CAA News Today

Last month, The College Art Association signed onto a letter from the American Society for Environmental History (ASEH) directed to the EPA in protest of the agency’s decision to retire its online archive. The letter was sent on Monday, June 13, 2022, in coordination with the delivery of a letter from Environmental Data & Governance Initiative (EDGI) with co-signers, including the Sierra Club several libraries, and other organizations.

The announcement is available on ASEH’s website.

EDGI’s letter can be found here, and their press release can be found here.

Filed under: Advocacy

Pride Month and Art Journal Open

posted by June 08, 2022

 

This Pride Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that center LGBTQ+ topics, as well as gender and sexual identity, in the fields of visual arts and the humanities. This week, we are sharing a bibliography of articles on these topics from our open-access journal Art Journal Open.

 

 

Downey, Kerry. “Creating Good-Enough Containers: Reflections on Queerness in Community-Based Museum Education.” Art Journal Open (January 9, 2019). 

 

Kerry Downey, They said to the ocean, 2016, monotype with chine-collé, 19 x 13.5 in. Printed with Marina Ancona / 10 Grand Press. 

Doyle, Jennifer and David Getsy. “Queer Formalisms: Jennifer Doyle and David Getsy in Conversation.” Art Journal Open (March 31, 2014). 

Math Bass, Body No Body Body, 2012, latex paint on canvas and wood, installation view, Overduin and Kite, Los Angeles, 2012 (artwork © Math Bass; photograph provided by Overduin and Kite) 

Getsy, David J. and Che Gossett, “A Syllabus on Transgender and Nonbinary Methods for Art and Art History.” Art Journal Open (February 4, 2022). Crossover article from Art Journal, 80, no. 4 (Winter 2021). 

Del LaGrace Volcano, Moj of the Antarctic: On the Mountain, Antarctica, 2005, giclée print, 30 x 36 in. (76.2 x 91.4 cm) (artwork © Del LaGrace Volcano)

Latimer, Tirza True. “Introduction: Conversations on Queer Affect and Queer Archives.” Art Journal Open (October 24th, 2013). Crossover article from Art Journal 72, no. 2 (Summer 2013). 

Veronica Friedman, Pages from monthly planners, 1980 and 1981. Veronica Friedman Papers, Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Historical Society, San Francisco (photograph © Barbara McBane)

Queer Caucus for Art.Update from the Queer Caucus for Art.” Art Journal Open (January 26, 2016). 
Rosa, Maria Laura. “Questions of Identity: Photographic Series by Alicia D’Amico, 1983–86.” Art Journal Open (July 2, 2019).Crossover article from Art Journal 78, no. 1 (Spring 2019). 

Alicia D’Amico photograph of Liliana, a performance by Liliana Mizrahi, 1983, scanned copy of original negative, reproduction from original 35mm negative contact (photograph © Archivo Alicia D’Amico, Buenos Aires)

Shvarts, Aliza. “Toward a Reparative Pedagogy: Art as Trigger, Art as Repair.” Art Journal Open (April 7, 2022). 

 

 

Whitener, Brian. “Transiting in Anti-Patriarchal Worlds: The Queer Photography of Fernando Fuentes.” Art Journal Open (November 18, 2021).   

Fernando Fuentes, “Emma” (with Homero Emma Jimenez), 2020 (photograph by Constanza Moctezuma) 

 

Filed under: Advocacy, AJO, Publications

Pride Month and caa.reviews

posted by June 02, 2022

This Pride Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that center LGBTQ+ topics, as well as gender and sexual identity, in the fields of visual arts and the humanities. This week, we are sharing a bibliography of publications and exhibitions on these topics reviewed this past year on our open-access journal caa.reviews.

 

Arscott, Caroline and Katie Scott, editors. Manifestations of Venus: Art and Sexuality. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2001.
Battcock, Gregory. Oceans of Love: The Uncontainable Gregory Battcock. Ed Joseph Grigely, Cologne, Germany: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther Konig, 2016.
Betancourt, Roland. Byzantine Intersectionality: Sexuality, Gender, and Race in the Middle Ages. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2020.
Black Sheep Feminism: The Art of Sexual Politics. Dallas: Dallas Contemporary, 2016.
Brandt, Amy ed. Tseng Kwong Chi: Performing for the Camera. Norfolk, VA and New York: Chrysler Museum of Art, Grey Art Gallery, New York University, and Lyon Artbooks, 2015.
Butler, Connie. Mark Bradford: Scorched Earth. Exh. cat. Los Angeles: Hammer Museum in association with Prestel, 2015.

