College Art Association

CAA News Today

Jeffrey R. Hayes: In Memoriam

posted by October 24, 2012

Tanya J. Tiffany is associate professor of art history in the Department of Art History at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.

Jeffrey Hayes

Jeffrey R. Hayes

Jeffrey R. Hayes, professor of art history and director of the master’s degree program in liberal studies at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, died on June 18, 2012. Hayes was an exceptional scholar, teacher, and colleague, and a pioneering figure in the field of outsider art in the United States.

Hayes received his BA in history from Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, in 1967. Following his service as captain in the US Army during the Vietnam War (from which he received an honorable discharge as a conscientious objector), Hayes returned to his native Maryland. In 1972 he earned an MLA in the history of ideas at Johns Hopkins University; the multidisciplinary scope of that program introduced him to art history. A decade later he completed his PhD in art history at the University of Maryland, where he worked under the guidance of Elizabeth Johns, who became a lifelong mentor and friend.

Hayes’s expertise in American art was far reaching. Building on his dissertation research, his first major scholarly works included an exhibition and catalogue as well as two groundbreaking monographs on the modernist painter Oscar Bluemner: Oscar Bluemner: Landscapes of Sorrow and Joy (Washington, DC: Corcoran Gallery of Art, 1988) and Oscar Bluemner (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991). Hayes then turned his attention to curating exhibitions and writing catalogues on major collections and figures in outsider art, including Common Ground/Uncommon Vision: The Michael and Julie Hall Collection of American Folk Art, which was coauthored with Russell Bowman and Lucy Lippard and published by the Milwaukee Art Museum in 1993; The Art of Carl McKenzie (Milwaukee: UWM Art Museum, 1994); and Signs of Inspiration: The Art of Prophet William J. Blackmon (Milwaukee: Patrick and Beatrice Haggerty Museum of Art, Marquette University, 1999).

Jeffrey Hayes OscarBluemner

In recent years Hayes returned to his research on Bluemner’s art with the volume Bluemner on Paper (New York: Barbara Mathes Gallery, 2005), and at the time of his death he was writing about the Wisconsin sculptors Mona Webb and Thomas Owen Every, known as Dr. Evermor. In addition to his many influential publications, Hayes also received prestigious awards and fellowships from institutions including the Smithsonian, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the American Philosophical Society.

From 1982 until his death, Hayes taught in the Department of Art History at University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, where he also served as department chair from 1989 until 1996. In 2000, he founded the master’s degree program in liberal studies, the only degree of its kind in the state school system; he remained the program’s director until his death.

Hayes was extraordinarily generous as a colleague and as a mentor to his many graduate students; his boundless energy, kindness, and humor will be greatly missed. In addition to his scholarship, Hayes was a strong political activist as well as an avid tennis player, fisherman, and swimmer.

Jeffrey Hayes is survived by his wife, Leslie; his three children, Eli, Zachary, and Ursula; and by his grandchildren.

Read another obituary on Hayes in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Filed under: Obituaries

Recent Deaths in the Arts

posted by October 24, 2012

In its monthly roundup of obituaries, CAA recognizes the lives and achievements of the following artists, scholars, architects, photographers, and others whose work has significantly influenced the visual arts. This month was marked by the loss of the conceptual artist Michael Asher, the Belgian abstract painter Raoul De Keyser, the sculptor and activist An Dekker, and the English gallery director Michael Stanley. CAA has published a special obituary of Jeffrey R. Hayes, a professor of art history at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.

