CAA News Today

See full text reproduced below. Article also available on Jstor.

 

“Notes from the Women’s Caucus for Art (WCA),” a column featured in Art Journal during the 1970s, created an important forum for critical debates in the feminist art movement. In Summer 1975, for example, Meredith Rode shared evidence of fatigue with the feminist struggle in her letter “The High Price of Indifference.” Rode’s letter generated numerous responses in the winter 1975 issue, including Ann Sutherland Harris’s practical advice on how to counter this exhaustion.

The first President of WCA advocated both passive and activist gestures, ranging from sending a check to the National Organization of Women to pressuring local museums to display works by women in their collections, organizing group shows of women artists, mentoring female students, and buying women’s art.

This snapshot of WCA’s essential role in feminism art and activism reminds us how we can individually act to demand equity while working in conjunction with the collective efforts of essential national organizations, such as WCA and CAA. Read the full text below.

Post by Joanna Gardner-Huggett

Sources:

  • Meredith Rode, “Notes from the Women’s Caucus for Art: The High Price of Indifference,” Art Journal (Summer 1975): 345.
  • Ann Sutherland Harris, “Notes from the Women’s Caucus for Art,” Art Journal (Winter 1975/76): 147.

Biography of post author: Joanna Gardner-Huggett is an Associate Professor of History of Art and Architecture at DePaul University and Chair of the Committee on Women in the Arts. She teaches courses on twentieth-century art and feminist theory, while her research focuses on the intersection between feminist collaboration and arts activism and has been published in numerous journals and anthologies. Joanna’s most recent scholarship explores the history of the Chicago based women artists’ collectives Artemisia Gallery in Chicago (1973-2003), ARC Gallery (1973-present), and Sapphire and Crystals (1987-present).

 

FULL TEXT (from image): Ann Sutherland Harris, “Notes from the Women’s Caucus for Art,” Art Journal (Winter 1975/76): 147.

The comments of Meredith Rode, which appeared in this column last summer (see Art Journal, Summer 1975, p. 345), provoked two types of responses. Rode addressed herself to the problem of the indifference and fatigue that have begun to plague the women’s movement. Some of our respondents felt that this new phase was entirely natural and that women could now get on to other things. Other agreed with Rode that efforts should be made to continue the kinds of organized activities that have characterized the women’s movement in the past. We have included comments from both sides of the argument because, together, they establish a provocative, and constructive, dialogue.

In the going battle for excellence in artistic endeavors, or at the very least in the battle for the recognition of such, women are necessarily well prepared for the fight. The feminist movement is in fact successful in the degree of professionalism that is shown by its members. This professionalism is engendered not by participation in marches or in a common philosophy, but by sincere individual effort and personal discipline in pursuit of excellence. The social situation that has given rise to the feminist movement has been a difficult and unrelenting taskmaster. The professional woman is necessarily strengthened by the unrelenting standards and demands and thereby becomes an effective standard-bearer of the women’s movement—even though she may be completely remove from any organized feminist actions.

If the feminist movement can focus on excellence, then all its desire ends will follow naturally. The primary concern should not be one of the numbers but rather one of quality. If the aforementioned standards are met, the feminist movement will be self-perpetuating and self-evidently justified. The urge and tendency to slacken standards in order to ameliorate quickly quantitative inequities is suicide. The feminist movement needs to look to the demands of professionalism as the method to success. To turn from marches to a concern for excellence is not to abandon the movement but rather to ensure and shore up a movement against indifference and apathy.

Art is similarly embattled but, with the help of highly qualified professionals, has the opportunity to meet and surpass levels of excellence so often forgotten and more often ignored through ineptitude. Excellence is the challenge and when met continuously cannot be denied forever. This, then, is the method, slow and unheadlined, certain, desperately needed, and opportunely waiting for women to pursue.

Ursela Gilgulin, College of Saint Elizabeth, Convent Station, New Jersey

 

Meredith Rode’s important letter to members of the Women’s Caucus for Art must have struck many sympathetic chords. All who have become involved in the women’s movement will have recognized her feelings of exhaustion and discouragement and the internal pressure to “get back to normal.” But that is impossible once one has become a feminist.

