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Scripting A Smeary Spot on Art Journal Open

posted by CAA — Dec 21, 2017

The late Jack Doroshow performs as Mother Flawless, a clairvoyant psyche. In this scene she recites an excerpt from Joanna Russ’ sci-fi novel We Who Are About To. . . , A.K. Burns, video still from A Smeary Spot, 2015, four-channel video installation, HD color, six-channel sound, TRT 53:13 (artwork © A.K. Burns; image provided by the artist, Callicoon Fine Arts, NY, and Michel Rein Gallery, Paris/Brussels)

In this annotated commentary, artist A.K. Burns and art historian and critic Melissa Ragain explore the script, performances, and citations in Burn’s video installation A Smeary Spot (2015), which is the first episode in her five-part Negative Space film cycle.

From Ragain’s introduction: “In this annotated commentary, A.K. and I discuss the first episode of Negative Space titled A Smeary Spot, a fifty-three-minute, four-channel video installation that premiered in September 2015 at Participant Inc. in New York. We walk through selections from the script, which A.K. constructed out of appropriated and altered excerpts from poetry, philosophy, and fiction. Feminist sci-fi by writers like Joanna Russ, Ursula K. Le Guin, and the new materialist philosophy of Karen Barad were starting points for Negative Space though its cultural touchstones are far more wide-ranging.”

Visit Art Journal Open to explore Scripting A Smeary Spot.

 

Filed under: AJO

News from the Art and Academic Worlds

posted by CAA — Dec 20, 2017

An MIT student perusing works available through the school’s Student Loan Art Program (courtesy MIT List Visual Arts Center, photo by John Kennard)

Each week CAA News summarizes articles, published around the web, that CAA members may find interesting and useful in their professional and creative lives.

8 US Colleges Lending Their Art Collections to Students

Making art collections available to students has grown in popularity on campuses across the country. (Hyperallergic)

Is Higher Education Really Losing the Public?

New public opinion data suggest that despite significant concerns about prices, most Americans (and many Republicans) believe a postsecondary education is essential. (Inside Higher Ed)

Culture Track ’17 Finds American Definition of Culture Changing

A new study shows the distinction between fine art and pop art becoming blurred, as Benjamin Millepied, 2018 CAA Keynote Speaker Charles Gaines, and other city arts leaders discuss the implications for museums and creators. (The Hollywood Reporter)

On Neuroaesthetics, or the Productive Exercise of Looking at Art

Jonathan Fineberg is director of an emerging art-science PhD program at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. (Hyperallergic)

Documents Reveal How the Berkshire Museum Manipulated Its Board Into Liquidating Its Collection

How does a museum end up deciding to sell off substantially all of its most valuable artworks? (Artnet News)

CEOs Are Going to Art School to Think More Creatively

RISD launched a continuing education program in 2016 aimed at today’s global leaders. (Artsy)

Filed under: CAA News

Meet the 2017 Wyeth Award Winners

posted by CAA — Dec 19, 2017

Benjamin Henry Latrobe, A view on Mount Vernon with the Washington family on the terrace, 1796, watercolor, pen and ink on paper, 16 3/8 x 24 inches. Image: Wikimedia Commons

Meet the Grantees

Since 2005, the Wyeth Foundation for American Art has supported the publication of books on American art through the Wyeth Foundation for American Art Publication Grant, administered by CAA. The 2017 grantees are:

  • Fryd, Vivian, “Against Our Will”: Representing Sexual Trauma in American Art, 1970–2014 (Penn State University Press)
  • Moore, Emily, For Future Generations: Tlingit, Haida, and American Art in Alaska’s New Deal Totem Parks (University of Washington Press)
  • Naeem, Asma, Out of Earshot: Sound and Technology in American Art, 1850–1900 (University of California Press)
  • Sienkewicz, Julia, Epic Landscapes, Benjamin Latrobe and the Art of Watercolor (University of Delaware Press)
  • Weyl, Christina, The Women of Atelier 17: Craft, Creativity, and Modernist Printmaking (Yale University Press)

Read a list of all recipients of the Wyeth Foundation for American Art Publication Grant from 2005 to the present.