  • Michael Asher, the trailblazing Los Angeles conceptual artist and beloved CalArts professor, passed away on October 15, 2012. He was 69 years old. Active since the early 1970s, Asher was one of the first artists to engage in institutional critique by altering the norms that define galleries, museums, and schools. His contribution to the 2010 Whitney Biennial, which requested that the museum be free and open for twenty-four-hours, earned him the prestigious Bucksbaum Award
  • Bruno Bobak, a Polish-born Canadian “war artist” during the Second World War, passed away on September 24, 2012, at the age of 88. Bobak enlisted in the Canadian Army at the age of 18, making him the youngest soldier to create artwork during the war. His watercolors and drawings were evocative and disturbing, showing the bare reality of life on the front lines
  • Melvin Charney, a Montreal-based architect and teacher, died on September 17, 2012. He was 75 years old. Charney created bold public works that blurred the lines between art and architecture, such as the garden for the Canadian Centre for Architecture and the world’s first human-rights monument in Ottawa, Canada. He was also instrumental in establishing the architecture program at the University of Montreal
  • Raoul De Keyser, a Belgian abstract painter, died on October 5, 2012. He was 82 years old. In an ever-expanding art world that prizes the brashest statement, De Keyser’s compositions stood out as examples of forceful gentleness, muted and lyrical. Long admired as a “painter’s painter,” he came to greater prominence during the 2000s with a series of major exhibitions in Germany, France, and England. He is represented by David Zwirner in New York
  • An Dekker, a socially conscious sculptor of biomorphic forms, died on September 14, 2012, at the age of 80. Dekker was born in the Netherlands and traveled extensively throughout Europe and Africa. Residing in London the 1970s and 1980s, she was a cofounder of the Hackney Flashers’ photography workshop (with her fellow artist Jo Spence, also recently deceased) and the Women’s Graphic Workshop
  • Préfète Duffaut, a Haitian muralist and painter, passed away on October 6, 2012, at the age of 89. Duffaut created brilliantly colored murals of imaginary cities for hospitals and churches. His imagery was inspired by the Haitian religion of voodoo and a personal mysticism
  • Gilbert Warren Einstein, an art dealer who founded G. W. Einstein Company in New York, passed away on September 21, 2012, at the age of 70. Einstein’s gallery specialized in twentieth-century works on paper, and he was a member of the International Fine Print Dealers Association of America
  • Robin Fior, a British graphic designer at the forefront of the 1960s print revolution, died on September 19, 2012. He was 77 years old. Fior made a name for himself as a designer for radical newspapers, such as Black Dwarf and Peace News. He was political to the bone, active in the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, and in later years served as the art director at the left-wing Pluto Press
  • Ulrich Franzen, a polarizing German-born architect whose projects exemplified the modernist architecture ethos of “form follows function,” passed away on October 6, 2012. He was 91. Franzen’s most visible project was the skywalks at Hunter College in New York, an enclosed pedestrian walkway connecting the school’s buildings; other prominent commissions included Houston’s Alley Theater in 1968
  • Richard Gordon, a photographer and writer based in Berkeley, California, died on October 6, 2012. He was 67 years old. Gordon’s black-and-white street photography followed the tradition of Henri Cartier-Bresson, Helen Levitt, and Robert Frank. An exhibition devoted to his 1970s photographs of American cities is on view at Gitterman Gallery in New York until November 7, 2012
  • Pedro E. Guerrero, a photographer who gained recognition for his dynamic images of Frank Lloyd Wright’s architecture, died on September 13, 2012, at the age of 95. Guerrero’s working relationship with Wright, which began in the late 1930s, led to magazine assignments and book projects. In the 1960s and 1970s he embarked on a new photography series documenting the work and personality of the artists Alexander Calder and Louise Nevelson
  • Jeffrey R. Hayes, a professor of art history and director of the master’s degree program in liberal studies at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, passed away on June 18, 2012. He was 65 years old. A specialist in outsider art, Hayes wrote several books on the artist Oscar Bluemner. CAA has published a special obituary of Hayes
  • Mick Jones, a British illustrator, teacher, and dedicated socialist, died in August 2012 at the age of 68. Jones took part in the Prague Spring of 1968, an experience that revealed to him how art can be a force for social change. Back in England he shared his devotion to politics through community murals and trade-union banners. He spearheaded the Camden Mural Project (1978), which instructed young people in the art of mural painting in public spaces and housing projects
  • Jeremy Le Grice, an English painter inspired by the landscape of his native Cornwall, died on August 9, 2012. He was 75. As a young man he studied with the Cornish painter Peter Lanyon and took classes at the Slade School of Art in London. Le Grice’s paintings, a cross between abstraction and representation, have a rough-hewn quality, fitting for an artist who lived for most of his life in close proximity to the sea
  • Howard R. Moody, a reverend with a love for radical art and social justice, passed away on September 12, 2012, at the age of 92. For over thirty years Moody was the minister of Judson Memorial Church in New York’s Greenwich Village. No ordinary congregation, the church became famous as an alternative space for experimentation in visual art, theater, and dance; likewise establishing itself as a safe haven for the marginalized poor and drug-addicted inhabitants of the neighborhood
  • Harris Savides, a cinematographer who worked closely with young directors, died on October 9, 2012. He was 55 years old. Independent filmmakers depended on Savides’s exacting vision and technical skill to achieve the perfect look for their films. Notable films include Sofia Coppola’s Somewhere (2010) and Noah Baumbach’s Margot at the Wedding (2007), both of which benefited from Savides’s moody and poetic atmosphere
  • Serge Spitzer, a Romanian-born installation artist whose work addresses the passing of time and collective memory, died on September 9, 2012, at the age of 61. The artist participated in Documenta and the Venice Biennale. One of his best-remembered works was a 2010 installation at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, a labyrinthine network of plastic tubing that evoked earlier forms of communication in the city
  • Michael Stanley, the director of Modern Art Oxford, a contemporary art gallery in England, passed away on September 22, 2012. He was 37 years old. As the director of both Modern Art Oxford and the Milton Keynes Gallery, Stanley championed young artists, including Jenny Saville, Phil Collins, and Pawel Althamer. This year he served as a judge for the prestigious Turner Prize
  • John Steiger, a Chicago-based illustrator and artist known for his educational drawings, died on September 5, 2012, at the age of 89. A veteran of World War II, Steiger contributed work to Encyclopaedia Britannica Films and the children’s magazine Highlights; he also maintained a separate studio practice as a realist painter
  • Albin Trowski, a Polish-born artist and illustrator who made his home in Manchester, England, following World War II, passed away on September 12, 2012. He was 93 years old. A gifted draftsman, Trowski realized charming city scenes and landscapes in watercolor and oil paint
  • Rodney Uren, an Australian architect known for his large-scale urban projects, passed away on September 9, 2012, at the age of 63. He was a principal designer at the international design firm Hassell Practice; notable projects include the Olympic Park Station, a majestic, environmentally friendly structure that was built for the Sydney Olympics in 2000