One way to counteract the feeling that the movement is losing energy is to subscribe to Women Today. It brings you lots of evidence twice a month that the women’s movement is thriving and growing, which is not what you will sense reading the national daily press. I also recommend joining at least one of the national women’s organizations like N.O.W. or W.E.A.L. Their publications will also keep you in touch with the movement. Sometimes I think that no hidden nook or cranny of male-chauvinism will be left untouched by enterprising American feminists!

This is pass support—signing a check, posting off a membership form, and sitting back while others do the work. But it is much better than nothing and maybe it is all that some of us can manage for a while and at least you will have the contacts to move back to a more active role when the energy returns. Even those who are being—temporarily, we hope—in active, should be able to manage an occasional letter to their state or national legislators. It takes very little time to do (the letter should only be a short indication of your stand) and it is effective precisely because most of us are too lazy to do it. Keeping affirmative action programs strong and equalizing pension benefits for women are two issues that everyone should be concerned about and should write at least one letter on behalf of. We have almost 1000 members; 1000 letters would make anyone pay attention!

There are also lots of little things that we can do to help. If you are an art historian, make sure that women artists get a fair share of your courses and that you are aware of the way women are seen by artists in general. Because all the survey texts leave out Käthe Kollwitz, Mary Cassatt, Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun, and Barbara Hepworth, to name only a few who could as well represent their centuries as the male artists chosen, this does not mean that you cannot discuss them. If you work in a museum, find out what works by women your museum owns and whether they are displayed regularly. Even more helpful, find out what postcards and slides of women’s works are available (all museums need prodding here—MOMA has cards of only one Nevelson, one Frankenthaler, and Meret Oppenheim’s fur-lined tea cup, saucer, and spoon). Maybe you can help originate an exhibition devoted to a woman or a group of women artists, or at least make sure they are fully represented in group shows. If you teach, you can be sure your women students get the encouragement they deserve. If you have anything to do with the hiring of anyone, you can do your best to locate able women candidates and makes sure that their candidacy gets fair consideration. If you are employed full-time, you might consider all the marvelous women artists who are not and buy their work—some very fine and quite well-known women ask very reasonable prices for their work.

I doubt that anyone interested enough to read this far has not done at least one of these things this past year. Perhaps we are all unaware of how much the movement has become “normal.” But never underestimate the power of an accumulation of small actions like these to contribute to major social change. This much all of us can surely manage most of the time. If some of us can occasionally do more, then the momentum will be sustained. It must be—we all have too much to lose.

Ann Sutherland Harris, S.U.N.Y at Albany

 


In 1972, CAA founded its first committees devoted to women in the arts. As a part of this yearlong 50th anniversary celebration, we are sharing historic materials from CAA members and archives that intersect with feminism at the organization, including CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts (CWA) and our Affiliated Societies, Women’s Caucus for Art (WCA) and The Feminist Art Project (TFAP).

This celebration culminates in a program and reception at Boston University’s Joan and Edgar Booth Theatre on Friday, September 23, 2022. This program will reflect upon the incredible history of feminist pioneers at the organization while looking toward a more inclusive, equitable future through the continued work of the CWA. The members of CWA are carrying the torch of feminism during this crucial time of precarity for women’s rights.

Over the next couple months, visit this site (CAA News) and our social media pages to explore more about this history and items from our archives.

The Women’s Caucus of Art (WCA) began at CAA in 1972 and broke off to become an independent organization in 1974. Their mission is to create community through art, education, and social activism. recognizing the contribution of women in the arts; providing women with leadership opportunities and professional development; expanding networking and exhibition opportunities for women; supporting local, national and global art activism; and advocating for equity in the arts for all. The organization is still active with many local branches and as an Affiliated Society of CAA holds an annual meeting held in conjunction with CAA.  It has awarded prizes for lifetime achievement to many of the (now) best-known American women artists, beginning in 1978 with Isabel Bishop, Louise Nevelson, Georgia O’Keeffe, Selma Burke, and Alice Neel.

Each year since 1979, the WCA presented an exhibition of honorees’ work in conjunction with their national conference. In 1994, the exhibition took place at the Queens Museum of Art, showing work by Mary Adams, Maria Enriques de Allen, Beverly Pepper, Faith Ringgold, Rachel Rosenthal, and Charlotte Streifer Rubinstein. Ringgold and Rubinstein were active WCA members at the time.