BACKGROUND

For the Wyeth Foundation for American Art Publication Grant, “American art” is defined as art created in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. Eligible for the grant are book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of American art, visual studies, and related subjects that have been accepted by a publisher on their merits but cannot be published in the most desirable form without a subsidy. The deadline for the receipt of applications is September 15 of each year.

Guidelines
Process, Materials, and Checklist

CONTACT

Questions? Please contact Aakash Suchak, CAA grants and special programs manager at 212-392-4435.

Filed under: Books, Grants and Fellowships

The weekly CAA Conversations Podcast continues the vibrant discussions initiated at our Annual Conference. Listen in each week as educators explore arts and pedagogy, tackling everything from the day-to-day grind to the big, universal questions of the field.

This week, Ray Yeager, associate professor of Art at the University of Charleston and Katherine Barnes, adjunct professor at Columbia College, discuss teaching art appreciation to non-majors.

Filed under: CAA Conversations

New in caa.reviews

posted by CAA — Dec 15, 2017

Elena Phipps discusses The Andean Science of Weaving: Structures and Techniques for Warp-Faced Weaves by Denise Y. Arnold and Elvira Espejo. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Courtney Pedersen reviews the Cindy Sherman exhibition at the Brisbane Gallery of Modern Art. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Mechtild Widrich writes about Reparative Aesthetics: Witnessing in Contemporary Art Photography by Susan Best. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Nathan Arrington and Carolyn Yerkes discuss The Plaster Cast Gallery at the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art. Read the full review at caa.reviews. 

Gillian Elliot reviews Romanesque Cathedrals in Mediterranean Europe: Architecture, Ritual and Urban Context edited by Gerardo Boto Varela and Justin E. A. Kroesen. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Alison Syme writes on John Singer Sargent and the Art of Allusion by Bruce Redford. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

David Pullins reviews Les Jombert: Une famille de libraires parisiens dans l’Europe des Lumières (1680–1824) by Greta Kaucher. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Philip Kelleher writes about the exhibition Francis Alÿs: The Fabiola Project. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Aaron Slodounik discusses The Deaths of Henri Regnault by Marc Gotlieb. Read the full review at caa.reviews.

Hanneke Grootenboer reviews Rembrandt: The Painter Thinking by Ernst van de Wetering. Read the full review at caa.reviews. 

 

Filed under: caa.reviews

Notice of CAA 106th Annual Business Meeting

posted by CAA — Dec 15, 2017

College Art Association
Notice of 106th Annual Business Meeting
Los Angeles, California
Wednesday, February 21 and Friday, February 23, 2018

The 106th Annual Business Meeting of the members of the College Art Association will be called to order at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 21st, during Convocation at the 2018 Annual Conference, in Room 502A and B at the Los Angeles Convention Center, 1201 S. Figueroa Street, Los Angeles, California.

CAA President, Suzanne Preston Blier, will preside. The Annual Business Meeting will be held in two parts.

AGENDA

The Agenda for the first part of the Annual Business Meeting is as follows:
I. Welcome – Hunter O’Hanian, CAA Executive Director and CEO
II. Presentation by Suzanne Preston Blier, CAA President
III. Executive Director’s Report – Hunter O’Hanian
IV. Presentation of CAA Awards for Distinction – Suzanne Preston Blier
V. 2018 Professional Development Fellowships in Visual Arts and Art History
VI. Keynote Address – Charles Gaines, CalArt, School of Art.

After the Keynote Address, the Meeting will be recessed and will re-convene on Friday, February 23, 2018 from 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. in Room 403B, at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The Agenda for the second part of the Annual Business Meeting is as follows:

VII. Approval of Minutes of 105th Annual Business Meeting, February 15 and 17, 2017 – see: http://www.collegeart.org/news/2017/12/15/caa-105th-annual-business-meeting-minutes 

VIII. Financial Report: Teresa Lopez, CAA Chief Financial Officer
IX. Old Business
X. New Business
XI. Results of Election of New Directors: Suzanne Preston Blier
XII. Open discussion with members, Board and staff

Proxies
If you are unable to attend the Annual Business Meeting, please complete a proxy online to appoint the individuals named thereon to (i) vote, as directed by you, for directors, and, at their discretion, on such other matters as may properly come before the Annual Business Meeting; and (ii) to vote in any and all adjournments thereof. CAA Members will be notified when the proxy for casting votes becomes available online in early January 2018. A proxy, with your vote for directors, must be received no later than 6:00 p.m. PST Thursday, February 22, 2018.