Read all past obituaries in the arts in CAA News, which include special texts written for CAA. Please send links to published obituaries, or your completed texts, to Christopher Howard, CAA managing editor, for the November list.

Filed under: Obituaries, People in the News

This week CAA will begin mailing Conference Information and Registration, which provides important details, instructions, and deadlines for attending and participating in the 101st Annual Conference, to all individual and institutional CAA members. Nonmembers and those wanting a digital file now can download a PDF of the booklet. The conference will take place February 13–16, 2013, in New York.

Following sections on registration and CAA membership, Conference Information and Registration describes travel, lodging, and transportation options and explains the basic processes for candidates seeking jobs and employers placing classifieds and renting booths and tables in the Interview Hall. In addition, the publication lists topics for eleven Professional-Development Workshops. If you want to connect with former and current professors and students, consult the Reunions and Receptions page. The booklet includes paper forms for CAA membership, conference registration, workshops, special events, and mentoring enrollment.

The contents of Conference Information and Registration also appear on the conference website, which is being updated regularly between now and the February meeting. You may also choose to join CAA and register online.

Solo Exhibitions by Artist Members

posted by October 22, 2012

See when and where CAA members are exhibiting their art, and view images of their work.

Solo Exhibitions by Artist Members is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2012

Mid-Atlantic

Terence Hannum. Stevenson University Art Gallery, Stevenson, Maryland, August 27–October 6, 2012. Veils. Drawing and collage.

Midwest

Linda Stein. George A. Spiva Center for the Arts, Joplin, Missouri, July 19–September 7, 2012. The Fluidity of Gender: Sculpture by Linda Stein. Sculpture.

Northeast

Sharon Butler. Real Art Ways, Hartford, Connecticut, September 20–November 11, 2012. Sharon Butler: Gone Wrong. Painting.

Cora Cohen. Heather Gaudio Fine Art, New Canaan, Connecticut, September 29–November 29, 2012. Another Blank Space: Recent Paintings by Cora Cohen. Painting.

Dianna Frid. BravinLee Programs, New York, September 6–October 13, 2012. “The Waves” and “The Comets.” Artist’s books.

John William Keedy. Genesee Center for the Arts and Education, Rochester, New York, September 14–October 27, 2012. It’s Hardly Noticeable. Photography.

Michael Rich. Chace-Randall Gallery, Andes, New York, September 21–November 4, 2012. Traveler. Painting.

Michael Rich. Old Spouter Gallery, Nantucket, Massachusetts, August 10–23, 2012. Restoration. Painting.

Lorna Ritz. Augusta Savage Gallery, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, September 10–28, 2012. Falling into the Night Sky. Painting.

Fotini Vurgaropulou. A Repeat Performance, Antiques etc, Greenwood Lake, New York, October 8–November 2, 2012. Cast & Reel. Cast glass sculpture and mixed media.