Explore the exhibition through archival photographs below!

All images courtesy of the Queens Museum, New York.

 

Cover of the WCA catalog for the 1994 exhibit at the Queens Museum of Art. See more WCA exhibition catalogs on their website.

 

Opening of WCA’s 1994 exhibition at the Queens Museum of Art. Quilt works by honoree, Faith Ringgold.

 

Opening of WCA’s 1994 exhibition at the Queens Museum of Art. Rachel Rosenthal (right) was the first performance artist ever to be a WCA Honoree.

 

Opening of WCA’s 1994 exhibition at the Queens Museum of Art.

 

Opening of WCA’s 1994 exhibition at the Queens Museum of Art.

 

Opening of WCA’s 1994 exhibition at the Queens Museum of Art.

 

Opening of WCA’s 1994 exhibition at the Queens Museum of Art. Award recipient, Beverly Pepper’s work, The Todi Columns, 1979.

 

Opening of WCA’s 1994 exhibition at the Queens Museum of Art. Award recipient Mary Adams’s work, Wedding Cake Basket. Adams was the first Native American Honoree from the Mohawk Nation and had started making baskets when she was ten years old.

 


In 1972, CAA founded its first committees devoted to women in the arts. As a part of this yearlong 50th anniversary celebration, we are sharing historic materials from CAA members and archives that intersect with feminism at the organization, including CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts (CWA) and our Affiliated Societies, Women’s Caucus for Art (WCA) and The Feminist Art Project (TFAP).

This celebration culminates in a program and reception at Boston University’s Joan and Edgar Booth Theatre on Friday, September 23, 2022. This program will reflect upon the incredible history of feminist pioneers at the organization while looking toward a more inclusive, equitable future through the continued work of the CWA. The members of CWA are carrying the torch of feminism during this crucial time of precarity for women’s rights.

Over the next couple months, visit this site (CAA News) and our social media pages to explore more about this history and items from our archives.

At CAA’s 2022 Annual Conference, current and former members of the Committee on Women in the Arts (CWA) presented a session on the history of feminism at CAA and within their committee entitled “50 Years of Feminist Art at CAA: Looking Back, Looking Forward.” Watch the video below to hear a series of talks on this history.

50 Years of Feminist Art at CAA: Speakers

Chair: Joanna P. Gardner-Huggett, DePaul University

Judith K. Brodsky, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts

Ferris Olin, Rutgers University

Midori Yoshimoto, New Jersey City University

Carron P. Little, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Kalliopi Minioudaki, Independent Scholar and Curator

Zoë Charlton, American University

 

Abstract: Fifty years ago, the Committee on Women in the Arts was founded to promote the recognition of women’s valuable contribution to the visual arts and to critical art-historical study; advocate for feminist scholarship and activism in art; develop partnerships with organizations with compatible missions; monitor the status of women in the visual-arts professions; provide historical and current resources on feminist issues; and support emerging artists and scholars in their careers. In 2020, the CWA implemented the 50/50 initiative, which aims for 50% representation of women scholars and artists at the CAA Annual Conference and intersectional feminist content inclusive of race, class, gender, body size, disability, or age. At this significant juncture, this session proposes to reflect on the committee’s history by inviting previous members and chairs to discuss their work with the CWA, as well as collaborations with other affiliate committees and groups, such as the Women’s Caucus for Art, The Feminist Art Project, the Queer Caucus, and many more. In addition to assessing CWA’s past contributions, the panel will engage in a conversation of what work remains to be done.

 


In 1972, CAA founded its first committees devoted to women in the arts. As a part of this yearlong 50th anniversary celebration, we are sharing historic materials from CAA members and archives that intersect with feminism at the organization, including CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts (CWA) and our Affiliated Societies, Women’s Caucus for Art (WCA) and The Feminist Art Project (TFAP).

This celebration culminates in a program and reception at Boston University’s Joan and Edgar Booth Theatre on Friday, September 23, 2022. This program will reflect upon the incredible history of feminist pioneers at the organization while looking toward a more inclusive, equitable future through the continued work of the CWA. The members of CWA are carrying the torch of feminism during this crucial time of precarity for women’s rights.

