices that respond to lived experience, encouraging connections beyond art. As part of Threewalls’ board I will be involved again in expanding the discourse around the presentation and  exhibition of contemporary art—from Threewalls, to the fourth wall, to breaking down walls. This is where itinerancy comes into play as the presentation model for Threewalls.

Having lived and practiced as an artist, writer, curator and educator in Boston, San Francisco, New York, Portland, Chicago and Richmond, I have had a life that is productively itinerant!

How would you say poetry weaves itself through your work?

For many years theses were separate activities, but in 2012 I began writing theatrical works with spoken lines that are meant to be performed in galleries by non-actors chosen from the community in which the piece is performed. Often the pieces concern that community so I might sometimes have a local artist or curator play themselves. This happened most recently at the venue in Mexico I mentioned, Biquini Wax EPS, in a farce that I wrote based on my experiences in the art and academic worlds. The piece was translated into Spanish and performed by local artists, writers, curators, and activists. I think of the pieces as time based-sculpture. The performance was just one part of a big show titled “When the Sick Rule the World” after Dodie Bellamy’s essay of the same name.

What is a favorite exhibition you’ve worked on over the years?

When I was at Pacific Northwest College of Art I curated a two-person show of B. Wurtz and Xylor Jane. There was a catalog and public program, and it was great to bring my San Francisco, New York, and Portland communities together. Xylor Jane is painter I have known from way back in my San Francisco days. Her work is formally beautiful and inspired by numbers, the Fibonacci sequence and the color sequences of ROYGBIV. She accomplishes a lot in visually intense abstractions that are based on logical forms. B. Wurtz is older than Xylor and is more of a conceptualist, having gone to school at CalArts in its heyday. Some of his classmates were Mike Kelly and Tony Oursler. He took classes with [Michael] Asher. The show was rigorous and unexpected—it did a lot to get students to think out of the box.

Do you have a favorite artist or exhibition in general?

I am not sure, at this point, if I have favorite artists anymore, but I recall The Museum as Muse which was curated by Kynaston McShine for MoMA as being a terrifically aesthetic, intellectual, and poetic exhibition that sought to give voice to the complicated relationship between museums and artists in light of history and institutional critique. I am fortunate enough to have seen it and to also have the terrific catalog. I feel that McShine as an art world personage needs to be studied and written about. He was important not just for being the curator of Primary Structures and Information but also for being of black Caribbean descent (he was born in Trinidad) and for being a one-time the lover of Frank O’Hara. Paradoxically, his work at MoMA also caused the Guerrilla Girls to organize and fight for greater inclusion of women and people of color in New York museums. No one has dealt with McShine’s legacy or his biography in the way they should. McShine was complicated and private, and so brilliant and influential.

When did you first become a CAA member?

I joined CAA in 2013 because as a department chair at VCU’s School of the Arts I wanted to stay in touch with artists, historians, and theorists from around the country. There are certain people who I aim to see at every conference just so that we can catch up and talk about the field and find ways to organize and help each other. In some ways the CAA reminds me of NAAO conferences that I used to attend in the 1990s.

Garfield Park Conservatory. Photo: Joelle Te Paske

What should people make sure not to miss while they’re in Chicago for the 2020 conference?

In Chicago there is no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing, so I suggest bringing a warm coat! Also, go to Garfield Park Conservatory—one of the largest and most stunning botanical conservatories in the nation with thousands of plant species from around the world throughout eight indoor display gardens.

What is your must-read book at the moment?

I would have to say Housing Shaped by Labour: The Architecture of Scarcity in Informal Settlements by Ana Rosa Chagas Cavalcanti.

How do you balance your artistic and professional roles? 

Surround yourself with the things and people that you love. That is the only way I have been able to find balance. I find balance because it is a necessity and loving what I do makes it worth the time and effort.