South

Heather Deyling. Cochenour Gallery, Georgetown College, Georgetown, Kentucky, August 24–September 16, 2012. Color Sprawl: Works by Heather Deyling. Painting, collage, and installation.

Corinne Diop. Smith House, Arts Council of the Valley, Harrisonburg, Virginia, September 7–October 1, 2012. Surface. Photomontage and mixed media.

Beauvais Lyons. Downtown Gallery, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, September 7–8, 2012. The Legacy of Rev. James Randolph Denton: Performance and Installation. Printmaking and taxidermy.

Judith Pratt. Charles E. Beatley Jr. Central Library, Alexandria Commission for the Arts, Alexandria, Virginia, August 1–December 27, 2012. Judith Pratt: Portable Apparitions. Sculpture.

Linda Stein. Alexandria Museum of Art, Alexandria, Louisiana, September 21–November 24, 2012. The Fluidity of Gender: Sculpture by Linda Stein. Sculpture.

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: ,

Registration for CAA’s THATCamp has now closed.

CAA invites interested participants to attend its first Humanities and Technology Camp (THATCamp) “unconference” on digital art history, taking place on the two days immediately preceding the Annual Conference: Monday, February 11, NOON–5:00 PM, and Tuesday, February 12, 9:00 AM–3:00 PM. The event will take place at Macaulay Honors College, City University of New York, located at 35 West 67th Street in Manhattan.

CAA’s THATCamp is free and open to graduate students and scholars at all career stages. The only requirements for attendance are an active interest in how digital technology is affecting the discipline of art history and the humanities in general and a willingness to share your questions and ideas. Space is limited! Register today to secure your place. Graduate students may apply for a limited number of fellowships funded by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation to lessen the cost of travel expenses to New York.

The purpose of the CAA unconference is manifold: to increase awareness of existing digital projects in art history, architectural history, and archeology; to foster a community of scholars invested in digital art history; to identify digital tools that may be used to improve future CAA conferences; to facilitate technology workshops and training sessions; and to provide support for art-history professionals pursuing nontraditional career paths.

“Unconference” is a term that may be new to people in art and academia but has, in fact, been around since the late 1990s. It is used to describe a participant-driven meeting that in many respects is the opposite of a traditional academic conference. Formal presentations or a set program of speakers are not determined beforehand. Unconferences generate productive encounters among diverse groups of people, an experience that can be compared to being a member of an improvisational acting troupe.

THATCamp itself, however, is a recent invention, founded in 2008 at the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, as a meeting for technology and humanities professionals—including professors, librarians, and museum curators—to share ideas and collaborate on projects. The camps have since sprung up in locations across the United States and internationally.

People in the News

posted by October 17, 2012

People in the News lists new hires, positions, and promotions in three sections: Academe, Museums and Galleries, and Organizations and Publications.

The section is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2012

Academe

Steven Bleicher, an artist and professor of foundations in the Department of Visual Arts at Coastal Carolina University in Conway, South Carolina, has been promoted to associate dean of the Thomas W. and Robin W. Edwards College of Humanities and Fine Arts at his school.

Lucy Bradnock, formerly managing editor of the Getty Research Journal and a research associate at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California, has been appointed lecturer in art history at the University of Nottingham in England.

Blane De St. Croix, an installation artist and sculptor, has been appointed to head the Sculpture Department with the rank of tenured associate professor at the Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts at Indiana University in Bloomington. De St. Croix was formerly associate professor of sculpture at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton.

Andrea Giunta has been appointed to the newly established endowed chair in Latin American art history and criticism in the department of art and art history at the University of Texas at Austin. Her position is partially endowed by a $1 million grant from the Longhorn Network and an anonymous matching donation. Giunta founded the school’s Center for Latin American Visual Studies program in 2009.

Elisa P. Korb, assistant professor of humanities at Anderson University in Anderson, Indiana, has accepted a position as assistant professor of fine arts at Misericordia University in Dallas, Pennsylvania.

Jason LaFountain, a recent PhD graduate from Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has joined the Art History Department of Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, as the Terra Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in American Art. LaFountain specializes in colonial American and early modern British subjects.

Alix Lambert, an artist and filmmaker, has been named visiting assistant professor at the Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts at Indiana University in Bloomington.

Richard Meyer, formerly an associate professor of art history and fine arts at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, has been appointed professor of art history at Stanford University in Stanford, California.