Next Meeting – 2019
The 107th Annual Business Meeting of the College Art Association will be held in New York in 2019, and again take place in two parts — with a call to order on February 13, and a second meeting and open discussion on February 15.

Roberto Tejada, Secretary
College Art Association

December 15, 2017

Filed under: Board of Directors, Governance

CAA 105th Annual Business Meeting Minutes

posted by CAA — Dec 15, 2017

The College Art Association 105th Annual Business Meeting Minutes
New York Hilton Midtown Hotel
1335 Avenue of the Americas
NY NY 10019

February 15, 2017: Convocation, 5:30 p.m.
West/East Ballroom, 3rd Floor

February 17, 2017:  MY_CAA, 12:15 p.m.
East Ballroom, 3rd Floor
 

Part One

CAA’s President, Suzanne Preston Blier, welcomed attendees to CAA’s Convocation and to the Association’s 105th Annual Meeting of its members. While the Annual Meeting was scheduled to be held in two parts, Blier advised attendees that official items of the meeting would be covered on Friday, February 17th, from 12:15 – 1:15 p.m. at the “My-CAA meeting, hosted by Hunter O’Hanian, CAA’s new Executive Director and CEO.

Convocation proceeded with the President’s opening comments followed by the Awards ceremony, the Keynote Address with Mary Miller, and cocktails next to the East Ballroom.

CAA’s President, Suzanne Preston Blier addressed Convocation with the subject “Art Matters.” Here follows the link to President Blier’s comments:  http://www.collegeart.org/news/2017/02/24/caa-2017-convocation-presidents-address-art-matters/

Part Two

I. Call to Order – President’s Report – Suzanne Preston Blier
On Friday, February 17, 2017 at 12:15 p.m., President Blier called to order Part Two of the Annual Meeting in the East Ballroom.

II. Blier introduced Judith Rodenbeck the Annual Conference Chair who spoke of the success of the changes to the Annual Conference instituted by the Annual Conference Committee and other parties. Rodenbeck had received much positive feedback on the new, shorter session times (90 minutes) and the multitude of session options available to Conference attendees.

III. Report by Hunter O’Hanian, CAA’s Executive Director and CEO

IV. President Blier asked for the approval of the minutes of the February3, 2016 Annual Business Meeting held in Washington, D. C. A motion was made to approve the 2016 minutes. The motion was seconded and the minutes were approved.

V. Blier/Hunter called on Teresa Lopez, CAA’s Chief Financial Officer, to give her financial report for Fiscal Year 2016.

Due to reduced membership enrollment, as well as lower attendance in at 2016 Washington DC annual conference, the Association ended fiscal year 2016 with a deficit of $326,000 including one-time expenses of $125,000.

As of the end of the last fiscal year, there were 9,027 individual members and 1,311 institutional members, including 735 library subscribers handled through Taylor & Francis. Last year’s deficit was funded from the Association’s reserves. The fair market value of CAA’s investment portfolio decreased from $9,644,074 on July 1, 2016 to $9,399,572 on June 30, 2016. CAA drew down $925,000 in that period.

In July 2016, the CAA Board of Directors hired a new executive director, Hunter O’Hanian. In the current year, we have seen an increase in total membership numbers and revenue. Registrations for this year’s annual conference have not only exceeded last year, but have also exceeded paid registrations from the 2015 annual conference in New York. The number of attendees for this Annual Conference stands at 3,236 as of this afternoon.

Over the next few months CAA staff and board will be working on budgets on for future years which will better match projected expenses to projected revenues.

Copies of the audited financial statements for FY2016 compared with FY2015 are available here and as a pdf on our website.

VI. President Blier called for Old Business. There was none.

VII. President Blier called for New Business. There was none.

VIII. Results of Board Election
President Blier stated that official business was completed and announced the results of the election of new directors. The following members have been elected to CAA’s Board of Directors:

Colin Blakely
Peter Lukehart
Melissa Hilliard Potter
Julia Sienkewicz

President Blier thanked all the candidates for their willingness to serve CAA.