Over the next couple months, visit this site (CAA News) and our social media pages to explore more about this history and items from our archives.

In 1972, CAA founded its first committees devoted to women in the arts. As a part of this yearlong 50th anniversary celebration, we are sharing historic materials from CAA members and archives that intersect with feminism at the organization, including CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts (CWA) and our Affiliated Societies, Women’s Caucus for Art (WCA) and The Feminist Art Project (TFAP).

This celebration culminates in a program and reception at Boston University’s Joan and Edgar Booth Theatre on Friday, September 23, 2022. This program will reflect upon the incredible history of feminist pioneers at the organization while looking toward a more inclusive, equitable future through the continued work of the CWA. The members of CWA are carrying the torch of feminism during this crucial time of precarity for women’s rights.

Over the next couple months, visit this site (CAA News) and our social media pages to explore more about this history and items from our archives.

 

 

 

The College Art Association has signed onto this statement from the American Historical Association (AHA) and the Organization of American Historians (OAH). The statement expresses dismay over the Supreme Court majority opinion in the Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health decision that overturned Roe v. Wade. It argues that the decision misrepresents history, instead “adopt[ing] a flawed interpretation of abortion criminalization that has been pressed by anti-abortion advocates for more than thirty years.” It warns that the Court’s majority opinion does not meet the standards of historical scholarship and that “[t]hese misrepresentations are now enshrined in a text that becomes authoritative for legal reference and citation in the future.”

Filed under: Advocacy

CWA Picks: Summer 2022

posted by June 30, 2022

Vlada Ralko, Lviv Diary No. 020, 2022, ink and watercolor on paper, 11.5 x 8.5 inches, ©Vlada Ralko, courtesy of Voloshyn Gallery and Fridman Gallery

Exhibitions and Scholarship Selected by the Committee on Women in the Arts (CWA)

 

If trauma names the psychic impact of damaging events, it also points to the possibility of working through the mute immobility that is trauma’s primary effect. Gender hierarchies are part of trauma and the recovery from it.  In What Does a Woman Want? Reading and Sexual Difference (1993), Shoshana Felman makes a broad and provocative claim: “every woman’s life contains explicitly or in implicit ways, the story of trauma.” The scholarship and exhibitions featured here substantiate Felman’s insight. In a few exhibitions, trauma is pronounced and linked to specific events, such as Russia’s assault on Ukraine. In others, trauma must be discerned in portrayals that attest to the diffuse reality of gender inequity. All of the work tells us that the current historical moment is rife with danger and violence and thereby underscores the necessity of feminism’s insights.   

Each month, CAA’s Committee on Women in the Arts selects the best in feminist art and scholarship. The following exhibitions and events should not be missed.

 

Trauma-Informed Pedagogy: Addressing Gender-Based Violence in the Classroom 
Jocelyn E. Marshall and Candace Skibba (eds.)
Emerald Publishing, 2022 

What role can teaching play in the effort to address gender-based violence? This collection offers practical, creative, and theoretical strategies for addressing this specific form of trauma in the classroom. The editors assert that teaching can create spaces that counter the “silence” and “unempathetic discourse” that gender-based violence most often meets when it is brought into the open. Featuring the artwork of and scholarship on the indigenous artist Julia Rose Sutherland, as well as a conversation between curators Monika Fabijanska and Dineke Van der Walt, Trauma-Informed Pedagogy foregrounds visual art practices as tools for exploring trauma and finding possibilities for recovery. This makes perfect sense, given the “troublesome visual representations” that block out the fact that gender-based violence is pervasive but systematically denied, a trauma in and of itself. 

 

  

Women Painting Women 
Museum of Modern Art, Fort Worth, Texas 
Through September 25, 2022   

Feminist art tends to be associated with practices that defy medium, genre, and the art historical canon, but what about the women painters who situate their work firmly in the figurative tradition? Curated by Andrea Karnes, Women Painting Women features the work of forty-six painters who have made women their subjects since the 1960s and illuminates the feminism that can animate figuration. Creatively rendering women’s “bodies, gestures, and individuality,” together these portraits play with a range of scales that move from the modest (Somaya Critchlow) to the gigantic (Jenny Saville) and suggest the spaces allotted to women and the spaces they want to claim. Women Painting Women is a refreshingly straightforward but decidedly necessary theme, given how rare it is to see women as artists and artistic subjects at the same time. 