Guna Nadarajan, formerly vice provost for research and dean of graduate studies at Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, has been selected as the new dean of the School of Art and Design at the University of Michigan.

Howard Paine, associate professor of printmaking at the Memphis College of Art in Tennessee, has been released from the faculty. The controversial decision to eliminate several positions, in June 2012, was made as a result of the college’s financial burden.

Museums and Galleries

Ethan Lasser, a former curator of the Chipstone Foundation in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, has been appointed Margaret S. Winthrop Associate Curator of American Art in the Harvard Art Museums’ Division of European and American Art, where he is currently developing two new exhibitions, The Practice and Poetics of Repair and Makers: Craft and Industry in American Art.

Melissa Jordan Love has been appointed the first academic curator of the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. Love holds a joint appointment in the McIntire Department of Art in the College of Arts and Sciences and will participate in the new Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures.

Elizabeth Milroy, professor of art history and American studies at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, has joined the Division of Education at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in Pennsylvania as Zoë and Dean Pappas Curator of Education for Public Programs. Milroy is a specialist in the history of the city of Philadelphia and a scholar of cultural institutions in the United States.

Mary Morgan Darby Radcliff has served as a summer 2012 intern at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, where she assisted the Development Office. Radcliff is pursuing an MA in visual arts administration at New York University.

Anne-Imelda Radice, a senior consultant for the Dilenschneider Group and a member of the CAA Board of Directors, has been named the director of the American Folk Art Museum in New York.

David Russick has joined the staff of the Milwaukee Art Museum in Wisconsin as its new exhibition designer. Russick formerly was the chief designer at the Indianapolis Museum of Art in Indiana.

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: ,

Institutional News

posted by October 17, 2012

Read about the latest news from institutional members.

Institutional News is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2012

The Cincinnati Art Museum in Ohio has been awarded a $1.5 million grant by the state of Ohio in support of a major renovation project of the museum’s Romanesque revival building, library, and archives. In addition, the museum has also won a grant from the Institute of Museums and Library Services for $149,656, with a matching amount of $176,722, to aid its digital inventory of approximately 25,000 works on paper, including pastels, watercolors, posters, and illustrated books.

The Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, has received a $1.5 million gift from the estate of the late professor Karl Kilinski to fund an endowed chair in Hellenic visual vulture. The award will allow the university to hire a professor with expertise in the art of the Bronze Age, classical Greece, and Byzantium.

The Mount Holyoke College Art Museum in South Hadley, Massachusetts, has received a Museums for America grant from the Institute of Museums and Library Services for $148,599, with a matching amount of $400,696. The grant will be used to digitize approximately four thousand objects in its collection, including works on paper, objects of American material culture, and American and European silver.

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston has won a grant from the Institute of Museums and Library Services for $146,559, with a matching amount of $264,122. The award will be used to develop the Texas Artisans and Artists Archive, a digital resource that documents the lives and practices of individuals who lived and worked in Texas in the early twentieth century.

The New Orleans Museum of Art in Louisiana has received a Museums for America grant of $150,000, with a matching amount of $360,179, to help fund the second phase of a digitization project that will make ten thousand images of works held in the collection accessible online.

The Philadelphia Museum of Art in Pennsylvania has been awarded a Museums for America grant of $150,000, with a matching amount of $444,884. The award money will be applied to a digitization project of more than four thousand items in the museum’s holdings, including paintings and decorative objects from its Chinese collection.

Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa, Oklahoma, has received a grant from the Institute of Museums and Library Services for $141,232, with a matching amount of $143,162, to support a program, called Free 2nd Saturdays, that seeks diversify the museum’s public.

The Seattle Art Museum in Washington has earned a grant from the Institute of Museums and Library Services for $140,000, with a matching amount of $146,134. The funds will support the museum’s teen programs, which help educate young people using the museum’s collection.  

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond has received a Museums for America grant of $150,000, with a matching amount of $550,622, to aid in the creation of an online catalogue of the museum’s collection. The new catalogue system will make accessible works of art that are held in offsite storage facilities.

The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, has won a grant from the Institute of Museums and Library Services for $111,615, with a matching amount of $298,447. The museum will apply the money toward a twenty-three-month educational program called American Visions: Engaging the Community with American Art.

The Worcester Art Museum in Worcester, Massachusetts, has received a grant of $123,679 administered by the Institute of Museums and Library Services. The award will aid in the museum’s digital archiving of eight hundred American and European paintings currently in storage. The project will make available works by artists such as Mary Cassatt, John Singer Sargent, Gustave Courbet, and Camille Pissarro.