Mark Bradford. Lights and Tunnels, 2015 (photograph © 2015 Joshua White; provided by Hauser & Wirth)

Butt, Gavin. Between You and Me: Queer Disclosures in the New York Art World, 1948–1963. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2005.

 

 

De Salvo, Donna. Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again. Exh. cat. New Haven and New York: Yale University Press in association with The Whitney Museum of American Art, 2018.  

Installation view, Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, November 12, 2018–March 31, 2019 (photograph © 2018 by Ron Amstutz, provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Licensed by Artists Rights Society [ARS], New York) 

Corn, Wanda M. and Tirza True Latimer. Seeing Gertrude Stein: Five Stories. Exh. cat. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011.

Henri Matisse. Woman with a Hat (1905). Oil on canvas. 31 3/4 x 23 1/2 in. (80.7 x 59.7 cm). SFMOMA, Bequest of Elise S. Haas. © Succession H. Matisse, Paris / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Ben Blackwell

Doyle, Jennifer. Hold It Against Me: Difficulty and Emotion in Contemporary Art. Durham: Duke University Press, 2013.
Findlen, Paula, Wendy Wassyng Roworth, and Catherine M. Sama, editors. Italy’s Eighteenth Century: Gender and Culture in the Age of the Grand Tour. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2009.
Gallucci, Margaret A. Benvenuto Cellini: Sexuality, Masculinity, and Artistic Identity in Renaissance Italy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.
Gill, Lyndon K. Erotic Islands: Art and Activism in the Queer Caribbean. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2018.
Gómez-Barris, Macarena. Beyond the Pink Tide: Art and Political Undercurrents in the Americas. American Studies Now: Critical Histories of the Present. Oakland: University of California Press, 2018.
Guyton, Wade. One Month Ago. Edition of 500. New York: Karma, 2014.  
Johnson, E. Patrick and Ramón H. Rivera-Servera, editors. Blacktino Queer Performance. Durham: Duke University Press, 2016.
Jones, Amelia. Seeing Differently: A History and Theory of Identification and the Visual Arts. New York: Routledge, 2012.
Jones, Amelia and Erin Silver. Otherwise: Imagining Queer Feminist Art Histories. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016.

With follow-up interview between Amelia Jones and David J. Getsy, Abstract Bodies and Otherwise: A Conversation with Amelia Jones and David Getsy on Gender and Sexuality in the Writing of Art History. February 16, 2018

Junge, Sophie. Art about AIDS: Nan Goldin’s Exhibition Witnesses: Against Our Vanishing  Berlin: De Gruyter, 2017.
Katz, Jonathan David and Rock Hushka, editors. Art AIDS America. Exh. cat. Seattle: Tacoma Art Museum in association with University of Washington Press, 2015.

Courtesy of the Zuckerman Museum of Art. Photos by Mike Jensen

Latimer, Tirza True. Eccentric Modernisms: Making Differences in the History of American Art. Oakland: University of California Press, 2016.
Murray, Derek Conrad. Queering Post-Black Art: Artists Transforming African-American Identity after Civil Rights. London: I.B. Taurus, 2016.
No Wrong Holes: Thirty Years of Nayland Blake. Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, September 29, 2019–January 26, 2020; MIT List Visual Arts Center (online), Cambridge, MA, October 16, 2020–February 14, 2021.

No Wrong Holes: Thirty Years of Nayland Blake, installation view, MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, MA, 2020–21 (photograph © Charles Mayer, provided by MIT List Visual Arts Center)

 Patel, Alpesh Kantilal. Productive Failure: Writing Queer Transnational South Asian Art Histories. Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 2017.
Rice, Shelley. Inverted Odysseys: Claude Cahun, Maya Deren, Cindy Sherman.  Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1999.
Salter, Gregory. Art and Masculinity in Post-War Britain: Reconstructing Home. London: Routledge, 2019.
Transamerica/n: Gender, Identity, Appearance Today. McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, June 20–September 15, 2019.