  

 

Martine Syms, Neural Swamp 
Philadelphia Museum of Art 
Through October 30, 2022

Martine Syms’ multi-channel video installation Neural Swamp deploys the tactics of surveillance, cinema, and sport to investigate what it means to be a Black woman in a hyper-digitized world. Blurring the line between horror and humor, Syms works with algorithms and artificial intelligence to question the technologies that erase and exploit Black bodies, voices, and narratives. Accompanied by Kit’s World, a series of videos that also explore technological mediation, Neural Swamp was commissioned by the Future Fields commission in Time-Based Media. 

 

  

Women at War 
Fridman Gallery, New York 
July 6 through August 26, 2022 

In collaboration with Voloshyn Gallery in Kyiv, Ukraine, Monika Fabijanska curated this timely exhibition that documents how Ukrainian women artists explore the gendered dimensions and consequences of war. Several artworks were made after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February 2022, others date from the eight years of war following the annexation of Crimea and the creation of separate ‘republics’ in Donbas in 2014. Together the artwork in Women at War poses questions about women as the natural victims of war and creates a nuanced picture, both of Ukrainian feminism, and the visual practices that have accompanied it. Through a wide array of themes, mediums, styles, Women at War narrates a nuanced history of women in Ukraine and is, more broadly, a historiographic project that meditates on how women become visible when history is written as a war against their agency. 

 

  

Cornelia Parker 
Tate Britain, London 
Through October 16, 2022  

One of Britain’s most beloved contemporary artists, Cornelia Parker works with domestic objects and reconfigures their scale through playful visual storytelling that often defies gravity. By doing so, Parker’s sculptures materialize the violence that undergirds everyday life and suspends it in the field of vision for all to see.   

 

  

Ancestors Know Who We Are 
Online 
National Museum of the American Indian 
The Smithsonian, Washington D.C.

Ancestors Know Who We Are is the Smithsonian’s first exhibition to feature Black-indigenous women artists. The title is borrowed from Storm Webber’s 2016 letterpress print, a statement she crafted in black sans serif letters in response to comments that she is neither Black nor Native enough. Across a range of mediums that trouble distinctions between tradition and the contemporary , the artists in this exhibition challenge assumptions that Native and Black experiences have essential and easily discernible features. In so doing, they unsettle the visual economy of race and the permission it gives to question who people are.  

 

  

Andrea Bowers 
Hammer Museum, University of California, Los Angeles 
Through September 4, 2022  

This is Andrea Bowers’ first museum retrospective and it surveys two decades of her artwork’s intimate connection to activism. A large part of Bowers’ work reframes protest banners and posters to show that political address is a form of creative expression that seeks to imagine and write more just worlds. Isolation and despair haunt this artwork, but the austerity Bowers brings to her images of protest ultimately draws attention to the bravery of individual activists as they seek collectivities that can confront and transform the regressive politics of twenty-first century mobs. 

 

 

Yayoi Kusama, A Poem in My Heart 
Yayoi Kusama Museum 
Tokyo, Japan 
Through August 28, 2022

This exhibition highlights the Surrealism that pulsates through Yayoi Kusama’s hallucinatory visions. Featuring paintings from the 1950s, viewers can see further into the artist’s inner landscapes and psychic worlds. The artwork overflows with organic, idiosyncratic forms that twist and undulate to reveal the poetics of Kusama’s creative heart. 

  

 

Suzanne Lacy, The Medium is Not the Only Message 
Queens Museum 
Queens, New York 
Through August 14, 2022

The Medium is Not the Only Message is a major survey of an artist who helped define feminist performance in the 1970s. Lacy has consistently put social issues—sex work, violence against women, racism, labor rights, poverty, and aging—at the center of her work. In recent years, she has become an artist who expands the reach of the museum, bringing institutions into the public worlds in which they are situated. This exhibition focuses on two dimensions of Lacy’s practice: personal narrative and conversation. Both underscore the value she places on relationality, co-creation, and mutual learning, all of which rebuff the presumption that technological mediums really allow people to communicate with each other. Featured projects were selected for their connections to Queens and demonstrate Lacy’s commitment to community-based practices that move “Between the Door and the Street,” the title of a 2013 project that featured women talking about the issues that impact their lives. 