ARNOLD J. KEMP BIOGRAPHY

Arnold J. Kemp is an interdisciplinary artist living in Chicago. The recurrent theme in his drawings, photographs, sculptures and writing is the permeability of the border between self and the materials of one’s reality. Kemp’s works are in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Studio Museum in Harlem, The Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, The Portland Art Museum, The Schneider Museum of Art, and the Tacoma Art Museum. He has received awards from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the  Joan Mitchell Foundation, The Pollock-Krasner Foundation, and Portland Institute for Contemporary Art. His work has been exhibited recently in Chicago, Mexico City, New York, San Francisco and Portland. His work was also shown in TagProposals On Queer Play and the Ways Forward at the ICA Philadelphia. Kemp was a founding curator at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts from 1993-2003 and is currently the Dean of Graduate Studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Submit a Proposal for Idea Exchange at CAA 2020

posted by September 16, 2019

Idea Exchange at the 2018 CAA Annual Conference. Photo: Rafael Cardenas

We launched Idea Exchange at the 2018 Annual Conference in Los Angeles in response to members who expressed an interest in holding informal roundtable discussions on topics ranging from fellowship applications and gallery representation to student engagement in the classroom and preserving women artists’ legacies. See a list of previous discussion topics here.

We’re offering Idea Exchange again in 2020 and we’re looking for CAA members to serve as discussion leaders.

Propose a topic that you would like to discuss with your colleagues for a sixty-minute roundtable at the conference. It can relate to professional development, teaching, or current events, such as the debate surrounding Confederate monuments or the #MeToo movement in the arts. Be creative. The conversations are meant to be lively and engaging. Please submit your Idea Exchange proposals by November 1, 2019.

SUBMIT IDEA EXCHANGE TOPIC

In order to submit an Idea Exchange topic, you will need to have your member ID and password ready. If you do not have an individual ID number and password or you do not know it, please contact member services by email at membership@collegeart.org or by phone at 212-691-1051, ext. 1.

Idea Exchange will be held in the Hilton Chicago, Lower Level, Salon B, during the following times:

Wednesday, February 12: 10:30 AM; 12:30 PM; 2:00 PM; 4:00 PM

Thursday, February 13: 10:30 AM; 12:30 PM; 2:00 PM; 4:00 PM

Friday, February 14: 10:30 AM; 12:30 PM; 2:00 PM; 4:00 PM

Saturday, February 15: 10:30 AM; 12:30 PM

For more information on Idea Exchange, contact Mira Friedlaender, manager of the Annual Conference, at mfriedlaender@collegeart.org or by phone at (212) 392-4405.

2018 CAA Annual Conference. Photo: Rafael Cardenas

In fall 2018, we announced CAA had received an anonymous gift of $1 million to fund travel for art history faculty and their students to special exhibitions related to their classwork. The generous gift established the Art History Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions.

The jury for the Art History Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions met in May 2019 to select the first group of recipients as part of the gift.

The awardees are:

Catherine Girard, Eastern Washington University
Class: Topics in Art History: Manet Inside Out
Exhibition: Manet and Modern Beauty at The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

Luis Gordo Peláez, California State University Fresno
Class: Arts of the Colonial Andes
Exhibition: Art & Empire: The Golden Age of Spain at The San Diego Museum of Art

Alison Miller, University of the South
Class: Japanese Print Culture
Exhibition: Yoshitoshi: Spirit and Spectacle at the Minneapolis Institute of Art

Rachel Stephens, University of Alabama
Class: American Portraiture
Exhibition: Black Out: Silhouettes Then and Now at the Birmingham Museum of Art

“We’re delighted to announce the inaugural recipients of the Art History Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions, a groundbreaking CAA program designed specifically to enhance students’ first-hand knowledge of works of art,” said Hunter O’Hanian, CAA’s executive director. “The new Fund places a spotlight on the critical work art history scholars are doing to grow the field, with CAA as the go-to organization supporting and advancing their work.”

The Art History Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions supports travel, lodging, and research efforts by art history students and faculty in conjunction with special museum exhibitions in the United States and throughout the world. Awards are made exclusively to support travel to exhibitions that directly correspond to the class content, and exhibitions on all artists, periods, and areas of art history are eligible.

Applications for the second round of grants will be accepted by CAA beginning in fall 2019. Deadlines and details can be found on the Travel Grants page.

Attendee at 2018 CAA Annual Conference in Los Angeles. Photo: Rafael Cardenas

In August, we announced that CAA received a major anonymous gift of $1 million to fund travel for art history faculty and their students to special exhibitions related to their classwork. We’re pleased to now be accepting applications for the newly created Art History Special Exhibition Travel Fund. 