Respectfully submitted,

Roberto J. Tejada, Secretary
College Art Association

March 22, 2017

 

Next CAA Annual Business Meeting  – 2018

The 106th Annual Meeting of the College Art Association will take place during Convocation on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. and on Friday, February 23, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. at the Los Angeles Convention Center.

Filed under: Board of Directors, Governance

CAA Art Book Holiday Gift Guide

posted by CAA — Dec 15, 2017

The holiday season is here and we’re celebrating with two of our favorite things—art and books!

CAA members get 25% off ARTBOOK | D.A.P. titles, 25% off MIT Press titles, and 20% off University of Chicago Press titles, with options for everyone on your list.

Access your discounts through the member log-in on the My Benefits page of your CAA account. 

ARTBOOK | D.A.P.

 Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power

Edited with text by Mark Godfrey, Zoé Whitley. Contributions by Linda Goode Bryant, Susan E. Cahan, David Driskell, Edmund Barry Gaither, Jae Jarrell, Wadsworth Jarrell, Samella Lewis

Bringing to light previously neglected histories of 20th-century black artists in the era of Malcolm X and the Black Panthers.

 

 

Design is Storytelling

Ellen Lupton

The award-winning author of Thinking with Type and How Posters Work demonstrates how storytelling shapes great design.

 

 

 

Interviews on Art

Robert Storr

Edited with interview by Francesca Pietropaolo

Collected for the first time in a single volume, read interviews conducted by museum curator, academic, editor and writer Robert Storr.

 

 

Browse the 2017 ARTBOOK | D.A.P Holiday Gift Guide

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO PRESS

Art Without Borders: A Philosophical Exploration of Art and Humanity

Ben-Ami Scharfstein

Acknowledging that art is a universal part of human experience leads us to some big questions: Why does it exist? Why do we enjoy it?

 

 

 

John Heartfield and the Agitated Image: Photography, Persuasion, and the Rise of Avant-Garde Photomontage

Andrés Mario Zervigón

Exploring the evolution of photomontage from an act of antiwar resistance into a formalized political art in the Weimar Republic.

 

MIT PRESS

Whitechapel: Documents of Contemporary Art

The 2006 collaboration between Whitechapel Gallery and The MIT Press combines affordable paperback prices, good design, and impeccable editorial content.

Browse the 2017 MIT Press Holiday Gift Guide

Filed under: Books, Membership

CAA 2018 Annual Conference Keynote Speaker Charles Gaines is a Los Angeles-based artist whose complex grid-work and mapping pulls from conceptual art and the field of philosophy. His work is currently on view at ICA Miamiat Cornell Fine Arts Museumat kurimanzutto in Mexico City, and he has an upcoming show at Galerie Max Hetzler in Berlin. CAA media and content manager, Joelle Te Paske spoke with Charles about what he’s working on, his teaching at CalArts and Los Angeles in 2017, and if artists can change the world.

CAA’s Annual Conference Convocation, including the keynote address and presentation of the Awards for Distinction, will occur February 21, 6:00-7:30PM and will be livestreamed.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Charles Gaines, Numbers and Trees: Central Park Series 2, Tree #7, Maria, 2017. © Charles Gaines. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

Joelle Te Paske: I read the interview that you did for your Studio Museum exhibition in 2014 and you said: “I use systems in order to provoke the issues around representation.” I’m curious about how you’re thinking about systems right now in 2017.

Charles Gaines: I work with systems and structures, which results in the fact that the work itself is rule-based. My interest in it is really a suspicion about standard ideas of subjectivity. I felt that when I was in graduate school, the way we talked about art, seems that it was based on the assumption that the art object itself was a kind of access to the subjectivity of the artist. I got suspicious about [that] idea in modernism. That the purpose of art is, at its most essential core, a subjective practice, and if you take subjectivity out of it, you’ve eliminated or eviscerated the idea of art itself.

I wasn’t necessarily opposed to the concept of aesthetics itself, but again, when it became the principal and core purpose of a work of art, I had a lot of problems with that—to produce this aesthetic object—because that brings up issues of culture. And so, I was saying that aesthetic effects can be produced not by one’s intuition, but they can also be produced by rational strategies and intellectual, productive strategies, and one can have the aesthetic experience that’s a product of that. It’s a way of challenging the notion of how representation works in works of art.