Jacolby Satterwhite, How lovly is me being as I am, 2014, neon, installation view from Transamerica/n: Gender, Identity, Appearance Today, McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, 2019 (artwork © Jacolby Satterwhite; photograph provided by the artist and Morán Morán, Los Angeles)

Tony Greene: Room of Advances. MAK Center for Art and Architecture, Schindler House, Los Angeles, June 18–September 7, 2014.

Tony Greene. His Puerile Gestures (1989). Mixed Media. 25 1/2 x 29 3/4 in. Collection of Ray Morales, from the estate of Norm MacNeil

Turner, James Grantham. Eros Visible: Art, Sexuality and Antiquity in Renaissance Italy.  New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017.
Tyburczy, Jennifer. Sex Museums: The Politics and Performance of Display. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016.
Zanele Muholi: Isibonelo/Evidence. Brooklyn Museum, New York, May 1–November 8, 2015.

Zanele Muholi: Isibonelo/Evidence. Installation view. Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum.

 

Filed under: Advocacy, caa.reviews, Publications

The College Art Association has signed onto a letter from the American Society for Environmental History directed to the EPA in protest of the agency’s decision to retire its online archive. The text of the full letter is provided below.

The Honorable Michael Regan
Administrator
Environmental Protection Agency
1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20460
michael.regan@epa.gov

Re:

Dear Administrator Regan,

We the undersigned write to express our opposition to EPA’s plan announced in February to sunset its online archive in July 2022. The vast majority of our government’s interaction with the public comes through digital channels; public digital archives such as the EPA’s are of enormous value to historians as well as to the public.

This EPA archive has already proven immensely useful to environmental historians. Not only are citations to it regularly featured in traditional scholarly venues, it has greatly facilitated projects such as “A People’s EPA”, a website and Twitter feed through which historians help explain the work of the EPA to a broader public.

Not just historians but those from a variety of academic disciplines as well as the public rely on the EPA digital archive for information, insight, and analysis. The site has provided resources for others working in ecology, biology, toxicology, and other environmental sciences as well as geography, law, sociology, political science, and public health. Professors and teachers at various levels, from K-12 schools to the graduate level utilize the archive as a pedagogical resource, directing students to pages that offer authoritative records of the geographies they are exploring. Not least among those who have relied on the EPA’s online archive are those working with and living in more marginalized or environmental justice communities, a stated priority of current EPA leadership.

Having easily accessible documentation of the extensive EPA’s investigations and records of decision for Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, for instance, has helped overcome local doubts about the agency’s effectiveness, yielded greater understanding of chemical exposures, and otherwise significantly supported the agency’s efforts at clean-up. Here and elsewhere, residents faced with a potential environmental hazard can more easily access the agency’s past work in their locale as an aid to understanding prior investigations at the site.

The importance of EPA’s online archive is perhaps best illuminated by considering what will be lost when this archive is taken down. The many mentioned uses of EPA documents will become much more difficult for those who cannot travel to EPA’s print collections, and with any pandemic recurrence, well-nigh impossible. A tremendous gap will also open up in what more recent historical records are accessible, as it takes many years for any preserved documents to be transferred to and made available through the National Archives. It will become much more difficult for historians to assess and interpret this agency’s recent past, much less to situate it within longer histories and larger contexts.

We understand that the EPA’s provision of a public archive of its own documents and deliberations is voluntary and that online maintenance entails some costs. But those need to be factored against the better and broader understanding it has nourished of the vital work done by this federal agency, whose own future hinges on greater public awareness of and support for what it does. Instead of doing away with the EPA archive, the Biden administration should promote it as a model for other parts of the Executive Branch. In our digital age, agencies should make their own publications and other public interactions more quickly, thoroughly, and durably accessible, both to historians and to the larger publics our government serves.

Filed under: Advocacy
By Alexandra Klein, National Humanities Alliance (NHA) Communications and Government Relations Manager 

In early March, five months after Fiscal Year 2022 began, Congress finally passed a funding package for the year. The package included significant increases for federal humanities programs—most significantly, the largest increase we’ve seen in a decade for the National Endowment for the Humanities.  

This success followed a full year of robust humanities advocacy, much of which was supported by scholarly societies such as CAA. For example, thanks to their ability to mobilize their members, we were able to recruit advocates from all 50 states to participate in our 2021 Humanities Advocacy Day, which kicked off our advocacy for these FY 22 wins.  