The fund is designed to award up to $10,000 to qualifying undergraduate and graduate art history classes to cover students’ and instructors’ costs (travel, accommodations, and admissions fees) associated with attending museum special exhibitions throughout the United States and worldwide.  The purpose of the grants is to enhance students’ first-hand knowledge of original works of art.

Applications are due by January 15, 2019.

APPLY NOW

Related: Someone Just Gave Budding Art Historians $1 Million So They Can Afford to Actually Go See the Art They’re Studying

GUIDELINES

  • These awards support student and instructor travel costs incurred while visiting museum special exhibitions in the United States and worldwide.
  • Graduate and undergraduate art history classes are eligible to apply for funds to attend temporary museum exhibitions (not exhibitions on permanent display) in the United States and other countries. Exhibitions on any artist, period, or area of art history are eligible for funding.
  • Awards are made directly to institutions whose membership in CAA is in good standing. Applicant instructors must be individual members of CAA in good standing. Funds may only be used to travel to exhibitions that correspond directly to the content of the class.  Ideally, classes will be no larger than fifteen students and planned to benefit from the special exhibition (for instance, a seminar on the subject of the exhibition).
  • Awards may only be used for admission fees, travel and lodging expenses for the instructor and class members. Every attempt to attain group rates must be made.

Completed applications must include the following:

  • An application form
  • Instructor’s curriculum vitae
  • A course description and syllabus that identifies and explains the exhibition as part of the pedagogical aim of the course
  • An explanation of the instructor’s expertise in the subject matter of the exhibition
  • A tentative itinerary of travel and lodging
  • A budget detailing transportation and lodging expenses associated with traveling to and from the exhibition and lodging and admission costs, including an explanation of how any travel and accommodation funds in excess of the award will be raised
  • A letter of support from the instructor’s department chair or dean

 AWARDS

Awards will not exceed $10,000 per class, per exhibition.

ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Recipients of the award will be guaranteed a session at the subsequent CAA Annual Conference after their travel has ended. CAA will make the session available, but costs associated with attending the conference, including registration, membership, travel, and accommodation, will be the participants’ responsibility.

TIMELINE

The deadline for application materials is January 15, 2019.

APPLY NOW

Submit a Proposal for Idea Exchange at CAA 2019

posted by October 09, 2018

Idea Exchange at CAA 2018 in Los Angeles. Photo: Rafael Cardenas

We launched Idea Exchange at the 2018 Annual Conference in Los Angeles in response to members who expressed an interest in holding informal roundtable discussions on topics ranging from fellowship applications and gallery representation to student engagement in the classroom and preserving women artists’s legacies.

We’re offering Idea Exchange again in 2019 and we’re looking for CAA members to serve as discussion leaders.

Propose a topic that you would like to discuss with your colleagues for a sixty-minute roundtable at the conference. It can relate to professional development, teaching, or fellowships. Suggest a discussion around current events, such as the debate surrounding Confederate monuments or the #MeToo movement in the arts. Be creative. The conversations are meant to be lively and engaging. Please submit your Idea Exchange proposals by December 14, 2018.

SUBMIT IDEA EXCHANGE TOPIC

In order to submit an Idea Exchange topic, you will need to have your member ID and password ready. If you do not have an individual ID number and password or you do not know it, please contact member services by email at membership@collegeart.org or by phone at 212-691-1051, ext. 1.

Idea Exchange will be held in the Cultural and Academic Network Hall during the following times:

Thursday, February 14: 10:30 AM; 12:30 PM; 2:00 PM; 4:00 PM

Friday, February 15: 10:30 AM; 12:30 PM; 2:00 PM; 4:00 PM

Saturday, February 16: 10:30 AM; 12:30 PM

For more information on Idea Exchange, contact Alison Chang at achang@collegeart.org or by phone at (212) 392-4436.

2018 CAA Annual Conference. Image: Rafael Cardenas

We are pleased to announce CAA has received a major anonymous gift of $1 million to fund travel for art history faculty and their students to special exhibitions related to their classwork. The gift will establish the Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions, a new program to be administered and juried by CAA.

“This incredibly generous gift will not only support art history scholars and students for years to come, it is a powerful message to the visual arts field that their work is as important as ever,” said Hunter O’Hanian, CAA’s executive director. “The new Fund also reinforces CAA as the preeminent organization supporting and advancing professionals in the visual arts and design.”