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: ,

Grants, Awards, and Honors

posted by October 15, 2012

CAA recognizes its members for their professional achievements, be it a grant, fellowship, residency, book prize, honorary degree, or related award.

Grants, Awards, and Honors is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2012

Fred C. Albertson, associate professor in the Department of Art at the University of Memphis in Tennessee, has been named a 2012–13 Getty Scholar at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Albertson will be in residence at the Getty Villa in Malibu, working on a project titled “Palmyrene Sculpture in North American Museums.”

Ronni Baer, the William and Ann Elfers Senior Curator of Paintings at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, has been named a Museum Guest Scholar at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Baer will be in residence from January to March 2013.

Martina Bagnoli, curator of medieval art at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, will be a scholar in residence at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Bagnoli will use her residency to research “The Five Senses and Medieval Art.”

Susanna Berger, a graduate student at the University of Cambridge in England, has been awarded a 2011–13 Samuel H. Kress Fellowship via the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. The title of Berger’s research project is “The Art of Philosophy: Early Modern Illustrated Thesis Prints, Broadsides, and Student Notebooks.”

Kathryn Brown, assistant professor of art history at Tilburg University in the Netherlands, has been awarded a funded visiting fellowship at the Humanities Centre of the Australian National University in Canberra for July and August 2013. Her project is titled “Global Art and the Networked City.”

Kaira Marie Cabañas, a lecturer and director of the MA Program in Modern Art: Critical and Curatorial Studies in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University in New York, has been named a 2012–13 Getty Scholar at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. She will spend her residency on “Expressive Restraint: Geometric Abstraction and the History of Madness in Brazil.”

Matthew P. Canepa, assistant professor of art history at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, will be a Getty Scholar in residence at the Getty Villa in Malibu, California. Canepa, a specialist in the art and archeology of ancient Iran and the Mediterranean, will be working on a project, “Royal Glory, Divine Fortune: Contesting the Global Idea of Iranian Kingship in the Hellenized and Iranian Near East, Central and South Asia (330 BCE–642 CE).”

Tiziana D’Angelo, a doctoral candidate in the Department of the Classics at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been awarded a predoctoral fellowship from the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. D’Angelo’s residency will be devoted to a research project, titled “Travelling Colors: Artistic Models and Cultural Transfers in South Italian Funerary Wall Painting (IV–II BCE).”

Thierry de Duve, emeritus professor at the Charles de Gaulle Université Lille 3 in Villaneuve, France, has been awarded a William C. Seitz Senior Fellowship at the National Gallery of Art’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts in Washington, DC. His research project is called “Manet’s Testament, Duchamp’s Message, Broodthaers’ Lesson.”

Jessica Feldman, an intermedia artist based in New York, has earned an emerging artist fellowship from Socrates Sculpture Park in Long Island City, New York. An exhibition of outdoor work by the fifteen fellowship recipients will be on view from September 9, 2012, to March 31, 2013.

Ksenya Gurshtein, a recent PhD graduate of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, has been named a 201113 Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.

Cynthia Hahn, professor of art history at Hunter College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, has been named an Ailsa Mellon Bruce Senior Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Hahn will use the fellowship to work on her project, “Reliquaries: Objects, Action, Response.”

Marius Bratsberg Hauknes, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, has been awarded a twenty-four-month Chester Dale Fellowship. The 2011–13 fellowship is administered by the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Hauknes’s dissertation is titled “Imago, Figura, Scientia: The Image of the World in Thirteenth-Century Rome.”

Jessica L. Horton, a PhD candidate in the Graduate Program in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester in Rochester, New York, has been named a 2011–13 Wyeth Fellow through the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. She will use her fellowship, from the International Dissertation Research Fellowship Program, to conduct research on “Places to Stand: Native Art beyond the Nation.”

Mark Jamra, a typographic designer and associate professor at the Maine College of Art in Portland, has won a Stonington Residency at the Stephen Pace House in Stonington, Maine. The residency provides studio space and living accommodations and is open only to college alumni, faculty, and staff members.

Paul B. Jaskot, professor of the history of art and architecture at DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois, has been named Ailsa Mellon Bruce Visiting Senior Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Jaskot will use his fellowship to work on a project, titled “Cultural Fantasies, Ideological Goals, and Political Economic Realities: The Built Environment at Auschwitz.”