In addition to many other engagements with members of Congress and their staff throughout the year, we followed Humanities Advocacy Day with two congressional briefings to highlight the impact of NEH funding.  

The first briefing, held in September 2021, discussed NEH funding for diverse histories and civics in K–12 education. Since 2018, NHA has worked with over 20 NEH-funded professional development programs for K-12 educators to survey their impacts, and this briefing was an opportunity for congressional staff to hear about the data we’ve collected. At the briefing, we shared that 100 percent of respondents to a post-program survey reported experiencing professional growth as a result of the program they attended and 98 percent of respondents said they would recommend participating in an NEH workshop to a colleague. Staffers also heard directly from project directors about how these programs—which covered a range of topics including Native American histories, the Mississippi Delta, the Transcontinental Railroad, and Japanese American internment—offer crucial professional development to our nation’s educators, illuminate diverse histories, and support civic education in our nation’s classrooms.  

The second briefing, held in November 2021, showcased how NEH funding for public humanities discussions enriches our communities by highlighting the example of the NEH-funded “Freedom Stories: Unearthing the Black Heritage of Appalachia the International Storytelling Center (ISC) in Jonesborough, Tennessee. Those involved in the project spoke about how it built space for dialogue and learning, and about how the discussions offered participants the chance to explore our rich histories and come together across differences. Thanks to a partnership with NHA to document the impact of the program, we were able to highlight that 82 percent of participants in the “Freedom Stories” program agreed that they “feel more confident taking part in thoughtful discussions about race” as a result of the program, and 93 percent felt motivated to “listen to the stories of people whose backgrounds are different from [their] own.” 

After a long year of advocacy and several continuing resolutions that kept government funding at FY 21 levels past the beginning of FY 22, we were particularly pleased to see Congress approve a $12.5 million funding increase for the NEH in March, bringing its FY 22 budget to $180 million.  

Our other priorities also saw increases. These included an increase of $2.5 million for Title VI, which brought its funding to $71.9 million, and an increase of $1 million for Fulbright-Hays, which brought its funding to $9.8 million. The Institute of Museum and Library Services received $268 million, an $11 million increase for the agency overall. While there was an increase for both the Office of Museum Services and the administration budget, the funding to carry out the Library Services and Technology Act remained level. The National Archives and Records Administration received $388 million, an $11 million increase. And NHPRC received $7 million, a half a million dollar increase. 

There was one disappointment that came with these numbers. Nearly across the board, these final numbers were significantly lower than the numbers that the House and Senate originally proposed for our priorities. This was, however, the case for nearly all domestic spending.  

As we turn our attention to FY 2023, we are hopeful we can build on the level of support we saw in the initial FY 2022 bills to secure additional increases in the coming year. The FY 23 process is off to a good start with the administration proposing another round of robust increases for several humanities priorities, which we will be working to make a reality as Congress drafts its yearly appropriations bills.   

 

 

Filed under: Advocacy

Ukraine’s history, art, and culture are endangered by the ongoing war. At Dumbarton Oaks, this lecture and conversation series by experts in the fields of history, art history, archaeology, heritage, sociology, as well as museums and conservation, among others, presents the region’s rich historical and cultural complexity through its objects, sites, and monuments. A focus on the medieval and early modern periods featuring Greek, Latin, and Slavic contacts, brings to the fore critical evidence to counter modern misrepresentations of Ukraine’s history and cultural heritage.

INAUGURAL LECTURE | FRIDAY 22 APRIL 2022 | 12:00 EDT [ 17:00 London | 18:00 Paris | 19:00 Kyiv ]

OLENKA Z. PEVNY (University of Cambridge)

Lacunae of Art History and Kyiv’s Visual Culture

Free and open to the public. Register for the inaugural lecture here. If you cannot attend but would like to receive future updates about this series of events, please join the mailing list here.