 

Filed under: Advocacy, Committees, CWA Picks

Last month, The College Art Association signed onto a letter from the American Society for Environmental History (ASEH) directed to the EPA in protest of the agency’s decision to retire its online archive. The letter was sent on Monday, June 13, 2022, in coordination with the delivery of a letter from Environmental Data & Governance Initiative (EDGI) with co-signers, including the Sierra Club several libraries, and other organizations.

The announcement is available on ASEH’s website.

EDGI’s letter can be found here, and their press release can be found here.

Filed under: Advocacy

Pride Month and Art Journal Open

posted by June 08, 2022

 

This Pride Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that center LGBTQ+ topics, as well as gender and sexual identity, in the fields of visual arts and the humanities. This week, we are sharing a bibliography of articles on these topics from our open-access journal Art Journal Open.

 

 

Downey, Kerry. “Creating Good-Enough Containers: Reflections on Queerness in Community-Based Museum Education.” Art Journal Open (January 9, 2019). 

 

Kerry Downey, They said to the ocean, 2016, monotype with chine-collé, 19 x 13.5 in. Printed with Marina Ancona / 10 Grand Press. 

Doyle, Jennifer and David Getsy. “Queer Formalisms: Jennifer Doyle and David Getsy in Conversation.” Art Journal Open (March 31, 2014). 

Math Bass, Body No Body Body, 2012, latex paint on canvas and wood, installation view, Overduin and Kite, Los Angeles, 2012 (artwork © Math Bass; photograph provided by Overduin and Kite) 

Getsy, David J. and Che Gossett, “A Syllabus on Transgender and Nonbinary Methods for Art and Art History.” Art Journal Open (February 4, 2022). Crossover article from Art Journal, 80, no. 4 (Winter 2021). 

Del LaGrace Volcano, Moj of the Antarctic: On the Mountain, Antarctica, 2005, giclée print, 30 x 36 in. (76.2 x 91.4 cm) (artwork © Del LaGrace Volcano)

Latimer, Tirza True. “Introduction: Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives.” Art Journal Open (October 24th, 2013). Crossover article from Art Journal 72, no. 2 (Summer 2013). 

Veronica Friedman, Pages from monthly planners, 1980 and 1981. Veronica Friedman Papers, Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Historical Society, San Francisco (photograph © Barbara McBane)

Queer Caucus for Art.Update from the Queer Caucus for Art.” Art Journal Open (January 26, 2016). 
Rosa, Maria Laura. “Questions of Identity: Photographic Series by Alicia D’Amico, 1983–86.” Art Journal Open (July 2, 2019).Crossover article from Art Journal 78, no. 1 (Spring 2019). 

Alicia D’Amico photograph of Liliana, a performance by Liliana Mizrahi, 1983, scanned copy of original negative, reproduction from original 35mm negative contact (photograph © Archivo Alicia D’Amico, Buenos Aires)

Shvarts, Aliza. “Toward a Reparative Pedagogy: Art as Trigger, Art as Repair.” Art Journal Open (April 7, 2022). 

 

 

Whitener, Brian. “Transiting in Anti-Patriarchal Worlds: The Queer Photography of Fernando Fuentes.” Art Journal Open (November 18, 2021).   

Fernando Fuentes, “Emma” (with Homero Emma Jimenez), 2020 (photograph by Constanza Moctezuma) 

 

Pride Month and caa.reviews

posted by June 02, 2022

This Pride Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that center LGBTQ+ topics, as well as gender and sexual identity, in the fields of visual arts and the humanities. This week, we are sharing a bibliography of publications and exhibitions on these topics reviewed this past year on our open-access journal caa.reviews.