Nathaniel B. Jones, a doctoral student in art history at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, has received the David E. Finley Fellowship via the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. He intends to conduct research on his dissertation, “Nobilibus pinacothecae sunt faciundae: The Inception of the Roman Fictive Picture Gallery,” in Europe for two years, spending the third year of the fellowship in residence at CASVA.

Jennifer Josten, assistant professor in the Department of History of Art and Architecture at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, has been named a Getty Postdoctoral Fellow at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Josten’s project is titled “Mathias Goeritz’s Arquitectura Emocional: Shades of the New Monumentality in Midcentury Mexico.”

Subhashini Kaligotla, a poet and a doctoral student in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University in New York, has been named an Ittleson Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Her fellowship, which spans from 2012 to 2014, will be devoted to her dissertation, “Shiva’s Waterfront Temples: Reimagining the Sacred Architecture of India’s Deccan Region.”

Cindy Kang, a PhD candidate in the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, has been named a Getty predoctoral fellow for 2012–13. Kang will be in residence at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California, working on her dissertation, “Wallflowers: Tapestry and the Nabis in the Fin-de-siècle France.”

Jinah Kim has been named a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Kim, a recent PhD graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, will devote her fellowship to “Visions and the Visual: Color in Esoteric Buddhist Visual Practices in Medieval South Asia.”

Stuart Lingo, associate professor of art at the University of Washington’s School of Art in Seattle, has been named a Samuel H. Kress Senior Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Lingo will use his fellowship to work on a project titled “Bronzino’s Bodies: Fortunes of the Ideal Nude in an Age of Reform.”

Beili Liu, a multidisciplinary artist and associate professor of art at the University of Texas at Austin, received the Distinction Award at the 2011 Kaunas Biennial in Lithuania. Liu’s art uses elemental materials, such as wood, paper, salt, metal, and incense, to transform gallery spaces into meditative installations.

David S. Mather, who recently earned his PhD in the Visual Arts Department at the University of California, San Diego, has received a postdoctoral fellowship from the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles. Mather will use his residency at the Getty Center to further develop “‘The Wild Joy of Color’: Boccioni and the European Avant-Garde,” a chapter from his dissertation.

Jennifer Nelson, a graduate student in the Department of the History of Art at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, has been awarded a Robert H. and Clarice Smith Fellowship for 2012–13 from the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Nelson will use the award to work on “Image beyond Likeness: The Chimerism of Early Protestant Visuality, 1517–1565.”

Joshua O’Driscoll, a doctoral candidate in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been named a 2011–14 Paul Mellon Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. O’Driscoll will spend time on “Picti Imaginativo: Image and Inscription in Ottonian Manuscripts from Cologne.”

Ann E. Patnaude, a PhD student in the Department of Art History at the University of Chicago in Illinois, has received a twelve-month Chester Dale Fellowship for 2012–13, administered by the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Her dissertation is called “Locating Identity: Mixed Inscriptions in Archaic and Classical Greek Pottery and Stone, ca. 675–336 BCE.”

David Pullins, a doctoral candidate the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been named a David E. Finley Fellow for 2012–15. The fellowship, which comes from the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, will allow him to work on his dissertation, “Cut and Paste: The Mobile Image from Watteau to Pillement.”

William W. Robinson, the Maida and George Abrams Curator of Drawings in the Fogg Museum’s Division of European and American Art at Harvard Art Museums in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been named a Museum Guest Scholar at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Robinson will be in residence at the Getty from July to September 2013.

Sophia Ronan Rochmes, a PhD candidate in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at the University of California, Santa Barbara, has received a predoctoral fellowship from the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Rochmes will work on “Shades of Gray: Functions of Color and Colorlessness in Grisaille Manuscripts.”

Jennifer Margaret Simmons Stager, who earned her PhD from the History of Art Department at the University of California, Berkeley, has received a fellowship to study at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California, supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities. She will be in residence at the Getty Villa in Malibu, researching “The Embodiment of Color in Ancient Mediterranean Art.”

Roberto Tejada, the Distinguished Endowed Chair in Art History in the Meadows School of Art at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, has been named the 2012–13 recipient of the Fulbright-FAAP Distinguished Chair in the Visual Arts. The award from the Fulbright US Scholar Program will enable Tejada to engage in scholarship with faculty and students at the Fundação Armando Alvares Penteado (FAAP) in São Paulo, Brazil.

Krista Thompson, associate professor of art history at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, has received an American Council of Learned Societies fellowship for her project, “Photography, Screen, and Spectacle in Contemporary African Diasporic Cultures.”