Future events include:

  • May 2022 – Lecture: Mariana Levytska, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (The “Holy Rus’ concept” and Religious Art with Political Connotations (Pochaiv Monastery in 19th century)
  • May 2022 – Discussion workshop on The Cathedral of St. Sophia, Kyiv
  • June 2022 – Lecture: Christian Raffensperger, Wittenberg University (“Medieval Origins and Modern Constructs, Rus – Ukraine – Russia”)
  • July 2022 – Lecture: Liudmyla Sharipova, University of Nottingham (Mazepa’s women before and after Poltava: to save and to keep)
  • July 2022 – Discussion workshop on Endangered Monuments
  • September 2022 –  Lecture: Maria Grazia Bartolini, Università degli Studi di Milano (Reading the image of prince Volodymyr Sviatoslavych in seventeenth-century Kyiv)
  • September 2022 – Discussion workshop on Displaced Cultural Heritage.
  • October 2022 – Lecture: Nazar Kozak, Senior Research Scholar, Department of Art History, The Ethnology Institute, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine Lviv (Images of Power and Their Discursive Site-Specificity in Kyivan Rus’)
  • November 2022 – Lecture: Talia Zajac, University of Toronto (will speak about the marriages between the ruling clan of Rus’ and Latin Christian Europe or the translation and commentary on the eleventh-century prayerbook of Gertruda of Poland)
  • November 2022 – Discussion workshop on historical memory.
  • December 2022 – Lecture: Halyna Kohut, Associate Professor, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv (Taste, Social Class, and Oriental Carpet Design in the Eighteenth-Century Cossack Hetmanate)

 

SPONSORSHIP AND ENDORSEMENT:

  • Dumbarton Oaks
  • Princeton University
  • Boise State University
  • Tufts University
  • Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, University of Kent
  • College Art Association (CAA)
  • Byzantine Studies Association of North America (BSANA)
  • British Association for Slavonic and East European Studies (BASEES)
  • Historians of German, Scandinavian, and Central European Art (HGSCEA)
  • Society of Historians of Eastern European, Eurasian and Russian Art and Architecture (SHERA)

 

Filed under: Advocacy, Event

The Association of Academic Museums and Galleries has published The Task Force for the Protection of University CollectionsA Ready Reference Guide for Academic Museum Professionals. The Task Force, which includes CAA and its Executive Director and CEO, Meme Omogbai, aims to serve as a resource and advocate for college and university museums whose collections are or may be under threat. This guide outlines the Task Force’s purpose and has basic information for museum professionals to begin to address challenges related to voluntary deaccessions.

 

Filed under: Advocacy, Task Force

Women’s History Month and Art Journal Open

posted by March 21, 2022

Each week this Women’s History Month, we highlight the rich scholarship and programs produced at CAA that celebrate women in the fields of visual arts and the humanities. This week, we are sharing a bibliography of articles from our open-access journal Art Journal Open that feature women artists.

This Women’s History Month is also especially significant this year, which is the 50th anniversary of feminism at CAA. To learn more about this history, visit this page. CAA is also collecting archival materials to better understand and document the history of its Committee of Women in the Arts, including the committee’s many collaborations with other affiliate committees and groups, such as the Women’s Caucus for Art, The Feminist Art Project, the Queer Caucus, and many more. Visit this page for more information.

Andrew, Nell. “DadaDance: Sophie Taueber’s Visceral Abstraction.” Art Journal Open (July 3, 2014).

Sophie Taueber-Arp, Free Vertical-Horizontal Rhythms (Rythmes verticaux-horizontaux libres), 1919, gouache, 11 15⁄16 x 8 9⁄16 in. (30.3 x 21.8 cm). Stiftung Hans Arp und Sophie Taeuber Arp e.V., inv. 003.205 (artwork in the public domain; photograph provided by Stiftung Hans Arp und Sophie Taeuber Arp)

Barakeh, Zeina. “Projections for the Third Half [Cloud Storm].” Art Journal Open (August 6, 2020).

Zeina Barakeh, Projections From The Third Half [Cloud Storm], 2020, animation, 3 min. (artwork © Zeina Barakeh)

Barber, Tiffany E. “Narcissister, a Truly Kinky Artist.Art Journal Open (March 11, 2020).

Narcissister, Red Riding Hood, 2014, mixed media (photograph provided by the artist)

Berrigan, Caitlin and Sasha Engelmann. “Fault Lines and Fractures: A Conversation about Imaginary Explosions.” Art Journal Open (December 17, 2020).

Caitlin Berrigan, excerpt from Imaginary Explosions, 2018

Bryan-Wilson, Julia and Mary Beth Heffernan. Facing Social Practice: Mary Beth Heffernan in conversation with Julia Bryan-Wilson.” Art Journal Open (June 30, 2020).