 

Arscott, Caroline and Katie Scott, editors. Manifestations of Venus: Art and Sexuality. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2001.
Battcock, Gregory. Oceans of Love: The Uncontainable Gregory Battcock. Ed Joseph Grigely, Cologne, Germany: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther Konig, 2016.
Betancourt, Roland. Byzantine Intersectionality: Sexuality, Gender, and Race in the Middle Ages. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2020.
Black Sheep Feminism: The Art of Sexual Politics. Dallas: Dallas Contemporary, 2016.
Brandt, Amy ed. Tseng Kwong Chi: Performing for the Camera. Norfolk, VA and New York: Chrysler Museum of Art, Grey Art Gallery, New York University, and Lyon Artbooks, 2015.
Butler, Connie. Mark Bradford: Scorched Earth. Exh. cat. Los Angeles: Hammer Museum in association with Prestel, 2015.

Mark Bradford. Lights and Tunnels, 2015 (photograph © 2015 Joshua White; provided by Hauser & Wirth)

Butt, Gavin. Between You and Me: Queer Disclosures in the New York Art World, 1948–1963. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2005.

 

 

De Salvo, Donna. Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again. Exh. cat. New Haven and New York: Yale University Press in association with The Whitney Museum of American Art, 2018.  

Installation view, Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, November 12, 2018–March 31, 2019 (photograph © 2018 by Ron Amstutz, provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Licensed by Artists Rights Society [ARS], New York) 

Corn, Wanda M. and Tirza True Latimer. Seeing Gertrude Stein: Five Stories. Exh. cat. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011.

Henri Matisse. Woman with a Hat (1905). Oil on canvas. 31 3/4 x 23 1/2 in. (80.7 x 59.7 cm). SFMOMA, Bequest of Elise S. Haas. © Succession H. Matisse, Paris / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Ben Blackwell

Doyle, Jennifer. Hold It Against Me: Difficulty and Emotion in Contemporary Art. Durham: Duke University Press, 2013.
Findlen, Paula, Wendy Wassyng Roworth, and Catherine M. Sama, editors. Italy’s Eighteenth Century: Gender and Culture in the Age of the Grand Tour. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2009.
Gallucci, Margaret A. Benvenuto Cellini: Sexuality, Masculinity, and Artistic Identity in Renaissance Italy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.
Gill, Lyndon K. Erotic Islands: Art and Activism in the Queer Caribbean. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2018.
Gómez-Barris, Macarena. Beyond the Pink Tide: Art and Political Undercurrents in the Americas. American Studies Now: Critical Histories of the Present. Oakland: University of California Press, 2018.
Guyton, Wade. One Month Ago. Edition of 500. New York: Karma, 2014.  
Johnson, E. Patrick and Ramón H. Rivera-Servera, editors. Blacktino Queer Performance. Durham: Duke University Press, 2016.
Jones, Amelia. Seeing Differently: A History and Theory of Identification and the Visual Arts. New York: Routledge, 2012.
Jones, Amelia and Erin Silver. Otherwise: Imagining Queer Feminist Art Histories. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016.

With follow-up interview between Amelia Jones and David J. Getsy, Abstract Bodies and Otherwise: A Conversation with Amelia Jones and David Getsy on Gender and Sexuality in the Writing of Art History. February 16, 2018

Junge, Sophie. Art about AIDS: Nan Goldin’s Exhibition Witnesses: Against Our Vanishing  Berlin: De Gruyter, 2017.
Katz, Jonathan David and Rock Hushka, editors. Art AIDS America. Exh. cat. Seattle: Tacoma Art Museum in association with University of Washington Press, 2015.

Courtesy of the Zuckerman Museum of Art. Photos by Mike Jensen

Latimer, Tirza True. Eccentric Modernisms: Making Differences in the History of American Art. Oakland: University of California Press, 2016.
Murray, Derek Conrad. Queering Post-Black Art: Artists Transforming African-American Identity after Civil Rights. London: I.B. Taurus, 2016.
No Wrong Holes: Thirty Years of Nayland Blake. Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, September 29, 2019–January 26, 2020; MIT List Visual Arts Center (online), Cambridge, MA, October 16, 2020–February 14, 2021.