Groundbreaking in its scope, the Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions is intended exclusively to enhance the first-hand knowledge of original works of art. The Fund will support travel, lodging, and admission for art history students and faculty in conjunction with special museum exhibitions in the United States and throughout the world. Awards will be made exclusively to support travel to exhibitions that directly correspond to the class content. However, exhibitions on all artists, periods, and areas of art history are eligible.

Awards of up to $10,000 will be granted on a per project basis by a jury formed by CAA to oversee the Fund for Travel to Special Exhibitions.

Applications will be accepted by CAA beginning in fall 2018. All application criteria and information will be listed on the CAA website.

CAA recently corresponded with Marc Handelman, an artist and assistant professor of visual arts for the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, about a new grassroots organization concerned with advocacy issues, called the Art Professors of America.

When and why did the Art Professors of America form? What are its goals?

A couple of dozen art professors from several schools in the Northeast came together in the wake of the election initially to discuss how we might respond to a right-wing campaign to blacklist liberal and progressive faculty by smearing them as un-American. Simultaneously, many of us were seeing a troubling uptick both of threats and attacks on Latino, Muslim, and LGBTQ students, and of anti-Semitism on campuses. Some of us were also experiencing increased feelings of anxiety and self-censorship. Most of all, we felt the urgency and need of being together and sharing our experiences as artists and educators and citizens. We decided to meet every two weeks in New York and continue the conversation. Because colleagues from around the country reached out to be part of the dialogue, we started an email group that now represents professors in well over a dozen states. We are currently working on expanding this network to all fifty states, welcoming art professors of all ranks and teaching status, including TAs and those between positions. Our primary goal right now is to be a platform that connects people nationally and shares critical information. Our latest project was the launch of our website that features news related to education in our political climate and a critical resource page.

What is the purpose of the advocacy resource APA is building?

There are many potential and actual threats that faculty are facing increasingly. Some of these issues begin at the state level, where funding for classes or entire programs are being cut due to their political content. Other issues range from online harassment to deceptively progressive legislation for free-speech protection on campus. Meanwhile, higher education in general continues to foster crippling student debt as institutions struggle to deal with increasing demands for greater diversity, inclusion, and equity. The resource page we launched and continue to build on modestly attempts to provide critical information and tools to help us deal with some of these problems, from distributing information about student loans for undocumented students to debt models in art education. Other items provide online security protocol and consent laws for recording in classrooms. Some of the categories include Censorship and Intimidation, Critical Pedagogy, Alternative Art Programs, Debt and Precarity, Sanctuary and Immigration, and Legal Resources, among others.

Where do the resources come from?

Nearly all of the content already exists online in some form, from other organizations and studies. Populating the website was an extensive three-month process of collecting information and links and aggregating them in these categories. We have been so grateful to other working groups and colleagues for sharing their resources as well.

What are the most urgent issues confronting art professors in the United States today?

Clearly we don’t assume to speak for every program. But in the immediate context, the travel ban and ICE deportations may have the most immediate effects on our students, faculty, and visiting artists. Academic freedom has been under various levels of threat for a long time, and it remains to be seen how deeply and broadly new threats develop. But economic precarity and inequality remain the most pressing structural issue in education both for art schools and the larger university system. This affects part-time adjuncts who, already underpaid, are increasingly asked to do things such as decrease their course loads so as not to trigger contingent benefits, the end of tenured lines, and students who suffer under crippling debt or have no access to higher education at all. Critical and progressive curricula can’t make up for the undergirded issues of access, which are directly tied to geography, race, and class.

Under this current political regime, arts faculty may actually have a greater deal of security than professors and departments researching and teaching social justice, antiracism, and climate change. We need to continually find ways to support our colleagues in other fields.

How can CAA members get involved?

We welcome new arts-affiliated adjuncts, TAs, and professors into our organization and dialogue—the more voices represented, the better. Members will have access to group documents and files, as well as The Story Collection Project, which shares and archives testimonials and stories about what is happening in different corners of our campuses and in classrooms across the country. Meanwhile, the Art Profs America website, offering news, links, and resources, is live and available to anyone online. Please feel free to share with other colleagues as well. You can visit us, or join at http://artprofsamerica.com.

To request to join the discussion, please visit https://groups.google.com/d/forum/art-profs-america. You may also follow APA on Twitter.

Filed under: Advocacy, Higher Education, Teaching