Stanford Express Care nurse Anna Chico, who was among the first providers to use PPE Portraits for COVID-19 care, March 2020 (photograph by Cati Brown-Johnson)

Burns, A.K. and Melissa Ragain. “Scripting A Smeary Spot.” Art Journal Open (December 8, 2017).

The late Jack Doroshow performs as Mother Flawless, a clairvoyant psyche. In this scene she recites an excerpt from Joanna Russ’ sci-fi novel We Who Are About To. . . , A.K. Burns, video still from A Smeary Spot, 2015, four-channel video installation, HD color, six-channel sound, TRT 53:13 (artwork © A.K. Burns; image provided by the artist, Callicoon Fine Arts, NY, and Michel Rein Gallery, Paris/Brussels)

Cancelmo, Amy. “Roots and Ramble Kija Lucas and Amy Cancelmo in Conversation.” Art Journal Open (August 30, 2016).

Kija Lucas, Bristol 30, 2013, archival pigment print, 20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 60.9 cm), from In Search of Home, (artwork © Kija Lucas)

Carland, Tammy Rae and Ann Cvetkovich. “Sharing an Archive of Feelings: A Conversation.” Art Journal Open (October 24, 2013).

Tammy Rae Carland, Galz Living Room, MWMF, from Outpost, 2004, color photograph, 20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61cm) (artwork © Tammy Rae Carland)

Costello, Kate. “P&P .” Art Journal Open (November 3, 2016).

Still from Kate Costello, P&P, 2016, video, 1 min., 26 sec. (artwork © Kate Costello)

Craycroft, Anna. “To Listen.” Art Journal Open (October 25, 2017).

Sophomore Seminar with Meg Cranston and Marlena Donohue, April 5, 2017: Meg Cranston and Marlena Donohue’s class met with Anna Craycroft to discuss Tuning the Room in relation to Umberto Eco’s essay “The Open Work.” (artwork © Anna Craycroft)

Craycroft, Anna. “To Record, to Interpret, to Comment.” Art Journal Open (March 1, 2017).

Anna Craycroft, The Earth Is a Magnet, 2016, installation view, part of The Artist’s Museum, Institute of Contemporary Art Boston, November 16, 2016–March 26, 2017 (artwork © Anna Craycroft; photograph by Charles Mayer)

DaPonte, Amy A. “Candida Höfer’s Turken in Deutschland as ‘Counter-publicity’.” Art Journal Open (January 6, 2017).

Candida Höfer, Untitled from Türken in Deutschland 1979, 1979, color slide projection, 80 slides, approx. 7 min., dimensions variable (artwork © Candida Höfer, Köln/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2016)

Fuenmayor, Jesús. “Barricades of Silence: Nikita Gale in Conversation with Jesús Fuenmayor.” Art Journal Open (August 20, 2020).

Nikita Gale, INTERCEPTOR, 2019, installation view, Fall Apart: Nikita Gale & Pat O’Neill, Martos Gallery, New York, January 11–February 24, 2019 (artwork © Nikita Gale; photograph by Charles Benton/Martos Gallery, provided by the artist)

Goodeve, Thyrza Nichols. “The Cat is My Medium: Notes on Writing and Art of Carloee Schneemann.” Art Journal Open (July 29, 2015).

Carolee Schneemann, Kitch’s Last Meal, 1973–76, Super 8mm film, double projection, vertical, sound on cassette, ca. 5 hrs., two installation views (artwork © Carolee Schneemann; photographs provided by the artist)

Goulish, Matthew. “A Clear Day and No Memories: Neurology, Philosophy, and Analogy in Kerry Tribe’s HM.” Art Journal Open (February 5, 2014).

Eadward Muybridge, Pi-Wi-Ack, Valley of the Yosemite (Shower of Stars), “Vernal Fall,” 400 Feet Fall, No. 29, 1872, wet-plate collodion photograph (photograph in the public domain)

Graham, Amanda Jane. “Space Travels: Trisha Brown’s Locus.” Art Journal Open (July 22, 2016).