No Wrong Holes: Thirty Years of Nayland Blake, installation view, MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, MA, 2020–21 (photograph © Charles Mayer, provided by MIT List Visual Arts Center)

 Patel, Alpesh Kantilal. Productive Failure: Writing Queer Transnational South Asian Art Histories. Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 2017.
Rice, Shelley. Inverted Odysseys: Claude Cahun, Maya Deren, Cindy Sherman.  Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1999.
Salter, Gregory. Art and Masculinity in Post-War Britain: Reconstructing Home. London: Routledge, 2019.
Transamerica/n: Gender, Identity, Appearance Today. McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, June 20–September 15, 2019.

Jacolby Satterwhite, How lovly is me being as I am, 2014, neon, installation view from Transamerica/n: Gender, Identity, Appearance Today, McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, 2019 (artwork © Jacolby Satterwhite; photograph provided by the artist and Morán Morán, Los Angeles)

Tony Greene: Room of Advances. MAK Center for Art and Architecture, Schindler House, Los Angeles, June 18–September 7, 2014.

Tony Greene. His Puerile Gestures (1989). Mixed Media. 25 1/2 x 29 3/4 in. Collection of Ray Morales, from the estate of Norm MacNeil

Turner, James Grantham. Eros Visible: Art, Sexuality and Antiquity in Renaissance Italy.  New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017.
Tyburczy, Jennifer. Sex Museums: The Politics and Performance of Display. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016.
Zanele Muholi: Isibonelo/Evidence. Brooklyn Museum, New York, May 1–November 8, 2015.

Zanele Muholi: Isibonelo/Evidence. Installation view. Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum.

 

Filed under: Advocacy, caa.reviews, Publications

The College Art Association has signed onto a letter from the American Society for Environmental History directed to the EPA in protest of the agency’s decision to retire its online archive. The text of the full letter is provided below.

The Honorable Michael Regan
Administrator
Environmental Protection Agency
1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20460
michael.regan@epa.gov

Re:

Dear Administrator Regan,

We the undersigned write to express our opposition to EPA’s plan announced in February to sunset its online archive in July 2022. The vast majority of our government’s interaction with the public comes through digital channels; public digital archives such as the EPA’s are of enormous value to historians as well as to the public.

This EPA archive has already proven immensely useful to environmental historians. Not only are citations to it regularly featured in traditional scholarly venues, it has greatly facilitated projects such as “A People’s EPA”, a website and Twitter feed through which historians help explain the work of the EPA to a broader public.

Not just historians but those from a variety of academic disciplines as well as the public rely on the EPA digital archive for information, insight, and analysis. The site has provided resources for others working in ecology, biology, toxicology, and other environmental sciences as well as geography, law, sociology, political science, and public health. Professors and teachers at various levels, from K-12 schools to the graduate level utilize the archive as a pedagogical resource, directing students to pages that offer authoritative records of the geographies they are exploring. Not least among those who have relied on the EPA’s online archive are those working with and living in more marginalized or environmental justice communities, a stated priority of current EPA leadership.

Having easily accessible documentation of the extensive EPA’s investigations and records of decision for Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, for instance, has helped overcome local doubts about the agency’s effectiveness, yielded greater understanding of chemical exposures, and otherwise significantly supported the agency’s efforts at clean-up. Here and elsewhere, residents faced with a potential environmental hazard can more easily access the agency’s past work in their locale as an aid to understanding prior investigations at the site.

The importance of EPA’s online archive is perhaps best illuminated by considering what will be lost when this archive is taken down. The many mentioned uses of EPA documents will become much more difficult for those who cannot travel to EPA’s print collections, and with any pandemic recurrence, well-nigh impossible. A tremendous gap will also open up in what more recent historical records are accessible, as it takes many years for any preserved documents to be transferred to and made available through the National Archives. It will become much more difficult for historians to assess and interpret this agency’s recent past, much less to situate it within longer histories and larger contexts.

We understand that the EPA’s provision of a public archive of its own documents and deliberations is voluntary and that online maintenance entails some costs. But those need to be factored against the better and broader understanding it has nourished of the vital work done by this federal agency, whose own future hinges on greater public awareness of and support for what it does. Instead of doing away with the EPA archive, the Biden administration should promote it as a model for other parts of the Executive Branch. In our digital age, agencies should make their own publications and other public interactions more quickly, thoroughly, and durably accessible, both to historians and to the larger publics our government serves.

Filed under: Advocacy