JTP: It’s finding an alternative route into meaning, essentially. It gives you a different pathway.

CG: Yes.

JTP: Do you have a memory of first noticing a system—I’ve read that you’re interested in Buddhist teachings—that you hadn’t considered before?

CG: I was introduced to two books, one by Ajit Mookerjee which is called Tantra Art, and the other is Henri Focillon, The Life of Forms in Art. Buddhist works are interesting to me because the monks made works of art, but had no concept of the unconscious.

JTP: Interesting. 

Charles Gaines. Photo: Katie Miller

CG: The personal subjectivity, they did not privilege that. But nevertheless, they have an art practice, made sculptures, drawings, and so it was interesting, because I had had to go outside the Western paradigm in order to discover that there are other ways of making work. And another thing that interested me about that is that the effect of that kind of process, this kind of sublime exhilarating experience, where you don’t actually have control over what you’re doing, because either the system has control of it or chance has control of it. And so you’re in this space that is to me way more interesting.

JTP: Yes, I’d say there’s a different kind of freedom to be found there.

If you could recommend one book to students or artists that they probably haven’t read, what would you recommend?

CG: Right now, books that deal with the postcolonial. Books that allow you to think about the relationship of art and culture, and the way that challenges assumptions of modernism. In my particular case, a very important book is Fred Moten’s [and Stefano Harney’s] The Undercommons, because of the way [Moten is] trying to negotiate what blackness means. It’s quite different from certain sociological or essentialist ideas of that subject.

JTP: Thinking about your role at CalArts, what are the changes that you’ve seen as part of the faculty?

CG: CalArts has managed to maintain, to some degree, the kind of reputation of an art practice that is not the standard. I was talking to some people about this the other day, and in particular Europeans generally think that CalArts is the most elite of art schools. They think that it’s among the best schools in the United States, but the reason why is because the school privileges ideas and challenges notions of certain standard practices. There’s a general suspicion of the idea of mastery.

JTP: That’s beautifully put.

CG: I mean, a lot of schools have developed programs or disciplines called new genres. So they’ll have painting, drawing, sculpture, printmaking, and the new genres. And so new genres is, I think, supposed to deal with the issues that are conceptually driven in works of art. You know, in particular, the avant-garde.

CalArts was invented with that kind of idea, and so I still think it’s a bit radical. Which blows me away actually, because I still get into discussions with other professionals, not so much in the art world, but certainly in academia, about whether the role of mastery informs curriculum. In our Masters program, we get the students who never really challenged the idea of mastery. In the 1970s, 80s, and 90s, there was the idea of art as an avant-garde practice; it wasn’t something that was controversial.  It’s sort of a weird reversal of history, that the idea of art as an avant-garde practice is becoming more and more provocative. Particularly in the way people are thinking about educational systems and curriculum development and so forth. It’s the idea that they haven’t really come into the framework experienced in critiquing the idea of mastery with respect to works of art. I guess that’s the largest change that I’ve seen.

JTP: Yes, I think that your comment about the longer view of the history and the purpose of art is interesting, because history repeats itself and reconfigures itself.

When you’re working with students, what are you most excited about?

CG: In terms of what I enjoy in the experience of teaching at CalArts, we are lucky to get really good students. And the graduate students tend to be a little older and so, you wind up having the richest seminars—critical discussions about works of art, where the teaching goes two ways. I learn from them, they learn from me.

JTP: That’s terrific.

CG: You know, that keeps it quite vibrant and alive. There is a transition that the art students have to go through to get to that point where their criticality can reach a more sophisticated level. Their first year, [that] tends to be pretty traumatic for them. The dismantling of a lot of their assumptions about art. But through this process, they segue into the ability to be quite intelligent and quite interesting [in] the way they ultimately critique ideas and each other’s work.

Charles Gaines, Manifestos 2 (Installation), 2013. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: Steven Probert © Charles Gaines. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

JTP: I’m curious too about LA. I know that you’re a longtime resident of the city—if you had to choose one thing for people coming to the conference, what you would recommend?