Trisha Brown, Locus Solo, 2011, performed by Diane Madden in “Performance 11: OnLine/Trisha Brown Dance Company” in conjunction with the exhibition On Line: Drawing through the Twentieth Century, Museum of Modern Art, New York, January 2011 (photographs © Yi-Chun Wu; photographs provided by Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA/Art Resource, NY)

Jenkinson, Monique. “Diva Maw.” Art Journal Open (October 29, 2020).

Monique Jenkinson (Fauxnique), Diva Maw, 2020, digital video, 5:35 min.; soundtrack by Marc Kate, Untitled (“Diva Maw” Soundtrack), 2020, audio file (video © Monique Jenkinson; soundtrack © Marc Kate)

Kauffman, Vanessa. “Outside of Time: Patricia Fernández Carcedo in Conversation with Vanessa Kauffman.” Art Journal Open (August 12, 2016).

Visitors in Patricia Fernández Carcedo’s studio during Headlands’ Fall 2015 Open House (artwork © Patricia Fernández Carcedo; photograph by Rebecca Puretz, provided by Headlands Center for the Arts)

Laser, Liz Magic and Christopher Y. Lew. “InterAct: a reenacted interview.” Art Journal Open (May 4, 2011)

Liz Magic Laser, Flight, 2010, performance, MoMA PS1, Long Island City, April 10, 2010 (artwork © Liz Magic Laser; photograph by Mia Tramz, provided by Derek Eller Gallery). The performance was developed in collaboration with actors Lindsey Andersen, Nic Grelli, Elizabeth Hodur, Michael Wiener, Max Woertendyke, and Lia Woertendyke

Lee, Young Jean. “Women in Downtown Theater.” Art Journal Open (August 26, 2012).
Leeson, Lynn Hershman. “Excerpts from the Graphic Novel !Women Art Revolution—A Secret History.” Art Journal Open (May 29, 2011)
Mann, Elana. One day I will make a mace, but for now I have a mouth.” Art Journal Open (September 30, 2021).

Elana Mann, Unidentified Bright Object #61, 2021, clay, wood, and glass, 14 ½ x 3 ½ x 3 ¾ in. (36.8 x 8.9 x 9.5 cm) (artwork © Elana Mann; photographs by Brica Wilcox)

Masley-Charlet, Caitlin. “Caitlin Masley-Charlet in Conversation with Elisabeth Smolarz.” Art Journal Open (June 5, 2018).

Elisabeth Smolarz, ENCYCLOPEDIA OF THINGS, ongoing 2014–2017. Archival inkjet prints, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist.

Masley-Charlet, Caitlin. “Caitlin Masley-Charlet and Diana Shpungin in Conversation.” Art Journal Open (July 8, 2016).

Diana Shpungin, detail of A Break in One and Several Places, 2015, graphite pencil, horsehair broom, glazed porcelain and stoneware, 24 x 43 x 14 in. (60.9 x 109.2 x 35.5 cm) (artwork © Diana Shpungin)

McKee, C.C. “‘a salting of sorts’: Salt, Sea, and Affective Form in the work of Deborah Jack.” Art Journal Open (July 30, 2019).

Deborah Jack, SHORE, 2004, nylon screens, video projection, rock salt, reflecting pool, dimensions variable, installation view, Big Orbit Gallery, Buffalo, New York (artwork © Deborah Jack; photograph provided by the artist)

McClure, Michael Jay. “If it Need Be Termed Surrender: Trisha Donnelly’s Subjunctive Case.” Art Journal Open (July 29, 2013).

Trisha Donnelly, Untitled, 2008, plaster, horsehair, paint, pillow, belts, lamp, two parts, ea. 36 x 60 x 22¾ in. (91.4 x 152.4 x 57.8 cm), installation view, The Quick and the Dead, Walker Art Center, 2009 (artwork © Trisha Donnelly; photograph provided by Casey Kaplan, New York)

Ohsawa, Asuka. “Squares, Triangles, and Cats.” Art Journal Open (December 31, 2020).
Porges, Maria. “Shortest Stories.” Art Journal Open (December 20, 2018).
Rosa, María Laura. Questions of Identity: Photographic Series by Alicia D’Amico, 1983–86.” Art Journal Open (July 2, 2019).

