College Art Association

CAA News Today

Support CAA’s Publications Fund

posted by CAA — May 20, 2016

CAA’s journals continue to deliver the world’s leading scholarship in the visual arts. This year, we welcome many new additions and changes to the publications while maintaining our commitment to bringing readers the most vital, intellectually compelling, and visually engaging scholarly journals in art and art history.

We encourage you to support our mission of advancing the highest standards of intellectual engagement in the arts with a gift to the Publications Fund today. As always, your contribution is tax-deductible, so please give generously!

Beginning July 1, 2016, CAA welcomes Nina Athanasoglou-Kallmyer, Professor Emerita at the University of Delaware, as The Art Bulletin’s next editor-in-chief. Rebecca Brown, Art Journal’s editor-in-chief and Associate Professor at Johns Hopkins University, published her first issue in Spring 2016. CAA’s exclusively online publication, caa.reviews recently launched a new website, and Art Journal Open, CAA’s accessible online venue for contemporary works, takes on appropriation as an artistic strategy in a three-part series.

Here are some recent highlights from CAA publications:

In The Art Bulletin:

  • Recent articles include Erik Inglis on revelations in the 1534 inventory of the St-Denis treasury; Paola Demattè on cross-cultural factors in eighteenth-century Parisian prints of Chinese subjects; Richard Taws on the imposter dauphins in the wake of the French Revolution and the issue of truth in nineteenth-century discourse; and the tensions between the individual and the collective in postwar German art groups, in an analysis by Jacopo Galimberti
  • In the “Whither Art History?” series, Youngna Kim explores the relation of Korean art history to global developments in the discipline; Shao Yiyang reflects on the state of art history in China
  • Reviews of books range from art in Byzantine diplomatic encounters to transcontinental and transoceanic image networks in early America, and from Chinoiserie in eighteenth-century Britain to the circulation of artworks in late Ottoman Istanbul

In Art Journal:

  • Artists’ projects by Jason Simon, Amy Adler, and Julia Oldham, the last an astrophysical exploration of loss, love, and canine connection
  • Essays by Emma Chubb, examining Isaac Julien’s images of traumatic crossings of the Mediterranean by present-day migrants; Natilee Harren on the means by which materials and fragments of the urban fabric found their way into the confounding commodities of Fluxus artists in the 1960s; Cynthia Chris and Jason Simon on the economic elements of video art as it nears the half-century mark; and Daniel Rosenberg on the presentation of complex data about war and disaster in large photographic works by the Dutch artist Gert Jan Kocken
  • A seven-author forum organized by Jordana Moore Saggese that sheds new light on diversity and difference from perspectives including queer failure, craft, diasporic studies, critical race history, and disability
  • Reviews of books artists on William Kentridge, Isa Genzken, and Antonin Artaud; on decolonization in postwar France; and on art emerging from postsocialist nations
  • In Art Journal Open, “Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation” by Natilee Harren. Harren’s three-part essay examines appropriation as an artistic strategy that pressures both the legal and conceptual definitions of authorship through a case study of three specific episodes in artist Karl Haendel’s practice of circulating existing images. Nate Harrison responds, offering a critical reminder of the historical specificity of postmodernism and appropriation. Haendel’s contribution Oral Sadism & the Vegetarian Personality (Approximately) is an animated representation of the artist’s extensive archival collection of some ten thousand found images and photographs, used as source material for his drawings. Other recent pieces are a report on Art + Feminism’s Wikipedia Edit-a-thon at the Museum of Modern Art by Chelsea Spengemann, and a conversation between curator Mia Locks and artist Math Bass.

In caa.reviews (Now fully open access!):

  • caa.reviews continues to expand the number and type of reviews published each year. In 2015, the journal published 159 reviews on exhibitions and books in all areas of the visual arts. In 2016, an addition to the Re:Views series—an essay by Eddie Chambers, University of Texas Austin, on his role in commissioning reviews on African and African Diaspora art—discusses the division of subject categories within US academic communities and the lack of scholarship published on these topics. Forthcoming by caa.reviews Editor Designate, Juliet Bellow, is a multimedia project using the Scalar platform reviewing a two-day performance at the Tate Modern, If Tate Modern was Musée de la danse? by choreographer Boris Charmatz, which will be accompanied by an interactive floor plan and additional texts and images.

These highly regarded journals reach tens of thousands of readers around the world and serve as essential resources to those working in the visual arts—none of which would be possible without your support. Contributors who give at a level of $250 or higher are prominently acknowledged in the publication they support for four consecutive issues, as well as on the publication’s website for one year, through CAA News, and in the Annual Conference’s convocation booklet. On behalf of the scholars, critics, and artists who publish in the journals, we thank you for your continued commitment to maintaining a strong and spirited forum for the visual arts community.

With best regards,

 

 

 

 

Gail Feigenbaum
Vice President for Publications