Ming Tiampo, associate professor of art history at Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario, has received an honorable mention from the Dedalus Foundation’s Robert Motherwell Book Award for Gutai: Decentering Modernism (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011).

Noa Turel has been awarded a postdoctoral fellowship from the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Turel, who recently received her PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara, will be in residence from September 2012 to June 2013, working on “Living Color: The Animation Paradigm of Pictorial Realism 1350–1550.”

Susan M. Wager, a PhD student in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University in New York, has been named a Samuel H. Kress Fellow for 2012–14 from the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Wager, whose specialty is eighteenth- and nineteenth-century French visual culture, will research her dissertation, titled “Boucher’s Bijoux: Luxury Reproductions in the Age of Enlightenment.”

Gennifer Weisenfeld, associate professor in the Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, has been awarded a grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts for her book, Imaging Disaster: Tokyo and the Visual Culture of Japan’s Great Earthquake of 1923 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2012).

Stephen Hart Whiteman has been awarded a 2012–14 A. W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. His project is titled “Vocabularies of Culture: The Landscape of Multiethnic Emperorship in the Early Qing Dynasty (1661–1722).”

Jeff Williams, an artist and assistant professor in studio art at the University of Texas at Austin, has won the 2012 Texas Prize, a $30,000 triennial award sponsored by the Austin Museum of Art/Arthouse. The prize, given to an emerging artist based in Texas, is juried by an international group of artists, scholars, and curators.

Marie Yasunaga, a PhD candidate in the Department of Comparative Literature and Culture at the University of Tokyo in Japan, has received a predoctoral fellowship from the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Yasunaga will be a resident from September 2012 to June 2013; her project is titled “Color Theories in Museum Spaces: Installation Experiments by Karl Ernst Osthaus and Karl With. From German Kunstgewerbe-Reformbewegung through Symbolism and Expressionism to the Era of the White Cube.”

Mantha Zarmakoupi, a Humboldt Postdoctoral Fellow in the Archäologisches Institut at the Universität zu Köln in Germany, has been named a 2012–13 Getty Scholar at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Zarmakoupi specializes in classical art and archeology, which she will explore during her residency in a project titled “The Idea of Landscape in Roman Luxury Villas.”

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: ,

Exhibitions Curated by CAA Members

posted by October 15, 2012

Check out details on recent shows organized by CAA members who are also curators.

Exhibitions Curated by CAA Members is published every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2012

Reni Gower. Heated Exchange. Upstairs Artspace, Tryon, North Carolina, September 21–November 17, 2012.

Julie L. McGee. Martha Jackson Jarvis: Ancestors’ Bones. Mechanical Hall Gallery, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, September 5–December 9, 2012.

Gloria Williams Sander. Significant Objects: The Spell of Still Life. Norton Simon Museum of Art, Pasadena, California, July 20, 2012–January 21, 2013.

Cortney Lane Stell. Something about the State of Being. Philip J. Steele Gallery, Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design, Denver, Colorado, August 31–October 13, 2012.

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: ,

Books Published by CAA Members

posted by October 15, 2012

Publishing a book is a major milestone for artists and scholars—browse a list of recent titles below.

Books Published by CAA Members appears every two months: in February, April, June, August, October, and December. To learn more about submitting a listing, please follow the instructions on the main Member News page.

October 2012

Laura Auricchio, Elizabeth Heckendorn Cook, and Giulia Pacini, eds. Invaluable Trees: Cultures of Nature, 1660–1830 (Oxford, UK: Voltaire Foundation, 2012).

Judith K. Brodsky and Ferris Olin, eds. The Fertile Crescent: Gender, Art, and Society (New Brunswick, NJ: Institute for Women and Art, Rutgers University, 2012).

Kathryn Brown. Women Readers in French Painting 1870–1890: A Space for the Imagination (Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2012).

Frances S. Connelly. The Grotesque in Western Art and Culture: The Image at Play (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012).

Zoya Kocur and Simon Leung, eds. Theory in Contemporary Art since 1985, 2nd ed. (Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012).

Lauren Hackworth Petersen and Patricia Salzman-Mitchell, eds. Mothering and Motherhood in Ancient Greece and Rome (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2012).

Ming Tiampo. Gutai: Decentering Modernism (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011).

Gennifer Weisenfeld. Imaging Disaster: Tokyo and the Visual Culture of Japan’s Great Earthquake of 1923 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2012).

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: ,