Alicia D’Amico photograph of Liliana, a performance by Liliana Mizrahi, 1983, scanned copy of original negative, reproduction from original 35mm negative contact (photograph © Archivo Alicia D’Amico, Buenos Aires)

Santos, Dorothy R. “ Domain Errors.” Art Journal Open (July 24, 2020).
Schiff, Karen L. “Imprinting Agnes Martin.” Art Journal Open (December 19, 2014).

Karen L. Schiff, Agnes Martin, El País, 21 December 2004, II, 2005, graphite and stylus on vellum, 17 x 12 inches (artwork © Karen L. Schiff)

Sifuentes, Aram Han. “Official Unofficial Voting Station: Voting for All Who Legally Can’t.” Art Journal Open (October 1, 2020).

Protest Banner Lending Library, Let Us Vote! and Official Unofficial Voting Station, 2020, textile banners (photograph by Thaib A. Wahab)

Szymanek, Angelique. “Haptic Encounters: Margarita Cabera’s Space in Between.” Art Journal Open (October 15, 2020).

Margarita Cabrera, Sewing Machine (Blue-Green), 2016, vinyl, thread, copper wire, and appliance parts (artwork © 2020 Margarita Cabrera/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society [ARS], NY; photograph provided by the artist)

Vlassopoulou, Penelope. “No water, Athens, Greece, 2015: Twenty-four hours with nothing to eat or drink, only smelling the jasmine.” Art Journal Open (October 26, 2016).

 Excerpt from Pandelis Prevelakis, I Kefali tis Medousas [The Head of Medusa] (Athens: Friends’ Editions, 1963), trans. the artist and Markus Nystrom

Watt, Marie. “In Conversation with Marie Watt: A New Coyote Tale.” Art Journal Open (October 19, 2017).

Marie Watt, Blanket Stories: Transportation Object, Generous Ones, Trek, 2014, cast bronze, 18 x 4 x 6 ft. (5.49 x 1.22 x 1.83 m). Permanent installation, Tacoma Art Museum, Tacoma, Washington (artwork © Marie Watt; photograph by Benjamin Benschneider/OTTO)

Wilson, Siona. Portraits (and) Matter.” Art Journal Open (January 13, 2022).
Yoshitake, Mika. “Humans have been Human for so long: Shana Lutker and Mika Yoshitake in Conversation.” Art Journal Open (August 2, 2016).

Shana Lutker, A handsome confused puppet, 2015, mirrored glass box, fluorescent lights, wood, marble, casters, 49 x 30 x 19 in. (124.4 x 76.2 x 48.2 cm) (artwork © Shana Lutker; photograph by Cathy Carver)

Yurshansky, Jenny. Hide and Seek.” Art Journal Open (March 25, 2021).

Jenny Yurshansky, Hide and Seek (folded view), 2021, interactive sculpture, inkjet print, 3 3/4 x 3 3/4 x 3 in. (9.5 x 9.5 x 7.6 cm) (photograph provided by the artist) Folk tradition meets revisionist storytelling in Jenny Yurshansky’s printable sculpture

(more…)

Filed under: Advocacy, AJO, Uncategorized

HUMANITIES ADVOCACY DAY

posted by March 18, 2022

March 14 – 15, 2022 Hosted by National Alliance for the Humanities

CAA attended Humanities Advocacy Day this March. The event provides the opportunity to connect with a growing number of humanities advocates from around the country. On March 14, we explored approaches to year-round advocacy on college campuses and in local communities. Shelly C. Lowe, Chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities, discussed her goals and vision for the NEH with Jim Grossman, president of the National Humanities Alliance and executive director of the American Historical Association.

On Humanities Advocacy Day, March 15, meetings were held with House and Senate offices to make a persuasive case for federal funding for the humanities. CAA staff met with representatives from Senator Schumer’s office as well as Representative Nadler’s office. The programs were all held virtually. Learn more.

For more on CAA’s advocacy efforts, click here.
Filed under: Advocacy

CAA has signed onto the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES) statement in opposition to banning scholars based on citizenship. CAA stands by its previous condemnation of Russia’s colonialist aggression and oppression of Ukraine. At the same time, we share concerns about calls for blanket bans on the participation of individual Russians and Belarusians in scholarly events and scholarly exchange. CAA believes that banning Russians and Belarusians based solely on their citizenship goes against our fundamental principles of scholarship, open communication, and dialogue. To read the statement in full, please visit their page.

Filed under: Advocacy