CG: LA has a remarkable list of museums, mostly contemporary art museums and modern art museums. Nobody should miss that. The art scene in LA is just generally interesting. I can also easily make a plug, because I’m on the board of the new ICA LA (Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles). People should make sure not to miss the ICA LA.

JTP: Thank you, that’s great. I know too that you’ve been part of the debate in Boyle Heights about art spaces and gentrification, and there’s been dialogue on all sides about it.

CG: I got caught up in the whirlwind of that. In this particular instance, the artists who’ve been moving into Boyle Heights in the last five or 10 years or so formed an alliance with a particular group of Latino artists to form a new strategy to fight gentrification. I was sort of upset by the fact that they’re attacking some very progressive alternative spaces.

In Boyle Heights, there’s a legitimate effort to fight gentrification that follows a history of certain strategies of fighting it that are unique to minority communities. In other words, Boyle Heights is a depressed community and was formed not because Latinos and Black people wanted to live there; it was formed because of redlining. And so those people, they want to stay in Boyle Heights, but they want it improved. And so their strategy against gentrification includes finding ways where they can increase their voices in terms of how this plays itself out. But this other group does not want any improvement. They just want to stop it.

They’re not interested in the idea of improvement, so what I said was that the artists who moved to Boyle Heights must recognize that they’re the first stage of gentrification. And I said that they were appropriating and colonizing the interests of the minority community.

JTP: You’re saying development could be good, it should be driven by the people who have been living there. They should have input and they should be guiding it.

CG: Whether it’s good or not, it’s inevitable.

JTP: It’s inevitable; okay that is a good distinction.

CG: There isn’t history where these kind of things, where gentrification was essentially stopped. What happened is that it was controlled.

JTP: We definitely want people coming from out of town to be aware of what is happening in Los Angeles. It’s helpful to hear your perspective, because you’ve lived there a long time and you’ve been active and involved, so thank you.

By the way, have you attended CAA conferences in the past?

CG: Absolutely. In fact, I’ve even been on a couple of panels. Several times in the past. There’s such a wide variety that’s available to see. I think it is very, very important to maintain that diversity and I have been noticing the increase in social and cultural issues.

Joelle: That’s definitely something we’re working on here at CAA.

I do have one more question, and it’s my favorite. Please feel free to answer it however you’d like. Do you think artists can change the world?

CG: I mean, it’s a cause and effect thing. Artists can change our ideas about art. But artists can also play a role in changing our ideas about society. They can play a role in that, like the activism that artists [did] in the 1970s helped to increase the number of women and minorities in art. And that comes from not only artists dealing with politics, but at the same time culture in general, a critique of male dominance and white male dominance, so artists play a role with other forms of social activism in changing things. It’s not like you can make a work of art and everybody’s just like “Oh, okay, I feel differently now.”

I think that people who make the argument that artists can’t change things—the phrase itself makes no sense to me. But the people who make that argument make it under the assumption—this is why Fred Moten’s The Undercommons is such an important book—of a simplistic notion about what politics is and how it works.

JTP: I agree. It’s my favorite question, because I very much believe that artists play a role in doing so.

This has been a rich discussion, thank you for taking the time. Is there anything else that you’d like to add in for people reading this?

CG: It’s a pleasure talking, and I’m looking forward to the event. I don’t know what I’m going to talk about yet, but I’ll think of something.

JTP: Yes, from this conversation, I have a feeling you definitely will.

The 106th Annual Conference takes place in Los Angeles, February 21-14, 2018. Click here to explore the conference program.

Image courtesy ACLU.

Tomorrow, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is voting to repeal net neutrality—the idea that internet service providers should treat all online content equally without blocking or slowing down specific websites or allowing companies to pay for preferential treatment.

Net neutrality is important to intellectual freedom, freedom of speech, and access to information. If access to the internet becomes regulated by the ability to pay higher fees for certain types of content, many libraries, museums, non-profit organizations, and activist groups will be forced to choose between providing crucial services and providing full access to the internet.

Click here to protect net neutrality

Read more on the issue:

Net Neutrality Rollback Concerns Colleges (Inside Higher Ed)

Why Does Net Neutrality Matter to Libraries? (ALA American Library Association)

Net Neutrality: Why Artists and Activists Can’t Afford to Lose It (New York Times)

Filed under: Advocacy